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  • The Birth of Modern PRBy 1915, Lee had already established quite a reputation for himself. Growing up in Georgia as the son of a Methodist minister, Lee started his career as a journalist for the New York Times. Realizing his passion lay elsewhere, in 1905 he founded one of the nation’s first public relations firms, Parker and Lee, which used the tagline “Accuracy, Authenticity, and Interest” as their motto. In 1906, when there was a train accident in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Lee was the one who advised his client, Pennsylvania Railroad,* to issue what is today considered the first press release ever. It shared a public response and disclosed details about the tragedy from the company’s point of view. The move was widely seen as a stroke of genius, and even more widely copied. Writing a press release gave Lee and his client the ability to influence the media before journalists were able to gather facts from elsewhere. Without the Internet or Twitter, this effectively allowed them to control the story. Soon after, Lee was hired full time by Pennsylvania Railroad, making him what his personal archives described as “the first VP-level corporate public relations person.” On the heels of the Ludlow Massacre, Lee was brought in by the Rockefellers to help “manage” the public fury. His first act was to travel to Colorado and speak directly to the people there to understand the situation. Having done that, Lee reported to Rockefeller, “The people of this state have been led to believe by the hostile press that you and your friends are exploiting the state. From friendly sources, I gather this opinion is still widely held.” 2 The fight to restore the Rockefeller reputation, however, did not start well for Lee. In late 1915, he decided to publish some pamphlets, which he titled “Facts Concerning the Struggle in Colorado for Industrial Freedom.” They contained many factual “errors” and were widely seen as propaganda. They directly led muckraking journalist Upton Sinclair (who achieved fame for his 1906 exposé of the meat-packing industry, called The Jungle) to brand Lee with the nickname “Poison Ivy.” Still, Lee had a gift for the art of influence. Despite his missteps, what he did next was a PR master stroke that is still remembered nearly 100 years later. He advised Rockefeller to carry around dimes in his pocket and hand them out freely to people on the street. A dime (10 U.S. cents) adjusted for inflation was worth approximately 2 dollars by today’s standards. For Rockefeller, though, the amount of the money was unimportant. The simple act of personal charity changed how people saw him, and how history remembered him. He transformed his legacy from a detached billionaire to an engaged, kind, and grandfatherly benefactor of society. In 2007, PBS aired The Rockefellers, a documentary film about the life and times of the Rockefeller family. Despite the fact that the Rockefeller name was despised for many years, the film description noted, “Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior [Rockefeller’s son] left his six children and 22 grandchildren aninvaluable inheritance: a name which stood not for corporate greed, but for the well-being of mankind.” Thanks to a combination of smart PR and a later dedication from the family to making charitable donations, the Rockefeller family name eventually was no longer a symbol of greed, but rather a leading family in contributing actively to society.Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action (p. 6). John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.
  • The Birth of Modern PRBy 1915, Lee had already established quite a reputation for himself. Growing up in Georgia as the son of a Methodist minister, Lee started his career as a journalist for the New York Times. Realizing his passion lay elsewhere, in 1905 he founded one of the nation’s first public relations firms, Parker and Lee, which used the tagline “Accuracy, Authenticity, and Interest” as their motto. In 1906, when there was a train accident in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Lee was the one who advised his client, Pennsylvania Railroad,* to issue what is today considered the first press release ever. It shared a public response and disclosed details about the tragedy from the company’s point of view. The move was widely seen as a stroke of genius, and even more widely copied. Writing a press release gave Lee and his client the ability to influence the media before journalists were able to gather facts from elsewhere. Without the Internet or Twitter, this effectively allowed them to control the story. Soon after, Lee was hired full time by Pennsylvania Railroad, making him what his personal archives described as “the first VP-level corporate public relations person.” On the heels of the Ludlow Massacre, Lee was brought in by the Rockefellers to help “manage” the public fury. His first act was to travel to Colorado and speak directly to the people there to understand the situation. Having done that, Lee reported to Rockefeller, “The people of this state have been led to believe by the hostile press that you and your friends are exploiting the state. From friendly sources, I gather this opinion is still widely held.” 2 The fight to restore the Rockefeller reputation, however, did not start well for Lee. In late 1915, he decided to publish some pamphlets, which he titled “Facts Concerning the Struggle in Colorado for Industrial Freedom.” They contained many factual “errors” and were widely seen as propaganda. They directly led muckraking journalist Upton Sinclair (who achieved fame for his 1906 exposé of the meat-packing industry, called The Jungle) to brand Lee with the nickname “Poison Ivy.” Still, Lee had a gift for the art of influence. Despite his missteps, what he did next was a PR master stroke that is still remembered nearly 100 years later. He advised Rockefeller to carry around dimes in his pocket and hand them out freely to people on the street. A dime (10 U.S. cents) adjusted for inflation was worth approximately 2 dollars by today’s standards. For Rockefeller, though, the amount of the money was unimportant. The simple act of personal charity changed how people saw him, and how history remembered him. He transformed his legacy from a detached billionaire to an engaged, kind, and grandfatherly benefactor of society. In 2007, PBS aired The Rockefellers, a documentary film about the life and times of the Rockefeller family. Despite the fact that the Rockefeller name was despised for many years, the film description noted, “Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior [Rockefeller’s son] left his six children and 22 grandchildren aninvaluable inheritance: a name which stood not for corporate greed, but for the well-being of mankind.” Thanks to a combination of smart PR and a later dedication from the family to making charitable donations, the Rockefeller family name eventually was no longer a symbol of greed, but rather a leading family in contributing actively to society.Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action (p. 6). John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.
