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What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
By Bob Snyder
Speak up,
I can’t
hear you!
The Sound of the World Cup
You can argue the real World Cup
winner was the stadium horn of South African
soccer, locally k...
Primitive & Effective...
• ...As a sound device.
• So, what’s wrong
with Vuvuzela
Marketing?
• It’s single note...
• It’s ...
Tribal interest• Just as
marketing is
used by
companies to
create customer
interest in
brand, products
and services,
the k...
But Tribes Change...
The World Changes
Today’s modern
DURBAN
The GAME itself Changes
Changes in Our IT World
• Context-aware computing
• Pattern-based strategy
• Social Networking
• Cloud Computing
The Confluence of Four
• Cloud, context, pattern, and business social
networks are linear notes, but the confluence
of the...
Increasing Segmentation
• By Product
• By Customers
• By Channels
Segmenting? No Fracturing!
Advent of Social Networking
• A New Conversation Begins....
• Business Implications
The Power of Facebook
• More than 400 million
active users
• 50% of active users log
on to Facebook in any
given day
• Ave...
Social Media Experts
• Make a guess as to HOW MANY
experts on social networking we
have?
Twitter Vuvuzela?
• Only 8.7% of TWITTER messages could be said to
have "value”
• Self-promo 5.9%
• Spam 3.75%
• Talk 37.5...
Brands & Twitter
Source:
Razorfish
Digital
Brand
Experience
Study
How online content maps to
the IT buying process
The TechTarget Media Consumption Report
Anti-Social Networking
• Out of 255 Enterprise 2.0
applications
– 70% are capable of
transferring files
– 64% have known
v...
Mobile Phones & Devices
• Swiss Army knife utility
• New form factors
• When combined with
social
networking...powerful!
iPad Fuss Missed The Point
It’s About What
He’s NOT
Holding in His
Hands...
The Power of Applications
Cloud Computing
GET YOUR
HEAD OUT
OF THE
CLOUDS
Changes in the Tribe
Hook Instead of Hammer
• Lead Generation: The hammer
was the telephone with endless
cold calls beating executives into
app...
Partner Preparation
• We slice, dice and tier our partners
Level Playing Field vs
Levels of Playing Fields
Fill-in–the-Form-itis
It was supposed to
be HIGH TECH, HIGH
TOUCH...circa 1980
author and Apple PR
guru Regis McKenna
The Greying of the Channel
Ben Stiler, Then and Now (42)
They Know More...
They Have More Access
Access to...
...Your Sources of Supply
...Your Components
...Your Record
...Your Competitors
...Your...
What the Partner Wants
• A stable regime
• Simple, clear
programmes
• Less paperwork
• Communication
• “Don’t Step on
My T...
Vendor Certification
• It was a pretty
good trick to get
channel to pay
for their
education to sell
your products,
but...
...
• You send channel partners to other web sites.
• You measure how many partners refer other partners
to you (Net Promoter ...
Vuvuzela Marketing
The vuvuzela rocks stadiums with its loud and
raucous sound that reflects the exhilaration of
supporter...
Vuvuzela Marketing...
• Was right for its time...
• But today it grates on
customer and channel
alike...
• The note it hit...
Instead...
• Symphony
Orchestra
For some reason...
• Personally, I favour lots of STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Thanks for
Listening!
We publish
Channel News for
Solution Providers
throughout EMEA.
www.ConsumerIT.eu
www.IT-SP.eu
www.On-CE.eu
www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com
www.DigitalSignageNews.eu
Click on
photo to hear
the L...
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?
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What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?

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Using the Vuvuzela of World Cup fame to illustrate how traditional one-note marketing is yielding to an orchestra of social media and digital marketing.

