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Kees Noorman William McDonough + Partners  © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
WM+P MBDC MC McDonough Consulting Speaking Engagements McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry Product & Process Design Willi...
 
CRADLE to GRAVE  design paradigm TAKE   raw material extraction  and  synthesis WASTE landfill incineration MAKE   manufac...
Optimal Sustainability Eco-efficient Design Flight Path Leadership Eco-effective Design Time Present Shareholder Value  Fu...
 
1  Insist on the right of humanity and nature to co-exist 2  Recognize interdependence 3  Respect relationships between sp...
Biological Metabolism Technical Metabolism © 2008  MBDC
EcoWorx Polyolefin Material Newly Polymerized Nylon 6 Ecosolution Q Facing Fiber Ecoworx Backing Carpet Tile Production Ca...
<ul><li>Is it a biological or technical nutrient? </li></ul><ul><li>Are materials recyclable/ compostable? </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Is it a biological or technical nutrient? </li></ul><ul><li>Are materials recyclable/ compostable? </li></ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Consider a tree: </li></ul><ul><li>produces oxygen </li></ul><ul><li>creates habitat  </li></ul><ul><li>stores car...
 
Solar oriented, solar powered Safe materials in closed-loop cycles Treats water as precious resource: capture and reuse He...
 
11/16/09 © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
Imagine a cradle to cradle building… © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
Setting Priorities, Making Choices © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
Site Water Energy Materials IEQ Goals Best Practices: LEED Strategies
Owner  Mission  Project Principles Beyond Best Practices: Eco-effective Design © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
Site Water Energy Materials IEQ Project Goals Project Principles Beyond Best Practices: Eco-effective Design Owner  Missio...
© 2008 Anshen + Allen / William McDonough + Partners
© 2008  William McDonough + Partners
focus on patient / exam rooms © 2008  Anshen + Allen / William McDonough + Partners
identifying key materials © 2008  Anshen + Allen  / William McDonough + Partners
© 2008  MBDC / William McDonough + Partners
NASA Collaborative Support Facility
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NASA CSF NASA CSF NASA CSF NASA CSF |  RESULTS 2500GJ 0 1250GJ <ul><ul><ul><li>87%   reduction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul...
NASA CSF |  RESULTS <ul><ul><ul><li>Potential Cradle to Cradle Certified </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10%   certifi...
“ We come in peace”
© 2008  William McDonough + Partners
© 2008  William McDonough + Partners
© 2008  William McDonough + Partners
© 2008  William McDonough + Partners
Our goal is a delightfully diverse, safe, healthy and just world — with clean air, water, soil and power — economically, e...
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Cradle to Cradle, From Efficiency To Effectiveness

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Kees Noorman, Director Business Development and General Affairs - William McDonough + Partners EU - The Netherlands

