Business letters pp

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This is a slide show designed to help students differentiate the difference between block and modified block style letters. It also provides information about the parts of the letter formatting styles.

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Business letters pp

  1. 1. Business LettersWhy Are They Important ?How Do You Create a Good Impression?<br />21st Century Skills Performance Assessment<br />2012-2013<br />Virginia Lee Taylor-Mounts<br />
  2. 2. Why Are They Important?<br />
  3. 3. Professional Communication<br />The reader’s time is very important; write clearly and carefully outline the intent of your communication.<br />The format of the letter helps to clarify the content of the letter.<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  4. 4. Business Letters<br />Professional Communication<br />Provide information<br />Advertise<br />Keep track of communications outside an organization<br />(Riverside, n.d.)<br />
  5. 5. Provide Information<br />Share ideas<br />Make offers<br />Request information<br />Offer thanks<br />Send congratulations<br />Introduce yourself or others<br />Make Recommendations<br />Apologize<br />("Etiquette for Writing Business Letters," n.d.)<br />
  6. 6. Advertise<br />These letters have common characteristics:<br />Find a common ground with the consumer<br />Consumers must feel they need your product<br />You should offer a solution to their problem<br />Show the consumer what’s in it for them<br />("Effective Advertising Messages," n.d.)<br />
  7. 7. Keep Track of Outside Communication<br />Provide documentation of important matters<br />Can be filed, scanned and filed electronically<br />More formal than email<br />Professional way to communicate<br />("Etiquette for Writing Business Letters," n.d.)<br />
  8. 8. Writing Letters<br />Intent of the communication<br />Know your audience<br />Language – tone, choice of words<br />Visual appearance—format of letter<br />(Riverside, n.d.)<br />
  9. 9. Intent of Communications<br />Purpose<br />Know why the correspondence is being written<br />What will the correspondence do for the reader<br />State you main point early<br />What action do you want out of the reader<br />("Purdue OWL: Effective Workplace Writing," n.d.)<br />
  10. 10. Know Your Audience<br />What is the expectation of your audience<br />Expectations<br />Characteristics<br />Goals<br />Why do they need this information<br />Know what information they need<br />Make your document persuasive<br />("Purdue OWL: Effective Workplace Writing," n.d.)<br />
  11. 11. Language—Tone & Choice of Words<br />Tone is a reflection of you and the company<br />You should:<br />Know why you are writing the document<br />What action do you want from the reader<br />Know what you want the reader to learn or understand<br />Tone affects how the reader will react to what is said<br />Know what tone you want to demonstrate<br />Confidence <br />Courteous<br />Sincere<br />("Purdue OWL: Effective Workplace Writing," n.d.)<br />
  12. 12. AIDA<br />Attention<br />Interest<br />Desire<br />Action<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  13. 13. Attention<br />Get the reader’s attention<br />Use a statement that will grab their attention.<br />Flattery<br />Ask a question<br />Surprise<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  14. 14. Interest<br />Get the reader interested in the reason for the letter<br />It could be your product, meeting, you as a prospective employee<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  15. 15. Desire<br />Explain what you can do for them, how you can help them<br />Be specific<br />Use professional language<br />Do not use slang<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  16. 16. Action<br />Tell them what action you want them to take<br />Don’t expect them to guess what you want them to do<br />Your words should help them understand how you can do something for them<br />("How to Write a Business Letter That Gets Results," n.d.)<br />
  17. 17. How Do You Create A Good Impression? <br />
  18. 18. Letter Formats<br />Block<br />Modified Block<br />
  19. 19. Block<br />Every thing begins at the let margin<br />No paragraph indentions<br />The date should be about 2 to 3 lines below the letterhead<br />Adjust this to create a pleasing appearance<br />All other spacing should remain true to standard<br />
