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Psychosocial and nutritional support to pre-school age children and their siblings in Gaza Strip ECHO/-ME/BUD/2009/01045<b...
PMRS – Tdh-It intervention aimed at supporting the healthy growth and development of children by<br /><ul><li>addressing a...
promoting healthy life styles within their families
restoring & reactivating the natural and positive interaction between the individual and the social environment</li></li><...
With the support of<br />The implementingpartnersPalestinianMedicalRelief SocietyTerre deshommes Italia<br />The Beneficia...
Area of intervention<br />West of Rafah -  East of Khan Younis<br />Abassan al Zanna, Abassan al Kabira, Abassan al Jadida...
Beneficiaries<br /><ul><li>4,000 children attending KGs and their siblings (<5y)
6,000 family members of anaemic/malnourished children
90 teachers and directors</li></ul>NB round figures<br />Total number: 10,090<br />
Results achieved<br />Caregivers increased their knowledge about children needs and decreased violent and coercitive attit...
Main activities<br />
KG Based Activities <br /><ul><li>training and capacity building of project staff
training of teachers including follow up throughout the project
structured recreational, educational and stress releasing activities for  children & mothers
psychosocial support to families and teachers including referral to specialized institutions
nutritional screening of children and siblings
distribution therapeutic and prophylactic doses of iron and multivitamins
referral of medical cases to PMRS and/or other specialized institutions
improvement and rehabilitation of KGs</li></ul>9<br />
Awareness Activities <br />IntegratedPsychosocial and Nutritional Awarenessfor mothers <br />10<br />
Home Based Activities <br />2,000 home visits for all anaemic and malnourished cases identified including nutritional coun...
Project Impact<br />12<br />
Children<br />KEY ISSUES<br /><ul><li>Children suffer both from direct stress created by the Cast Lead and adults’ stress ...
Children difficult behaviours in reaction to adult poor skills in dealing with them
35.6% <5y children anaemic
75.5% prevalence of anaemia in children <24 months
100% improved  the interaction with peers and 69% the autonomy
92% recognise the adult as referent for solving conflicts with the peers
3700 received supplementation
67% cured from anaemia
Average haemoglobin level increased from 9.97 to 11.30 gr/dl (+1.33 )</li></ul>ACTIVITIES<br /><ul><li>Structured animatio...
Trips with mothers
Screening and supplementation
Referral </li></ul>13<br />
14<br />
15<br />15<br />
Children screened <br /><ul><li>51.9% male – 48.1% female
58.7% attending KG – 41.3% siblings
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Psychosocial and nutritional support to pre-school age children and their siblings in Gaza Strip

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Transcript of "Psychosocial and nutritional support to pre-school age children and their siblings in Gaza Strip "

