Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

TE Summit 25.10. 2013 Gianluca Misuraca " Results from the Mireia survey"

149

Published on

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
149
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • 1
  • EXAMPLES: POVERTY in FRANCE, ITALY, GERMANY
    At least 14% (more than 8 million people) live on less than 60% of the average income in France.
    The French poverty line is officially 964 euros for a single person per month. And this is the euro zone’s second-richest country, after Germany.
    In the euro zone’s third-largest economy, Italy, a map has been made public showing where the poor can get free meals and lodging in Rome. Its statistics agency’s latest findings show that more than 28% of Italians were already suffering close to the poverty line or below it in 2011. The average income for a person considered poor here is just over 700 euros per month.
    The climb in poverty trends is even evident also in Germany, the leading euro zone economy, which is not applying austerity policies.
    Its national statistics show that nearly 16% of Germans were living below the poverty line in 2011 – again, measured as 60% of the average wage, or 940 euros per month
  • I primi sono documenti strategici di ampio respiro.
    Per vedere meglio l’orientamento nel settore, vedremo più nel dettaglio:
    - European Innovation Partnership on Active and Heathy Ageing: l’iniziativa cardine che orienta la ricerca e il trasferimento delle soluzioni nel settore.
    L’orientamento di H2020 nel settore.
    L’EIP
    Facendo incontrare domanda e offerta, riducendo il time to market
    Ownership degli stakeholders chiave (università e centri di ricerca, autorità pubbliche, ospedali, cliniche e fornitori di assistenza, industria, ONG rappresentanti cittadini, pazienti e anziani).
    Volontà politica, autorità politiche di alto livello
    Costruendo su soluzioni e strumenti esistenti
    Dispiegamento su ampia scala (large-scale deployment)
    Condivisione di conoscenza e di best-practices – superare frammentazione
  • E.g. in providing digital literacy to excluded groups and using ICTs to support social inclusion of disadvantaged groups through acquiring new skills or for supporting them for instance in their search for employment
    there is still incomplete knowledge about who and how many these actors are, their funding sources, their role for improving socio-economic inclusion, the target groups they address, the services they provide, the social needs they fulfil, the impact of their actions from socio-economic and digital inclusion perspective, and finally their -ICT related- needs and how policy could support them
  • The social investment package gives guidance to Member States on more efficient and effective social policies in response to the significant challenges they currently face. These include high levels of financial distress, increasing poverty and social exclusion, as well as record unemployment, especially among young people. These are combined with the challenge of ageing societies and smaller working age populations, which test the sustainability and adequacy of national social systems
  • Diversity (Typology) & Dependency of the changing local context (needs of targets groups,…)
  • Strong links among eInclusion Actors & ICT & Employments related services
  • Evidence from literature shows that
    adoption of ICT increases the demand for skilled workers and reduces that for unskilled workers
    employment, wage trajectories and labour supply decisions along the life-cycle tend to be affected by the level of digital skills of individuals
    access and ability to use ICT affects employability, by shaping the decision to enter the labour market and of investing in training, and the likelihood of obtaining/maintaining a job
  • Evidence from literature shows that
    adoption of ICT increases the demand for skilled workers and reduces that for unskilled workers
    employment, wage trajectories and labour supply decisions along the life-cycle tend to be affected by the level of digital skills of individuals
    access and ability to use ICT affects employability, by shaping the decision to enter the labour market and of investing in training, and the likelihood of obtaining/maintaining a job
  • enabling empowerment mechanisms
