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When Two Worlds Collide: Using Agile Story Points AND Management Time Tracking
 

When Two Worlds Collide: Using Agile Story Points AND Management Time Tracking

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Presented by Nicole Bryan, VP of Product at Tasktop ...

Presented by Nicole Bryan, VP of Product at Tasktop

Congratulations, you've successfully adopted Agile methods! You've been at it for six months, and you're humming along like a well-oiled machine. You've even scaled to multiple separate agile teams. Your developers are happy and production seems to be up!

And then the dreaded question comes – "We need this feature, how long will it take?" Your answer … "We've estimated that to be about 50 story points." Blank stare.

It's no secret, there are some challenges in trying to marry Agile processes to outside stakeholder needs. For example, Agile teams may prefer to use Story Points as an estimate of the complexity of a story, while business stakeholders generally just want to know how many person-hours a feature will require. Often the PMO is interested in tracking developer time in order to better understand their Return on Investment. But their instructions to use time-tracking tools is met with either simple annoyance our outright disdain.

In this webinar, Nicole explores some of the challenges that arise when marrying Agile processes to outside stakeholder needs. She shows you practical ways to make the translation of Agile, to the Rest of the World, as painless as possible – and helps show you why it actually helps development teams in the end.

This webinar was presented on October 23 2013

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  • Use Mylyn to auto track time directly in your IDEUse an agile tool that has work logs in the agile tool directlyAlmost every agile tool has the ability to track time now “Work log” vs. “Timesheets”And for a cherry on top …Use Sync to then Sync that over to the PMO tool (e.g. CA Clarity) to have timesheets automatically filled in based on your work logs in your agile tool!(Now the PMO won’t bug you about estimates OR timesheets!!!)

When Two Worlds Collide: Using Agile Story Points AND Management Time Tracking When Two Worlds Collide: Using Agile Story Points AND Management Time Tracking Presentation Transcript

  • Time Man Hours Agile Relative Complexity Story Points PMO
  • The dreaded question: We need this feature, how long will it take? The equally dreaded response: It will take 50 story points
  • and logging
  • Selfish Ulterior Motive
  • Self-Improvement requires introspection and data The ultimate irony: What the PMO needs for its success is also what your team needs for its success
  • and track But disassociate the two – only look after the fact …. Hmmmm...
  • Estimation that accurately reflects relative complexity Is there a (relatively) even distribution of hours taken to complete stories that directly correlates to number of story points? Metric Average hours logged by story points
  • 40 20 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours 40 Hmmmm... 20 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours Take some old 2 pt stories that took 48 hours to complete and compare to the 2-4 hour stories – talk it through as a team to understand why the disparity • Technical debt? • Large disparity in experience on team? • “Lip Service” to estimation?
  • 20 10 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours 20 10 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours • Both could be ok! Just reflect different types of teams
  • 35 30 25 20 2 Point Story 15 3 Point Story 10 5 Point Story 8 Point Story 5 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours
  • 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Hmmmm... 2 Point Story 3 Point Story 5 Point Story 8 Point Story 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours > 72 Hours Indicative of a micro problem • Discuss specific stories that have been given 5 vs 3 points • Was it for a specific feature or set of stories that this happened?
  • 12 Hmmmm... Hmmmm... 10 8 2 Point Story 6 3 Point Story 4 5 Point Story 2 8 Point Story 0 1-2 Hours 2-4 Hours 4-8 Hours 8-12 Hours > 24 Hours > 48 Hours Indicative of a more macro problem • Significant technical debt? • Team education on estimation? > 72 Hours
  • Minimize disruption to the team when team changes occur Is there significant disparity between a new team member and the rest of the team in terms of time taken to complete stories? Metric Average hours logged by story points
  • Clear Pattern: Larger story, more hours
  • Hmmmm... Jennifer Clear Pattern: Larger story, more hours Jane No Clear Pattern! Is Jane junior or senior? • If junior: Does she need some mentoring? Should you institute pair programming for the next few sprints? • If senior: Is her ideal time playing a role?
  • Team Signature Team Signature Team Signature
  • Have I Convinced You Yet? No?
  • ©2013 Rally Software Development Corp
  • ©2013 Rally Software Development Corp No eating unless the PMO is happy too!
  • Mylyn Agile Tool With Work logs or Timesheets
  • SLI Pattern Applies to Diagrams
  • Selfish Ulterior Motive