The 21st Century Student
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The 21st Century Student

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The 21st Century Student Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The 21 st Century Student: Going to School Online
  • 2. Education without walls…
    • By Christina Couch If the phrase "online learning" conjures up images of glassy-eyed adults miserably staring at a computer screen, you've got it all wrong. Common misconceptions about what eLearning is and what it entails oftentimes prevent lifelong learners from continuing their education. High-quality online courses are dynamic, innovative, rigorous, and above all, effective. So which eEd myth is keeping you from making the leap into the virtual classroom?
  • 3. Myth 1: Online learning will make traditional classroom-based education obsolete.
    • Truth : While online education provides advantages of access, and potentially lower cost and higher quality, this does not diminish the value of face-to-face student services and learning. Particularly for under prepared and returning students, the classroom and the campus provide necessary connections and resources that help them on their learning journeys. It is likely that many of these students would be better served beginning in face-to-face courses, then moving to a hybrid environment, and then progressing to learning purely online (if there is a need or wish to learn in that way). Moreover, online learning is more often than not blended with classroom teaching. Rather than making traditional instruction obsolete, it simply gives us an interesting and possibly transformative tool to apply to our modern teaching and learning contexts.
    • Robert W. Mendenhall
  • 4. Myth 2: Online learning is a quick and easy way to get a degree.
    • Truth : A few unscrupulous “diploma mills” have damaged online learning’s reputation. These programs were never accredited and do not reflect the general quality of online learning degrees. Students may be able to earn a degree more quickly in some online learning programs, not because less work is required, but because they are able to move at their own pace. Generally, though, the evidence is that students take longer, read more, write more, and do more research than a classroom student (they obviously sit in a classroom for less time, leaving more time for these other activities). Robert W. Mendenhall 
  • 5. Myth 3: Online learning diminishes the teacher’s importance.
    • Truth : Much of today’s online learning simply is delivering classroom instruction via technology. In such cases, the faculty role does not change much, except that faculty report it is even more work to teach online because students expect more responsiveness and interaction via e-mail. The faculty role is generally different but often enhanced and even 9re important in redesigned online and hybrid learning courses that take advantage of the technology. Online learning can free faculty to do what is uniquely human and more interactive, rather than simply deliver lectures. Faculty have more time to interact personally with students, to mentor, advise, review individual work, and answer questions.
  • 6. Myth 4: Online courses lack interaction.
    • Truth : Students typically have more one-on-one interactions with their teachers and fellow students in online courses, especially when team projects are assigned. Teachers report getting to know their students better, and students who are shy or do not think well “on their feet” tend to contribute more in online environments. Students are often actively interacting with both resources and others in online environments .
  • 7. Myth 5: Online students are isolated and therefore will be socially disadvantaged.
    • Truth : In fact, students often engage actively both online and off as they complete assignments and socialize with other students and adults in their schools, at home, and in the community. Online students typically take only one or two courses online, blending their learning opportunities with traditional instruction in brick-and-mortar schools.
  • 8. Myth 6: Online teachers have easy jobs.
    • Truth : Online teachers report that they work much harder and spend more hours online than in the classroom but that they love it. They do not simply “move a class online” and “put up what they teach.” Online instructional design, writing, management of instruction, and communicating with students can take considerable time and be quite different from what goes on inside a traditional classroom.
  • 9. A day in the life…
    • 7:00am - Wake Up
    • 7:30-8:00am - Check emails; Eat breakfast with kids and get them ready.
    • 8:30am - Get kids to school/daycare
    • 9:10am - Login and begin working
    • 9:15 – 10:30am - Clean out inbox; Answer emails and document contact with students/families; Grade assignments
    • 10:30 – noon - Continue to answer emails as they come in. Make HomeBase calls to students/families. Document contact and attempted contact with students. Eat lunch while working
    • Noon – 2:00pm - Continue to answer emails as they come in. Call as many content-area students as possible; Document contact and attempted contact with students; Work on creating lessons; Committee Meetings (Technology, Curriculum and Staff Development)
    • 2:00-4:00 - Continue to answer emails as they come in. Continue making calls. Work on creating lessons. IEP Conference Call
    • 4:00 - Pick up kids from daycare
    • 4:00-8:00pm - Family time
    • 8:00-11:00pm - Answer emails. Work on creating assignments. Grade assignments
    • 11:00-midnight -Go to bed
  • 10. Myth 7: Online courses are easier for students than regular courses.
    • Truth : Most online courses are not condensed or easier versions of regular courses. They are aligned to rigorous state standards. They require active participation and operate in settings under supervision of state-certified teachers, require students take state assessment tests, have attendance policies, and have competency-based academic progress requirements in effect.
  • 11. Myth 8: A student is more likely to cheat online.  
    • Truth : Cheating is no more prevalent online than in the classroom. In addition, there are many technological ways to deter it and track it. In many cases, the online venue and communication enables teachers to get to know their students' idiosyncrasies and skills much better. Teachers say that student writing has a voice and that it is often easier to spot work that is inconsistent or unlike earlier communication in online environments.
  • 12. Myth 9: Virtual schools are about technology.
    • Truth : Virtual schools are about curriculum and instruction for students. The “medium” is not the message because the student, instructor, content, and learning goals are key. Networks simply make it possible to provide communication, access to extended resources, and use of sound, graphics, video, text, interactivity, and other digital capabilities to strengthen instruction. Most schools have the basic technology, Web browsers, plug-in software, and access that are needed.
  • 13. Myth 10: Online courses represent an “add-on” to already burdened school systems and teachers. 
    • Truth : Online education does not represent an “add-on.” It does represent an opportunity take advantage of online resources; enable teachers to help students learn in ways that match students’ needs and learning style, and transform schools. Online courses may or may not decrease costs, depending on how budgets are allocated and how online courses are integrated into instruction. Training and support of teachers is important. 
    • Robert W. Mendenhall 
  • 14. Robert Mendenhall
    • Several of our slides featured the analysis of Robert Mendenhall. Mendenhall is the president of Western Governor’s University, a private, non-profit online university, that boasts over 10,000 students as of June 2008. Mendenhall was also appointed to the Commission on the Future of Higher Education by U.S. Secretary of Education, Margaret Spellings.
    • To hear more about what Robert Mendenhall has to say about online education, listen to this interview via podcast at http://www.educause.edu/blog/mpasiewicz/E07PodcastAninterviewwithRober/167262
  • 15. So which eEd myth is keeping you from making the leap into the virtual classroom?
    • Myth 1: Online learning will make traditional classroom-based education obsolete.
    • Myth 2: Online learning is a quick and easy way to get a degree.
    • Myth 3: Online learning diminishes the teacher’s importance.
    • Myth 4: Online courses lack interaction.
    • Myth 5: Online students are isolated and therefore will be socially disadvantaged.
    • Myth 6: Online teachers have easy jobs.
    • Myth 7: Online courses are easier for students than regular courses.
    • Myth 8: A student is more likely to cheat online.
    • Myth 9: Virtual schools are about technology.
    • Myth 10: Online courses represent an “add-on” to already burdened school systems and teachers.