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  • Every spring it produces thousands of blossoms, only a few of which germinate, take root and grow. Who would see cherry blossoms piling up on the ground and think, “How inefficient and wasteful”? The tree’s abundance is useful and safe. The fallen blossoms decompose into food for other living things. Bacteria and fungi feed on the organic waste of both the tree and the animals that eat its fruit, depositing nutrients in the soil in a form ready for the tree to take up and convert into growth. One organism’s waste becomes another organism’s food; nutrients flow perpetually in regenerative, cradle-to-cradle cycles of birth, decay, and rebirth. As a cherry tree grows, it enriches far more than the soil. While making food from the sun, it sequesters carbon, produces oxygen and filters water. The tree’s limbs and leaves harbor a great diversity of microbes and insects, all of which play a role within a local system of natural cycles. Even in death the tree provides nourishment as it decomposes and releases minerals that fuel new life. From blossom to sapling to magnificent old age, the cherry tree’s growth is regenerative. Every last particle contributes in some way to the health of a thriving ecosystem. Waste that stays waste does not exist. Instead, waste nourishes; waste equals food.
  • For example, as I mentioned earlier, Shaw ’ s technical nutrient carpet tile, which is used by commercial customers, is designed to be returned to the company after use and be perpetually upcycled into the next generation of high quality carpet tile. The tiles can be replaced one at a time or in bulk. For information, just call the 800 number on the tile ’ s technical nutrient backing. NEXT A World of C2C Flows
  • This is a fundamental distinction. All the chemicals in cradle-to-cradle materials are assessed down to 100 parts per million and characterized as environmentally safe and healthy. Biological nutrients are safe for biological cycles and technical nutrients are safe for technical cycles. The design of each is defined by the cycle in which it will flow. Let me show you a few of each. Here are some successful biological nutrients: [Images: Hycrete Concrete Additive and Wet Women Surf Wax] Some successful technical nutrients: [Images: Cabot ’ s Nanogel and Solutia ’ s Ultron Fiber] And some bio-technical nutrients: [Images: Nike running shoe and the Ford Model U]
  • This is a fundamental distinction. All the chemicals in cradle-to-cradle materials are assessed down to 100 parts per million and characterized as environmentally safe and healthy. Biological nutrients are safe for biological cycles and technical nutrients are safe for technical cycles. The design of each is defined by the cycle in which it will flow. Let me show you a few of each. Here are some successful biological nutrients: [Images: Hycrete Concrete Additive and Wet Women Surf Wax] Some successful technical nutrients: [Images: Cabot ’ s Nanogel and Solutia ’ s Ultron Fiber] And some bio-technical nutrients: [Images: Nike running shoe and the Ford Model U]
  • Office Building of the Future Client Fortune magazine Program High-rise office buildingStatus Concept Design Design Strategies - Photovoltaic panels collect enough energy to provide up to 40 percent of the building’s needs - Geothermal heating and an on-site power generator provide the energy that solar cannot - Multiple skins perform functions varying from weatherproofing to insulation to transparency - Under-floor air distribution improves air quality and allows for flexible workstation arrangements - All materials used are designed to return safely to the earth or to be reused - Curved forms increase stability while maximizing enclosed space - Green roof reduces the “urban heat island” while absorbing and cleaning rainwater - Three-story atrium with gardens - Extensive water recycling systems on-site - Design is tailored to the site to capture maximum sunlight
  • To be effective, technical nutrients need to be recovered and used again and again in closed-loop cycles. That ’ s reverse logistics; designing products for disassembly and designing the infrastructure to effectively recover their high quality components for perpetual re-use. Steelcase ’ s Think office chair, the first product in the contract furniture industry to achieve Cradle to Cradle Certification, is designed for disassembly and 98 percent of its components are recyclable. To keep the Think chair ’ s components flowing in technical cycles, the company has entered into a partnership with customers and recyclers, providing information and guidance on product disassembly and re-use. NEXT Steelcase Answer Systems Workstation Steelcase is also the first office furniture company to achieve MBDC certification for an entire workstation, earning a Silver level certification for using materials assessed for environmental health and safety and designed for cradle-to-cradle cycles.
  • This is a fundamental distinction. All the chemicals in cradle-to-cradle materials are assessed down to 100 parts per million and characterized as environmentally safe and healthy. Biological nutrients are safe for biological cycles and technical nutrients are safe for technical cycles. The design of each is defined by the cycle in which it will flow. Let me show you a few of each. Here are some successful biological nutrients: [Images: Hycrete Concrete Additive and Wet Women Surf Wax] Some successful technical nutrients: [Images: Cabot ’ s Nanogel and Solutia ’ s Ultron Fiber] And some bio-technical nutrients: [Images: Nike running shoe and the Ford Model U]