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  • 1
  • The origin of the device is disputed. The term vuvuzela was first used in South Africa from the Zulu language or Nguni dialect meaning to make a vuvusound (directly translated: vuvu-ing).[citation needed] Controversies over the invention arose in early 2010. South African Kaizer Chiefs fan Freddie "Saddam" Maake claimed the invention of the vuvuzela by fabricating an aluminium version in 1965 from a bicycle horn and has photographic evidence of himself holding the aluminium vuvuzela in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.[7] He also claimed to have coined vuvuzela from the Zulu language for "welcome", "unite" and "celebration."[8] Plastics factory Masincedane Sport popularised the ubiquitous plastic vuvuzela commonly heard at South African football games in 2002,[9] and the Nazareth Baptist Church claimed the vuvuzela belonged to their church.[10]
    These plastic horns have been marketed and available in the United States as "Stadium Horns" since the mid-1960s[citation needed]. Similar horns have been in existence for much longer. An instrument that looks like a vuvuzela appears in Winslow Homer's 1870 woodcut "The Dinner Horn"[11]
    [edit]Use at international tournaments
    The world soccer governing body, FIFA, proposed to ban vuvuzelas from stadiums, as they were seen as potential weapons for hooligans and could be used in ambush marketing. Columnist Jon Qwelane described the device as "an instrument from hell".[12] South African soccer authorities argued that the vuvuzela was part of the South African soccer experience.[13] 
  • You don’t notice small incremental changes, even when the accumulated affect becomes evolutionary, if you in the middle of the TRIBE.
  • For decades the purpose of technology was to add efficiency and cut costs. The future may be somewhat different.

    Peter Sondergaard, global head of research at Gartner, to talk about the changes ahead in corporate enterprise and what will drive them.

    Forbes: What's changing in IT?

    Peter Sondergaard: Information will be the oil of the next century.

    No, and there are four major trends that will change everything substantially.

    Let's go through them. What's on top?

    The evolution toward cloud--not just from a technology architecture perspective, but more from the standpoint of a way of doing business--is a disruptive trend. It's not just a linear evolution.

    No, and there are four major trends that will change everything substantially.

    Let's go through them. What's on top?

    The evolution toward cloud--not just from a technology architecture perspective, but more from the standpoint of a way of doing business--is a disruptive trend. It's not just a linear evolution.

    Disruptive in what way?

    It forces a revision in the business model of the providers of technology. It questions whether there is a long-term sustainability of a long-term license and maintenance software model and it questions whether it is possible to sustain a services business with labor as the primary cost component. It suggests mixing the two, which forces a revision of the large-scale technology providers, whether it's IBM, Microsoft, HP, Oracle or SAP.

    Wasn't IBM always juggling services, software and hardware?

    They have been juggling hardware and service, and over the last 10 years they have built a very credible software business. But each model exists independent of the other. The supply chain model is all about hardware excellence. The software model is all about maintenance and licensing. And the service model is an expensive model based on operational costs of people and being able to scale that efficiently. Going forward this is not a cataclysmic change, but it is a blending of the three. Cloud suggests you can be a service provider and sell software in monthly increments. When you are a traditional software vendor, you have to switch from taking revenue up front to receiving the revenue over 12 months. That is a different cash flow model.

    Is it possible for the market leaders to make the shift?

    Very likely, but it will require painful explanations to Wall Street why different product lines reflect a different revenue and cost perspective than others, even though the long-term outcome is the same. It opens up an opportunity for smaller or more nimble providers.

    Will it be an opportunity for smaller, nimble providers or a consolidation where the winner takes all?

    A winner-take-all model presumes a large mega-vendor can sustain continuous innovation across all levels of a highly vertically integrated model. That is possible, providing you continue to absorb innovation that is created by smaller technology providers and you have a very efficient model for integrating this and extending your platform to be part of an overall strategy. This is a model Oracle and IBM have pursued for a number of years with demonstrable success. But will they be able to continue this?
    These megatrends will force them to operate differently from a business and financial perspective

    Is there any precedence for this?

    In the 1970s and early 1980s there were some highly integrated companies. IBM is the only survivor of that era. They did not foresee the impact and rise of the personal computer and they didn't foresee client/server computing. They also didn't foresee the traditional service bureau solution would have challenges.

    What's the second trend?

