Who Moved the Projector?

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A broad review of the Pro Audio Video industry from the perspective of the pro AV installer/integrator, from rAVe EUROPE

A broad review of the Pro Audio Video industry from the perspective of the pro AV installer/integrator, from rAVe EUROPE

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  • PROJECTORS were the centre of the AV universe...
  • Now they are just one of many moons in an AV planet in an IT universe (or is it IP Universe)
  • rAVe [Publications] attended the official unveiling of the Christie MicroTiles line in Times Square last month. Although we had already seen the MicroTiles at InfoComm in a private suite, it wasn't until last month that we understood the game-changing impact Christie will have with MicroTiles. And, to be perfectly honest, we don't even think that Christie has a handle on how big of a product they have on their hand with MicroTiles.Why are we so bullish on MicroTiles? Simple: it's a differentiator that LITERALLY gives way to very creative, unique "out of the box/rectangle" projection images and puts that in the hands of the most creative systems designers on the market. The actual individual tiles are rear-screen, DLP projected, 16"W x 12"H (20" diagonally), 20" deep and weigh 20 pounds. That in itself is not impressive, unless you were or are in the projection CUBE business. MicroTiles immediately renders that market, with its giant, multi-person, color-management horror problems, useless. MicroTiles are the ultimate "cube" solution, in our opinion, as they are portable, single-person installable and, because they are LED-lit, are calibrated to AUTOMATICALLY color-correct and light-uniformity by talking to each other. Yes, talking to each other. For example, if you have to replace one, the new one AUTOMATICALLY adjusts BOTH color-temperature AND light output to conform to the worst-performing Tile. But since they are LED, the worst case is 20 percent light output loss over 60,000-hours. The real strength, however, is in the shapes, sizes and creative installs you can do with MicroTiles. They're a bit expensive for boardroom and conference room installs, but for rental, staging and large venue applications -- watch out -- these could take over quickly. Why? Again, they are automatic. Not only do they auto-correct for color and light uniformity, but they literally figure out the size and shape of the image you are making and re-calibrate the image to be shown without ANY signal or wall processor. Seriously. How? They have IR-sensors that allow them to see which Tile is next to, on top of and below it. Thus, it figures out where each Tile is positioned and re-purposes the image shape and size accordingly. Seriously, this works. We saw it, live, in NYC last week! Not much else to say, other than they are about USD$3700 per Tile, and we highly recommend that you consider watching this 4:28-video we shot that demos MicroTiles perfectly for you! The audio sucks on this video, but you CAN hear it, but more importantly, you'll see them in action in all shapes and sizes. Remember, you can change shapes and size on-the-fly, literally, as each Tile figures out where it is in relation to the projected image. Go and watch the video for Christie MicroTiles
  • rAVe [Publications] attended the official unveiling of the Christie MicroTiles line in Times Square last month. Although we had already seen the MicroTiles at InfoComm in a private suite, it wasn't until last month that we understood the game-changing impact Christie will have with MicroTiles. And, to be perfectly honest, we don't even think that Christie has a handle on how big of a product they have on their hand with MicroTiles.Why are we so bullish on MicroTiles? Simple: it's a differentiator that LITERALLY gives way to very creative, unique "out of the box/rectangle" projection images and puts that in the hands of the most creative systems designers on the market. The actual individual tiles are rear-screen, DLP projected, 16"W x 12"H (20" diagonally), 20" deep and weigh 20 pounds. That in itself is not impressive, unless you were or are in the projection CUBE business. MicroTiles immediately renders that market, with its giant, multi-person, color-management horror problems, useless. MicroTiles are the ultimate "cube" solution, in our opinion, as they are portable, single-person installable and, because they are LED-lit, are calibrated to AUTOMATICALLY color-correct and light-uniformity by talking to each other. Yes, talking to each other. For example, if you have to replace one, the new one AUTOMATICALLY adjusts BOTH color-temperature AND light output to conform to the worst-performing Tile. But since they are LED, the worst case is 20 percent light output loss over 60,000-hours. The real strength, however, is in the shapes, sizes and creative installs you can do with MicroTiles. They're a bit expensive for boardroom and conference room installs, but for rental, staging and large venue applications -- watch out -- these could take over quickly. Why? Again, they are automatic. Not only do they auto-correct for color and light uniformity, but they literally figure out the size and shape of the image you are making and re-calibrate the image to be shown without ANY signal or wall processor. Seriously. How? They have IR-sensors that allow them to see which Tile is next to, on top of and below it. Thus, it figures out where each Tile is positioned and re-purposes the image shape and size accordingly. Seriously, this works. We saw it, live, in NYC last week! Not much else to say, other than they are about USD$3700 per Tile, and we highly recommend that you consider watching this 4:28-video we shot that demos MicroTiles perfectly for you! The audio sucks on this video, but you CAN hear it, but more importantly, you'll see them in action in all shapes and sizes. Remember, you can change shapes and size on-the-fly, literally, as each Tile figures out where it is in relation to the projected image. Go and watch the video for Christie MicroTiles
  • Vague and undefined
  • Well GroundedBoth Feet on the Ground
