Introduction to Film Language

  • 5,412 views
Uploaded on

An introduction to mise en scene, cinematography, editing and sound …

An introduction to mise en scene, cinematography, editing and sound
for teachers attending the summer 2009
Teacher's Institute at Jacob Burns Film
Center, Pleasantville, NY.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Great presentation still had same problem with images.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • 9---Boa noite amigos.. MEGA EVENTOS DE FÉRIAS jogando.net/mu/
    Venham conhecer nossos Servidores de Mu
    Online Season 6 e participar dos EVENTOS
    De Férias que preparamos para vocês.
    CONFIRAM = http://www.jogando.net/mu/
    Venham participar do 6° Megaultrasuperhiper Evento Castle Siege
    >>muitos kits novos;
    >> Nossos GMs online em todos os servers
    Fazem eventos todos os dias:
    Fazemos sua Diversão com qualidade,há mais de 5 anos
    Servers ON 24 horas por dia.
    Vários Server esperando por você.Venha se divertir de verdade.
    Site http://www.jogando.net/mu/ Benvindos ao nosso servidor.
    HYCLEN Divulgadora Oficial ..Boa semana a todos e boas férias !!!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Great presentation! The content is wonderful. Could you please provide the references to the video files? Many thanks!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • great presentation but i keepon getting this problem on the silde 'quicktime and a motion JPEG decompressor are needed to see this picture'
    could u plz help? thankz
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Hi! Great content. But can you post the reference to the video files, otherwise this presetntion feels very half ...

    Thanks,
    Klaus
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,412
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
631
Comments
5
Likes
7