  1. 1. Psychosocial and nutritional support to pre-school age children and their siblings in Gaza Strip ECHO/-ME/BUD/2009/01045<br />Presentation of<br />Project Findings<br />September 2009 - June 2010<br />Commodore Gaza Hotel, Gaza, 29 June 2010<br />
  2. 2. PMRS – Tdh-It intervention aimed at supporting the healthy growth and development of children by<br /><ul><li>addressing anaemia and malnutrition
  3. 3. promoting healthy life styles within their families
  4. 4. restoring & reactivating the natural and positive interaction between the individual and the social environment</li></li></ul><li>AnIntegrated Psychosocial and Nutritional Approach<br />Aims at providing children a safe environment and healtier lifestyles towards their development as human beings<br />
  5. 5. With the support of<br />The implementingpartnersPalestinianMedicalRelief SocietyTerre deshommes Italia<br />The Beneficiaries<br />Children <5<br />Families <br />Kindergartens <br />(teachers & directors)<br />The Stakeholders<br />M.o.H.<br />M.o.E.<br />Service Provider<br />Can’an Institute of New Pedagogy<br />
  6. 6. Area of intervention<br />West of Rafah - East of Khan Younis<br />Abassan al Zanna, Abassan al Kabira, Abassan al Jadida, Banisohaila, Abu Taema, Al Gharbia, MawasiRafah, Canada, Tal el Sultan<br />5<br />
  7. 7. Beneficiaries<br /><ul><li>4,000 children attending KGs and their siblings (<5y)
  8. 8. 6,000 family members of anaemic/malnourished children
  9. 9. 90 teachers and directors</li></ul>NB round figures<br />Total number: 10,090<br />
  10. 10. Results achieved<br />Caregivers increased their knowledge about children needs and decreased violent and coercitive attitudes and practices towards them<br />Children improved autonomy and relationships with peers and caregivers<br />Children improved their nutritional status and their Hb value<br />Families improved their nutritional habits and started adopting an healthier lifestyle<br />
  11. 11. Main activities<br />
  12. 12. KG Based Activities <br /><ul><li>training and capacity building of project staff
  13. 13. training of teachers including follow up throughout the project
  14. 14. structured recreational, educational and stress releasing activities for children & mothers
  15. 15. psychosocial support to families and teachers including referral to specialized institutions
  16. 16. nutritional screening of children and siblings
  17. 17. distribution therapeutic and prophylactic doses of iron and multivitamins
  18. 18. referral of medical cases to PMRS and/or other specialized institutions
  19. 19. improvement and rehabilitation of KGs</li></ul>9<br />
  20. 20. Awareness Activities <br />IntegratedPsychosocial and Nutritional Awarenessfor mothers <br />10<br />
  21. 21. Home Based Activities <br />2,000 home visits for all anaemic and malnourished cases identified including nutritional counselling to improve nutritional habits and monitor compliance to therapy<br />11<br />
  22. 22. Project Impact<br />12<br />
  23. 23. Children<br />KEY ISSUES<br /><ul><li>Children suffer both from direct stress created by the Cast Lead and adults’ stress and difficulties
  24. 24. Children difficult behaviours in reaction to adult poor skills in dealing with them
  25. 25. 35.6% <5y children anaemic
  26. 26. 75.5% prevalence of anaemia in children <24 months
  27. 27. 100% improved the interaction with peers and 69% the autonomy
  28. 28. 92% recognise the adult as referent for solving conflicts with the peers
  29. 29. 3700 received supplementation
  30. 30. 67% cured from anaemia
  31. 31. Average haemoglobin level increased from 9.97 to 11.30 gr/dl (+1.33 )</li></ul>ACTIVITIES<br /><ul><li>Structured animation, educational and stress releasing activities in the KGs
  32. 32. Trips with mothers
  33. 33. Screening and supplementation
  34. 34. Referral </li></ul>13<br />
  35. 35. 14<br />
  36. 36. 15<br />15<br />
  37. 37. Children screened <br /><ul><li>51.9% male – 48.1% female
  38. 38. 58.7% attending KG – 41.3% siblings
  39. 39. more than 50% above 4 years</li></ul>16<br />
  40. 40. Prevalence of Anaemia<br />17<br />
  41. 41. Underweight<br /><ul><li>79 children (2.1%) have a weight for age below -2Z a percentage normally found in healthy populations</li></li></ul><li> 6.95% children with low height for age (below -2Z)<br /> Higher than what found in healthy population<br />19<br />
  42. 42. Overweight <br />5.2% of children overweight<br />The BMI for age curbs show a slight shift to right side <br />20<br />
  43. 43. Nutritional Impact<br />Of total children enrolled<br /><ul><li>67.2% not anaemic anymore
  44. 44. 32.8% still anaemic, but:
  45. 45. severe and moderate anaemia reduced from 10.3% to 1.6%
  46. 46. 28.6% improved haemoglobin >=1gr/dl clinically significant</li></ul>21<br />
  47. 47. Improvement<br />Improvement of HB is strongly linked to age<br />22<br />
  48. 48. Teachers <br />KEY ISSUES<br /><ul><li>poor understanding of their role on early child development (ECD)
  49. 49. little consideration for pedagogical relationship with families
  50. 50. scarce attention to importance of KG environment</li></ul>ACTIVITIES<br /><ul><li>training
  51. 51. mentoring and on the job follow up
  52. 52. peer support and networking</li></ul>88% improved their performance<br />92% improved knowledge of children needs<br />
  53. 53. Scale<br /><ul><li>1 very poor skills
  54. 54. 5 excellent skills</li></li></ul><li> <br />25<br />
  55. 55.  <br />26<br />
  56. 56.  <br />Out of 2261 KG children <br /><ul><li>3.54% showed difficulties
  57. 57. 0.49% needed referral</li></ul>Difficulties reported: <br />bed wetting, stubborness, introversion, aggressivity, finger suckingspeech difficulties<br />
  58. 58. Mothers<br />KEY ISSUES<br /><ul><li>Mothers expect their children to behave as young adults
  59. 59. Educational strategies are very poor
  60. 60. Child’s mistakes perceived with sense of failure, shame and loss of trust
  61. 61. Poor follow up of children at KG
  62. 62. Poor knowledge and practice of nutritional principles</li></ul>ACTIVITIES<br /><ul><li>Awareness
  63. 63. Mentoring
  64. 64. Home based nutritional counselling</li></ul>100% increased understanding of children needs and improved relation with teachers <br />100% acquired clearer understanding of nutrition principles <br />28<br />
  65. 65.  <br />Poor use of different educational strategies and frequent use of punishments <br />has changed<br />29<br />
  66. 66.  <br />30<br />
  67. 67. Child’s mistakes were perceived with far too strong emotional reactions such as sense of failure, shame and loosing trust in themselves as mothers and in the child<br />31<br />
  68. 68.  <br />Poor follow up of the child at KG and poor communication with teachers to develop joint educational strategies, especially for children showing difficult behaviours<br />32<br />
  69. 69. Why is anemia bad for children? <br />33<br />
  70. 70. What are the causes of anemia? <br />34<br />
  71. 71. What food is bad for children growth? <br />35<br />
  72. 72. More @<br />ECHO - EuropeanCommissionHumanitarianAid<br />ec.europa.eu/echo/index_en.htm<br />Palestinian Medical Relief Society<br />www.pmrs.ps<br />Fondazione Terre des hommes Italia<br />www.terredeshommes.it<br />Pictures Alessio Romenzi<br />www.photoshelter.com/c/alessioromenzi<br />36<br />
  73. 73. 37<br />
  74. 74. The Psychosocial and nutritional support to preschool-age children and their <br />siblings in Gaza Strip -  ECHO/-ME/BUD/2009/01045 <br />project and this presentation have been realised with the support of<br />‘The European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid department supports relief activities for vulnerable people in crisis zones around the world.’<br />Disclaimer<br />“This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Commission. The views expressed herein should not be taken, in any way, to reflect the official opinion of the European Commission.”<br />38<br />

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