  • ILikeonomics is based on the simple idea that, “People buy from people they like”. I wasn’t kidding when I said it was a simple idea.In the book, Rohit breaks down what goes into being likable – truth, relevance, unselfishness, simplicity and timing. The idea being that if you can understand what makes a company more likable than others, you can try to apply to your situation.Along with the framework, there a lot of great Likeonomics stories so you can see the concept in action. This makes for a fast, fun, and informative read that will leave you with plenty to think about when it comes to addressing the “Likability-Gap” with your product and company.To give you an idea of what Likeonomics is all about, here are my favorite 8 quotes from the book:Marketing has played a central role in creating a culture where people are afraid to trust the media around them.The American poet and activist AudreLorde is credited with the famous saying: “There are no new ideas. There are only new ways of making them felt.”In the long term, the only thing that can help the most successful organizations and people differentiate is based on their human elements, as well as what they sell or what they say.The Likeability Gap describes the difference between what people do because they have to, and what they do because they want to. In a world where just having a good product or service isn’t enough, the likeability gap explains success and failure.In order to be believable, the most successful people and organizations always find a way to share their truth, and then build on it.…finding the right truth is hard. The truth can be buried. It can feel wrong to share.It is impossible to care about everything. Things like irrelevant products and over-the-top sales people are easy to tune out. That is a choice many of us make on an hourly basis without thought.The important thing to remember is just because a topic is relevant for someone doesn’t mean that you automatically have relevance to that topic.
  • ILikeonomics is based on the simple idea that, “People buy from people they like”. I wasn’t kidding when I said it was a simple idea.In the book, Rohit breaks down what goes into being likable – truth, relevance, unselfishness, simplicity and timing. The idea being that if you can understand what makes a company more likable than others, you can try to apply to your situation.Along with the framework, there a lot of great Likeonomics stories so you can see the concept in action. This makes for a fast, fun, and informative read that will leave you with plenty to think about when it comes to addressing the “Likability-Gap” with your product and company.To give you an idea of what Likeonomics is all about, here are my favorite 8 quotes from the book:Marketing has played a central role in creating a culture where people are afraid to trust the media around them.The American poet and activist AudreLorde is credited with the famous saying: “There are no new ideas. There are only new ways of making them felt.”In the long term, the only thing that can help the most successful organizations and people differentiate is based on their human elements, as well as what they sell or what they say.The Likeability Gap describes the difference between what people do because they have to, and what they do because they want to. In a world where just having a good product or service isn’t enough, the likeability gap explains success and failure.In order to be believable, the most successful people and organizations always find a way to share their truth, and then build on it.…finding the right truth is hard. The truth can be buried. It can feel wrong to share.It is impossible to care about everything. Things like irrelevant products and over-the-top sales people are easy to tune out. That is a choice many of us make on an hourly basis without thought.The important thing to remember is just because a topic is relevant for someone doesn’t mean that you automatically have relevance to that topic.
  • ILikeonomics is based on the simple idea that, “People buy from people they like”. I wasn’t kidding when I said it was a simple idea.In the book, Rohit breaks down what goes into being likable – truth, relevance, unselfishness, simplicity and timing. The idea being that if you can understand what makes a company more likable than others, you can try to apply to your situation.Along with the framework, there a lot of great Likeonomics stories so you can see the concept in action. This makes for a fast, fun, and informative read that will leave you with plenty to think about when it comes to addressing the “Likability-Gap” with your product and company.To give you an idea of what Likeonomics is all about, here are my favorite 8 quotes from the book:Marketing has played a central role in creating a culture where people are afraid to trust the media around them.The American poet and activist AudreLorde is credited with the famous saying: “There are no new ideas. There are only new ways of making them felt.”In the long term, the only thing that can help the most successful organizations and people differentiate is based on their human elements, as well as what they sell or what they say.The Likeability Gap describes the difference between what people do because they have to, and what they do because they want to. In a world where just having a good product or service isn’t enough, the likeability gap explains success and failure.In order to be believable, the most successful people and organizations always find a way to share their truth, and then build on it.…finding the right truth is hard. The truth can be buried. It can feel wrong to share.It is impossible to care about everything. Things like irrelevant products and over-the-top sales people are easy to tune out. That is a choice many of us make on an hourly basis without thought.The important thing to remember is just because a topic is relevant for someone doesn’t mean that you automatically have relevance to that topic.
