Assessment for Learning in an Elementary Math Classroom presentation

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  • Take a picture of my shape of the day with learning targets.
  • Assessment for Learning in an Elementary Math Classroom presentation

    1. 1. Presented by Tanya Braybrook, B.Ed. Email: tanya@mathprofile.comFollow on Twitter: @MathProfile Find us on Facebook
    2. 2. Workshop ObjectivesGeneral Learner Expectation: The learner will be prepared to try one new assessment strategy in their math class within the next four weeks.Specific Learner Expectations: 1. The learner will discuss what assessment for learning is and is not. 2. The learner will understand the conclusions coming from research. 3. The learner will explore a variety of assessment tasks. 4. The learner will view a variety of rubrics for specific math tasks. 5. The learner will view different ways of record keeping.
    3. 3. ResearchBlack, Paul and Dylan Wiliam. “Inside the Black Box: RaisingStandards Through Classroom Assessment.” Phi Delta Kappan(October 1998): 139-148.Stiggins, Richard. “Assessment, Student Confidence, and SchoolSuccess.” Phi Delta Kappan (November 1999): 191-198.Glanfield, Florence, William S. Bush, Jean Kerr Stenmark.Mathematics Assessment: A Practical Handbook for Grades K-2.Reston, Va.: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2003.Huinker, DeAnn. Mathematics Assessment Sampler:Prekindergarten-Grade 2. Reston, Va.: National Council ofTeachers of Mathematics, 2006.Alberta Education. Rethinking Classroom Assessment withPurpose in Mind: Assessment for Learning, Assessment asLearning, Assessment of Learning. Edmonton, AB: AlbertaEducation, 2006.
    4. 4. The picture shows the 2nd edition which was published in 2011.Stiggins, Richard, Judith A. Arter, Jan Chappius and StephenChappius. Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing itRight—Using it Well. Portland, Oregon: Assessment TrainingInstitute, 2004. Assessment Training Institute http://www.assessmentinst.com
    5. 5. Three Big Questions / Seven Strategies (from Stiggins, Arter, J. Chappius & S. Chappius: Classroom Assessment for Student Learning)WHERE AM I GOING? Strategy 1: Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target. Strategy 2: Use examples and models of strong and weak work.WHERE AM I NOW? Strategy 3: Offer regular, descriptive feedback. Strategy 4: Teach students to self-assess and set goals.HOW CAN I CLOSE THE GAP? Strategy 5: Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time. Strategy 6: Teach students focused revision. Strategy 7: Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track of and share their learning.
    6. 6. Strategy 1:Provide a clear and understandable vision of the learning target. We are learning… our classmates’ names. We are learning... to predict covered words. We are learning... to write the date correctly. We are learning… to count on when adding. We are learning... how to tell if a number is odd or even. We are learning... how to find the area of a shape.
    7. 7. Math Routines I can...√ solve problems using a calendar√ skip count by:2’s, 3’s, 4’s, 5’s, 10’s, 25’s and 100’s√ show a number -using tallies -with materials -using pictures -using numbers -in many different ways√ read 3-digit numbers√ read number words√ represent a number as different equations√ compare numbers√ put numbers in order√ find mistakes in numbers that are in order√ estimate√ discuss information from a bar graph
    8. 8. Gr. 2 Sample Essential QuestionsWhat numbers can we use to talk about position?What are the numbers used to skip count by: -2’s -5’s -10’s?What are different ways 2 digit numbers can be represented?How can 2 digit numbers be compared and ordered?How can we estimate the number of objects?How do days relate to weeks and months?
    9. 9. We are learning to name the months of the year. We are learning to relate the number of months to a year.1. Write the month that comes AFTER.March September2. Write the month that comes BEFORE.June August3. Write the month that comes BETWEEN.October December May July4. What position is each month in? (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, …)September February5. Write that month that is in each position.4th 8th6. How many months are in a year?7. If this is the month of October and my birthday is in April, how many more months until my birthday?8. What month comes 3 months after March?9. What month comes 6 months before January?10. If your little sister is two and a half years old, how many months is that?