    Context-aware computing. It is separate to cloud, but there is some overlap. We're on our way into a world in which the context of a person or a physical device is known because it's integrated using wireless technologies. You can use that context to develop services and extend the capabilities of information technology. This is what we do on top of all the wireless stuff we are putting in place around the globe. It enables us to understand the location of users and enables us to produce a number of services. This gives rise to a new dimension of the services industry that is heavily dependent on information being provided.

    What's the third trend?

    Pattern-based strategy. It's the next step after predictive analytics. We have exhausted a 40-year time frame of optimizing internal data based upon what happened in the past. We're now using technology to predict or determine patterns or deviations from patterns. A call center can detect a fault in a product before people can. We can understand the behavior of consumers based on what they do in social environments. It enables us to now predict patterns for a business model. We have deployed islands of technology that are forward-looking. We have not integrated them. The next 15 years will be about integrating those islands of technology.

    What's the last trend?

    The business use of social networks. These different networks will reach close to 1 billion people by 2012. That includes Facebook and similar networks in China and Japan. Businesses will start to use them.


    How?

    The concepts of the software will be embedded in business processes, whether it involves customers or it's internal. The network may be firewalled off. But it will revolutionize the way we work. Today if you have a piece of ERP software in an organization, the business process is built into the software. When you make decision, you drop down to a series of ways of making those decisions that mirror what happens in social collaborative networks. What will happen in the future is those networks will be built into back-office systems so the entire process is used within a piece of software. Today you use the system, then you go into a series of meetings, then someone goes back into the system.

    Is this comparable to a blending of the extranet and intranet?

    Yes. The decision process is on top of a relatively linear evolution of technology. We know you're in the building close to us. We need you in this meeting. The piece of software you log onto will allow you to participate. The purpose is to understand whether we go for another supplier.

    What happens when these four trends collide?

    Cloud, context, pattern, and business social networks are linear progressions. But it is the confluence of the four that extends what we do with information technology. It now has more to do with revenue, value and citizen involvement than cost optimization of back-office processes.

    This is more than just normal gathering of information, right?

    Yes, it also includes unstructured data such as audio, graphic and video. It allows organizations that extend the value of what they provide and to increase revenue. This is the first time there are more trends focused on revenue creation and optimization.

    Isn't there a dark side to this as well? You can watch what each employee can do.

    This has the prospective of suggesting that you don't only look at productivity increase. It's the combination of the individual and the collective adding value to the business. But with anything that humans do, there is a dark side.
  • For decades the purpose of technology was to add efficiency and cut costs. The future may be somewhat different.

    it also includes unstructured data such as audio, graphic and video. It allows organizations that extend the value of what they provide and to increase revenue. This is the first time there are more trends focused on revenue creation and optimization.
  • DESKTOP to LAPTOP to NETBOOK to TABLET to SMARTPHONE... GFK notes the product cycles are going faster, less than 4 years now. Faster and faster...

    Why increasing segmentation? As competition increases, it is a path to distinguish between companies and products.

    Not just hardware...
  • BY CUSTOMER...the generations that grown up with internet

    BY CHANNEL... Not only the huge divide B2B and B2C, but segmentation to distinguish Computer Dealers selling Office Products and Office Products Dealer selling PCs... As well as in value-added channels where segmentation between flavours of channels kick in...and new models are emerging with SaaS, cloud and managed services
  • Fracturing is one reason why social networking is so appealing...it fits a multi-tentacled world...