    (e.g. in terms of improving ICT skills and acquiring other skills than ICT, such as social skills, communication skills or labour market skills through ICT, as well as self-confidence, etc. which in turn can increase social capital formation)
    enhancing outreach capabilities of individuals and groups either as part of the local community they belong too, but virtually at a global scale
    (e.g. through networking and participating in dedicated 'spaces' for socializing and community-building, thus in turn improving social capital bonding and bridging, as individuals of various backgrounds are brought together beyond one's immediate social network)
    offering new and innovative ways for economic participation in society
    (e.g. increasing the opportunities for job-related search, training and self-employment or online activities allowing to engage in social and economic interactions)
  • The social investment package gives guidance to Member States on more efficient and effective social policies in response to the significant challenges they currently face. These include high levels of financial distress, increasing poverty and social exclusion, as well as record unemployment, especially among young people. These are combined with the challenge of ageing societies and smaller working age populations, which test the sustainability and adequacy of national social systems
  • Health, Demographic Ageing a key priority under Europe 2020, European Innovation Partnership, and H2020
    Longer term R&D
    Virtual Physiological Human/Uomo fisiologico Virtuale (VPH) (in-silico medicine)
    Personalised health and well-being
    Active and assisted living (elderly and people with disabilities)
    + Int: Cooperation, roadmapping, standards
    Applied R&D/Innovation
    AAL Joint Programme (+ follow-up)
    Pre-commercial procurement
    Take-up/Deployment support
    Integrated care, Independent living, Inclusion
    Public Procurement of Innovation
  • Transcript

    • 1. 25th October 2013 Results from the MIREIA Survey: Mapping of eInclusion Actors across Europe UniteIT first annual Gianluca Misuraca Telecentre-Europe Su Tentative Agenda 20 Senior Scientist, European Commission, JRC-IPTS The views October 23, 2013 W ednesday,expressed by the authors are not necessarily those of the EC 09:00 – 17:00 UniteIT pro
    • 2. Joint Research Centre Institute for Prospective Technological Studies Serving society Stimulating Innovation Supporting legislation 2
    • 3. State of the Union…  Deepest and longest recession since the birth of the EU…  Unemployment hits record highs…  26.654 million unemployed people in EU28 (11%)  Youth unemployment in EU28: 23.4% (5.560 million people - under 25) Source: Eurostat, July 2013 3
    • 4. Poverty is rising…  In 2011, 119.6 million people (24.2% of EU27) at risk of poverty or social exclusion (AROPE)  Increased from 23.6% in only one year (2010) The AROPE indicator is defined as the share of the population in at least one of the following three conditions: 1)at risk of poverty (meaning below the poverty threshold); 2)in a situation of severe material deprivation; 3)living in a household with very low work intensity. 4
    • 5. Social exclusion A vicious cycle 5
    • 6. EU Policy context Employment & Social Investment Packages Social Investment for Growth and Cohesion - COM(2013)83 Strengthening the social dimension of EMU - COM(2013)690
    • 7. eInclusion  Objectives:  to reduce gaps in ICT usage and promote the use of ICT to overcome exclusion, improve economic performance, employment opportunities, quality of life, social participation and cohesion  Inclusive pillar of the Lisbon Strategy under the i2010 Agenda  Riga (2006) and Vienna (2008) Ministerial Declarations  Among the key targets of the Europe 2020 strategy  Increase employment from 69 to 75% of EU population  Improve educational levels (school drop-out <10%; at least 40% of 30-34 years old to complete tertiary education)  Get 20 million people out of poverty and/or social exclusion 7
    • 8. eInclusion actors: An untapped resource  Crucial role due to their multiplier/amplifier effects Public, private organisations address and which social third sector intentionally inclusion goals through ICTs or promote the use of ICTs to enhance the socio-economic inclusion of marginalized and disadvantaged groups and of people at risk of exclusion (JRC-IPTS, 2012)  High diversity in the EU  Telecentres, Cybercafés, Libraries, civic centres, educational and training institutions, NGOs, private and public organisations, etc.  Limited policy attention and important ‘knowledge gaps’ 8
