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Fortran 90 BasicsFortran 90 Basics
I don’t know what the programming languageI don t know what the programming language
of...
F90 Program StructureF90 Program Structure
A Fortran 90 program has the following form:A Fortran 90 program has the follow...
Program CommentsProgram Comments
Comments start with a !Comments start with a !
Everything following ! will be ignored
Thi...
Continuation LinesContinuation Lines
Fortran 90 is not completely format-free!Fortran 90 is not completely format free!
A ...
AlphabetsAlphabets
Fortran 90 alphabets include the following:Fortran 90 alphabets include the following:
Upper and lower ...
Constants: 1/6Constants: 1/6
A Fortran 90 constant may be an integer, real,A Fortran 90 constant may be an integer, real,
...
Constants: 2/6Constants: 2/6
A real constant has two forms, decimal andA real constant has two forms, decimal and
exponent...
Constants: 3/6Constants: 3/6
A real constant has two forms, decimal andA real constant has two forms, decimal and
exponent...
Constants: 4/6Constants: 4/6
A logical constant is either .TRUE. or .FALSE.g S
Note that the periods surrounding TRUE and
...
Constants: 5/6Constants: 5/6
A character string or character constant is aA character string or character constant is a
st...
Constants: 6/6Constants: 6/6
A string has length zero (i.e., no content) is ang g ( , )
empty string.
If single (or double...
Identifiers: 1/2Identifiers: 1/2
A Fortran 90 identifier can have no more thanA Fortran 90 identifier can have no more tha...
Identifiers: 2/2Identifiers: 2/2
Unlike Java, C, C++, etc, Fortran 90 does not, , , ,
have reserved words. This means one ...
Declarations: 1/3Declarations: 1/3
Fortran 90 uses the following for variableFortran 90 uses the following for variable
de...
Declarations: 2/3Declarations: 2/3
Character variables require additionalCharacter variables require additional
informatio...
Declarations: 3/3Declarations: 3/3
Examples:Examples:
CHARACTER(LEN=20) :: Answer, Quote
Variables Answer and Quote can ho...
The PARAMETER Attribute: 1/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 1/4
A PARAMETER identifier is a name whose value
cannot be modified. ...
The PARAMETER Attribute: 2/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 2/4
Since CHARACTER identifiers have a lengthg
attribute, it is a lit...
The PARAMETER Attribute: 3/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 3/4
Since Fortran 90 strings are of fixed length, oneSince Fortran 90...
The PARAMETER Attribute: 4/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 4/4
By convention, PARAMETER identifiers use ally ,
upper cases. Howe...
Variable Initialization: 1/2Variable Initialization: 1/2
A variable receives its value withA variable receives its value w...
Variable Initialization: 2/2Variable Initialization: 2/2
Variable initialization is very similar to what weVariable initia...
Arithmetic OperatorsArithmetic Operators
There are four types of operators in Fortran 90:There are four types of operators...
Operator PriorityOperator Priority
** is the highest; * and / are the next, followedg ; / ,
by + and -. All relational ope...
Expression EvaluationExpression Evaluation
Expressions are evaluated from left to right.Expressions are evaluated from lef...
Single Mode ExpressionSingle Mode Expression
A single mode arithmetic expression is anA single mode arithmetic expression ...
Mixed Mode Expression: 1/2Mixed Mode Expression: 1/2
If operands have different types, it is mixedIf operands have differe...
Mixed Mode Expression: 2/2Mixed Mode Expression: 2/2
Note that a**b**c is a**(b**c) instead of( )
(a**b)**c, and a**(b**c)...
The Assignment Statement: 1/2The Assignment Statement: 1/2
The assignment statement has a form ofThe assignment statement ...
The Assignment Statement: 2/2The Assignment Statement: 2/2
The left example uses an initialized variableThe left example u...
Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 1/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 1/4
Fortran provides many commonly usedFortran provides many ...
Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 2/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 2/4
Some mathematical functions:Some mathematical functions:
...
Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 3/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 3/4
Some conversion functions:Some conversion functions:
Func...
Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 4/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 4/4
Other functions:Other functions:
Function Meaning Arg. Ty...
Expression EvaluationExpression Evaluation
Functions have the highest priority.
Function arguments are evaluated first.
Th...
What is IMPLICIT NONE?What is IMPLICIT NONE?
Fortran has an interesting tradition: allg
variables starting with i, j, k, l...
List-Directed READ: 1/5List Directed READ: 1/5
Fortran 90 uses the READ(*,*) statement to( , )
read data into variables fr...
