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Harriet Tubman Day One
 

Harriet Tubman Day One

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    Harriet Tubman Day One Harriet Tubman Day One Presentation Transcript

    • Splash from Harriet Tubman Conductor on the Underground Railroad 1. Take out “ new ” Cornell note paper. 2. Turn to Page 369.
    • Remember: You are ONLY to write what appears in BLUE. Cornell Notes
    • Before You Read Build Background In the period before and during the Civil War, the Underground Railroad was a series of secret travel routes and hiding places where people who opposed slavery hid slaves who were traveling North toward freedom. Harriet Tubman guided and aided runaways.
    • Before You Read When you analyze the historical context of a biography, you examine how the people in the text were affected by what was taking place in the world around them. Analyze Historical Context Cornell Notes
    • Before You Read In the notes section – Answer the following question “ What hardships can you predict the escaped slaves are going to face on their journey to freedom? Cornell Notes
    • Before You Read In the notes section – Answer the following question “ How could Harriet Tubman be a role model to people today? Cornell Notes
    • Before You Read Political History In the 1840s the Supreme Court ruled that people did not have to help bounty hunters capture runaway slaves. This ruling weakened the original Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. Congress’s 1850 Fugitive Slave Act appeased the South by allowing arrests of suspected slaves in northern states and imposing prison time and fines on people who helped fugitive slaves.
    • Before You Read Political History In the 1840s the Supreme Court ruled that people did not have to help bounty hunters capture runaway slaves. This ruling weakened the original Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. Congress’s 1850 Fugitive Slave Act appeased the South by allowing arrests of suspected slaves in northern states and imposing prison time and fines on people who helped fugitive slaves.
    • Reading the Selection In the Summary/Reflection answer the following question. In what ways can facing conflict make it harder to remain true to yourself? Cornell Notes
    • Reading the Selection What significance do you think the photograph of the lantern page 369 has to this selection?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first paragraph in the right-hand column on page 371. How did Tubman’s determination and leadership not only help the slaves but furthered the cause of women’s rights as well?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the right-hand column on page 372. Slavery was no longer practiced in Canada during the time of this account. (It was abolished in 1833.) What do you think life in Canada would be like for fugitive slaves almost twenty years after slavery was abolished there?
    • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 372. What do you think is more important to the escaping slaves in this engraving—the journey, or the destination?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the left-hand column on page 373. What are the qualities that made Thomas Garrett different from other members of the Underground Railroad?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Quakers, also known as the Society of Friends, are a Christian group that believes that humans are inherently good. How does Garrett show this Quaker belief in his treatment of fugitive slaves?
    • Before You Read Cultural History In Tubman’s time, slaves were worth about $1,000 each, which explains why she says she had $11,000 worth of property with her. This was a lot of money at that time — $1,000 dollars in 1851 would be approximately $23,000 today.
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last paragraph on page 374. Harriet Tubman was not a typical woman of her day. What are some things she did that set her apart from other women in that era?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first paragraph in the right-hand column on page 375. How could slave owners justify treating fellow human beings as possessions?
    • Before You Read Cultural History This was called the Middle Passage because it was the middle of a three-part journey for the slave traders—(1) from Europe to Africa, bearing goods to trade for slaves; (2) the middle passage, bringing the slaves to America; and (3) bringing the goods they traded the slaves for back to their homes in Europe.
    • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 375. Slaves often had to hid in places that were unpleasant and uncomfortable, like this swamp.
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first two paragraphs on page 376. What can you infer about how the escaped slaves felt about Tubman?
    • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 376. In what way does this painting illustrate the perils of attempting to escape slavery?
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last three paragraphs on page 377. Think about your prediction about the living conditions in Canada. How close were you to the conditions the author describes? Explain.
    • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last three paragraphs on page 377. The author describes the situation in St. Catharines. What is a reason for Tubman to regret living there?
    • Before You Read Cultural History Escaped slaves began to settle in Canada as early as 1817. Most settled along Lake Erie and the Niagara River, moving into areas with a large African American population as a way to protect themselves from bounty hunters. Many Great Lakes ships would transport escaped slaves free of charge and drop them on Canadian soil.
    • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 378. Review this historical photograph of Harriet Tubman. What can you infer about her personality based on her facial expression, posture, and clothing? Is this image of Tubman in keeping with Ann Petry’s portrayal? Explain.
    • Reading the Selection