    Like anything that starts with consumers, it gets a suspicious greeting by a sceptical business community
  • People on Facebook
    More than 400 million active users
    50% of our active users log on to Facebook in any given day
    Average user has 130 friends
    People spend over 500 billion minutes per month on Facebook
    Activity on Facebook
    There are over 160 million objects that people interact with (pages, groups and events)
    Average user is connected to 60 pages, groups and events
    Average user creates 70 pieces of content each month
    More than 25 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) shared each month.
    Global Reach
    More than 70 translations available on the site
    About 70% of Facebook users are outside the United States
    Over 300,000 users helped translate the site through the translations application

    Platform
    More than one million developers and entrepreneurs from more than 180 countries
    Every month, more than 70% of Facebook users engage with Platform applications
    More than 550,000 active applications currently on Facebook Platform
    More than one million websites have integrated with Facebook Platform
    More than 150 million people engage with Facebook on external websites every month
    Two-thirds of comScore’s U.S. Top 100 websites and half of comScore’s Global Top 100 websites have integrated with Facebook

    Mobile
    There are more than 100 million active users currently accessing Facebook through their mobile devices.
    People that use Facebook on their mobile devices are twice more active on Facebook than non-mobile users.
    There are more than 200 mobile operators in 60 countries working to deploy and promote Facebook mobile products
    http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • http://www.marketingvox.com/87-of-tweets-have-value-to-others-pear-analytics-perceives-044886/?utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_source=mv&utm_medium=textlink 8.7% of Tweets Have Value to Others, Pear Analytics Perceives   Twitter's Fail Whale A short-term study by Pear Analytics concludes that 40.5% of messages published on Twitter are "pointless babble" — a proclamation that fervently circulated the microblogging site this week. To reap its findings, Pear Analytics snapshot Twitter every 30 minutes between 11:00 AM and 15:00 PM "for a fortnight," according to the BBC. A total of 2000 messages were picked up, then terraced into six categories: spam, news, self-promotion, pointless babble, conversational and tweets with pass-along value. The company found that only 8.7% of messages could be said to have "value," loosely defined as news of interest. In contrast, conversational tweets, such as the kind of messages users send to each other in private instant messages, were as prevalent as the "pointless babble" — itself loosely defined as little more than personal status updates of no immediate relevance to most users. Conversational tweets composed 37.5% of messages posted. Self-promotion totaled 5.85%; spam, 3.75%. The low figures for self-promotion were unsurprising; in a July survey by LinkedIn Research Network/Harris Poll, only 8% of advertisers reportedly deemed Twitter an effective promotional tool. "With the new face of Twitter, it will be interesting to see if they take a heavier role in news, or continue to be a source for people to share their current activities that have little to do with everyone else," said Pear founder Ryan Kelly. The company plans to repeat the study quarterly. And while interest in the findings has been high on the Twittersphere, observations from Big Mouth Media and TechCrunch suggest that the analytics group perhaps redefine the "pointless babble" bracket. Navel-gazing status updates, such as "my new books arrived" or "Gmail is down again," can prove useful to both users and companies that know how to extrapolate and leverage these tweets — whose power over brands stems precisely from the lack of deep thought put into publishing them.
  • http://feed.razorfish.com/feed09/the-data/

    FEED is Razorfish’s annual study charting how technology is changing the way consumers engage with brands. The report, and the blog, are written by Garrick Schmitt, Group Vice President, Experience Planning.

