Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Role of Industrial Distribution In the US
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Role of Industrial Distribution In the US

1,711
views

Published on

Corporate speaking engagement in Boston, July 2006

Corporate speaking engagement in Boston, July 2006


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,711
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Role of the Industrial Distributor in the US Market Tom Clawser, Sales & Marketing Manager Brown Transmission and Bearing Company Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Lenze AG Country Managers Meeting, Boston: July 2, 2006
  • 2. Agenda Origin of the Distributor in the US The Distributor in the Supply Chain Distributor/Manufacturer Relations
  • 3. Origin of the Distributor in the US Agenda
  • 4.
    • “ Our concern is that we, as a manufacturer supplier, are not as adept at meeting local needs as our distributors. We don't have the people who would be immediately responsive. We don't have local inventories. And it's not uncommon for someone to need a product or part in hours.”
    • Bill Moore, vice president of sales development
    • and channel management SKF Service Division
    • Purchasing Magazine, November 2006
    The Gap between Manufacturer and Consumer... Origin of the Distributor in the US
  • 5. Bridging the Gap: The Evolution of the Distributor Origin of the Distributor in the US PRODUCTS FOR HOME & FARM, HARDWARE General Store c. 1800’s GENERAL LINE INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES Mill Supply c. 1890-1955 PRODUCT LINE LIMITED BY CATEGORY Specialist 1955-current
  • 6. How it began...
    • General Store concept was predominantly a retail model, for home and farm. Industrial consumers bought directly from the manufacturer.
    • Mill Supply concept grew exponentially during and immediately after World War II
    • Both models sold general line industrial supplies
    • Manufacturing boom of the 1940’s created unprecedented inventory demands, which general line distributors could not meet.
    • Hence, the birth of the specialist distributor
    Origin of the Distributor in the US
  • 7. Distribution at a Glance
    • $825 billion industry in North America
    • In the United States alone, industrial distributors:
      • Represent over 5% of total gross domestic product ($750 billion).
      • Operate more than 83,000 companies with over 113,000 branch locations.
      • Employ 1.4 million workers, nearly 1% of total employment.
    • Source: PTDA Foundation, 2006
    Origin of the Distributor in the US
  • 8. Origin of the Distributor in the US The Distributor in the Supply Chain Agenda
  • 9. The Role of the Distributor in the Supply Chain
    • Add value for manufacturer and consumer
    • Reduce cycle time from requisition to receipt
    • Manage quantity differentials between production and consumption
    • Increase available inventory
    • Improve consumer ROI on machine components and spare parts inventory
    • Provide a communication channel between manufacturer and consumer
    The Distributor in the Supply Chain
  • 10. Services and Market Strategies
    • Entry-point Services are common to nearly all distributors.
    • Value-Added Services generate measurable returns to the consumer, and add competitive advantage to the distributor
    • Premier Services are of a consulting nature, and are offered by only a small percentage of distributors.
    The Distributor in the Supply Chain
  • 11. Entry-point Services The Distributor in the Supply Chain Local Inventory Technical Support Delivery Services Product Application Line of Credit Distributor Industrial Consumer
  • 12. Value-Added Services The Distributor in the Supply Chain Sub-Assembly Kit Building VMI Installation Repairs Distributor Industrial Consumer
  • 13. Premier Services The Distributor in the Supply Chain Energy Audits Training Predictive Maintenance Storeroom Mgmt Distributor Industrial Consumer Process Improvement
  • 14. Why Consumers Buy from Distributors
    • Single source for multiple product lines
    • Local inventory
    • Technical expertise
    • Application assistance
    • Large selection of products and services to choose from
    The Distributor in the Supply Chain
  • 15. Why Manufacturers Sell Through Distributors
    • Local, personalized service for consumers
    • Extension of existing sales force
    • Complementary product lines afford greater opportunities for “systems” selling
    • Closeness to market; distributor is more sensitive to regional market trends
    • Adds depth to available inventory
    The Distributor in the Supply Chain
  • 16. Origin of the Distributor in the US The Distributor in the Supply Chain Distributor/Manufacturer Relations Agenda
  • 17. How Good Distributors Choose Good Manufacturing Partners
    • Products that meet consumer needs/desires
    • Functional stability (financial, organizational, process and personnel)
    • A well defined, well communicated marketing strategy
    • Collaborative sales planning and execution
    • Training capabilities and emphasis
    • Selective, limited distribution
    Distributor/Manufacturer Relations
  • 18. Developing a Mutually Beneficial Sales and Marketing Strategy
    • Add value for the consumer
    • Set reasonable, written expectations
    • Select accessible target customers/products
    • Evaluate quarterly and adjust as necessary
    • Know your competition well and be ready to address their strengths and weaknesses
    • Be of one voice in front of employees and prospects
    Distributor/Manufacturer Relations
  • 19. Key Performance Indicators Getting Both Sides What They Need
    • Communication : sharing ideas, successes and failures assures a healthy partnership
    • Cooperation : joint sales efforts on a regular basis indicate a willingness to work toward common goals
    • Competence of both parties to testify to each other’s capabilities before the consumer
    • Commitment : partners will only invest when they are committed, they will only succeed when they invest
    Distributor/Manufacturer Relations
  • 20. Final thoughts...
    • By working with distributors, customers and manufacturers are improving their profits and achieving competitive advantage in the marketplace.
    • Tim Underhill, Underhill & Associates
    • “ The Channel of Choice”
    • “ Don't underestimate the value of a good distributor.”
    • Bill Moore, vice president of sales development
    • and channel management SKF Service Division
    • Purchasing Magazine, November 2006
  • 21. Thank you