  • Everyone wanted to work with the highly likeable and highly competent individuals (who the study dubbed the “Lovable Star”), and no one wanted to work with the low competence and low likeability individuals (the “Incompetent Jerk”). The unexpected results came when looking at the other two categories. The study demonstrated that when faced with a choice between a more likeable person who workers had a stronger personal relationship with, or someone who had better job performance, but was less likeable— most people chose to work with the “Lovable Fool” (low competence, high likeability) rather than the “Competent Jerk” (high competence, low likeability).Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action . John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.
  • Everyone wanted to work with the highly likeable and highly competent individuals (who the study dubbed the “Lovable Star”), and no one wanted to work with the low competence and low likeability individuals (the “Incompetent Jerk”). The unexpected results came when looking at the other two categories. The study demonstrated that when faced with a choice between a more likeable person who workers had a stronger personal relationship with, or someone who had better job performance, but was less likeable— most people chose to work with the “Lovable Fool” (low competence, high likeability) rather than the “Competent Jerk” (high competence, low likeability).Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action . John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.
  • Everyone wanted to work with the highly likeable and highly competent individuals (who the study dubbed the “Lovable Star”), and no one wanted to work with the low competence and low likeability individuals (the “Incompetent Jerk”). The unexpected results came when looking at the other two categories. The study demonstrated that when faced with a choice between a more likeable person who workers had a stronger personal relationship with, or someone who had better job performance, but was less likeable— most people chose to work with the “Lovable Fool” (low competence, high likeability) rather than the “Competent Jerk” (high competence, low likeability).Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action . John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.
  • The authors of Freakonomics like to use the description “rogue economist” to describe their take on the world. Part economics and part social psychology, they merged these worlds together successfully in a groundbreaking book that explains why we behave the way we do, why seemingly unrelated phenomena from across the world may be linked, and how our understanding of what motivates our behaviors may not be as simple and rational as we like to think. Since Freakonomics, this theme of the irrationality of behavior is one that has become extremely popular in multiple best-selling books.“Morality, it could be argued, represents the way that people would like the world to work, wheareas economics represents how it actually does work.” 
  • The Birth of Modern PRBy 1915, Lee had already established quite a reputation for himself. Growing up in Georgia as the son of a Methodist minister, Lee started his career as a journalist for the New York Times. Realizing his passion lay elsewhere, in 1905 he founded one of the nation’s first public relations firms, Parker and Lee, which used the tagline “Accuracy, Authenticity, and Interest” as their motto. In 1906, when there was a train accident in Atlantic City, New Jersey, Lee was the one who advised his client, Pennsylvania Railroad,* to issue what is today considered the first press release ever. It shared a public response and disclosed details about the tragedy from the company’s point of view. The move was widely seen as a stroke of genius, and even more widely copied. Writing a press release gave Lee and his client the ability to influence the media before journalists were able to gather facts from elsewhere. Without the Internet or Twitter, this effectively allowed them to control the story. Soon after, Lee was hired full time by Pennsylvania Railroad, making him what his personal archives described as “the first VP-level corporate public relations person.” On the heels of the Ludlow Massacre, Lee was brought in by the Rockefellers to help “manage” the public fury. His first act was to travel to Colorado and speak directly to the people there to understand the situation. Having done that, Lee reported to Rockefeller, “The people of this state have been led to believe by the hostile press that you and your friends are exploiting the state. From friendly sources, I gather this opinion is still widely held.” 2 The fight to restore the Rockefeller reputation, however, did not start well for Lee. In late 1915, he decided to publish some pamphlets, which he titled “Facts Concerning the Struggle in Colorado for Industrial Freedom.” They contained many factual “errors” and were widely seen as propaganda. They directly led muckraking journalist Upton Sinclair (who achieved fame for his 1906 exposé of the meat-packing industry, called The Jungle) to brand Lee with the nickname “Poison Ivy.” Still, Lee had a gift for the art of influence. Despite his missteps, what he did next was a PR master stroke that is still remembered nearly 100 years later. He advised Rockefeller to carry around dimes in his pocket and hand them out freely to people on the street. A dime (10 U.S. cents) adjusted for inflation was worth approximately 2 dollars by today’s standards. For Rockefeller, though, the amount of the money was unimportant. The simple act of personal charity changed how people saw him, and how history remembered him. He transformed his legacy from a detached billionaire to an engaged, kind, and grandfatherly benefactor of society. In 2007, PBS aired The Rockefellers, a documentary film about the life and times of the Rockefeller family. Despite the fact that the Rockefeller name was despised for many years, the film description noted, “Their contributions transformed America. When he died at age 86, Junior [Rockefeller’s son] left his six children and 22 grandchildren aninvaluable inheritance: a name which stood not for corporate greed, but for the well-being of mankind.” Thanks to a combination of smart PR and a later dedication from the family to making charitable donations, the Rockefeller family name eventually was no longer a symbol of greed, but rather a leading family in contributing actively to society.Bhargava, Rohit (2012-04-27). Likeonomics: The Unexpected Truth Behind Earning Trust, Influencing Behavior, and Inspiring Action (p. 6). John Wiley and Sons. Kindle Edition.