    Based on 1000 USA consumers
  • Social Networking and Collaborative Application Usage Explodes in Businesses Worldwide
    Personal-to-Business “Crossover” is Accelerating, Says Latest Industry Report from Palo Alto Networks
    SUNNYVALE, Calif., Nov. 9, 2009 – Palo Alto Networks™, the leader in next-generation firewalls, today announced results of an international study that reveal the use of social networking and collaborative applications for business purposes has skyrocketed in the last six month period. With increased adoption of Web-based applications comes new business and security risks that go far beyond potential productivity losses. Yet most companies have outdated IT infrastructure and usage policies that may fail to protect them from these growing risks.
    These are just some of the results of the fourth Application Usage and Risk Report (Fall Edition 2009), a semi-annual analysis of application usage on enterprise networks. Unlike other industry reports that are based on behavioral surveys, the Application Usage and Risk Report looks at which applications are in use, identifies emerging trends, and discusses the associated business benefits and risks. Made available today, this edition of the report summarizes traffic assessments performed between March and September 2009 in more than 200 organizations worldwide that span markets including financial services, manufacturing, healthcare, government, retail, and education.
    Despite many enterprises’ attempts to block these applications, the rate at which they are making the crossover from personal to business use is happening faster than previous crossovers, such as instant messaging (IM). The use of a social networking application can bring measurable business benefits, but not without introducing business and security risks. These Enterprise 2.0 applications can transfer files, propagate malware, and have known vulnerabilities that can be exploited. The Application Usage and Risk Report is available for download at http://www.paloaltonetworks.com/literature/AUR_report1109.html.
    Some specific findings from the research include:
    Twitter session use grew more than 250 % from the Spring 2009 edition of the Application Usage and Risk Report, published in April.
    Facebook use increased 192 % while Facebook Chat (released in April 2008) was the fourth most commonly detected chat application, ahead of Yahoo! IM and AIM.
    SharePoint collaboration is ubiquitous – bandwidth consumed by SharePoint, specifically the documents component, increased 17-fold from the previous report in April.
    Blogging and wiki editing increased by a factor of 39, while total bandwidth consumed increased by a factor of 48.
    Social networking and collaborative applications are increasingly considered to be Enterprise 2.0 applications, along with messaging of all types, conferencing, and VoIP. These business-enabling applications are not threats, yet they pose risks to enterprise networks. The analysis discovered 255 Enterprise 2.0 applications – of which 70 % are capable of transferring files, 64 % have known vulnerabilities, 28 % are known to propagate malware, and 16 % can tunnel other applications. Examples of new threats introduced to enterprise networks by applications such as Facebook include Koobface, Fbaction and Boface, which all target social networking applications to hijack accounts and personal data.
    “We know that workers are using these applications to help them get their jobs done, with or without approval from their IT departments. And now we know this is happening much faster than anticipated. It’s naïve to think that old-school security practices can handle this deluge,” said Rene Bonvanie, Palo Alto Networks vice president of worldwide marketing. “Organizations must realize that banning or allowing specific applications in a black-and-white fashion is bad for business. They need a new approach that allows for shades of gray by enforcing appropriate application usage policies tailored for their workforce. This is a radical and necessary shift for today’s IT security professionals.”
    Additional information on the more than 900 applications that are identified by Palo Alto Networks can be found in Applipedia, part of the company’s Application and Threat Research Center. Visit the online resource to find the latest news, commentary, and discoveries on applications and threats at http://www.paloaltonetworks.com/researchcenter/.
    About Palo Alto Networks
    Palo Alto Networks™ is the leader in next-generation firewalls, enabling unprecedented visibility and granular policy control of applications and content – by user, not just IP address – at up to 10Gbps with no performance degradation. Based on patent-pending App-ID™ technology, Palo Alto Networks firewalls accurately identify and control applications – regardless of port, protocol, evasive tactic or SSL encryption – and scan content to stop threats and prevent data leakage. Enterprises can for the first time embrace Web 2.0 and maintain complete visibility and control, while significantly reducing total cost of ownership through device consolidation. For more information, visit www.paloaltonetworks.com.
    Palo Alto Networks, the Palo Alto Networks Logo and App-ID are trademarks of Palo Alto Networks, Inc. in the United States. All other trademarks, trade names or service marks used or mentioned herein belong to their respective owners.
  • Please note the DATE of this article...at that date there was a maelstorm of negative iPAD press due to overhype of launch.