  • This is a fundamental distinction. All the chemicals in cradle-to-cradle materials are assessed down to 100 parts per million and characterized as environmentally safe and healthy. Biological nutrients are safe for biological cycles and technical nutrients are safe for technical cycles. The design of each is defined by the cycle in which it will flow. Let me show you a few of each. Here are some successful biological nutrients: [Images: Hycrete Concrete Additive and Wet Women Surf Wax] Some successful technical nutrients: [Images: Cabot ’ s Nanogel and Solutia ’ s Ultron Fiber] And some bio-technical nutrients: [Images: Nike running shoe and the Ford Model U]
  • UCSF Mission Bay Hospital Complex CLIENT University of California, San Francisco LOCATION San Francisco, California PROGRAM Children’s, women’s and cancer hospital, ambulatory care, and central utilities plant AREA 865,000 sf STATUS Schematic design EXECUTIVE ARCHITECT Anshen &amp; Allen STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS Rutherford &amp; Chekene, Arup MEP ENGINEER Arup SUSTAINING DESIGN FEATURES Patient rooms will include materials which have undergone assessment to eliminate most known toxic elements Patient care units are configured to allow daylight and views into most working stations Extensive green roofs and gardens across the hospital complex will be among the most of any urban U.S. hospital Water conservation will include rain/storm water collection and reuse onsite for landscape irrigation, one of the few examples of water conservation on a large urban hospital site
  • NASA CSF Moffet Field, CA Client NASA Ames Research Center Program Office Area 48,000 sf Status (10/31/08) In construction documents: construction to start Summer/Fall 2009 Team DMJM H&amp;N / AECOM: Architect/Engineer of Record Siteworks, Landscape Architect Loisos + Ubbelhode: Daylighting, Lighting and Energy Design TBD Consulting: Cost Estimating Design Concepts : The design of the CSF is founded on three basic ideas: Concept 1: A building that is both iconic and integrated with the surrounding landscape. The CSF will be come the “front door” of NASA, embodying the spirit of the people and place in an evocative way. At the same time, the CSF should embrace a seamless integration with the surrounding landscape (visually, spatially and systematically). Concept 2: A self-shading building that creates a strong image for NASA. The CSF design is based on the idea that a building exoskeleton will be an expression of the NASA spirit: experimental yet functional, elegant but not precious. The design of the exoskeleton is intended to recall lunar modules and satellites, while also reinforcing the pedagogical mission of the project to demonstrate, in as many ways as possible, the building’s metabolisms of energy, water and materials. Concept 3: A column-free space that allows for ultimate flexibility over time: a sustainable structural approach. A simple approach to flexibility, yet the idea of a column-free space is a driver of much of the design. By developing the shade canopy as an integral part of the lateral bracing system, the building interior has been freed from braced frames in the short direction, increasing the flexibility of the interior. The exoskeleton approach has the potential for increased performance in a major seismic event, and greater ability for repair afterwards. Design Strategies Narrow floorplates (56’), high floor to floors (15’), integrated and abundant glazing create excellent daylighting Building orientation with long faces north/south provide for good solar and wind orientation, controlling solar gain and increasing natural ventilation effectiveness Steel exoskeleton recalls surrounding wind tunnel architectural vocabulary, provides for column-free interiors. Exoframe functions as braced frame in short direction, providing better seismic performance and easy repair and replacement. Exoskeleton also shades building, provides glare control through vegetated trellises and architectural sun shades, and extends BIPV canopy to maximize solar capture. High performance lighting complements daylighting through design and control systems, creating excellent lighting conditions while reducing lighting power use to 40% below Title 24. Uses high performance radiant heating/cooling system, connected to geothermal wells, fed into building intelligence management system. Underfloor ventilation-only system provides fresh air. Building windows and shades are fully automated and integrated with HVAC. Ecomachine treats blackwater, graywater, for reuse as toilet flushing. Stormwater cleansed and infiltrated on-site. Irrigation needs met using local non-potable source; landscape designed to reduce water demand. Client Principles: Create a compelling business case. (workplace effectiveness/worker productivity, reduced operational costs) Design a model high-performance building (energy, water, materials) Showcase NASA technologies and approaches Construct within budget and on schedule Results: Energy performance: 600GJ/year verses 2300 GJ/year for a Title 24 building (73% savings) Phase 1 BIPV canopy meets 60% of the remaining energy demand (360GJ). Phase 2 should make the building a net energy exporter. Energy performance with PVs: 240 GJ/year purchased from grid (90% below a Title 24 building) Water: 137,000 gals/year verses 1,025,000 gals/year for a conventional building (87% savings) Sewer Discharges: 0 gals/year verses 455,000 gals/year for a conventional building (100% savings). All workstations have access to daylight, fresh air, individual control of ventilation air and zoned control of thermal systems. Space plan groups workstations into neighborhoods surrounding communal spaces to promote collaboration and identity, as well as to reinforce daylighting and ventilation strategies.
  • Transcript of "Cradle to Cradle, From Efficiency To Effectiveness"

