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Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
Uhm iup workshop introduction
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Uhm iup workshop introduction

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  • NCC missions.
  • IUP Task Force members include researchers, librarians, academic publishers, and museum curators. There are representatives from both Japan and North America.
  • The first goal was to document the range of problems encountered by US Academics. In order to identify the specific problems that scholars encounter in obtaining permissions from Japan, the task-force conducted an survey in the winter of 2007-2008 which was sent out by various Japan-related list-serves.
  • There were 120 responses to the survey, most from scholars, teachers or graduate students in Japanese or Asian studies in various disciplines. Most of the respondents state that their native language is not Japanese. This is the break down of scholars’ disciplines and how they use images in their research. The survey results were compiled and analyzed by Ms. Reiko Yoshimura (The Smithsonian Institution) and Ms. Eiko Sakaguchi (University of Maryland) and the more detailed report of the survey by Reiko is posted on the Image Use Protocol Website, which will be touched upon later today.
  • I will not discuss the survey in detail, but I do want to share some of the results. The survey identified what types of images scholars use and how they use them, procedures for obtaining permissions, and problems encountered. According to the survey results, common aspects of problems encountered included lack of understanding of legal issues, cultural and social differences between North America and Japan, and communication problems.
  • The next two goals were to clarify the differences between U.S. academic publishing and publishing in Japan, and to organize a meeting with Japanese image rights holders to promote mutual understanding and exchange views about improving access to images. In order to accomplish those goals, a day-long symposium was held in Tokyo to increase our mutual understanding of copyright guidelines and the permissions process. The background of the Tokyo Conference is two fold: 1) the need for communication, to share information, and to seek advice from Japanese counterparts And 2) the need to call attention in Japan to the importance of international image use and its problems, including the difficulties faced by foreign scholars.
  • The symposium was held on June 23 of last year, at the International House of Japan, with over 100 participants in attendance. Participants from North America consisted of task force members, librarians, North American scholars from various disciplines, and a representative from an American academic publisher. Librarians from Europe also attended. From the Japan side, there were publishers, and representatives from museums, temples, and other organizations. The morning meeting was an open session and the topics included the survey findings, the importance of using images, standard procedures for obtaining permission to use images in North America, and experiences of using Japanese images. You can read about the morning session in the Tokyo conference booklet. The afternoon session was closed and started with presentations on standard procedures for obtaining image use permission by Japanese publishers, museums and religious institutions as well as individuals. Japanese publishers explained how to acquire permission to use an image in a publication and how they handle requests received for use of images that appeared in books produced by the publisher. Museum curators described the increase in demand for images provided by museums. And temples and shrines shared the obstacles in use of images due to their religious concerns. Also, the draft of Image the Use Guidelines created by IUP was presented and a great deal of discussion followed with advice from Japanese stakeholders.
  • Note to presenter: Animations: 1 st click: Item #1 appears. 2 nd click: Item #2 appears. 3 rd click: Item #3 appears. 4 th click: Item #4 appears. 5 th click: Item #5 appears. 6 th click: Item #6 appears. 7 th click: Go to the next slide. These are some of the important findings of the Tokyo Conference. In general, images are copyrighted, so, you need permission(s) to use them. Follow the copyright laws of the country in which you plan to use (publish) the images. In case of image use, permissions may be required not only from a copyright holder, but also from other right holders. Who is the owner/creator of the object in the image?   Who created the image? Who is the owner of the image?   What/who is in the image? Japanese situations are substantially different form those of North America: The “Fair use” (“fair dealing“ in Canada) provision is NOT commonly applied to use of images even for scholarly and educational purposes. Japanese copyright laws approve “quotation” of both texts and images. Rights holders are not accustomed to being requested for a permission, due to the “quotation” provision. Publishers obtain image reproduction permissions, not authors. Communication in English is not widely accepted in Japan. Delay of responses is expected if English is used for communication.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Introduction NCC & Image Use Protocol Task Force April 23, 2010 University of Hawai’i at Manoa Library North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC)
    • 2. NCC http://www.nccjapan.org
      • North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources
      • Independent nonprofit educational organization established in 1991
      • Major funders:
        • Japan-United States Friendship Commission
        • Japan Foundation
      • Volunteers of librarians and faculty in Japanese studies, with small NCC’s staff
    • 3. What NCC Does
      • Serves the field of Japanese Studies in North America to strengthen Japanese language collections and to promote access to information in all forms and formats.
