• Save
Understanding Online Sharing 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Understanding Online Sharing 2012

on

  • 1,344 views

The presentation deals with social sharing. It tries to outline main personas and motivations of content sharing. The second part deals with content optimization for YouTube. ...

The presentation deals with social sharing. It tries to outline main personas and motivations of content sharing. The second part deals with content optimization for YouTube.

More about Toni Richard Crisolli
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/toni.crisolli
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/tonicrisolli
Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/tcrisolli
Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/tonicrisolli
Wordpress: http://www.youtube.com/user/tonicrisolli
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/24348670@N07

More about the organizations involved in the training:
Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom: http://www.freiheit.org
Project Polska: http://projektpolska.pl/
European Liberal Forum: http://www.liberalforum.eu/

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,344
Views on SlideShare
1,344
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Understanding Online Sharing 2012 through DIRECT link
    COPY & PASTE the LINK
    ---> http://po.st/mY44Z7
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • What are 10 Addictive Types of Content?Written byJeff Bullas - 52 CommentsCategories: Blog, Blogging, Content, Social MediaAre you having problems driving traffic to your blog? Are you finding that no one is retweeting your content or sharing it on Facebook?When starting a blog the challenge for any blogger is providing content that will entice and delight your readers. You want them looking forward to your next article.Developing an antenna for creative ideas for content is a skill that can be developed.What I have found effective is to take notes when reading a book or after a meeting when customers provide insights into their business dilemmas. To capture these I sometimes enter it straight into my Apple iPhone with the “notes” feature or use Evernotes mobile app that saves the idea in  the  ”cloud” for future reference.Everyone has ProblemsOne thing to keep in mind is that every business or reader has day to day challenges and problems that they want help solving. Helping customers find solutions and ideas for their pain points is an easy way to provide addictive content.Ideally you want your blog to become the industry resource or Bible that becomes the “Go To Portal” for your subscribers.Social Proof is VitalDo you have clients saying to you “What are some of your customers finding what works for them?” or “Provide me with some case studies that verifies that strategy has worked in the past“.Providing social proof and evidence is a very powerful content type that validates and confirms that they will not be reinventing the wheel or wasting time and money.10 Addictive Content TypesThese ten I have found to be very effective and will ensure that you are providing information that your readers will find worth sharing, “Tweetable” and Facebook “likeable”.1. ReviewsReviews of products , books or applications in your industry provide a shortcut that saves people and your subscribers time. Everyone has the problem of being “time poor“. The other advantage with this content is that the companies and people whose product or book you are reviewing will share your content with their networks accelerating its spread and improving its virality.Example:8 Great Twitter Tools That Will Get You Tweeting Like A ProThis multiple review had the benefit of motivating the eight companies who developed them to tweet and share with their networks.2. Mega ListsA  long list of tips, tactics and answers that provide people with a resource that maps out many ideas that they can go back to as a reference have proven to work well. You can go a bit crazy here if you are not careful but give it a try .Example90 Tips to Make Your Blog Rock3. How To’sThis content type maps out different solutions and answers to the everyday issues that your customers want answers to. This can be the simple basics of  ”How to get started” for the newbies to the industry or a more complex article that provides new insights to veterans.ExampleHow To Write A Mind Blowing Headline For Twitter So People Will Read Your Blog4. Experts and Thought Leader InterviewsInterviewing experts in your field will achieve two objectives.Provide great content that will entice your readers with their insightsPromote and connect your blog to their networks.You will not have to ask them to share it, they will “want” to share their interview with their followers and tribe whether it be a video or text in a Q&A format.ExamplesFrom Zero To 40,000 Facebook Fans: Interview With Mike WatkinsSocial Media and The CEO – Video Interview With Greg Savage CEO of Firebrand Talent5. Case StudiesCase studies provide the proof that a certain strategy will work if planned and applied correctly. Research and track down specific examples of how other companies have been successful.ExampleThe 7 Secrets to Ford’s Social Media Marketing SuccessHow To Run A Successful Social Media Marketing Campaign: Case Study6. Negative or Contratrian StoriesIt never ceases to surprise me that a negative headline and position will drive more traffic than a positive slant on a story or article.Example30 Things You Should Not Share On Social MediaWhat is revealing is that the article 20 Things you should Share on Social Media only had half the traffic of the article with the negative headline!7. Facts, Figures and StatisticsPeople love facts and figures and aggregating the latest data about your industry will provide a focus on your blog that will keep your readers coming back for more. Providing this regularly will assist you in positioning your blog and content as the hub to keep on top of the latest numbers. Statistics help businesses pick trends and opportunities in their sector.Example50 Fascinating Facebook Facts And FiguresThis is in fact a hybrid content type that mixes the mega list format with the facts and figures8. News StoriesBlogs are the digital worlds online magazines and newspapers and providing the latest news is always attractive and valuable content. Don’t hesitate to put your own slant on the news that displays your grasp of your industry.ExampleApple makes Huge Announcement about Twitter9. ResearchThe latest research provides signposts for future planning and validates and lends credibility to strategies. If managers can  provide proof of why something should be done then it helps them take action and obtain approval from their CEO. Research does need to be presented with well formatted articles that allow skimming and scanning for “time poor” excecutives! Bullet points, screen shots and subtitles are all important elements to provide easy reading.ExampleHarvard Study: 30 Key Findings on How The CEO Engages With Social Media10. InfographicsProviding infographics that simplifies the presentation of complex data and facts and figures are proving to be extremely popular. This content type also lends itself to being embeded in other blogs and websites.Example20 Stunning Social Media Statistics Plus InfographicHybrids of these ten content types are also very effective and mixing these into mixed formats can provide creative variations that can drive traffic and sharing.What content types have worked for you on your website and blog? Look forward to hearing your success stories!Read more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2011/11/08/what-are-10-addictive-types-of-content/#CTJmXDVvMfyfgC01.99