    1. 1. Kees Noorman William McDonough + Partners © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    2. 2. WM+P MBDC MC McDonough Consulting Speaking Engagements McDonough Braungart Design Chemistry Product & Process Design William McDonough + Partners Architecture & Community Design © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    3. 4. CRADLE to GRAVE design paradigm TAKE raw material extraction and synthesis WASTE landfill incineration MAKE manufacturing production distribution use © 2008 MBDC
    4. 5. Optimal Sustainability Eco-efficient Design Flight Path Leadership Eco-effective Design Time Present Shareholder Value Future
    5. 7. 1 Insist on the right of humanity and nature to co-exist 2 Recognize interdependence 3 Respect relationships between spirit and matter 4 Accept responsibility for the consequence of design 5 Create safe objects of long-term value 6 Eliminate the concept of waste 7 Rely on natural energy flows 8 Understand the limitations of design 9 Seek constant improvement by sharing knowledge © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    6. 8. Biological Metabolism Technical Metabolism © 2008 MBDC
    7. 9. EcoWorx Polyolefin Material Newly Polymerized Nylon 6 Ecosolution Q Facing Fiber Ecoworx Backing Carpet Tile Production Carpet Tile Sale & Use © 2008 MBDC Recovery & Separation Mechanical Recycling Chemical Recycling Are you using reverse logistics?
    8. 10. <ul><li>Is it a biological or technical nutrient? </li></ul><ul><li>Are materials recyclable/ compostable? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you have reverse logistics? </li></ul><ul><li>Does your energy come from renewable sources? </li></ul><ul><li>Is your water drinkable? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you practicing social fairness? </li></ul>© 2008 MBDC
    9. 11. <ul><li>Is it a biological or technical nutrient? </li></ul><ul><li>Are materials recyclable/ compostable? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you have reverse logistics? </li></ul><ul><li>Does your energy come from renewable sources? </li></ul><ul><li>Is your water drinkable? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you practicing social fairness? </li></ul>© 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    10. 12. <ul><li>Consider a tree: </li></ul><ul><li>produces oxygen </li></ul><ul><li>creates habitat </li></ul><ul><li>stores carbon </li></ul><ul><li>fixes nitrogen </li></ul><ul><li>distills water </li></ul><ul><li>builds healthy soil </li></ul><ul><li>use the sun’s energy to make food </li></ul><ul><li>creates cooling through evaporation </li></ul><ul><li>changes with the seasons </li></ul><ul><li>self replicates </li></ul>
    11. 14. Solar oriented, solar powered Safe materials in closed-loop cycles Treats water as precious resource: capture and reuse Healthy workplace that promotes community, connectivity Abundant daylight and fresh air Anticipatory design: adapts and evolves over time Is native to its place © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    12. 16. 11/16/09 © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    13. 17. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    14. 18. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    15. 19. Imagine a cradle to cradle building… © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    16. 20. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    17. 21. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    18. 22. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    19. 23. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    20. 24. Setting Priorities, Making Choices © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    21. 25. Site Water Energy Materials IEQ Goals Best Practices: LEED Strategies
    22. 26. Owner Mission Project Principles Beyond Best Practices: Eco-effective Design © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    23. 27. Site Water Energy Materials IEQ Project Goals Project Principles Beyond Best Practices: Eco-effective Design Owner Mission Strategies © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    24. 28. © 2008 Anshen + Allen / William McDonough + Partners
    25. 29. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    26. 30. focus on patient / exam rooms © 2008 Anshen + Allen / William McDonough + Partners
    27. 31. identifying key materials © 2008 Anshen + Allen / William McDonough + Partners
    28. 32. © 2008 MBDC / William McDonough + Partners
    29. 33. NASA Collaborative Support Facility
    30. 41. NASA CSF NASA CSF NASA CSF NASA CSF | RESULTS 2500GJ 0 1250GJ <ul><ul><ul><li>87% reduction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>from 1,025,000 gals/yr for a conventional facility to 137,000 gals/yr </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>100% reduction from 455,000 gals/yr for a conventional facility to 0 gals/yr </li></ul></ul></ul>1.25 m 0 750k 500k 0 250k Base Case Base Case Base Case <ul><ul><ul><li>90% reduction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>from 2300 GJ/yr for a conventional facility to 240 GJ/yr </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Potable Water </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sewer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Energy </li></ul></ul></ul>PERFORMANCE
    31. 42. NASA CSF | RESULTS <ul><ul><ul><li>Potential Cradle to Cradle Certified </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10% certified products </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>based on construction cost </li></ul></ul></ul>100% 0% 50% MATERIALS Composite Site Structure Skin Systems Scene
    32. 43. “ We come in peace”
    33. 44. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    34. 45. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    35. 46. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    36. 47. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
    37. 48. Our goal is a delightfully diverse, safe, healthy and just world — with clean air, water, soil and power — economically, equitably, ecologically and elegantly enjoyed. © 2008 William McDonough + Partners
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