    What We Missed About iPAD
    04. February 2010 Bob Snyder Bob’s Byte
    No one and no product could have lived up to the hype that preceded the Apple iPad launch. Not even Steve Jobs who cranked up the hype machine in the first place.
    Steve Jobs stood there on stage, iPad in hand like Moses with The Tablet, and a list of his own Commandments: Thou shall create a product category between smartphones and netbooks. Thou shall not have strange devices before you. Thou shall not covet thy neighbour’s goods...
    But this time, this very time when we knew what we wanted, when we knew what to expect...somehow it didn’t turn out to be the Second Coming we expected. (Actually for Steve it’s the Third Coming but why quibble?)
    Yes, the Apple faithful didn’t break ranks. But plenty of journalists who try to make a living out of being sceptics certainly cranked out the critical articles: 10 Things Wrong with iPad, iPad No Kindle Killer, What iPad is Missing...
    But it’s not about what iPad is “missing.” It’s about what we are missing.  And we’re missing the point. Almost all of us are just missing the whole point. And the consumer will soon prove us wrong.
    This time deceived us because it looks familiar: Steve Jobs the Product Genius (from the original Genius bar) poised on stage, waving a piece of hardware That Will Change the World.
    He did that performance with the Mac (but in those days not as many were listening). He pulled it off big-time with iPod. And he did it with iPhone.
    What’s different? And why is iPad getting so much abuse?
    We all really wanted to believe the hype, we wanted a device That Could Change the World. What Steve brought us was a clever re-positioning of the Tablet that Bill Gates wanted so badly for so many years. “It’s not a Tablet,” says Steve, waving his hand in a Jedi mind trick move...”It’s a whole new category.”
    You see we fixate on the device, the product in Steve’s hands. Because that’s what we buy, that’s what we see, that’s what we touch and multi-touch...
    But what we can’t see, smell or hear on stage is the most important part of the Steve Show. iPad is walking into the market at an affordable price ($499) and carrying one great sack of proven applications.
    iPod had to prove iTunes. iPhone had to build the Apps Store.
    iPad just strolls into our lives with both iTunes, iStore—plus iBooks which needs no heavy lifting because Kindle already pulled the weight up the hill.
    iPad is a winner because it’s another form factor feeding into the world’s greatest and growing Apps platform: Apple. Steve Jobs has the ability to get industries like media, music and books to think big and go with Apple to market. He's driving the Content business.
    And, ladies and gentlemen, if you’ve heard it once, you’ve forgotten it a thousand times: software drives hardware sales. More specifically, APPS RULE.
    It’s not that iPad will change the world. Even though Apple WILL sell millions of iPads in a record time. Yes, I think you couldn’t stop Apple from selling millions even if you attached a Swine Flu app.
    It’s all about APPS. The devices will get less and less important until the cloud covers them all.
    EDITOR'S NOTE ADDED: March 30th...The closer we get to actually having the product in the marketplace, the more everyone now realizes I had it right in early February. The iPAD is not for geeks: it's a mass market product that will depend heavily on its "ecosystem" appeal.
    While Apple will make money off the sale of each iPad, Broadpoint AmTech analyst Brian Marshall estimates Apple will generate enough revenue from content sales equal to 10% of its iPad hardware sales by the end of this year and about 30% in 2011.
    It's all about recurring revenue from media/content. 16,700 iPhone apps have been certified as iPad-compatible so far. and more than more than 140,000 applications are racing up from behind. (For example, there have been more than 3 billion iPhone app downloads since the iPhone launched in mid-2007.)
    Since I filed my WE'RE ALL WRONG ABOUT iPAD (in the early days when the press was disappointed and negative) the bandwagon has come to realise the true genius of bringing another form factor to tap the Apple content platform in the mass market.
    Now WE'RE ALL RIGHT ABOUT iPAD and the stock analyst TREFIS even shows iPAD is already 4.3% of Apple's current stock price (even before product release.) Software drives hardware: it's an old rule. Live by it or die by it.
  • 150,000+ Apple Apps