  • Cisco's Future In Pictures12.10.08, 06:00 AM EST What the networking giant must do to convince the world to smile for the cameraGood thing that John Chambers is chief executive of a $100 billion company. He'd make a lousy secretary. During the Cisco Systems (nasdaq: CSCO - news - people ) chief's keynote at the company's yearly analyst conference on Tuesday, Chambers confessed he types at a plodding 12 to 15 words a minute. No matter: Chambers is turning Cisco into the most video-friendly company in the world. The networking giant's CEO communicates with his 66,000 employees largely by video blog, posted to an internal YouTube-like site called C-Vision. In Tuesday's talk, he predicted a future where the majority of communication within Cisco would be Internet-based video, streaming directly to desktops, mobile devices and "telepresence" rooms throughout the company. Now all Chambers has to do is convince his customers to do the same. The recession has sliced Cisco's stock price by a third since the beginning of the year to $17.16 a share, but it hasn't dampened Chambers ambitions. Chambers was one of the world's top evangelists for broadband communications over the past decade. Now he's turning that intensity to arguing that the future of communications--and of course, Cisco's revenue stream--will be built on video services. The Internet will be so transformed by video, Cisco contends, that it deserves a new name: Medianet. That new buzzword for the company represents the video-optimized Internet of 2025, when Cisco projects video data will account for 90% of all traffic flowing across routers. (See "Metadata: Cisco Speaks In Tongues.") "It's a visual world," Chambers said. "Easy-to-use video that's real, that's like you're sitting there talking to somebody, where you can constructively argue like a family, but 40 families in 40 different locations thinking together. ... It's the capability of video combined with data and voice that brings [collaboration] to life." Even for Cisco, however, cashing in on the video future won't be simple. Today, most video traffic on the Web flows from consumer sites like YouTube and Hulu. More traffic could nudge consumer Internet service providers to eye products such as Cisco's ASR 9000, a video-focused router that was announced last month. (See "Cisco Revs Up Video.") But those broadband providers account for only 25% of Cisco's revenues. Corporate customers provide the other three-quarters of Cisco's sales--which means that Cisco will have to make a convincing case for why companies will save or make money by using video to connect employees, partners and customers.IBM (nyse: IBM - news - people ), for instance, a company known for trying every new internal communication platform from social networks to virtual worlds, has hesitated to jump into video to the same degree as Cisco. AkibaSaeedi, the company's director of unified communications, says Cisco's focus on video in general may be slightly impractical. Although IBM employees have access to SametimeUnyte, a program that allows face-to-face video from practically every seat at the company, she says that IBM's remote conversations usually begin with instant messaging and only occasionally escalates into video conferencing. "Video is not the centerpiece," she says, citing social networking, blogs, wikis and even RSS feeds as equally important. "It's important, but it's not the end-all be-all."In fact, most companies are still hardly aware of video's potential as a business application, says AbnerGermanow, an analyst with research firm IDC. "People in business still think of video on the model of watching TV, not its value for enterprise," he says. That may be slowly changing. According to IDC's research, video conferencing is currently growing at between 10% and 15% a year. Meanwhile, the amount of work-related video--not including video conferencing--consumed by the average employee has doubled every two years. That means companies are picking up on the idea of hosting online archived footage for employee viewing, just as Cisco uses its C-Vision site for internal communication, says Germanow. Germanow argues that YouTube-like videos make sense for training sessions, video blogging and what he calls "ego-casting," company-wide messages from executives. "In many ways, it's easier to watch a three minute video than read a 10-page memo," he says.Another important application may be video surveillance. Although the audience for security videos is limited to a few employees, creating the footage involves recording and streaming thousands of hours of content, Germanow says. But Cisco' video crown jewel, and the center of its marketing push, has been its telepresence business: room-based video systems that cost as much as $300,000--plus as much as $10,000 a month in bandwidth costs--and beam life-sized images of meeting attendees across the country in high-definition with no discernible latency. Marketing that expensive technology as a replacement for business travel has helped it to grow quickly if only in a few companies. Cisco announced that it had shipped its 1,000th telepresence unit in September after almost two years of availability (see "Tightening The Telepresence Belt").On Monday, Cisco announced several products designed to add features to those telepresence rooms. One new device, which Cisco calls the "Media Experience Engine," lives in a company's data center and translates video data from one format to another so that it can be displayed on anything from a smart phone to a telepresence screen. Another feature called "Expert On-Demand," sorts through a company's database of experts to create a video connection between a user--say, a confused customer in a bank's branch office--and the person best suited to answer his or her questions on any given topic. And a third experimental technology, demonstrated at Tuesday's analyst conference, aims to translate different languages spoken during a telepresence session in real-time. (See "Metadata: Cisco Speaks In Tongues.") For now, few businesses are adopting video to the same degree as Cisco, or even IBM, says Henry Dewing, an analyst with Forrester Research (nasdaq: FORR - news - people ). But he says his clients are coming around. In a report last year, he described a company that cut off its employees' access to Web video to save bandwidth costs. Now, he says, such companies are instead asking how they can build their networks to accommodate the video load of streaming video and conferencing. "IT guys are moving from 'How do I stop this?' to 'How do I make sure that business-focused video is being treated correctly?'" he says. As companies see the value of face-to-face interaction, Dewing says, he expects adoption to grow. "Executives want to know whether you're shaking your head or nodding, whether you're looking at your shoes or into the other person's eyes," he says. "Strategic conversations, performance reviews, negotiations, those kinds of communication really scream out for video."