    • 9. In cooperation with stakeholders, MIREIA is involving researchers and practitioners to: 1. Map eInclusion actors in Europe to better understand their characteristics and policy potential; 2. Design and 'test' a methodological framework to enhance capacity of eInclusion intermediaries and engage them to collect data and to measure their impacts http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/eInclusion/MIREIA.html 9
    • 10. Research Design WP 1 – Characterisation & Mapping of eI2 in EU  Task 2 – Locality Mapping   Task 3 – EU27 Mapping WP 2 – IAF Development & Testing Task 4 – Review of methods and indicators  Task 5 – Development of the eI2 - Impact Assessment Framework Task 6 – Test & operationalisation of the eI2 - Impact Assessment Framework 2012 2013 Way forward   Experts and Stakeholders’ Consultations Experts and Stakeholders’ Consultations Task 1 – Literature Review
    • 11. EU27 Mapping: Methodology First attempt of collection of primary data at EU27 level In collaboration with 2,752 organisations >300 Networks ≥ (70.000 members) 27 Countries 15 languages 14 country profiles 11
    • 12. Survey on eInclusion Actors in the EU27 FINAL DRAFT Authors: Gabriel Rissola, Maria Garrido Editors: Cristina Torrecillas, Clara Centeno, Gianluca Misuraca http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/eInclusion/documents/SurveyeIncActorsdraftfinalwithcovers23102013.pdf 2013 Report EUR XXXXXX EN 12
    • 13. Typology of eInclusion actors Public Sector 1.National, Regional or State Agencies 2.Municipal/City Government 3.Public Libraries 4.Government-run Telecentres 5.Formal Educational Institutions Private Sector 1.Cybercafés 2.Private Training Organizations 3.Formal Educational Institutions 4.Other 13
    • 14. Estimated 'market’ size  Public libraries, municipalities, government and NGO-run telecentres represent the bulk of eInclusion actors with variations across the EU27 Sector and Type  Low participation of private sector  >20% are networks  ≥ 60% members of networks  ≥250,000 eInclusion intermediaries in EU27  1 actor every 2,000 citizens 14
    • 15. The EU27 landscape… N=2752 15
    • 16. Organisational capacities Staff size Size (Staff & Budget) Annual Budget 16
    • 17. Targets Groups Percentage of organizations which serve that target group 17
    • 18. Services ICT enabled services Social & Economic services Percentage of organizations that provide such services 18
    • 19. Key results  Important effort of characterisation and first mapping at EU27 level   A myriad of actors playing a vital social and economic role   in spite of limited resources and organisational capacities Crucial contribution to advancing the Digital Agenda for Europe and other key social and economic policy goals of the EU   baseline for future research and a 'living directory' for policy interventions strengthening community building, digital empowerment, social inclusion, learning and employability Complementarity of social functions performed  High potential for the creation of multi-stakeholders partnerships 19
    • 20. Policy Options  Support the network effects, the innovation processes created and the services provided by this high and diverse number of organisations   Create the conditions for a larger involvement of the private sector   e.g. CSR, innovative PPP, and within the Grand Coalition for Digital Jobs Reinforce the capacities of eInclusion intermediary actors to further develop their entrepreneurial skills and ensure self-sustainability   Half of which have <10 employees and annual budgets of <100.000€ through service provision and the establishment of business models increasingly based on usage/service fees Strengthen the role these organisations can play in addressing digital exclusion, employability, and the shortage of ICT skilled workers  Link to the Social Investment Package and cohesion policy instruments 20
    • 21. MIREIA eI2-IAF Rationale  ICT-mediated interventions of eInclusion Intermediaries can have an ‘amplifying’ effect, contributing to: 21