    81,500 Android apps... http://www.androlib.com/appstatstype.aspx
  • Well Grounded
    Both Feet on the Ground
  • Just like in nature, many different types of clouds, not just public and private...
  • Like the night sky, CLOUD changes depending upon where you are standing when you look at it
  • A Brave New World: Responding to Shifts in the Selling/Buying Model
    Posted on October 5, 2009 by M. Scott Miller
    Last week, The Complex Sale, Pedowitz Group, Eloqua, and Oracle hosted a luncheon designed to brief sales and marketing executives on how their worlds were changing.  It was a great turn out with even better insight into how buyers are changing their habits. At no time in history has Sales and Marketing seen as radical a shift in buying behaviors as in the last five years.  With tools like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, information is now quite literally at our buyer’s fingertips.
    Organizations are having trouble adapting to this change.  The concept of the new “Sales 2.0” world has created more questions than answers as to how Sales and Marketing can leverage new technologies to drive messaging and sales effectiveness.    Today, buyer “self education” renders Sales and Marketing blind to buyers’ interests, propensities, and levels of engagement in our typical Sales and Marketing plans.  Buyers are less likely to engage with sales teams or to read our messaging.  Instead, buyers leverage Webinars, Online Meetings, and interactive web sites and control the sales process themselves.
    Steve Woods, author of Digital Body Language and CTO of Eloqua states, “a sales person’s biggest competition for an executive’s time is now Google.”  If we as sales people cannot bring more value to the conversation than what is available online, then we are not going to capture an executive’s time or imagination.
    Rick Page, author of Hope is Not a Strategy and founder of The Complex Sale states, “lead generation used to be about a hammer, now it is about a hook.” The hammer was the telephone with endless cold calls beating executives into appointments by attrition.  The hook is an opportunity for the executive to learn something insightful about their own business, industry, or competition.
    Debbie Qaquish, Chief Revenue Officer at the Pedowitz Group states, “Marketing is earning its way on sales incentives trips by first, collaborating with sales to create the definition of a lead and secondly, providing insight into buyer activity on the company website that will triage the sellers call efforts.
    The session ended with the obvious question – what hasn’t changed in selling?
    The evaluation process is still logical and rational where the decision making process is emotional and political.  By avoiding the three foot rule (being within three feet of the prospect) and handling the sale over the web and phone, sellers risk becoming a victim of the crucible concept. Sellers need to know the competitive and political landscape, source of urgency, and enterprise level issues to when complex deals.
  • As a result of segmentation...
  • Vendor Certification—No, not the one you are thinking of...
  • You send channel partners to other web sites.
    You measure how many partners refer other partners to you (Net Promoter Score) and reward that
    Your only customer service policy is to do right by your customer
    Your channel are doing things with your product that you never imagined and they are posting videos
    Partners are posting you on social networks
    You know you compete for your partner’s attention with others
  • Traditionally made and inspired from a kudu horn, the vuvuzela was used to summon distant villagers to attend community gatherings.[4][dubious – discuss] The vuvuzela is most used at soccer matches in South Africa,[5] and it has become a symbol of South African soccer as the stadiums are filled with its loud and raucous sound that reflects the exhilaration of supporters.[4] The intensity of the sound caught the attention of the global soccer community during the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup in anticipation of South Africa hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup.[4]
    The vuvuzela has been the subject of controversy. Its high sound pressure levels at close range can lead to permanent hearing loss for unprotected ears after exposure,[6] with a sound pressure of 120 dB(A) (the threshold of pain) at 1 metre (3.3 ft) from the device opening.[4]
  • Transcript of "What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing?"

