Pni tbli us 2.2

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TBLI CONFERENCE™ is the prime annual global networking and learning event on Environment, Social, Governance (ESG) and Impact Investing.

TBLI CONFERENCE USA New York 2013
Monday and Tuesday, June 17-18, 2013

Speakers:
Paul Rose
Vice President of the Royal Geographical Society
Richard L. Kauffman
Chairman for Energy Policy and Finance for the State of New York - Governor of New York's Office and Cabinet - United States of America
Martin Rapaport is chairman of the Rapaport Group and founder of the Rapaport Diamond Report

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Pni tbli us 2.2

  1. 1. “28 years of innovation and sustainability- from the Amazon to the Sahara and back ” TBLI and Sustainable Forestry, New York 17 June 2013
  2. 2. Aziz Sy Maize in Senegal • 5 tons / hectare with compost + NPK + without biochar • 14 tons / hectare with same fertiliser and 2 kg of biochar per m2 • Biochar at 150 € / tonne • Marginal profit = 4,800 € / hectare for first year • 7,800 € / hectare for following years
  3. 3. Pape Demba Onions in Senegal • 12 tons / hectare with fertiliser without biochar • 18.2 tons / hectare same fertiliser and 1 kg of biochar per m2 • Biochar at 150 € / tonne • Marginal profit = 2,400 € / hectare for first year • 3,900 € / hectare for following years
  4. 4. Aziz Sy at Ross-BethioYield doubled
  5. 5. Biochar on Trees • Tea trees: heights and volumes with biochar on average from 20% to 40% increase T. Hoshi, International Conference on O-Cha (Tea) Culture and Science, Session II (Production) 2001 • Cashew: productivity from 1.15 t/ha to 1.6 t/ha with 25 t/ha of biochar from rice husk • Coffee & Cocoa: trials taking place in Costa Rica under IBI (International Biochar Initiative) monitoring in collaboration with Catie
  6. 6. The Sahel crisis • Perfect storm of – draught – conflicts (Libia/Mali) – food price increases – population growth – insufficient food stocks – bad infrastructure – less foreign remittances – widespread poverty • Two years of low and erratic rainfall • Grain production down 36% (Chad and Gambia −50%) • Ground nuts production down 59% • 8.5 million suffer food insecurity • 1 million children suffer severe acute malnutrition
  7. 7. Benefits biochar • Activates micro-organisms in soil • Acts as catalyst for fertilizer • Perfect for disturbed, weathered, and degraded soil • Significantly increases crop productivity by improving soil fertility (generally between 50 and 200%) • Enhances soil biology (40% inc. in mycorrhizal fungi) • Improves nutrient retention in soils (50% inc. in Cation Exchange Capacity) • Improves water retention capacity of soils (up to 18% inc. ) • Increases the alkalinity of acidic soils (1 point ph inc.) • Increases soil organic matter
  8. 8. Using biochar and agro-ecology to grow food in the Sahara
  9. 9. cucumber zucchine squash african eggplant lettuce beans melons basil tomatoes yellow peppers gombo SVG production
  10. 10. PNI‟s Biochar Super Vegetable Gardens • Algeria: Hassi Messaoud Region • Burkina Faso: The Central Plateau 150 km East of Ouagadougou • French Guyana: SVGs in the Regional Natural Park • Ghana: Pilot agroforestry and SVG project • Haiti: SVG and Agroforestry pilot training project with Vetiver growers • Ivory Coast: Pilot agroforestry and SVG project • Mauritania: Region of Trarza at 164 km South and South East of Nouakchott • Nigeria: Pilot agroforestry and SVG, A.P. Leventis Ornithological Research Institute • Senegal: at Dagana, 400 km North of Dakar • Tanzania: Region 700 km West of Dar Es Salam, • Chad: Batha Region 700 km East of Djaména • Rio de Janeiro: rooftops mini SVGs of the Mata Machado favela • Brazil/Guyana: Project on both sides of the Guyana and Amapa border • France: Bar-sur-Loup near Nice
  11. 11. Biochar on Coffee • Increasing productivity without damaging quality • Potential for evolving towards organic production • Saving on fertilizers • Boosting of the tree immune system (secondary metabolites more effective) • Helping developing associated agricultural production for household consumption and cash crops • Adding value to coffee husks • Cogenerating sustainable energy for drying the beans and producing electricity • Tea trees: heights and volumes with biochar on average from 20% to 40% increase T. Hoshi, International Conference on O-Cha (Tea) Culture and Science, Session II (Production) 2001 • Cashew: productivity from 1.15 t/ha to 1.6 t/ha with 25 t/ha of biochar from rice husk • Coffee & Cocoa: trials taking place in Costa Rica under IBI (International Biochar Initiative) monitoring in collaboration with Catie
  12. 12. Cocoa with and without biochar in Belize
  13. 13. PRO-NATURA EXPEDITIONS HISTORY „Treetop Raft‟ expeditions, organized by Pro-Natura • 1996: French Guyana • 1999: Gabon • 2001: Madagascar • 2003: Panama Past expeditions, co-organized by Pro-Natura and the French Museum of Natural History (under a joint initiative entitled : “Our Planet Reviewed”) • 2006: Santo island, Vanuatu archipelago (terrestrial & marine expedition) • 2008-09: Mozambique (terrestrial expedition) • 2010: Madadascar (marine expedition) • 2012-13: Papua New Guinea (terrestrial & marine expedition) . I The biggest so far was the Santo-2006 expedition : 233 participants (155 Scientists, 58 management team and technical staff, 20 media and education) from 25 nationalities.
  14. 14. After one look at this planet, any visitor from outer space would say: « I want to see the manager » William S. Burroughs www.pronatura.org

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