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Public art

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Public art Public art Presentation Transcript

  • Beautiful Garbage
    • by Thalia Bloom
  • Trash should be beautiful
    • Found art, a popular form of public art, is about making trash beautiful.
    • Go straight to the source.
    • Make disposal beautiful.
    • Trashcans should be attractive, but also practical and easy to empty.
  • Examples elsewhere:
    • Singapore has an entire “Trash Island”, turned eco-tourism attraction.
    • Tokyo also has an extremely systematic and fairly attractive system.
  • But New York could do better.
    • We could have ARTISTIC trashcans.
    • Specifically, we could have animal trashcans--ones that you would feed trash too.
    • It should be clear which ones are recycling trash cans and which are not. So signs would have to be obvious.
    • This could also be an ironic statement about the environment. Humans constantly force animals to eat the waste we dispose of.
    • “ Animal art, unlike other playground surfaces, was almost never damaged by vandals” --Park Commissioner Henry J. Stern
    • Animal trashcans would provide the same safe atmosphere.
  • Location: Roosevelt Island
    • Roosevelt Island has essentially no public art.
    • It has a very pristine atmosphere.
  • Aesthetics
    • Not too cute
            • But not grotesque either
            • s
  • Ideas I toyed with:
    • Character cans--possibly too annoying?
    • “Hi, I’m Pete. I like to eat paper.”
    • Book characters: like Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, or Frog and Toad, byArnold Lobel
    • This would encourage small children to read, or relate their lives to what they read.
    • To some, book characters are too trite.
    • But animal designs that have the same personality and spirit of those book characters could achieve the same affect.
    • Children enjoy the picturesque trash cans and cleaning up after themselves more, and adults might feel nostalgic and feel safer in a child-friendly environment.