List-Directed READ: 2/5List Directed READ: 2/5
Data Preparation GuidelinesData Preparation Guidelines
READ(*,*) reads data...
List-Directed READ: 3/5List Directed READ: 3/5
The execution of READ(*,*) always starts withf ( , ) y
a new line!
Then it ...
List-Directed READ: 4/5List Directed READ: 4/5
Be careful when input items are on multiple lines.Be careful when input ite...
List-Directed READ: 5/5List Directed READ: 5/5
Since READ(*,*) always starts with a new line,( , ) y ,
a READ(*,*) without...
List-Directed WRITE: 1/3List Directed WRITE: 1/3
Fortran 90 uses the WRITE(*,*) statement to( , )
write information to scr...
List-Directed WRITE: 2/3List Directed WRITE: 2/3
Here is a simple example:Here is a simple example:
INTEGER :: Target
mean...
List-Directed WRITE: 3/3List Directed WRITE: 3/3
The previous example used LEN=* , whichp p ,
means the length of a CHARAC...
Complete Example: 1/4Complete Example: 1/4
This program computes the position (x and yp g p p ( y
coordinates) and the vel...
Complete Example: 2/4Complete Example: 2/4
The horizontal and vertical components of the velocityp y
vector are computed a...
Complete Example: 3/4Complete Example: 3/4
Write a program to read in the launch angle a, the timep g g ,
since launch t, ...
Complete Example: 4/4Complete Example: 4/4
Write a program to read in the launch angle a, the timep g g ,
since launch t, ...
CHARACTER Operator //CHARACTER Operator //
Fortran 90 uses // to concatenate two strings.// g
If strings A and B have leng...
CHARACTER Substring: 1/3CHARACTER Substring: 1/3
A consecutive portion of a string is a substring.p g g
To use substrings,...
CHARACTER Substring: 2/3CHARACTER Substring: 2/3
In (integer-exp1:integer-exp2), if the( g p g p ),
first exp1 is missing,...
CHARACTER Substring: 3/3CHARACTER Substring: 3/3
Substrings can be used on either side of theg
assignment operator.
Suppos...
Example: 1/5Example: 1/5
This program uses the DATE AND TIME()p g _ _ ()
Fortran 90 intrinsic function to retrieve the
sys...
Example: 2/5Example: 2/5
The following shows the specification part.g p p
Note the handy way of changing string length.
PR...
Example: 3/5Example: 3/5
Decompose DateINFO into year, month andp y ,
day. DateINFO has a form of ccyymmdd,
where cc = cen...
Example: 4/5Example: 4/5
Now do the same for time:Now do the same for time:
Hour = TimeINFO(1:2)
Minute = TimeINFO(3:4)Min...
Example: 5/5Example: 5/5
We may also use substring to achieve the samey g
result:
PrettyTime = “ “ ! Initialize to all bla...
What KIND Is It?What KIND Is It?
Fortran 90 has a KIND attribute for selectingg
the precision of a numerical constant/vari...
What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 1/2What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 1/2
Function SELECTED_INT_KIND(k) selects the_ _
KIND of an integ...
What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 2/2What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 2/2
SELECTED_INT_KIND() is usually used in the_ _ y
specification...
What KIND Is It (REAL)? 1/2What KIND Is It (REAL)? 1/2
Use SELECTED REAL KIND(k,e) to specify aS _ _ ( , ) p y
KIND for RE...
What KIND Is It (REAL)? 2/2What KIND Is It (REAL)? 2/2
Here is an example:Here is an example:
INTEGER, PARAMETER :: &
SING...
Why KIND, etc? 1/2Why KIND, etc? 1/2
Old Fortran used INTEGER*2, REAL*8,, ,
DOUBLE PRECISION, etc to specify the
“precisio...
Why KIND, etc? 2/2Why KIND, etc? 2/2
Due to the differences among computerDue to the differences among computer
hardware a...
Fortran 90 Control StructuresFortran 90 Control Structures
Computer programming is an art form,
like the creation of poetr...
LOGICAL VariablesLOGICAL Variables
A LOGIAL variable can only hold either .TRUE.y
or .FALSE. , and cannot hold values of a...
Relational Operators: 1/4Relational Operators: 1/4
Fortran 90 has six relational operators: <, <=,p , ,
>, >=, ==, /=.
Eac...
Relational Operators: 2/4Relational Operators: 2/4
Relational operators have lower priority thanRelational operators have ...
Relational Operators: 3/4Relational Operators: 3/4
For maximum portability, only assume thep y, y
following orders for let...
Relational Operators: 4/4Relational Operators: 4/4
String comparison rules:g p
Start scanning from the first character.