  20. 20. Modified Block<br />The date begins 2 to 3 lines below the letterhead<br />Adjust this to create a pleasing appearance<br />All other spacing should remain true to standard<br /> The date, complimentary close, and typed signature begin at center <br />Paragraphs can be indented ½ inch or be block with the left hand margin<br />
  21. 21. Parts of the Letter<br />Address <br />Date<br />Salutation<br />Body of the Text<br />Closing<br />Enclosures<br />Typist initials<br />
  22. 22. Address <br />Return Address—address of the sender<br />Letterhead<br />Contains business name and address clearly identified<br />No letterhead<br />You must insert the return address<br />Do not use the sender’s name or title in the address<br />Use only the street address, city, state, and zip code<br />Place city, state, & zip code one line above the date<br />Place the street address on the line above the city, state, & zip code (see next slide for example)<br />("Purdue OWL: Basic Business Letters," n.d.)<br />
  23. 23. Address<br />Return Address<br />This is how the business address should look when not using letterhead stationary.<br />111 Blue Bird Lane<br />Anyplace, WV 12345<br />July 1, 2011<br />
  24. 24. Address <br />Mailing Address<br />Using letterhead<br />The mailing address is placed a quad space below the current date<br />("Purdue OWL: Basic Business Letters," n.d.)<br />
  25. 25. Date<br />This indicates the date the letter was written<br />Use American date format<br />Ex. July 1, 2011<br />Do not abbreviate the months<br />Write them out completely ("Purdue OWL: Basic Business Letters," n.d.)<br />Place the date approximately 2 or 3 lines below the letter head or about 2 inches from the top if you are not using letter head.<br />
  26. 26. Salutations<br />Use the personal title of the addressee<br />If you don’t know the gender of the addressee, use a nonsexist salutation or use the complete name.<br />Ex. “To Whom It May Concern”<br />Ex. “Dear Chris Harmon” ("Purdue OWL: Basic Business Letters," n.d.)<br />Place the salutation a double space below the mailing address.<br />
  27. 27. Body of Letter<br />All lines of the paragraph are single spaced<br />Double space between each paragraph<br />Modified Block Letter<br />Can have a ½ inch paragraph indention<br />Block Letter<br />Paragraph begins at the left margin<br />
  28. 28. Complimentary Close<br />Double space below the last paragraph of the letter<br />The first word of the complimentary begins with a capital letter; all other words begin with a lower case letter.<br />Place a comma after the last word of the complimentary close<br />
  29. 29. Typed Signature<br />Begins a quad space below the complimentary close<br />The blank spaces between the complimentary close and the typed signature provide room for the sender of the letter to sign the letter<br />If the sender has a title, please it on the line below the typed signature<br />
  30. 30. Complimentary Close andTyped Signature<br />Example:<br /> Sincerely,<br /> Mary B. Doe<br /> President<br />
  31. 31. Enclosures<br />Tells the reader that something besides the written letter in included in the envelope<br />It is placed a double space below the Typed Signature and/or Title<br />Example (Modified Block):<br />Sincerely,<br />Mary J. Brown<br />President<br />Enclosure (3)<br />
  32. 32. Typist Initials<br />Identifies the individual for typing the letter<br />Use lower case<br />It is placed a double space below the enclosure notation<br />Example (Modified Block):<br />Sincerely,<br />Mary J. Brown<br />President<br />Enclosure (3)<br />vltm<br />
  33. 33. Font<br />Preferred font is Times New Roman<br />Preferred size is 12<br />
  34. 34. Formatting the Business Letter<br />Margins—Block & Modified Block<br />
  35. 35. Formatting the Business Letter<br />Margins—Block & Modified Block<br />
  36. 36. Final Impression<br />Proofread, Proofread, Proofread ! ! !<br />Never mail a letter with a typing error.<br />Never mail a letter with a grammar error<br />Errors in letters can diminish the impression that you are making upon the reader. <br />
  37. 37. You Try It !<br />If you have any questions, review this PP again or email me.<br />Practice is located in the practice folder on the website!<br />

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