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Film Language Theresa Dawson Jacob Burns Film Center Monday 20 July 2009
  • 2. Mise-en-scene Put into the scene / staging an action • Setting • Props • Costume • Performance • Lighting
  • 3. Mise-en-scene and film authorship Mise-en-scene central to auteur discussion i.e.film authorship. During classic Hollywood studio period control of the director was limited to those processes recorded during filming. The quality of a director’s work could be read through his control over mise-en- scene
  • 4. Setting Location: What is the significance of the natural setting in this clip? What is the significance of the house set?
  • 5. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 6. Props What is the key prop in this sequence? How do we know it is not just an innocuous part of the setting?
  • 7. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 8. Costume What is the significance of costume in this clip? How does the costume echo in other elements of the mise-en-scene?
  • 9. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 10. Performance Look at ‘Bruno’s’ performance in this clip. What suggestions are made about him? How do other elements of the mise-en-scene contribute to our ‘reading’ of him?
  • 11. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 12. 3 point lighting or ‘high key lighting’ Uses 3 light sources: a key light -the main light for the subject, a back light - picks subject out from background, and a fill light, to fill in shadows Designed to be unobtrusive How does 3 point lighting work in this clip?
  • 13. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 14. Top lighting A beautifying light Lighting from below A distorting light Side lighting A selective light that conceals/reveals How is Marlene Dietrich lit in this clip?
  • 15. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 16. Low key lighting ‘noir lighting’ Uses 1 source light, light is limited Images have high contrast ‘chiaroscuro’ Few mid-tones A very noticeable lighting effect
  • 17. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 18. Exercise What do we learn from the mise-en- scene in this opening sequence from Hitchcock’s Rear Window?
  • 19. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 20. Cinematography • Frame dimension • Lens • Camera angle • Camera movement • Focus • Film stock
  • 21. Frame dimension Aspect ratio 1: 1.33 ‘academy’ Cinemascope 1: 2.35 Widescreen 1: 1.85 (in Widescreen Europe 1:1.75) Identify frame dimension for the following 2 clips
  • 22. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 23. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 24. Lenses: wide angle What effect does shooting with a wide angle lens have on the image in this clip?
  • 25. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 26. Lenses: long lens The following clip of Dustin Hoffman desperately trying to halt a wedding was shot using a long lens -- what impact does this have on how we see his actions?
  • 27. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 28. Angle: low angle This character is shot from a low angle. What is our response to him?
  • 29. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 30. Angle: high Why is the camera positioned above The female lead in this sequence? How do we respond to her based on this framing from above?
  • 31. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 32. Angle: canted or ‘dutch’ This framing starts out as framed with the horizon but then goes askew. What is the reason for the askew or ‘canted’ framing in this clip? How does the askew framing make you feel?
  • 33. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 34. Moving camera: the track This is one of the most famous track shots in film history. Why does the filmmaker use a track shot? What effect does this shot have?
  • 35. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 36. Moving camera: steadicam What is the purpose of this very long shot? How does it make you feel? Why did the filmmaker choose to film in this way?
  • 37. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 38. Moving camera: pan crane Pan: Camera moving from side to side Crane: Camera is mounted on a crane and can float through the air How is pan and crane used in this shot?
  • 39. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 40. Focus: rack focus In this sequence we shift focus from one character to the other What is the effect of this change in focus?
  • 41. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 42. Film stock Comment on the color used in this clip?
  • 43. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 44. Editing • Continuity editing • 180 degree system • Match on action • Montage editing • Cross-cutting
  • 45. Continuity editing Dominant editing style Designed to be seamless Includes filming in 180 degrees of action Varying angles by more than 30 degrees Eyeline and other match shots
  • 46. 180 degree axis of action This clip explains the 180 degree rule Why is it important that you do not ‘cross the line/axis’ in terms of editing shots together?
  • 47. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 48. Match shots This sequence contains a ‘match on action’ shot Where does the match on action take place? Why is a match on action shot used?
  • 49. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 50. Self-conscious breaking 180 degree rule Ozu is a director who deliberately breaks the 180 degree rule Where do we see a break in the 180 degree rule in this clip? What effect does this have?
  • 51. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 52. Self-conscious match on action This sequence also contains a match action, however, it draws attention to itself Where is the match on action? What is the filmmaker implying here with this match on action shot?
  • 53. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 54. Montage editing The ‘Kuleshov’ effect Cutting of neutral shots of an actor’s face with other shots (variously reported as shots of soup, nature, a dead woman, a baby). The audience assumed that the actor’s expression changed but also that the actor was responding to things in the same scene as himself.
  • 55. Montage editing How is montage editing used in this clip?
  • 56. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 57. Cross-cutting Creates omniscience by alternating shots from one place with shots from another event or place. Typically used to cause tension in viewer. First used extensively by D W Griffith in his last minute rescue scenes. How is cross cutting used in the opening of Strangers on a Train? How is cross cutting used in The Godfather?
  • 58. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 59. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 60. Sound • Speech • Sound effects • Music • Diegetic v non diegetic • Diegetic: internal / external
  • 61. Speech How is speech varied in this clip? Why does the filmmaker vary loudness timbre of the speaker? How do you feel at the end of the clip?
  • 62. QuickTimeª and a H.264 decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 63. Sound effects What sound effects are used in this clip? What makes these sound effects more effective than the sound that might have been recorded on set?
  • 64. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 65. Music What sound effects and music do you hear in the opening credits of this film? What do the sounds make you think of? Why is sound so important in this opening sequence?
  • 66. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 67. Diegetic sound Diegetic means emanating from a source in the story space Non-diegetic sound means from outside the story space Is music in the Strangers on a Train clip diegetic or non-diegetic?
  • 68. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 69. Internal v external diegetic External diegetic sound is sound that can be heard by everyone else in the story Internal diegetic sound exists in the character’s mind How is external and internal diegetic sound used in this clip?
  • 70. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 71. Confused internal/external diegetic sound This clip famously plays tricks on the audience about whether the sound is external sound coming from an identifiable source, or whether it is internal and exists in the character’s mind How does the filmmaker do this?
  • 72. QuickTimeª and a Motion JPEG A decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 73. Exercise How is sound used to create emotion and tension in Robert Bresson’s ‘A Man Escaped’?
  • 74. Further information This presentation is online at slideshare: Reading: ‘Film Art: an introduction’, 7th edition, K Bordwell and D Thompson, Mcgraw-Hill, New York, 2004 My contact: tdawson@burnsfilmcenter.org