  • View As One Page »The Google Search of the future is here. Now. Today. The long-talked-about semantic web — Google prefers “Knowledge Graph” — is rolling out across all Google Search tools, and our most fundamental online task may never be the same again.Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. Type in an ambiguous query like “Kings” (which could mean royalty, a sports team or a now-cancelled TV show), and a new window will appear on the right side of your result literally asking you which entity you meant. Click on one of those options and your results will be filtered for that search entity.To understand the gravity of this change, you need to know about the fundamental changes going on behind the scenes at Google Search. As we outlined in our report earlier this year, Google is switching from simple keyword recognition to the identification of entities, nodes and relationships. In this world, “New York” is not simply the combination of two keywords that can be recognized. It’s understood by Google as a state in the U.S. surrounded by other states, the Atlantic Ocean and with a whole bunch of other, relevant attributes. As Ben Gomes, Google Fellow, put it, Google is essentially switching “from strings to things.”To build this world of things, Google is tapping a variety of knowledge databases, including Freebase, which it bought in 2010, Wikipedia, Google Local, Google Maps and Google Shopping. Currently, Google’s Knowledge Graph has over 500 million people, places and things and those things have at least 3.5 billion attributes.That’s a lot of things. According to Google, search users will see these new knowledge graph results at least as often as they see Google Maps in results. In fact, this update will have a greater initial impact than the updates that brought Google Images, videos, news and books, combined. It’s big and it’s probably going to be everywhere.Summaries of Good StuffIn addition to the window which will help users find the right “thing,” Google will also surface summaries for things, which, again, will try to be somewhat comprehensive by tapping into the various databases of knowledge. A search for Frank Lloyd Wright, for instance, will return a brief summary, photos of Wright, images of his famous projects and perhaps, most interestingly, related “things.” People who search for Wright are also looking for other notable architects. It’s a feature that may remind users of Amazon’s penchant for delivering “people who liked this book also bought or searched for this one” results.Gomes said that the search results are tailored to deliver information that best relates to the initial search result. So the details delivered about a female astronaut will likely outline her space travel record, because that’s what people who search for her are, according to Google, most interested in.How the Knowledge Graph Works. Click to see full graph exampleSince this is a knowledge graph (“Web” might be a better word), the results are designed to help you dig more deeply into related topics. Google showed us how someone might start by searching for a local amusement park, find an interesting rollercoaster as one of the “things” that relates to the park and end up digging in on details about that coaster and other similar rides. It’s a “skeleton of knowledge that allows you to explore information on the web,” said Gomes.There is the potential, Gomes added, of serendipitous discovery. The more you dig into things, the more things you learn about.Of course, not every “thing” is the right thing. Wikipedia is, for example, a community-sourced encyclopedia that is known for both its breadth and depth of information and the occasional whoppers of misinformation it stores. Google’s Knowledge Graph includes an error reporting system. When users find misinformation, Google will share it with the source and the knowledge graph will get just a little bit smarterFor now, though, the Knowledge Graph is not getting any smarter about you. If you search for an ambiguous topic and then guide Google Search to the more defined set of results, the same query later will not go directly to that filtered information — at least not yet. “We don’t have anything to announce for personalization,” said Gomes. The CompetitionGoogle’s chief search competitor, Microsoft Bing, also has millions of entities, but it’s not aiming for the purely semantic model of search results. Instead, Bing execs told Mashable that it’s focusing, in part, on much smaller set of segments that its users typically search on (i.e.: restaurants, hotels, movies) and trying to surface relevant information regarding those segments. A search result for hotels, for example, might include reservation tools. And while Google search now blends in Google+ results, Bing’s latest instantiation has moved social information to the right side of its search results pageIt’s unclear for now how the Google Knowledge Graph, which pushes aside keyword results in favor of relationships and artificial intelligence, impacts all the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) many web sites have done to push their search rank ever higher. Also unknown is how, if at all, Google’s sea change will impact Google+. Gomes revealed that some Google+ changes were coming “independent of this” update and that Google will be talking about them separately.Eventually, Google’s search will get smarter and will stop asking for your help to understand your query and start answering complex questions like “What is the coldest lake in the world in July?” It doesn’t matter why you want to know that, just that, someday, the right answer will be a click away on Google Search.Google’s Knowledge Graph will roll out across the U.S. (and on all Google platforms: desktop, mobile, tablet) in the coming days. Eventually, it will go global. Give it a try and let us know what you think of the brand new Google Search in the comments.
