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Harriet tubmandayone Harriet tubmandayone Presentation Transcript

  • Splash from Harriet Tubman Conductor on the Underground Railroad 1. Take out “ new ” Cornell note paper. 2. Turn to Page 369.
  • PSSA Word of the Day Process of Elimination Eliminating Incorrect Answers ✪ If you cannot quickly decide on the best answer to a multiple-choice question, you can use the process of elimination to help find the answer. ✪ In this process, you identify choices that are incorrect, often in several stages. ✪ Eliminating incorrect answers makes it much easier to choose the best answer. The process of elimination involves these steps. Step 1: Identify answer choices that are obviously wrong. Put a small x by these choices. Step 2: Reread the passage and the question carefully. Step 3: Choose between the answer choices that remain.
  • PSSA Word of the Day Process of Elimination Bob sat down at the table and put his head in his hands. He had a disgruntled look on his face. “I can’t believe that Mr. Hardison chose Alison Miller to represent the school of the Model United Nations this year. I’m the one he should have chosen.” What does the word disgruntled mean in this passage? A. delicious C. pleased B. dissatisfied D. infuriated Step 1: Eliminate the answer choices that are obviously wrong. Answer choice (A) makes no sense—what would it mean to have “a delicious look” on one’s face? This is nonsense, so it cannot be the correct answer. Answer choice (C) is also incorrect. From the context you can tell that Maria is NOT pleased.
  • PSSA Word of the Day Process of Elimination Bob sat down at the table and put his head in his hands. He had a disgruntled look on his face. “I can’t believe that Mr. Hardison chose Alison Miller to represent the school of the Model United Nations this year. I’m the one he should have chosen.” Q. What does the word disgruntled mean in this passage? A. delicious C. pleased B. dissatisfied D. infuriated Step 2: Go back and read the paragraph again carefully. It is clear that Bob is unhappy, since he “put his head in his hands” and then complained about something Coach Baker had done.
  • PSSA Word of the Day Process of Elimination Bob sat down at the table and put his head in his hands. He had a disgruntled look on his face. “I can’t believe that Mr. Hardison chose Alison Miller to represent the school of the Model United Nations this year. I’m the one he should have chosen.” Q. What does the word disgruntled mean in this passage? A. delicious C. pleased B. dissatisfied D. infuriated Step 3: You have eliminated choices (A) and (C). Of the remaining answer choices, which one seems to be the best answers? Someone who is infuriated is extremely angry. Does Bob show signs of extreme anger? No. He is not yelling. He has not lost his temper. He is, however, dissatisfied. The correct answer is (B).
  • Remember: You are ONLY to write what appears in BLUE. Cornell Notes
  • Cornell Notes Topic: What is more important, the journey or the destination?
    • Questions/Main Idea:
    • What hardships can you predict the escaped slaves are going to face on their journey to freedom?
    • How could Harriet Tubman be a role model to people today?
  • Cornell Notes Questions/Main Idea: Tuesday’s Homework Read the poem Harriet Tubman and answer the question on the back of the handout.
  • Before You Read Meet Eloise Greenfield
  • Before You Read Read to understand Harriet Tubman’s difficult path as she led others to freedom. Set a Purpose for Reading
  • Before You Read Build Background In the period before and during the Civil War, the Underground Railroad was a series of secret travel routes and hiding places where people who opposed slavery hid slaves who were traveling North toward freedom. Harriet Tubman guided and aided runaways.
  • Before You Read When you analyze the historical context of a biography, you examine how the people in the text were affected by what was taking place in the world around them. Analyze Historical Context Cornell Notes
  • Before You Read In the notes section – Answer the following question “ What hardships can you predict the escaped slaves are going to face on their journey to freedom? Draw an arrow from the question to your answer. Cornell Notes
  • Before You Read In the notes section – Answer the following question “ How could Harriet Tubman be a role model to people today? Draw an arrow from the question to your answer. Cornell Notes
  • Before You Read Political History In the 1840s the Supreme Court ruled that people did not have to help bounty hunters capture runaway slaves. This ruling weakened the original Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. Congress’s 1850 Fugitive Slave Act appeased the South by allowing arrests of suspected slaves in northern states and imposing prison time and fines on people who helped fugitive slaves.
  • Before You Read Political History In the 1840s the Supreme Court ruled that people did not have to help bounty hunters capture runaway slaves. This ruling weakened the original Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. Congress’s 1850 Fugitive Slave Act appeased the South by allowing arrests of suspected slaves in northern states and imposing prison time and fines on people who helped fugitive slaves.
  • Reading the Selection In the Summary/Reflection answer the following question. In what ways can facing conflict make it harder to remain true to yourself? Cornell Notes
  • Before You Read
  • Reading the Selection What significance do you think the photograph of the lantern page 369 has to this selection? Answer: You may say that Harriet Tubman is like a lantern that guides African Americans out of the darkness of slavery.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first paragraph in the right-hand column on page 371. How did Tubman’s determination and leadership not only help the slaves but furthered the cause of women’s rights as well? Answer: Tubman’s actions showed that a woman could do things a man could do, in some cases, even better than a man, which helped both the women’s rights and the suffragette movements.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the right-hand column on page 372. Slavery was no longer practiced in Canada during the time of this account. (It was abolished in 1833.) What do you think life in Canada would be like for fugitive slaves almost twenty years after slavery was abolished there? Answer: Possible answer: The fugitives would be free to earn a living, worship, buy property, travel, and participate in government.
  • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 372. What do you think is more important to the escaping slaves in this engraving—the journey, or the destination? Answer: You may say that the destination is more important because they will be free when they reach their destination.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the left-hand column on page 373. What are the qualities that made Thomas Garrett different from other members of the Underground Railroad? Answer: Garrett’s speech and clothing were different because he was a Quaker. He also gave the fugitives new shoes.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Quakers, also known as the Society of Friends, are a Christian group that believes that humans are inherently good. How does Garrett show this Quaker belief in his treatment of fugitive slaves? Answer: Garrett was a friend to all fugitives. Although he was strong, he only used his strength to help people, never to harm them. He made sure they were safe in his house.
  • Before You Read Cultural History In Tubman’s time, slaves were worth about $1,000 each, which explains why she says she had $11,000 worth of property with her. This was a lot of money at that time — $1,000 dollars in 1851 would be approximately $23,000 today.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last paragraph on page 374. Harriet Tubman was not a typical woman of her day. What are some things she did that set her apart from other women in that era? Answer: Possible answer: She risked her life to help others. She spent long periods of time away from home. She carried a gun and threatened to use it.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first paragraph in the right-hand column on page 375. How could slave owners justify treating fellow human beings as possessions? Answer: Possible answer: Slave owners claimed that they were caring for the slaves like parents cared for children, that the Bible provides a historical precedent, and that owners have a right to own slaves.
  • Before You Read Cultural History This was called the Middle Passage because it was the middle of a three-part journey for the slave traders—(1) from Europe to Africa, bearing goods to trade for slaves; (2) the middle passage, bringing the slaves to America; and (3) bringing the goods they traded the slaves for back to their homes in Europe.
  • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 375. Slaves often had to hid in places that were unpleasant and uncomfortable, like this swamp.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the first two paragraphs on page 376. What can you infer about how the escaped slaves felt about Tubman? Answer: They admired and loved her for helping them find freedom, but also felt misplaced resentment toward her for the hardship she was putting them through to get there.
  • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 376. In what way does this painting illustrate the perils of attempting to escape slavery? Answer: You may say that the wilderness terrain is difficult to navigate. Others might point out the dogs that have been sent to track the escaped slaves. One of the fugitives may have already been attacked by the dogs because he seems to be unable to walk on his own.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last three paragraphs on page 377. Think about your prediction about the living conditions in Canada. How close were you to the conditions the author describes? Explain. Answer: Possible response: My prediction was mostly accurate. Although I knew that Canada was not as racially divided as the United States, I didn’t know that former slaves could be elected to public office there.
  • Reading the Selection Analyze Historical Context Read the last three paragraphs on page 377. The author describes the situation in St. Catharines. What is a reason for Tubman to regret living there? Answer: She misses the mild Maryland climate.
  • Before You Read Cultural History Escaped slaves began to settle in Canada as early as 1817. Most settled along Lake Erie and the Niagara River, moving into areas with a large African American population as a way to protect themselves from bounty hunters. Many Great Lakes ships would transport escaped slaves free of charge and drop them on Canadian soil.
  • Reading the Selection Look at the painting on page 378. Review this historical photograph of Harriet Tubman. What can you infer about her personality based on her facial expression, posture, and clothing? Is this image of Tubman in keeping with Ann Petry’s portrayal? Explain. Answer: Tubman was very serious and dedicated. This fits Petry’s portrayal of a woman who was very committed to her cause.
  • Reading the Selection
  • After You Read Answer: Summaries should include Tubman’s technique for freeing the slaves from the plantation, her difficulties during the escape, how she helped the freed slaves once they arrived, and what she did the next year. Respond and Think Critically 1. Write a brief summary of the main events in this biography before you answer the following questions. For help on writing a summary, see page 185. [Summarize]
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically 2. What is another way of saying “Freedom is not bought with dust”? [Interpret] Answer: Freedom doesn’t come easily or cheaply.
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically 3. What were some effective methods that Tubman used to motivate the escapees? [Infer] Answer: Tubman could motivate the escapees because she had direct experience with slavery and escape. She inspires hope and fear through stories of those she knew who had escaped and those who had given up and been recaptured.
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically 4. Text-to-Text In what ways does your knowledge of Tubman’s journey with the eleven fugitives affect your understanding of Greenfield’s poem “Harriet Tubman”? [Connect] Answer: I now understand the events that inspired the author to write the poem, including the distance Tubman traveled and the relationships she had to build in order to make the escapes successful.
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically 5. Analyze Historical Context What were some obstacles that the runaway slaves faced on their journey? Use your web to help you answer the question. [Analyze]
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically Answer: The runaways experienced hunger, fatigue, homelessness, and poor weather. They were breaking the law by running away, and the Fugitive Slave Act meant they could be returned to their owners if they were found. They were constantly afraid and they were often irritable, suspicious, depressed, and mutinous.
  • After You Read Respond and Think Critically Answer: Each time she “conducted” a journey, she had to be willing to risk her life and undergo hardships and put other people’s lives first. 6. What do you think were the most difficult things Tubman had to accept when she decided to devote her life to helping others escape slavery? [Evaluate]
  • After You Read
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