How To Prune Grapevines Part 1
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How To Prune Grapevines Part 1

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How to winter prune premium wine grapes for making quality wine

How to winter prune premium wine grapes for making quality wine

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How To Prune Grapevines Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. How to Prune Grapevines Part One
  • 2. Introduction
    • Pruning is one of the most important operations carried out in the vineyard and is one of the most expensive and time consuming
  • 3. Introduction
    • Pruning time gives the opportunity to:
    • Regulate the form and size of the vine
    • Regulate the vigour of the vine
    • Regulate the quantity (yield) and quality of the grapes
  • 4. It Starts in the Bud
    • The bud contains the shoot, the leaves, tendrils and flowers, ready to burst and grow in spring
    • A bud is found in the nodes of grapevine shoots
    • These buds appear single but in fact, comprise at least three 'true' buds and a lateral bud
  • 5. Bud Node
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8. Shoots
    • In spring the main bud bursts to become a shoot
    Tendril Leaf Flowers
    • The shoot will produce the flowers that become the fruit
  • 9. Shoots
    • As well as producing fruit for this season the shoot develops the buds for next seasons growth
    • Later on the shoots harden, turn brown and become canes
  • 10. The shoot………. becomes the cane
  • 11. Canes
    • A shoot becomes a cane after periderm formation
    • From these canes will come the shoots that will carry the crop for the next season
    • But canes will only produce fruit if they come from buds that have been left deliberately (if you can count them)
    • Otherwise....
  • 12. They are Watershoots
    • The difference between a watershoot and a count shoot is....
  • 13. Watershoots
    • Count shoots from count nodes
    • Watershoots from nowhere
  • 14. Therefore…
    • Pruning is a matter of leaving count nodes
    • Count nodes are the nodes that you deliberately leave at pruning
    • Count nodes are always from wood (canes) that grew in the last season
    • These canes come from count nodes from the previous season
    • They are not from watershoots
  • 15. Recap……
    • Nodes contain buds
    • The main bud bursts to become a shoot
    • The new shoot produces the flowers which become the fruit
    • At the same time the new buds are forming in the shoot
    • Shoots become canes when they turn brown
    • Only canes that come from deliberately left buds are used for pruning which are found on count nodes
  • 16. Before we move on
    • Basal bud
      • A bud at the base of a cane
      • They don’t normally burst in the same season as buds at nodes
    • These can remain dormant for many years
    • But when they do burst they produce....
    • Blind buds
      • Buds that don’t burst
  • 17. Watershoots
    • Watershoots come from buds that have been dormant
    • But during this time they lose the fruitfulness
    • And that’s why they look like they come from nowhere!
  • 18. One last thing!
    • Bud swell and bleeding
    • Bud swell is when the buds swell and become fluffy just before budburst
  • 19. Bleeding
    • When a cane, spur or cordon is cut close to bud burst time the cut 'bleeds'
    • Bleeding is due to increased sap flow within the vine, which brings carbohydrate from the roots and trunks
    • It can also bleed early on in the pruning season if it rains heavily followed by warm weather
  • 20. Next…..Cane Pruning