  • View As One Page »The Google Search of the future is here. Now. Today. The long-talked-about semantic web — Google prefers “Knowledge Graph” — is rolling out across all Google Search tools, and our most fundamental online task may never be the same again.Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. Type in an ambiguous query like “Kings” (which could mean royalty, a sports team or a now-cancelled TV show), and a new window will appear on the right side of your result literally asking you which entity you meant. Click on one of those options and your results will be filtered for that search entity.To understand the gravity of this change, you need to know about the fundamental changes going on behind the scenes at Google Search. As we outlined in our report earlier this year, Google is switching from simple keyword recognition to the identification of entities, nodes and relationships. In this world, “New York” is not simply the combination of two keywords that can be recognized. It’s understood by Google as a state in the U.S. surrounded by other states, the Atlantic Ocean and with a whole bunch of other, relevant attributes. As Ben Gomes, Google Fellow, put it, Google is essentially switching “from strings to things.”To build this world of things, Google is tapping a variety of knowledge databases, including Freebase, which it bought in 2010, Wikipedia, Google Local, Google Maps and Google Shopping. Currently, Google’s Knowledge Graph has over 500 million people, places and things and those things have at least 3.5 billion attributes.That’s a lot of things. According to Google, search users will see these new knowledge graph results at least as often as they see Google Maps in results. In fact, this update will have a greater initial impact than the updates that brought Google Images, videos, news and books, combined. It’s big and it’s probably going to be everywhere.Summaries of Good StuffIn addition to the window which will help users find the right “thing,” Google will also surface summaries for things, which, again, will try to be somewhat comprehensive by tapping into the various databases of knowledge. A search for Frank Lloyd Wright, for instance, will return a brief summary, photos of Wright, images of his famous projects and perhaps, most interestingly, related “things.” People who search for Wright are also looking for other notable architects. It’s a feature that may remind users of Amazon’s penchant for delivering “people who liked this book also bought or searched for this one” results.Gomes said that the search results are tailored to deliver information that best relates to the initial search result. So the details delivered about a female astronaut will likely outline her space travel record, because that’s what people who search for her are, according to Google, most interested in.How the Knowledge Graph Works. Click to see full graph exampleSince this is a knowledge graph (“Web” might be a better word), the results are designed to help you dig more deeply into related topics. Google showed us how someone might start by searching for a local amusement park, find an interesting rollercoaster as one of the “things” that relates to the park and end up digging in on details about that coaster and other similar rides. It’s a “skeleton of knowledge that allows you to explore information on the web,” said Gomes.There is the potential, Gomes added, of serendipitous discovery. The more you dig into things, the more things you learn about.Of course, not every “thing” is the right thing. Wikipedia is, for example, a community-sourced encyclopedia that is known for both its breadth and depth of information and the occasional whoppers of misinformation it stores. Google’s Knowledge Graph includes an error reporting system. When users find misinformation, Google will share it with the source and the knowledge graph will get just a little bit smarterFor now, though, the Knowledge Graph is not getting any smarter about you. If you search for an ambiguous topic and then guide Google Search to the more defined set of results, the same query later will not go directly to that filtered information — at least not yet. “We don’t have anything to announce for personalization,” said Gomes. The CompetitionGoogle’s chief search competitor, Microsoft Bing, also has millions of entities, but it’s not aiming for the purely semantic model of search results. Instead, Bing execs told Mashable that it’s focusing, in part, on much smaller set of segments that its users typically search on (i.e.: restaurants, hotels, movies) and trying to surface relevant information regarding those segments. A search result for hotels, for example, might include reservation tools. And while Google search now blends in Google+ results, Bing’s latest instantiation has moved social information to the right side of its search results pageIt’s unclear for now how the Google Knowledge Graph, which pushes aside keyword results in favor of relationships and artificial intelligence, impacts all the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) many web sites have done to push their search rank ever higher. Also unknown is how, if at all, Google’s sea change will impact Google+. Gomes revealed that some Google+ changes were coming “independent of this” update and that Google will be talking about them separately.Eventually, Google’s search will get smarter and will stop asking for your help to understand your query and start answering complex questions like “What is the coldest lake in the world in July?” It doesn’t matter why you want to know that, just that, someday, the right answer will be a click away on Google Search.Google’s Knowledge Graph will roll out across the U.S. (and on all Google platforms: desktop, mobile, tablet) in the coming days. Eventually, it will go global. Give it a try and let us know what you think of the brand new Google Search in the comments.