Digitalna Politika 2.1 Document Transcript

  • 1. Digitalna politika 2.1Toni Richard Crisolli Hrvatska, Šibenik@ToniCrisolli 02.02.2013.
  • 2. Toni Richard Crisolli @tonicrisolli
  • 3. Toni Richard Crisollitoni.crisolli@fnst.orgtoni.crisolli@gmail.comTwitter.com/@tonicrisolli …/@FNFWestbalkanFacebook.com/toni.crisolliYouTube.com/tonicrisolliVimeo.com/tonicrisolli
  • 4. Mediji su se promenili• Mediji su sada fragmentirani u milion različitih tržišta - “dug rep”.• Konkurencija je svuda – nema više monopola.• Istinu o bilo čemu je postalo sve teže sakriti.
  • 5. Kako bi bili uvjerljivi kako bi se isticali, najuspješniji ljudi i organizacije uvijekpronađu način kako da dele njihovi istinu, a onda dalje da grade na tome.
  • 6. Picture and text credit: Matt Morrison
  • 7. POSLEDICEOBAMINEKAMPANJE Source: Google
  • 8. Scott TalanAsistent na Američkom univerzitetu,Washington, D.C.Škola za komunikacije“Društveni mediji su kaodoručak. Želiš da ga imaš – to jestvarno važan obrok – ali nijejedini obrok.” Source: Google
  • 9. Source: telegraph.co.uk
  • 10. Brendovi nas bombardirajuporukama, jer znaju više o namanego ikada.Ljudi su postali svesni toga dasvako žwli nešto od njih.Prva reakcija je da odbijamo iizbegavamo sve kao što jemarketing ili propaganda.Ljudi ne veruju brendovima(uključujući partijama).Svet je postao ciničan.
  • 11. Istina je sledeća … mi poslujemo, gradimo veze i čak glasamo zaljude koje „volimo“ (simpatičnost).
  • 12. Ljudi deluju na emocionalni, ljudski ineočekivani način i reaguju na podsticaje. Mi nismo logički roboti.
  • 13. Ljudi su društvena bića.Mi biramo da gradimo odnosei da poslujemo sa ljudima kojepoznajemo i volimo.U svetu pretrpanommedijima, sa mnoštvomorganizacija, političara i ljudikoji se takmiče za Vašu pažnju,ključ uspeha je Vašasposobnost da zaraditepoverenje.
  • 14. Angažovanje Istinitost PoverenjeDopadljivost (Likeability)
  • 15. „Dopadljivostinspiriše lične veze,koje inspirišudelovanja. To jerazlog zašto političarii dalje ljube bebice ipojavljujuse nazborovima.“
  • 16. Ove godine su bili treći predsednički izbori zaredom gde se pokazalo da je učešće mladihglasača oko 50% (što znači da polovina maldihkoji smeju da galsaju su ustvari glasali).
  • 17. “Ispratili smo 71.7 miliona poruka vezana zaizbore koje su sastavli korisnici unutar Amerike –dovoljno da se dostigne 9.27 na Facebook TalkMeter, što je najveći rezulatat koji se bazira naAmeričkim dogadjajima koje smo izmerili u 2012.“ - Facebook blog 2012.
  • 18. “U politici kada serazum i emocijasudare, emocija uvekpobedjuje.”
  • 19. http://www.channel4.com
  • 20. iHypeHisterijaje zarazna
  • 21. iHype
  • 22. makeapowerfulpoint.com
  • 23. source: snowboarding.transworld.net