  • A new InfoComm study announced at ISE projects audiovisual products and services will become a $91 billion global industry by 2012.The growth of digital signage, videoconferencing, and command and control facilities resulted in an 8% compound annual growth in demand for AV products and services between 2006 and 2009. The study finds that the audiovisual industry was a $68 billion a year industry in 2009. A compound annual growth rate of 10% is projected for the three-year period from 2009 to 2012. The fastest growing product categories are displays, AV conferencing equipment, streaming media and webcasting, wireless connections and software. There is also an increasing demand for directional and cone speakers in digital signage applications, designed to create an immersive experience for the consumer. AV applications such as digital signage, videoconferencing and digitized high-end audio systems will continue to drive growth for the next three years. In addition, the top AV control systems manufacturers' ability to provide total building automation will create additional growth because of emerging concerns relating to energy efficiency and building sustainability Contracts for service and maintenance of audiovisual systems are also increasing. The fastest growing services are programming, maintenance and training and other services. Technology managers have expressed a growing need for service contracts as AV systems have become complex and more mission-critical to the government, institutions and corporations. The corporate, education and government markets are the three largest consumers of audiovisual products and services. The growing need for communication and collaboration in these environments fuels reliance on AV technology. Go The 2010 InfoComm Global AV Market Definition and Strategy Study

Transcript

  • 1.
  • 2. Who Moved
    The Projector?
    by Bob Snyder
    Editor-in-Chief
    Channel Media Europe Ltd.
  • 3. Who Moved
    The Projector?
    by Bob Snyder
    Editor-in-Chief
    Channel Media Europe Ltd.
  • 4. WHO MOVED THE CHEESE?
    WHO MOVED THE PROJECTOR?  Slide 4
  • 5. IT’s TIME TO BREAK THE GLASS.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 6. Where Does Pro AV Go Now?
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 7. SILO by SILO, we’re going for a BROADER view...
    The ProAV industry is made up of SILOs of Product Categories & Specializations.
  • 8. “Projection and Screens.”
  • 9. 2010 will be the Year of the Projector, according to PMA.
    Worldwide front projector shipments will reach nearly 8 million in 2010, surging nearly 30% from 2009.
    -- A new study from Pacific Media Associates (PMA)
  • 10. The Centre of the Universe
  • 11. One of Many Moons
    The Centre of the Universe
  • 12. Projection and Screens
    The Projector Was the Heart of Pro AV
    Back in the 1980's, just making a projector that worked to blow-up video images on big screens was a feat by itself.
    NEC, Christie, Sanyo and Digital Projection et al took bold steps to become more than just also-ran "projector manufacturers."
    The Projector Shoot-Out ruled from 1992 to 1999 and now... Specs are dead.
    What's the differentiator for integrators now? Service, Service, Service.
    Gary calls it The Projection Differentiation Decade
    Photo Above: Epson’s GAMING projector.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 13. Projection and Screens
    Trends in Projection
    The Next Big Thing: mobile projection.
    Projectiondesign’sFR12 Remote Light Source technology allows the projector bulb to be placed up to 30m (100ft) from the projector head
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 14. Projection and Screens
    26% of all projectors sold now have LAN functionality!
    Trends in Projection
    Another Next Big Thing: Green
    Another Next Big Thing: 3D, of course!