  • View As One Page »The Google Search of the future is here. Now. Today. The long-talked-about semantic web — Google prefers “Knowledge Graph” — is rolling out across all Google Search tools, and our most fundamental online task may never be the same again.Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. Type in an ambiguous query like “Kings” (which could mean royalty, a sports team or a now-cancelled TV show), and a new window will appear on the right side of your result literally asking you which entity you meant. Click on one of those options and your results will be filtered for that search entity.To understand the gravity of this change, you need to know about the fundamental changes going on behind the scenes at Google Search. As we outlined in our report earlier this year, Google is switching from simple keyword recognition to the identification of entities, nodes and relationships. In this world, “New York” is not simply the combination of two keywords that can be recognized. It’s understood by Google as a state in the U.S. surrounded by other states, the Atlantic Ocean and with a whole bunch of other, relevant attributes. As Ben Gomes, Google Fellow, put it, Google is essentially switching “from strings to things.”To build this world of things, Google is tapping a variety of knowledge databases, including Freebase, which it bought in 2010, Wikipedia, Google Local, Google Maps and Google Shopping. Currently, Google’s Knowledge Graph has over 500 million people, places and things and those things have at least 3.5 billion attributes.That’s a lot of things. According to Google, search users will see these new knowledge graph results at least as often as they see Google Maps in results. In fact, this update will have a greater initial impact than the updates that brought Google Images, videos, news and books, combined. It’s big and it’s probably going to be everywhere.Summaries of Good StuffIn addition to the window which will help users find the right “thing,” Google will also surface summaries for things, which, again, will try to be somewhat comprehensive by tapping into the various databases of knowledge. A search for Frank Lloyd Wright, for instance, will return a brief summary, photos of Wright, images of his famous projects and perhaps, most interestingly, related “things.” People who search for Wright are also looking for other notable architects. It’s a feature that may remind users of Amazon’s penchant for delivering “people who liked this book also bought or searched for this one” results.Gomes said that the search results are tailored to deliver information that best relates to the initial search result. So the details delivered about a female astronaut will likely outline her space travel record, because that’s what people who search for her are, according to Google, most interested in.How the Knowledge Graph Works. Click to see full graph exampleSince this is a knowledge graph (“Web” might be a better word), the results are designed to help you dig more deeply into related topics. Google showed us how someone might start by searching for a local amusement park, find an interesting rollercoaster as one of the “things” that relates to the park and end up digging in on details about that coaster and other similar rides. It’s a “skeleton of knowledge that allows you to explore information on the web,” said Gomes.There is the potential, Gomes added, of serendipitous discovery. The more you dig into things, the more things you learn about.Of course, not every “thing” is the right thing. Wikipedia is, for example, a community-sourced encyclopedia that is known for both its breadth and depth of information and the occasional whoppers of misinformation it stores. Google’s Knowledge Graph includes an error reporting system. When users find misinformation, Google will share it with the source and the knowledge graph will get just a little bit smarterFor now, though, the Knowledge Graph is not getting any smarter about you. If you search for an ambiguous topic and then guide Google Search to the more defined set of results, the same query later will not go directly to that filtered information — at least not yet. “We don’t have anything to announce for personalization,” said Gomes. The CompetitionGoogle’s chief search competitor, Microsoft Bing, also has millions of entities, but it’s not aiming for the purely semantic model of search results. Instead, Bing execs told Mashable that it’s focusing, in part, on much smaller set of segments that its users typically search on (i.e.: restaurants, hotels, movies) and trying to surface relevant information regarding those segments. A search result for hotels, for example, might include reservation tools. And while Google search now blends in Google+ results, Bing’s latest instantiation has moved social information to the right side of its search results pageIt’s unclear for now how the Google Knowledge Graph, which pushes aside keyword results in favor of relationships and artificial intelligence, impacts all the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) many web sites have done to push their search rank ever higher. Also unknown is how, if at all, Google’s sea change will impact Google+. Gomes revealed that some Google+ changes were coming “independent of this” update and that Google will be talking about them separately.Eventually, Google’s search will get smarter and will stop asking for your help to understand your query and start answering complex questions like “What is the coldest lake in the world in July?” It doesn’t matter why you want to know that, just that, someday, the right answer will be a click away on Google Search.Google’s Knowledge Graph will roll out across the U.S. (and on all Google platforms: desktop, mobile, tablet) in the coming days. Eventually, it will go global. Give it a try and let us know what you think of the brand new Google Search in the comments.
  • View As One Page »The Google Search of the future is here. Now. Today. The long-talked-about semantic web — Google prefers “Knowledge Graph” — is rolling out across all Google Search tools, and our most fundamental online task may never be the same again.Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. Type in an ambiguous query like “Kings” (which could mean royalty, a sports team or a now-cancelled TV show), and a new window will appear on the right side of your result literally asking you which entity you meant. Click on one of those options and your results will be filtered for that search entity.To understand the gravity of this change, you need to know about the fundamental changes going on behind the scenes at Google Search. As we outlined in our report earlier this year, Google is switching from simple keyword recognition to the identification of entities, nodes and relationships. In this world, “New York” is not simply the combination of two keywords that can be recognized. It’s understood by Google as a state in the U.S. surrounded by other states, the Atlantic Ocean and with a whole bunch of other, relevant attributes. As Ben Gomes, Google Fellow, put it, Google is essentially switching “from strings to things.”To build this world of things, Google is tapping a variety of knowledge databases, including Freebase, which it bought in 2010, Wikipedia, Google Local, Google Maps and Google Shopping. Currently, Google’s Knowledge Graph has over 500 million people, places and things and those things have at least 3.5 billion attributes.That’s a lot of things. According to Google, search users will see these new knowledge graph results at least as often as they see Google Maps in results. In fact, this update will have a greater initial impact than the updates that brought Google Images, videos, news and books, combined. It’s big and it’s probably going to be everywhere.Summaries of Good StuffIn addition to the window which will help users find the right “thing,” Google will also surface summaries for things, which, again, will try to be somewhat comprehensive by tapping into the various databases of knowledge. A search for Frank Lloyd Wright, for instance, will return a brief summary, photos of Wright, images of his famous projects and perhaps, most interestingly, related “things.” People who search for Wright are also looking for other notable architects. It’s a feature that may remind users of Amazon’s penchant for delivering “people who liked this book also bought or searched for this one” results.Gomes said that the search results are tailored to deliver information that best relates to the initial search result. So the details delivered about a female astronaut will likely outline her space travel record, because that’s what people who search for her are, according to Google, most interested in.How the Knowledge Graph Works. Click to see full graph exampleSince this is a knowledge graph (“Web” might be a better word), the results are designed to help you dig more deeply into related topics. Google showed us how someone might start by searching for a local amusement park, find an interesting rollercoaster as one of the “things” that relates to the park and end up digging in on details about that coaster and other similar rides. It’s a “skeleton of knowledge that allows you to explore information on the web,” said Gomes.There is the potential, Gomes added, of serendipitous discovery. The more you dig into things, the more things you learn about.Of course, not every “thing” is the right thing. Wikipedia is, for example, a community-sourced encyclopedia that is known for both its breadth and depth of information and the occasional whoppers of misinformation it stores. Google’s Knowledge Graph includes an error reporting system. When users find misinformation, Google will share it with the source and the knowledge graph will get just a little bit smarterFor now, though, the Knowledge Graph is not getting any smarter about you. If you search for an ambiguous topic and then guide Google Search to the more defined set of results, the same query later will not go directly to that filtered information — at least not yet. “We don’t have anything to announce for personalization,” said Gomes. The CompetitionGoogle’s chief search competitor, Microsoft Bing, also has millions of entities, but it’s not aiming for the purely semantic model of search results. Instead, Bing execs told Mashable that it’s focusing, in part, on much smaller set of segments that its users typically search on (i.e.: restaurants, hotels, movies) and trying to surface relevant information regarding those segments. A search result for hotels, for example, might include reservation tools. And while Google search now blends in Google+ results, Bing’s latest instantiation has moved social information to the right side of its search results pageIt’s unclear for now how the Google Knowledge Graph, which pushes aside keyword results in favor of relationships and artificial intelligence, impacts all the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) many web sites have done to push their search rank ever higher. Also unknown is how, if at all, Google’s sea change will impact Google+. Gomes revealed that some Google+ changes were coming “independent of this” update and that Google will be talking about them separately.Eventually, Google’s search will get smarter and will stop asking for your help to understand your query and start answering complex questions like “What is the coldest lake in the world in July?” It doesn’t matter why you want to know that, just that, someday, the right answer will be a click away on Google Search.Google’s Knowledge Graph will roll out across the U.S. (and on all Google platforms: desktop, mobile, tablet) in the coming days. Eventually, it will go global. Give it a try and let us know what you think of the brand new Google Search in the comments.
  • View As One Page »The Google Search of the future is here. Now. Today. The long-talked-about semantic web — Google prefers “Knowledge Graph” — is rolling out across all Google Search tools, and our most fundamental online task may never be the same again.Starting today, a vast portion of Google Search results will work with you to intuit what you really meant by that search entry. Type in an ambiguous query like “Kings” (which could mean royalty, a sports team or a now-cancelled TV show), and a new window will appear on the right side of your result literally asking you which entity you meant. Click on one of those options and your results will be filtered for that search entity.To understand the gravity of this change, you need to know about the fundamental changes going on behind the scenes at Google Search. As we outlined in our report earlier this year, Google is switching from simple keyword recognition to the identification of entities, nodes and relationships. In this world, “New York” is not simply the combination of two keywords that can be recognized. It’s understood by Google as a state in the U.S. surrounded by other states, the Atlantic Ocean and with a whole bunch of other, relevant attributes. As Ben Gomes, Google Fellow, put it, Google is essentially switching “from strings to things.”To build this world of things, Google is tapping a variety of knowledge databases, including Freebase, which it bought in 2010, Wikipedia, Google Local, Google Maps and Google Shopping. Currently, Google’s Knowledge Graph has over 500 million people, places and things and those things have at least 3.5 billion attributes.That’s a lot of things. According to Google, search users will see these new knowledge graph results at least as often as they see Google Maps in results. In fact, this update will have a greater initial impact than the updates that brought Google Images, videos, news and books, combined. It’s big and it’s probably going to be everywhere.Summaries of Good StuffIn addition to the window which will help users find the right “thing,” Google will also surface summaries for things, which, again, will