    1. 1. What's Wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing? By Bob Snyder Speak up, I can’t hear you!
    2. 2. The Sound of the World Cup You can argue the real World Cup winner was the stadium horn of South African soccer, locally known as a humble “Lepatata...” ... now in OED and famous the world throughout as the vuvuzela
    3. 3. Primitive & Effective... • ...As a sound device. • So, what’s wrong with Vuvuzela Marketing? • It’s single note... • It’s annoying... • It’s out of date...
    4. 4. Tribal interest• Just as marketing is used by companies to create customer interest in brand, products and services, the kuduzela stimulated interest in the tribe from members.
    5. 5. But Tribes Change...
    6. 6. The World Changes Today’s modern DURBAN
    7. 7. The GAME itself Changes
    8. 8. Changes in Our IT World • Context-aware computing • Pattern-based strategy • Social Networking • Cloud Computing
    9. 9. The Confluence of Four • Cloud, context, pattern, and business social networks are linear notes, but the confluence of the four that will create a different sound for what we do with information technology. • The purpose of technology was to add efficiency and cut costs: now it’s more to do with revenue, value and citizen involvement than cost optimization of back-office processes.
    10. 10. Increasing Segmentation • By Product • By Customers • By Channels
    11. 11. Segmenting? No Fracturing!
    12. 12. Advent of Social Networking • A New Conversation Begins.... • Business Implications
    13. 13. The Power of Facebook • More than 400 million active users • 50% of active users log on to Facebook in any given day • Average user has 130 friends • People spend over 500 billion minutes per month on Facebook
    14. 14. Social Media Experts • Make a guess as to HOW MANY experts on social networking we have?
    15. 15. Twitter Vuvuzela? • Only 8.7% of TWITTER messages could be said to have "value” • Self-promo 5.9% • Spam 3.75% • Talk 37.5% • Babble 40.5% Source: Pear Analytics Only 8.7%?
    16. 16. Brands & Twitter Source: Razorfish Digital Brand Experience Study
    17. 17. How online content maps to the IT buying process The TechTarget Media Consumption Report
    18. 18. Anti-Social Networking • Out of 255 Enterprise 2.0 applications – 70% are capable of transferring files – 64% have known vulnerabilities – 28% are known to propagate malware – and 16% can tunnel other apps. Source: Palo Alto Networks
    19. 19. Mobile Phones & Devices • Swiss Army knife utility • New form factors • When combined with social networking...powerful!
    20. 20. iPad Fuss Missed The Point It’s About What He’s NOT Holding in His Hands...
    21. 21. The Power of Applications
    22. 22. Cloud Computing
    23. 23. GET YOUR HEAD OUT OF THE CLOUDS
    24. 24. Changes in the Tribe
    25. 25. Hook Instead of Hammer • Lead Generation: The hammer was the telephone with endless cold calls beating executives into appointments by attrition. • The hook is an opportunity for the executive to learn something insightful about their own business, industry, or competition.
    26. 26. Partner Preparation • We slice, dice and tier our partners
    27. 27. Level Playing Field vs Levels of Playing Fields
    28. 28. Fill-in–the-Form-itis It was supposed to be HIGH TECH, HIGH TOUCH...circa 1980 author and Apple PR guru Regis McKenna
    29. 29. The Greying of the Channel Ben Stiler, Then and Now (42)
    30. 30. They Know More...
    31. 31. They Have More Access Access to... ...Your Sources of Supply ...Your Components ...Your Record ...Your Competitors ...Your Other Partners
    32. 32. What the Partner Wants • A stable regime • Simple, clear programmes • Less paperwork • Communication • “Don’t Step on My Toes”
    33. 33. Vendor Certification • It was a pretty good trick to get channel to pay for their education to sell your products, but... ...Where is the Certification for PARTNER MANAGERS?
    34. 34. • You send channel partners to other web sites. • You measure how many partners refer other partners to you (Net Promoter Score) and reward that. • Your only customer service policy is to do right by your customer. • Your channel are doing things with your product that you never imagined and they are posting videos. • Partners are posting you on social networks. • You know you compete for your partner’s attention with others. Signs You Are A Partner-Centric Business
    35. 35. Vuvuzela Marketing The vuvuzela rocks stadiums with its loud and raucous sound that reflects the exhilaration of supporters... Its high sound pressure levels at close range can lead to permanent hearing loss for unprotected ears after exposure. Sound pressure of 120 dBA (the threshold of pain) at 1 metre (3.3 ft) from the device opening!
    36. 36. Vuvuzela Marketing... • Was right for its time... • But today it grates on customer and channel alike... • The note it hits is PAINFUL, not playful
    37. 37. Instead... • Symphony Orchestra
    38. 38. For some reason... • Personally, I favour lots of STRINGED INSTRUMENTS
    39. 39. Thanks for Listening! We publish Channel News for Solution Providers throughout EMEA.
    40. 40. www.ConsumerIT.eu www.IT-SP.eu www.On-CE.eu www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com www.DigitalSignageNews.eu Click on photo to hear the LAST vuvuzela marketing of WORLD CUP 2010. Read our News for EMEA Channels on these sites...
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