Maria Garrido: "Past and present of Telecentres - their demonstrated value"

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Telecentre-Europe Summit 2012 - Keynote Presentation of Maria Garrido: "Past and present of Telecentres - their demonstrated value"

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  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actual
  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actualConnecting impacts to work of e-Inclusion actors can be done by mapping:Institutional and service factors to different types of impactsOcurrence or not occurrence of impacts need to be contextualized
  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actual
  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actual
  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actual
  • The literature highlights more the potential than the actual
  • Citation recommendation: Sey, Araba
  • Maria Garrido: "Past and present of Telecentres - their demonstrated value"

    1. 1. Past and Present of Telecentres Their demonstrated value Telecentre-Europe Summit Warsaw, 2012 Maria Garrido and Araba Sey European Commission Joint Research Centre Institute for Prospective Technological Studies
    2. 2. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY• Build a landscape of theories that explain how, why, and under which conditions e-Inclusion actors contribute to advance social and economic goals.• Analyze the value of these theories and analytical frameworks and the evidence of impact.• Develop recommendations on the most promising theoretical pillars that could inform MIREIA project.
    3. 3. HOW WAS THE STUDY CONDUCTEDLANDSCAPE OF THE LITERATURE IN LAST 10 YEARS • English academic and grey literature sources • Over 400 articles, books, and reports reviewed • Identified the most dominant explanations and those with potential to explain how the work of e- Inclusion actors produces impact or not • 200+ sources selected for in-depth coding
    4. 4. SOME CONSIDERATIONS• Different perceptions of what constitutes impact• Difficulty in isolating the effects of ICT-related to other activities provided by intermediaries• Importance of contextual factors in explaining impact
    5. 5. DEFINING CATEGORIES OF IMPACT1. Skilling: improvement of ICT skills and capabilities, leading to better opportunities in labor market2. Empowerment: enhancement of confidence and motivation for learning and aspiration to improve3. Networking: strengthening network ties and outreach potential increasing opportunities for socio-economic participation.4. Job-placement capabilities: facilitate information access on job opportunities to actively participate in local economic development
    6. 6. SKILLING
    7. 7. EVIDENCE ON SKILLING• ICT skills training allows lower skilled workers to develop technical skills increasing competitiveness in labor market• Combined with other employment-related services (job interview skills, connection to employers, internships, etc.)• ICT skills training function as a catalyst to develop other critical skills that are highly valued in the labor market.• Basic ICT skills training often functions as a lure for participants to engage in either additional ICT skills courses or in other types of training.
    8. 8. EMPOWERMENT
    9. 9. EVIDENCE ON EMPOWERMENT• Motivation for participating in ICT skills training, participants often cite aspirations related to employment as major benefits.• Participants feel that ICT training can expand their employment horizons into areas previously considered out of reach.• Shared perception that ICT skills are very important to get better jobs, improve income, and learn more advanced technology skills or other kinds of skills.• Training provided not only builds human capital but enhances the “capacity of aspire” expanding professional horizons, self-esteem, and autonomy.
    10. 10. NETWORKING
    11. 11. EVIDENCE ON NETWORKING• E-Inclusion intermediaries are often the most valuable channel for finding employment after family and friends.• Important bridges for expanding and diversifying social relations and job channels• Means to connect to the outside world through technology and social networks and actively support community development
    12. 12. FOOD FOR THOUGHT• How do we define impact? For whom and for what?• What levels and combination of services e-Inclusion actors are needed to contribute to impact?• Evidence on impact is fragmented so what do we do as advocates, researchers, and program implementers?• How do we reach some level of systematization of future evidence? Pros and Cons• How do we draw a map of this all inclusive category of eInclusion intermediaries?
    13. 13. Thank You!Maria Garrido, Research Assistant Professor Araba Sey, Research Assistant ProfessorInformation School Information Schoolmigarrid@uw.edu arabasey@uw.eduTwitter: @mariaigarrido Luis Santana, PhD StudentTabitha Hart, PhD Student Communications DepartmentCommunications Department Technology & Social Change Group University of Washington Information School tascha.uw.edu +1.206.616.9101

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