try to be somewhat comprehensive by tapping into the various databases of knowledge. A search for Frank Lloyd Wright, for instance, will return a brief summary, photos of Wright, images of his famous projects and perhaps, most interestingly, related “things.” People who search for Wright are also looking for other notable architects. It’s a feature that may remind users of Amazon’s penchant for delivering “people who liked this book also bought or searched for this one” results.Gomes said that the search results are tailored to deliver information that best relates to the initial search result. So the details delivered about a female astronaut will likely outline her space travel record, because that’s what people who search for her are, according to Google, most interested in.How the Knowledge Graph Works. Click to see full graph exampleSince this is a knowledge graph (“Web” might be a better word), the results are designed to help you dig more deeply into related topics. Google showed us how someone might start by searching for a local amusement park, find an interesting rollercoaster as one of the “things” that relates to the park and end up digging in on details about that coaster and other similar rides. It’s a “skeleton of knowledge that allows you to explore information on the web,” said Gomes.There is the potential, Gomes added, of serendipitous discovery. The more you dig into things, the more things you learn about.Of course, not every “thing” is the right thing. Wikipedia is, for example, a community-sourced encyclopedia that is known for both its breadth and depth of information and the occasional whoppers of misinformation it stores. Google’s Knowledge Graph includes an error reporting system. When users find misinformation, Google will share it with the source and the knowledge graph will get just a little bit smarterFor now, though, the Knowledge Graph is not getting any smarter about you. If you search for an ambiguous topic and then guide Google Search to the more defined set of results, the same query later will not go directly to that filtered information — at least not yet. “We don’t have anything to announce for personalization,” said Gomes. The CompetitionGoogle’s chief search competitor, Microsoft Bing, also has millions of entities, but it’s not aiming for the purely semantic model of search results. Instead, Bing execs told Mashable that it’s focusing, in part, on much smaller set of segments that its users typically search on (i.e.: restaurants, hotels, movies) and trying to surface relevant information regarding those segments. A search result for hotels, for example, might include reservation tools. And while Google search now blends in Google+ results, Bing’s latest instantiation has moved social information to the right side of its search results pageIt’s unclear for now how the Google Knowledge Graph, which pushes aside keyword results in favor of relationships and artificial intelligence, impacts all the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) many web sites have done to push their search rank ever higher. Also unknown is how, if at all, Google’s sea change will impact Google+. Gomes revealed that some Google+ changes were coming “independent of this” update and that Google will be talking about them separately.Eventually, Google’s search will get smarter and will stop asking for your help to understand your query and start answering complex questions like “What is the coldest lake in the world in July?” It doesn’t matter why you want to know that, just that, someday, the right answer will be a click away on Google Search.Google’s Knowledge Graph will roll out across the U.S. (and on all Google platforms: desktop, mobile, tablet) in the coming days. Eventually, it will go global. Give it a try and let us know what you think of the brand new Google Search in the comments.
  • http://www.jeffbullas.com/2012/05/23/35-mind-numbing-youtube-facts-figures-and-statistics-infographic/35 Mind Numbing YouTube Facts, Figures and Statistics – InfographicWritten byJeff Bullas - 19 CommentsCategories: Facts and Figures, Social Media, Statistics, Video, YouTubeIt is not until you leap into a plane and fly half way around the world to distant places that you start to realize the size and scope of the planet we inhabit.Recently the earth’s population passed the 7 billion mark and over 2 billion of those are connected to the internet and more than 5 billion have a mobile phone.When you start connecting that many people with global social networks such as Facebook (with over  900 million users), then opportunities and access to markets that were local become  global.Markets for business that were measured in thousands and millions suddenly scale to billions.It is not only the size that expands but the velocity of the market accelerates as information is transferred and shared at light speed on optic fibre and wireless networks.Social Media is Unlocking OpportunitiesI recently finished reading an insightful book by Susan Cain. The book titled “QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking“, highlighted for me the power of the social web to provide everyone with a voice.The connected and global knowledge economy is providing the quiet introvert with media platforms that provide a soapbox to shout at the world.The creative spirits that were locked in urban and rural islands are now free to be heard, read and viewed in milliseconds on fixed and mobile devices.YouTube since its  inception in 2005 is one of many social media channels that allow anyone with passion and purpose to display and spread their ideas and express themselves.There are hundreds of YouTube partners earning 6 figure incomes from their presence on a free video channel.To provide some perspective on what the social and multimedia web has unleashed here are the latest YouTube facts, figures and statistics.YouTube Traffic60 hours of video are uploaded every minute, or one hour of video is uploaded to YouTube every second.Over 4 billion videos are viewed a dayOver 800 million unique users visit YouTube each monthOver 3 billion hours of video are watched each month on YouTubeMore video is uploaded to YouTube in one month than the 3 major US networks created in 60 years70% of YouTube traffic comes from outside the USYouTube is localized in 39 countries and across 54 languagesIn 2011, YouTube had more than 1 trillion viewsIn 2011 there were almost 140 views for every person on EarthYouTube Partner ProgramCreated in 2007, the YouTube partner program now has 30,000+ partners from 27 countries around the worldYouTube pays out millions of dollars a year to partnersHundreds of partners are making six figures a yearPartner revenue has more than doubled for four years in a rowMaking Money from YouTubeYouTube is monetizing over 3 billion video views per week globally98 of AdAge’s Top 100 advertisers have run campaigns on YouTube and the Google Display NetworkHundreds of advertisers are using TrueView in-stream