Solid state physics - Crystalline Solids

1,310 views
1,070 views

Published on

An Overview of Crystalline Solids under Solid State Physics

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,310
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Solid state physics - Crystalline Solids

  1. 1. SOLID STATE PHYSICS TRENAH DYNE T. BATULAN 1
  2. 2. CONDENSED MATTER SYSTEMS Hard Matter • Crystalline Solids (Conductors, Semiconductors, and Insulators) • Crystalline Solids + Defects (point, dislocations, surfaces and intersurfaes) • Non-Crystalline Solids • Quasicrystals • Amorphous Solids (glass) • Polymer Solids (glass and rubber) Soft Matter • Colloidal Dispersions • Polymer Melts and Solutions • Liquid Crystals • Biomatter (proteins, membranes, nucleic acids) 2
  3. 3. CONDENSED MATTER SYSTEMS Hard Matter • Crystalline Solids (Conductors, Semiconductors, and Insulators) • Crystalline Solids + Defects (point, dislocations, surfaces and intersurfaes) • Non-Crystalline Solids • Quasicrystals • Amorphous Solids (glass) • Polymer Solids (glass and rubber) Soft Matter • Colloidal Dispersions • Polymer Melts and Solutions • Liquid Crystals • Biomatter (proteins, membranes, nucleic acids) 3
  4. 4. CRYSTALLINE SOLIDS CONDUCTORS, SEMICONDUCTORS, AND INSULATORS 4
  5. 5. CRYSTALLINE SOLIDS • Composed of highly regular arrangement of atoms, ions, and molecules • Described as lattices 5
  6. 6. GENERAL CHARACTERIZATION •CONDUCTORS •INSULATORS •SEMICONDUCTORS 6
  7. 7. CONDUCTORS 7
  8. 8. CONDUCTORS • Permits charge to be transferred across the entire surface of the object • Contains a series of movable charges which are turned into electricity upon contact with another electrical source • These charges then transfer power to the next available conductor 8
  9. 9. INSULATORS 9
  10. 10. INSULATORS • Resists current flow • Inhibits the flow of electricity between molecules due to its high dielectric constant • May allow flow of charge at a certain amount of energy applied but there would be a degradation of the material 10
  11. 11. SEMICONDUCTORS 11
  12. 12. SEMICONDUCTORS • Has intermediate conductivity between a conductor and an insulator • Can resist and allow flow of electrons depending on the energy applied to it • Commonly used in electronics as transistors or diodes • Doping is a process wherein impurities are added to the semiconductor to improve its conductivity 12
  13. 13. BAND THEORY • An extension of molecular orbital theory • Describes bonding in solids. • Bands of orbitals that are filled or partially filled by valence electrons are called valence bands. • Higher-energy unoccupied bands in which electrons are free to migrate are called conduction bands. 13
  14. 14. BAND GAP • Energy gap between the valence and conduction bands • Influences the electrical and optical properties of the material 14
  15. 15. REFERENCES • Nicolić, B. (n.d). What is Solid State Physics. Department of Physics and Astronomy-University of Delaware, USA. Retrieved from http://www.physics.udel.edu/~bnikolic/teaching/ph ys624/lectures/what_is_solid_state_physics.pdf • University of California.(2011).Lattices. Retrieved from http://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~daniele/lattice/lattice.html • Penn Engineering-School of Engineering and Applied Science.(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~chem101/sschem/solidstat echem.html • Georgia State University-Department of Physics and Astronomy.(n.d.).Band theory of solids. Retrieved from http://hyperphysics.phy- astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/band.html • Georgia State University-Department of Physics and Astronomy.(n.d.).The doping of semiconductors. Retrieved from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/dope.html 15

×