Seminar on u a-v

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Seminar on u a-v

  1. 1. SEMINAR ON U-A-V PRESENTED BY-TARUN KUMAR MCA-4TH SEM ROLL NO-209077
  2. 2. UNMANNED AERIAL DRONES  History  Military Use  Civilian Use  Public Fears  Matt Burns, Cory Dressler, Katie Eakins, Ally Zimmer, Alyssa Clevenger, Patrick Blood
  3. 3. Unmanned Air Vehicle Origins Necessity, the “mother of invention” produced flying bomb concepts during the FirstWorld War.The armistice halted experiments on all but targets.  1917: French artillery officer, Rene`Lorin proposed flying bombs using gyroscopic and barometric stabilization and control.  1918: Germany halts development of guided weapons.  1918: Charles Kettering (USA) flies Liberty Eagle “Kettering Bug” and Army Air Corps orders 75 copies.  1920: Elmer Sperry perfects the gyroscope and the first enabling technology makes flight control feasible  1932: RAE “Fairey Queen” crashes, technology is still in its infancy. Fairey Queen IIIF Mark IIIB, 1932
  4. 4. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES  MILITARY USES • Attacking targets remotely without risking American lives. • Constant surveillance of enemy targets. • Near-instant strikes on targets of opportunity. • Air support for ground troops and allied forces.
  5. 5. Design of UAV Systems Introduction to UAVs 1990s - Reusable launchersDesign of UAV Systems Introduction to UAVs UAV UAV http://www.fas.org
  6. 6. Example - Manned airspaceDesign of UAV Systems Introduction to UAVs All countries have rules for how aircraft must operate in their airspace. • Most follow guidelines developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) • Rules apply to two types of airspace - Enroute airspace - the airways -Terminal airspace - around airports Airspace rules are based on manned aircraft experience • The established system is complex and slow to change Pilots, not ground controllers, have primary responsibility for safe operation/separation of aircraft • UAVs have ground (?) controllers not pilots UAVs will have to fit into a pilot based system
  7. 7. Example - Base operationsDesign of UAV Systems Introduction to UAVs Main Base Forward Base Emergency Base
  8. 8. QuestionDesign of UAV Systems Introduction to UAVs What do these challenges have to do with us (Aerospace Engineers)? •UAVs are air vehicles, they fly like airplanes and operate in an airplane environment -They are designed like air vehicles -They have to meet flight critical air vehicle requirements - Aerospace engineers understand the environment, the requirements and the design challenges •We know how to integrate complex, multi-disciplinary systems We provide leadership in development of air vehicle systems - UAVs are simply our next air vehicle system challenge
  9. 9. Global Hawk HAE UAV High Altitude Endurance Unmanned Aerial Reconnaissance System  Mission  Provide continuous day / night, high altitude, all weather surveillance and reconnaissance in direct support of allied ground and air forces across the spectrum of conflict  Increase the reach of existing and future surveillance systems  Extraordinary range and endurance  Fewer number of systems required to maintain global ISR coverage
  10. 10. Global Hawk HAE UAV The Global Hawk is an Integrated System Speed (n.miles/hour)
  11. 11. Global Hawk System Overview TACTICAL USERS (SENSOR ONLY) LAUNCH AND RECOVERY ELEMENT (C2 ONLY) MISSION CONTROL ELEMENT (C2 & SENSOR) C2 LOS COMMUNICATIONS UHF-Band: C2 LOS UHFSATCOM C2 C2 C2 C2 SATCOM INMARSAT C2 INMARSAT or Equivalent SENSOR Ku SATCOM Ku-Band: C2 and Sensor SATCOM C2 & SENSOR C2 & SENSOR CDL SENSORCDL C2 & SENSOR X-Band CDL: C2 and Sensor LOS ATC VOICE ATC Voice
  12. 12. Global Hawk Vehicle Size Length: 97 feet Wingspan: 94 feet Max Takeoff Wt: 130,000 lb. Loiter Speed: Operational Ceiling: 40,000 feet Max Unrefueled Range: 2,700 NM Length: 44.4 feet Wingspan: 116 feet Height: 15.2 feet (at tail) Max.Takeoff Wt: 25,600 lb. Loiter Speed: Operational Ceiling: 65,000 feet Max Unrefueled Range:over 12,000NM Length: 63.1 feet Wingspan: 104.8 feet Height: 16.7 feet (at tail) Max Takeoff Wt: 40,000 lb. Maximum Speed: 410 kts. TAS Operational Ceiling: over 70,000 feet Max Unrefueled Range: over 3,000 NM B-737U-2 Global Hawk 573 kts. TAS 343 kts. TAS
  13. 13. Airframe  Metallic  Aluminum  Steel  Titanium  Magnesium  Composite  Fiberglass  Graphite  Molded  Sheet Molded Compound
  14. 14. Propulsion  Reciprocating ( Aircraft)  2 Cylinder 2 Cycle  Turbo Prop  Turbo Jet  Turbo Fan  Ramjet  Pulse Jet  Rocket  Electric Motors
  15. 15. Flight Controls  Analog  Digital  Hybrid  Duplex  Triplex  Electrostatic • AHRS (Gyros) • Inertial • Formation Flight • Autonomous Flight – Active Real-Time – Re-Planning – Re-Tasking
  16. 16. Secondary Power  Batteries  Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)  Solar  Generator
  17. 17. Actuation System  Hydraulic  Pnuematic  Electro- Mechanical  Linear/Rotary  Push/Pull  Cables/Pulleys
  18. 18. File Name.18 As of (date) The Networked Vision of the Future UAVs Are A Major Part of the Vision
  19. 19. Questions?

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