and 60% of our in-stream ads are now skippableYouTube Product MetricsYouTube has more HD content than any other online video siteThere are thousands of full-length movies on YouTube10% of YouTube’s videos are available in HDYouTube mobile gets over 600 million views a dayTraffic from mobile devices tripled in 2011The YouTube player is embedded across tens of millions of websitesContent IDYouTube created the technology to detect uploaded videos that infringe copyright in 2007. Content ID technology creates a ID File for copyrighted audio and video material, and stores it in a database. When a video is uploaded, it is checked against the database, and flags the video as a copyright violation if a match is found. When this occurs, the content owner has the choice of blocking the video to make it unviewable, tracking the viewing statistics of the video, or adding advertisements to the videoContent ID scans over 100 years of video every dayMore than 3,000 partners use Content ID, including every major US network broadcaster, movie studio and record labelThere are more than eight million reference files (over 500,000 hours of material) in YouTube’s Content ID database. That number has doubled in the last yearOver a third of YouTube’s total monetized views come from Content IDMore than 120 million videos have been claimed by Content IDSocialThe rise of Facebook, Twitter and other social networks has accelerated the growth of YouTube as it enables discovery and sharing of online video.500 years of YouTube video are watched every day on FacebookOver 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter each minute100 million people take a social action on YouTube (likes, shares, comments, etc) every weekAn auto-shared tweet results in 6 new youtube.com sessions on averageThere are 500 tweets per minute containing a YouTube linkMillions of subscriptions to YouTube happen each day. (Subscriptions allow you to connect with someone you’re interested in — whether it’s a friend, or the NBA — and keep up on their activity on the site)More than 50% of videos on YouTube have been rated or include comments from the communityMillions of videos are favorited every dayRead more at http://www.jeffbullas.com/2012/05/23/35-mind-numbing-youtube-facts-figures-and-statistics-infographic/#GLVB72YoCq8K5MbI.99

Understanding Online Sharing 2012 Understanding Online Sharing 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • UNDERSTANDINGSHARING
  • Toni Richard Crisollitoni.crisolli@gmail.com, @fnst.orgtwitter.com/@tonicrisolliFacebook.com/toni.crisolliVimeo.com/tonicrisolli
  • Sharing is nothing new … But in the information age … We share From With More More more more more often quickly content sources people
  • Picture credit:NYTimes
  • Everybody faces obstacles (e.g.insufficient traffic andconversion) … What are your biggest challenges?
  • MotivationsBring valuable and entertaining content to othersWe define ourselves to others, and to receivesocial validationWe strengthen and nourish our connectionsSelf-fulfillment (enjoy getting credit)Advocate for causes we believe in
  • PersonasAltruists They share content to be Boomerangs Thrilled by the reaction ofhelpful to others, and aspire to be others to the content they share,reliable sources of information. They Boomerangs are even happy withprefer sharing by email and Facebook. negative responses. They’re after validation, of any sort.Careerists These well-educated Connectors This persona sees contentsharers want to earn a reputation for sharing as a way to stay connected withbringing value to their networks, others and make plans. Their sharingpreferring content that is more serious behavior is more relaxed, and theyand professional in tone. typically use email and Facebook.Hipsters These younger sharers “haveonly known life in the information age.” Selectives They put more thought intoThey use Twitter and Facebook to share what they share and with whom theycutting-edge and creative content, and share it. Because their sharing is morethey focus on identity-building. personalized, they expect people to respond to and act on their content.
  • Value of Content Practically useful Emotional content ContentContent shared to inform Content shared to entertain others or connect with other Motives Valence Presentation Altruistic Self - Positive Negativehelps others presentation
  • Top Sharable Types of ContentReviewsMega ListsHow To’s / TutorialsExperts and Thought Leader InterviewsNegative or Contrarian StoriesFacts, Figures and StatisticsNews StoriesResearch / Case StudiesInfographics
  • Influencing sharing behaviorAppeal to a peoples` motivation to connect witheach other —not just with your cause/brandMake it an integral easy part of the experienceKeep it simple... and it wont get muddledAppeal to their sense of humorEmbrace a sense of urgency
  • Optimizing content for visibility and sharing
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO)It is a general term used to describe methods and strategiesthat will help your site rank better in the search enginelistings. On page SEOThese are methods and strategies a site owner usesinternally on their own site to help their site rank better.
  • Off page SEOThis covers methods and strategies a site owner usesexternally on other peoples websites and blogs to help hiswebsite rank better. BacklinkingThis off page SEO method involves creating links on otherwebsites that point to your website. These links are calledback links.
  • Knowledge Graph
  • Knowledge Graph
  • Knowledge Graph
  • Knowledge Graph
  • Knowledge Graph
  • by GoogleYouTube since its inception in 2005 is one of many socialmedia channels that allow anyone with passion andpurpose, even the introvert of us, to display and spreadtheir ideas and express themselves.
  • Social symbiosis• 500 yrs. of YouTube video watched every day on FB• 700+ YouTube videos shared on Twitter each minute• 100 million social actions on YouTube every week• An auto-shared tweet results in 6 new youtube.com sessions on average• There are 500 tweets per minute containing a YouTube link
  • How to stand outfrom this mess?
  • “The most important part of what you do on YouTube – the greatest optimization –is to make something great, and to love what you’re making.”
  • The Creator Playbook February 2012
  • The First 15 Seconds
  • The First 15 SecondsStrategy:Make the beginning of your videos compelling to your viewer.Why It Works:Attentions spans are short. Hook viewers right from the start andincrease engagement for the entire length of the video.How To Do It:Accomplished through production and video structure.
  • The First 15 Seconds • Many viewers decide whether they are going to keep watching your video within the first 10-15 seconds. • Attention spans can be short and they are just one click away from abandoning your video. • The video’s content - “What am I Watching?” - should also come across in the first few moments and hook them early to give them a reason to stick around.