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 15. Projection and Screens
    Trends in Projection: Short Throw & Ultra Short Throw
    The short throw & ultra short throw category continues to gain traction, especially in the education segment.
    The combined short throw category now represents 9% of total global market volume...and climbing.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 16. Don’t Forget the Screens
    Trends in Screens
    Da-Liteand Joe Kane Productions are launching the new JKP Affinity 1.1 gain screen material.
    Projecta’sElpro Large with Easy to Install
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 17.
  • 18. Projection and Screens
    SUMMARY OF FORCES at PLAY
    PROJECTORS
    Commoditization wherever there is no innovation or specialization
    Go green, go service, go niche…
    SCREENS
    • Continual pressure from Displays
    • 19. Time to proselytize
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 20. “Displays and Mounts.”
    One of the single most significant AV products was the discontinous innovation know as LCD.
  • 21. LANG at ISE 2010
    The Love of Display
  • 22. Displays and Mounts
    The newest Wings Platinum 4.10 can operate up to 4 displays with one computer.
    InFocus enters the LCD with three new cost-effective LCDs for light commercial use, such as video conferencing, web meetings, demos, training, and presentations.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 23. Power of TouchScreens
    Designed for screens from 30" to 82", the 2700 is for public-facing applications such as digital signage, mall directories and classrooms.
    Turn an existing display into a high performance touch screen.
    NextWindow's latest large-format touch screen, 2700 Series, is a lightweight overlay that you can install via adjustable straps.
  • 24. Displays and Mounts
    Taking aim at the current market dominance of DLP in large venue applications. Prysm releases their Laser Phosphor Display (LPD) rear-screen projection technology.
    Prysm is leveraging Silicon Valley technology to lower the power costs behind large format displays...
     Steve Scrose, VP and GM of Prysm
    75% less power than LCD and DLP technology, says maker
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 25. “The actual individual tiles are rear-screen, DLP projected, 16"W x 12"H (20" diagonally), 20" deep and weigh 20 pounds. That in itself is not impressive, unless you were or are in the projection CUBE business.”
    “MicroTiles immediately renders that market, with its giant, multi-person, color-management horror problems, useless. MicroTiles are the ultimate "cube" solution, in our opinion, as they are portable, single-person installable and, because they are LED-lit, are calibrated to AUTOMATICALLY color-correct and light-uniformity by talking to each other. Yes, talking to each other.”
    GARY KAYYE, CTS
  • 26. Don’t Forget the Mounts
    PREMIER
    SANUS
    VOGEL’S
  • 27. “Digital Signage.”
    The conjunction between IT and AV that throws off impressive innovation and brings VISUAL communication to the public.
    Minicom: from KVM to DS
  • 28. Bob’s Anti-”DOOH” Campaign
    "Dooh!" is the catch phrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson when Homer injures himself, realizes he has done something stupid, or when something bad is about to happen to him.
    More importantly: DOOH is a vapid expression of what is not...Digital Out Of Home.
  • 29. Digital Signage
    Mitsubishi‘s PlayOut
    NEC (yes, the display manufacturer) announces a universal advertising platform for digital signage called VUKUNET.
    Why should you, the integrator, care? Simple -- this is a chance for you to make recurring revenue, via advertising.
    "What was needed was a solution that encompassed everything...from inception to deployment.Some of that is hardware; some software. The crucial point is that it is an end-to-end solution, not a series of unknowns joined together.".
    Here comes your footer  Page 28
  • 30. Digital Signage
    3M Holographic
    Poor Man’s Signage
  • 31. www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
    Digital Signage
    Measurability
    Consumers can use their mobile phones to read the QR codes...
  • 32. “Control and Integrator Solutions.”
    Control makers take action to maintain proprietary sstems while opening up to new interfaces.
  • 33. Control and Integrator Solutions
    Robert Noble, CTO at AMX, says, "We currently support the integration of most PCs, netbooks and tablets using browsers like Internet Explorer, Firefox and Apple Safari. AMX also supports smart devices like cell phones that utilize Android, Apple OS, Blackberry and Windows Mobile technologies; MP3 players and future connected devices that use web browsers and/or VNC applications."
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 34. “Rich Media and Content Distribution.”
  • 35. Rich Media and Content Distribution
    Enterprise streaming media markets at $3.2 billion in 2008 will triple to $14.4 billion by 2014.
    Digital Signage
    This is a dummy text. Please ignore the following content as it is dummy text.
    This is definitely some dummy text.
    The text here is meaningless as it is used to fill this slide.
    Replace this dummy text with our own text.