    10. 10. Strategy 2:Use examples and models of strong and weak work.
    11. 11. Give examples and non-examples of: even numbers EXAMPLES NON-EXAMPLESStudent A: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 1, 3, 5, 7, 9Student B: 743, 321, 568, 75 904, 772, 547, 329Student C: 6 824 3 265 Other possible assignments  triangles, certain events, acute angles, ABCC repeating pattern
    12. 12. “Visual Rubric” (Anne Davies)
    13. 13. Strategy 3: Offer regular, descriptive feedbackAlberta Education. Rethinking Classroom Assessment with Purpose in Mind:Assessment for Learning, Assessment as Learning, Assessment of Learning.Edmonton, Alberta: Alberta Education, 2006.
    14. 14. Categories for the Math Profile Assessment Tool by Grade LevelGRADE 1—9 categoriesRepresent Numbers Place Value CountingEstimation Add & Subtract PatternsEqualities Measurement GeometryGRADE 2—12 categoriesRepresent Numbers Place Value CountingEstimation Add & Subtract PatternsEqualities Measurement GeometryCalendar Graphing & Data AnalysisProblem SolvingGRADE 3—15 categoriesRepresent Numbers Place Value CountingEstimation Add & Subtract Multiply & DivideFractions Patterns EquationsTime Calendar MeasurementGeometry Graphing & Data Analysis Problem Solving
    15. 15. GRADE 4—14 categoriesRepresent Numbers Place Value Add & SubtractMultiply & Divide Fractions DecimalsPatterns Equations TimeCalendar Measurement GeometryGraphing & Data Analysis Problem SolvingGRADE 5—12 categoriesRepresent Numbers Estimation Multiply & DivideFractions Decimals PatternsEquations Measurement GeometryGraphing & Data Analysis Chance & Uncertainty Problem SolvingGRADE 6—13 categoriesRepresent Numbers Estimation Whole Number OperationsFractions, Ratios & Percents DecimalsPatterns Equations MeasurementGeometry Transformations Graphing & Data AnalysisChance & Uncertainty Problem Solving
    16. 16. Reading & Interpreting the Profile Graph
    17. 17. RubricsVan de Walle, John A. and LouAnn H.Lovin. Teaching Student-CenteredMathematics: Grades K-3.Boston, Massachusetts: PearsonEducation, Inc., 2006.
    18. 18. Show and Share Project
    19. 19. Strategy 4:Teach students to self-assess and set goals. Elk Island Catholic School Division Grade Two Created by Carrie Anaka, Michelle Buysen and Jenna deVries
    20. 20. Strategy 5:Design lessons to focus on one aspect of quality at a time.~ problem solving  teach different strategies and/or ways of recording answer one at a time~ basic facts using the Power of Ten philosophy/method (teach strategies such as doubles & doubles plus one; visualization; -9, then -8)~ performance tasks
    21. 21. Strategy 6:Teach students focused revision.
    22. 22. Possible topics include:-2-digit numbers(73 and 93)-shapes (square andtriangle)-operations(multiplication anddivision)-units of measurement(kilogram and gram)
    23. 23. Strategy 7:Engage students in self-reflection and let them keep track and share their learning. Basic Facts Graph Name: This graph shows that I… List 2 strategies you have used to get better at mad minutes. 1. 2. Write a sentence comparing your scores using the word “more”. Write a sentence comparing your scores using the word “less”.
    24. 24. Other ideas for self-reflection and sharing the learning… Learning logs/math journals Exit cards Pictures of manipulative work Student-led conference
    25. 25. Portfolios
    26. 26. Recording and Reporting
    27. 27. In a small group, discuss…How will what you have seen and heard in this session impact your teaching?
    28. 28. Learning Chains Could use “I can…” or “I learned…”Could be used to measure individual or class progress
    29. 29. General Learner Expectation: The learner will be prepared to try one new assessment strategy in their math class within the next four weeks. Final Thought…

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