  • The First 15 Seconds Tips: 1. Understand the engagement & viewing trends of your content 2. Determine the right ‘hook’ or opening for your content and audience 3. Experiment with variations 4. Place compelling content first 5. Use ‘Audience Retention’ graphs available in YouTube Analytics to track changes in how your audience is viewing your content.
  • Meta Data
  • Meta DataMeta Data are:1. Title2. Tags3. Description4. ThumbnailThis set of data informs theYouTube algorithm of a video’scontent, indexing it for search,features, related videos, andad-serving.
  • Meta DataStrategy:Write optimized titles, tags, and descriptions for your content.Why It Works:Metadata helps YouTube index your content and is critical tobuilding views from search and suggested videos.How To Do It:Use optimized keywords and formatting when writing metadatafor your videos.
  • Meta Data Title Tags • Compelling • Mix of common & specific • Keywords first keywords • Branding at end • Variations and plentiful • Accurately represents content • Use quotes for keyword phrases: “short film” Description • Optimize the first 1-2 sentences • Most compelling info first • Include keywords, links • Channel description, helpful information
  • YouTube Analytics Tool
  • • YouTube Analytics is a powerful tool and valuable resource for all content creators.• The tool provides deep insights about your channel, videos, and audience.
  • Strategy:Use YouTube Analytics regularly to assess your channel’sperformance, and investigate changes or trends across differentmetrics.Why It Works:Analytics provides actionable intelligence for creators to makebetter videos and implement or measure optimizations, anddevelop strategic programming.How To Do It:Routinely assess channel’s performance and make changes tocontent or strategies based on findings.
  • Tips:• Don’t just analyze your newest videos, use Analytics to learn about what videos from your archive continue to perform well.• Prioritize your efforts by starting optimizations on your top performing videos and work backward.• Identify and analyze your most viewed days, weeks, and individual videos to understand why they were so successful.• Track results of implemented changes.• Use the trends that are happening on your content to set a release schedule
  • Tips:• Measure the impact of including calls to action and annotations for comments, likes, or favorites in your videos.• Understand how viewers discover your content.• Assess the impact from a new metadata strategy, thumbnail optimization, or blog outreach initiative.• Improve the format or pacing of your videos and find optimal video length.• Learn more about your audience and what particular videos or content resonates with them by analyzing your audience location, gender, and age.
  • Annotations
  • Annotations
  • AnnotationsStrategy:Use annotations on your videos to increase viewership,engagement, and subscribers.Why It Works:Annotations are a unique feature to YouTube and can help youkeep viewers watching more content, increase community actionson your videos, and acquire new subscribers.How To Do It:Add relevant and helpful annotations to all your videos afterupload. Use annotations on archive videos to direct traffic to newinitiatives or content.
  • Annotations What can we do with annotations?
  • Call-to-Action (CTO)
  • Call to Action - CTOStrategy:Direct viewers during the video to take actions that can help buildaudience.Why It Works:Online video is an interactive experience. Prompting your viewersto take action will lead to more activity and help you buildengagement and audience.How To Do It:Accomplished through production and/or annotations.
  • Call to Action - CTO
  • Call-to-Action - CTO Tips: 1. Determine desired actions 2. Choose the right method and placement 3. Include / add call-to-actions to the video 4. Use the Subscription graph and Community Engagement graphs in Analytics to track changes in viewer actions in response to your CTAs.
  • Thumbnail Optimization
  • ThumbnailsStrategy:Create great, high-quality custom thumbnails for your videos thataccurately represent the content.Why It Works:Thumbnails act as mini-marketing posters for your content and areimportant to attracting clicks on your videos.How To Do It:Design and upload custom thumbnails for new videos. Updatearchive video thumbnails.
  • Involve your audience
  • Involve your audienceStrategy:Interact with your audience and involve them in your videos orchannel.Why It Works:Viewer interaction builds loyalty to your content and increasesviewer engagement. The channel’s involvement can guideconversation in comments and user actions.How To Do It:Create viewer-centric content, and engage with the audiencethrough social features on the platform.
  • The 11 best Tips
  • The 11 best tips#1) Likes and favorites increase your videos rankings in YouTubesearch.#2) Publishing videos regularly to YouTube will improve yourrankings#3) More content will lead to more viewership and more rankings#4) Write good titles. Put keywords first and branding at the end.#5) Include keywords in your tags and place those most importantkeywords and keyword phrases -at the start of your tags fields. Usemore than 12 tags.
  • The 11 best tips#6) Put your most compelling information first in your videosdescription. Add relevant links (channel, subscription, SM,content)! Also include a recurring keyword tagline.#7) YouTubes search algorithm favors videos that link to and drivetraffic to other YouTube assets via linked annotations.#8) Having your videos listed in playlists improves your contentsrankings in YouTube.Tip #9) Having a lot of video responses will also help indicate toYouTube that your video is popular and relevant and will help withSEO for YouTube.#10) Respond to comments early (24h) on after publishing a video.
  • The 11 best tipsYoutube.com/tonicrisolliinstead always useYoutube.com/user/tonicrisolli
  • Conclusion• Know your audience• Offer relevant content• Prepare professionally• Plan ahead and schedule (episodes)• Commit to highest quality possible• Take your time for optimization• Use annotations to influence experience and action• Use Analytics to optimize Meta data sets and timing• Involve your audience• Asking for help does not hurt• Partner up
  • Questions?