    • 22. MIREIA Operational Framework Adequacy of funding strategy to the einclusion needs Efficiency in allocation and deployment of funding Evaluation of eInclusion Intermediaries’ actions impacts per single intermediary or groups Adequacy of R isk management approach I nput and Output of public/ private funding I mpact Measurement Tool Aggregate eInclusion measures of Intermediaries’ actions impacts per single intermediary or groups P ROCES S ES INPUT FOR eINCLUSION STRATEGY CHANGES Counterfactual I mpact Evaluation Tool GLOB AL I MP ACT: S MART & S US TS I NAB LE GR OW TH CONTRIBUTION TO BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES (Process-based) I NP UTS CONTRIBUTION TO OUTCOMES (Resources-based) OUTP UTS CONTRIBUTION TO OUTCOMES (Resources-based) Intermediaries in various organizational forms: single organization; network; value chain EUR OP EAN ADDEDD VALUE S OCI AL OUTCOMES P erformance Assessment Tool Attribution issues and/or time lag 22
    • 23. Testing MIREIA IAF on real-world 'Pilots' Counterfactual Counterfactual Impact Impact Evaluation Evaluation Tool Tool Poland Web based data gathering tools Impact Impact Measurement Measurement Tool Tool Context Analysis Context Analysis framework framework Italy Intermediary Intermediary Performance Performance Assessment Tool Assessment Tool Ireland Spain 23
    • 24. What's Next  Publication of findings of the mapping exercise at EU27 level  JRC Technical Report - Analysis of the survey of eInclusion Actors in the EU27 (including Datasets available on MIREIA webpage)  JRC-S&P Report – Characterisation & Mapping of eInclusion Actors in the EU (Coming soon – Nov. 2013)  Dissemination at policy level  EU eGov High Level Conference, Vilnius, 14-15 November 2013  JRC Official Press Release  Refinement of the MIREIA eI2- IAF  Publication of results as JRC S&P Report (Jan. 2014)  Development of an electronic toolkit and guidelines  freely available online (Jan. 2014) 24
    • 25. Way forward MIREIA is yours: Exploit it! Some ideas… Build on MIREIA to set-up a large-scale pilot across the EU  to be funded through e.g., CIP or similar programmes under H2020 Use MIREIA to evaluate (ex-ante) eInclusion actions as part of the ESF  Action 57: Prioritize digital literacy and competences for the ESF Apply the MIREIA-IAF to social policy experimentations  Formulate proposals under the new Programme for Employment & Social Innovation (EaSI) which integrates and extends the coverage of Progress, EURES and the Microfinance Facility Programme 25
    • 26. Horizon2020 Europe 2020 priorities European Research Area International cooperation Shared objectives and principles ICT − − ICT ICT − − ICT − ICT − − ICT Tackling Societal Challenges Health, demographic change and wellbeing Food security, sustainable agriculture and the bio-based economy Secure, clean and efficient energy Smart, green and integrated transport Climate action, resource efficiency and raw materials Inclusive & innovative societies Secure Societies EIT JRC Simplified access − − − − Creating Industrial Leadership and Competitive Frameworks − Leadership in enabling and industrial technologies ICT −ICT −Nanotech., Materials, Manuf. and Processing −Biotechnology −Space − Access to risk finance − Innovation in SMEs Excellence in the Science Base Frontier research (ERC) Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) ICT Skills and career development (Marie Curie) Research infrastructures ICT Common rules, toolkit of funding schemes Dissemination & knowledge tranfer
    • 27.  Societal Challenge 6 – Inclusive & Innovative Societies Selected ICT Research Challenges: Inclusive and sustainable Europe for the young generation (60M€-2014)  Stimulating the use of ICT tools and services for learning and teaching New Forms of Innovation Digital Social Platforms (10M€-2014-2015) Empowering citizens to manage and monitor their personal data (10M€-2015) Open government: eParticipation and transparency (15M€-2015) Digital empowerment of citizens Stimulating the use of ICT to facilitate the social & economic integration of excluded citizens (50M€-2015) ICT for a more creative and innovative society (20M€-2014)  research on understanding how social innovation and creativity may lead to change in existing structures, practices and policies and how they can be encouraged and scaled-up 27
    • 28. gianluca.misuraca@ec.europa.eu For further information about MIREIA: http://is.jrc.ec.europa.eu/pages/EAP/MIREIA.html

    ×