      • Coordinates/develops projects in the area of:
        • Improving access to materials in all formats
        • Cooperative collections development
        • Training librarians and users of Japanese materials
        • Fostering close collaboration and consultation nationally and internationally
    • 4. Image Use Protocol Task Force
      • TF formed in January 2007
      • In response to requests from U.S. researchers for guidelines on locating, accessing and obtaining permission to use visual images from Japan in teaching, research and publications
    • 5. IUP TF Members
      • Task Force Co-Chairs
      • Akio Yasue (co-chair)
      • Deputy Director (retired)
      • Senior Advisor (current), National Diet Library
      • Theodore C. Bestor (co-chiar)
      • Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University
      • Task Force Members (alphabetical)
      • Robin Le Blanc
      • Professor of Political Science, Washington & Lee University
      • Ian Condry
      • Professor of Cultural Studies, MIT
      • Patricia Crosby
      • Executive Editor, University of Hawaii Press
      • Izumi Koide
      • Director, Resource Center for the History of Entrepreneurship, Shibusawa Ei'ichi
      • Memorial Foundation
      • Haruko Nakamura
      • Librarian of the Japanese Collection, Yale University
      • Eiko Sakaguchi
      • Curator of the Gordon W. Prange and
      • East Asian Collections, University of Maryland
      • Toshiko Takenaka
      • Professor of Law, University of Washington Law School
      • Reiko Yoshimura
      • Director of the Library
      • Freer and Sackler Galleries The Smithsonian Institution
      • Gennifer Weisenfeld
      • Professor of Art History, Duke University
      • Bruce Willoughby
      • Executive Editor Publications Program
      • Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan
      • Members Ex-Officio
      • Tokiko Bazzell
      • Japanese Specialist Librarian University of Hawaii Manoa (Chair, NCC)
      • Victoria Lyon Bestor
      • Associate, Reischauer Institute Harvard University (NCC Executive Director)
      • As of 2009
    • 6. IUP TF: Goals
      • Document the range of problems encountered by US academics
      • Clarify the differences between publishing environments between US academic publishing and the publishing industry in Japan.
      • Organize a joint meeting with Japanese image right holders to promote mutual understanding and to solicit their advice on how to improve the process of securing permission to use Japanese images.
      • Develop a set of “Best Practices for Accessing Visual Images from Japan.”
    • 7. IUP Survey Modified from Table 1 in Bazzell Yamamoto Tokiko, Sakaguchi Eiko, Yasue Akio, “Kaigai Nihon kenkyusha no gazo riyo” in Shuppan Nyusu , no. 2147 (2008.7. gejun): p.8
    • 8. IUP Survey: Problems
      • Cannot locate appropriate contact or image rights holders.
      • Do not know whom to contact for permission.
      • Lack of understanding on Japanese legal issues and their differences from the US, including the interpretation of "fair use."
      • Lack of knowledge of Japanese social protocols.
      • Language problems - cannot write letters in Japanese or Japanese lenders do not read English.
      • Problems in explaining procedural differences to Japanese lenders and US publishers.
      • Payment method- many Japanese lenders require bank transfer in Japanese Yen and do not accept credit card.
      • And more…
      From IUP Task Force Status Report-March 2008 by Reiko Yoshimura [and Robin LeBlanc] NCC Open Meeting AAS Annual Conference in Atlanta
    • 9. IUP TF: Goals
      • Document the range of problems encountered by US academics.
      • Clarify the differences between publishing environments between US academic publishing and the publishing industry in Japan.
      • Organize a joint meeting with Japanese image right holders to promote mutual understanding and to solicit their advice on how to improve the process of securing permission to use Japanese images.
      • Develop a set of “Best Practices for Accessing Visual Images from Japan.”
    • 10. IUP Tokyo Symposium
      • Japanese Images:
      • Using Them to Support Japan Studies Internationally
      • June 23, 2008 International House of Japan
      • Morning Session: The current situation in North America
      • Afternoon Session: Procedures for obtaining permission for image use in Japan and advice for North American users
    • 11. Findings of the Tokyo Conference
      • Images are copyrighted, in general.
      • Which Country’s Copyright Laws?
      • Multiple Right Holders
      • “ Fair Use” and “Quotation”
      • Lack of Awareness on Japan Side
      • Language Problem
      • And more…
    • 12. IUP TF: Goals
      • Document the range of problems encountered by US academics.
      • Clarify the differences between publishing environments between US academic publishing and the publishing industry in Japan.
      • Organize a joint meeting with Japanese image right holders to promote mutual understanding and to solicit their advice on how to improve the process of securing permission to use Japanese images.
      • Develop a set of “Best Practices for Accessing Visual Images from Japan.”
    • 13. Acknowledgement
      • NCC thanks the following funders who made the IUP possible:
      • Japan Foundation
      • Toshiba International Foundation
      • Japan-US Friendship Commission
      • Shibusawa Eiichi Memorial Foundation
      • University of Toronto Libraries
      • The International House of Japan

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