    WHO MOVED THE PROJECTOR?  Slide 34
  • 36. Rich Media and Content Distribution
    The Nitty Gritty of Making Content Happen
    HaiVision’sMakito™ Decoder, IP video appliance supports H.264 at up to 1080p60 HD and the delivery of video over IP.
    REACH’s ALL-in-ONE server
    iStreamPlanet offers iPhone streaming delivered over the Akamai HD Network for part of your live event strategy.
    WHO MOVED THE PROJECTOR?  Slide 35
  • 37. “Presentation Products.”
    Vaddio
  • 38. Presentation Products
    • Nearly 750,000 boards sold worldwide in 2009 and now the market will surge again to 1 million sales in 2010, says Futuresource Consulting.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 39. Presentation Products
    PLUS: Portable UPIC Wireless Interactive Panel
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 40. “Conferencing.”
    The battle is just beginning...
  • 41. Conferencing: The Contenders
    Radvision
    Huawei
    VIDYO
    Lifesize
    ooVoo
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 42. Conferencing: The Incumbents
    CISCO + TANDBERG + FLIP
    POLYCOM
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 43. “Paging & Evacuation.”
    It‘s all moving to “over-IP.“
    Biamp’sVocia
  • 44. “Video Security.”
    As security needs increase and the world moves into a video era, the winner is Video Security.)
    Bosch
  • 45. Video Security
    THE DARK AGES?
    • "We believe we currently live in the Dark Ages of computer video - computers are dependent on humans to tag videos in order to do anything interesting with them," Rob Haitani.
    Vitamin D accurately draws yellow boxes around people it spots and green boxes around other objects, like cars.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 46. “Pro Audio.”
    The Mother of AV, still very important and still very fragmented.
  • 47. Pro Audio: It’s All about IP Now
    “Local area networks (LANs) and IP-based applications are transforming our lives both in the office and at home,” says Lars-OlofJanflod, International Sales Manager, Genelec.
    Meyer's JM-1P Arrayable Loudspeaker
    Warwick Audio Technologies secures £1.5 million for its "Bend-it-Like Beckham" loudspeakers.
  • 48. “Information Technology .”
    Otherwise known as “IT.”
    “On the brink of the biggest transformation since PC knocked out the mainframe and mini...“
  • 49. iPAD FUSS MISSES THE POINT...
    It’s About What He’s NOT Holding in His Hands...
  • 50. CLOUDS, FROM BOTH SIDES NOW...
  • 51.
  • 52. GET YOUR HEAD OUT OF THE CLOUDS
  • 53.
  • 54. The Power of Applications
  • 55. IT
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 56. WHO MOVED THE PROJECTOR?
    The Control Room: An innovation born from the minds-eye of an integration firm in Southern California in the late 1980s. A manufacturer didn't invent this. Digital Signage: NEC Display first coined the term in the mid-1990s,but the concept was born via a moderately successful AV integration firm in Florida. Telepresence: Way before that term was ever used, an up-start AV integration firm from Chicago was taking existing VTC gear and making telepresence rooms that connected two sites together in life-sized proportions.
    Pro AV integrators are actually always the ones who served as the catalysts to innovation.
    YOU DID!
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 57. DISTRIBUTOR & INSTALLER NEWS
    The Need to Expand via GEO
    DISTRIBUTOR ACTIONS…
    • Maverick (Tech Data) expands into 12 countries
    • 58. AWE Europe launches KINETIK brand and expands into Europe
    • 59. STELJES expands into Europe
    • 60. PSCo opens in Dubai
    INSTALLERS, TOO!
    • AVM’s Global Partner Network (26 members, $3bn in sales)
    • 61. Circuit opens in Dubai.
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 62. VIDEO’s BEST SALESPERSON
    The Internet will be so transformed by video, Cisco contends, that it deserves a new name: Medianet.
    That new buzzword for the video-optimized internet of 2025.
    Cisco projects video data will account for 90% of all traffic flowing across routers.
  • 63. VIDEO3A.... Video Anywhere, Anytime, Any Place.
    HTML5 , still in draft mode, looks to seamlessly bring video to any display - from small handheld’s to your 50” living room flat screen, all via the web.
  • 64.
  • 65. THE FUTURE
    Contracts for service and maintenance of audiovisual systems are also increasing. The fastest growing services are programming, maintenance and training and other services.
    A new InfoComm study projects audiovisual products and services will become a $91 billion global industry by 2012.
  • 66. THE BIG PICTURE
    PREDICTIONS for 2011...
    More Chinese makers
    Big Makers Will Move from Specialization to Collision
    From Discontinuous Innovation to Brand Extension
    The Crunch Known as IT
    Move to Managed Services
    www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
  • 67. www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com