If...
LOGICAL Operators: 1/2LOGICAL Operators: 1/2
There are 5 LOGICAL operators in Fortranp
90: .NOT., .OR., .AND., .EQV. and ....
LOGICAL Operators: 2/2LOGICAL Operators: 2/2
If INTEGER variables m, n, x and y have, , y
values 3, 5, 4 and 2, respective...
IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 1/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 1/4
Fortran 90 has three if-then-else forms.
The most complete one is t...
IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 2/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 2/4
IF-THEN-ELSE-IF-END IF is the following.g
Logical expressions are e...
IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 3/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 3/4
Two Examples:Two Examples:
Find the minimum of a, b and c
and saves...
IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 4/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 4/4
The ELSE-IF part and ELSE part are optional.p p p
If the ELSE part ...
Example: 1/2Example: 1/2
Given a quadratic equation ax2 +bx + c = 0,Given a quadratic equation ax bx c 0,
where a 0, its r...
Example: 2/2Example: 2/2
The following shows the executable partThe following shows the executable part
READ(*,*) a, b, c
...
IF-THEN-ELSE Can be Nested: 1/2IF THEN ELSE Can be Nested: 1/2
Another look at the quadratic equation solver.Another look ...
IF-THEN-ELSE Can be Nested: 2/2IF THEN ELSE Can be Nested: 2/2
Here is the big ELSE part:g S p
d b*b 4 0*a*cd = b*b - 4.0*...
Logical IFLogical IF
The logical IF is from Fortran 66, which is ang ,
improvement over the Fortran I arithmetic IF.
If lo...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 1/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 1/7
Fortran 90 has the SELECT CASE statement forS S
selective exe...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 2/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 2/7
The label-list is a list of the following forms:The label lis...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 3/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 3/7
The SELECT CASE statement is SELECT CASE (selector)
executed ...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 4/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 4/7
Some important notes:Some important notes:
The values in labe...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 5/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 5/7
Two examples of SELECT CASE:p S S
CHARACTER(LEN=4) :: Title
I...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 6/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 6/7
Here is a more complex example:Here is a more complex example...
The SELECT CASE Statement: 7/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 7/7
PROGRAM CharacterTesting
IMPLICIT NONE
CHARACTER(LEN=1) :: In...
The Counting DO Loop: 1/6The Counting DO Loop: 1/6
Fortran 90 has two forms of DO loop: thep
counting DO and the general D...
The Counting DO Loop: 2/6The Counting DO Loop: 2/6
Before a DO-loop starts, expressions initial,p , p ,
final and step are...
The Counting DO Loop: 3/6The Counting DO Loop: 3/6
If step is positive:p p
The control-var receives the value of initial.
...
The Counting DO Loop: 4/6The Counting DO Loop: 4/6
If step is negative:p g
The control-var receives the value of initial.
...
The Counting DO Loop: 5/6The Counting DO Loop: 5/6
Two simple examples:Two simple examples:
INTEGER :: N, k odd integers
b...
The Counting DO Loop: 6/6The Counting DO Loop: 6/6
Important Notes:Important Notes:
The step size step cannot be zero
N h ...
General DO-Loop with EXIT: 1/2General DO Loop with EXIT: 1/2
The general DO-loop has the following form:The general DO loo...
General DO-Loop with EXIT: 2/2General DO Loop with EXIT: 2/2
REAL PARAMETER :: Lower = 1 0 Upper = 1 0 Step = 0 25REAL, PA...
Example, exp(x): 1/2Example, exp(x): 1/2
The exp(x) function has an infinite series:The exp(x) function has an infinite se...
Example, exp(x): 2/2Example, exp(x): 2/2
Note:
1
( 1)! ! 1
i i
x x x
i i i
This is not a good solution, though.
( 1)! ! 1i...
Example, Prime Checking: 1/2Example, Prime Checking: 1/2
A positive integer n >= 2 is a prime number if theA positive inte...
Example, Prime Checking: 2/2Example, Prime Checking: 2/2
INTEGER :: Number ! the input number
INTEGER :: Divisor ! the run...
Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 1/2Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 1/2
The previous program can be modified to findThe previous ...
Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 2/2Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 2/2
Count = 1 ! input is correct. start counting
WRITE(*,*) !...
Factoring a Number: 1/3Factoring a Number: 1/3
Given a positive integer, one can always factorizep g , y
it into prime fac...
Factoring a Number: 2/3Factoring a Number: 2/3
PROGRAM Factorize
IMPLICIT NONE
INTEGER :: Input
INTEGER :: Divisor
INTEGER...
Factoring a Number: 3/3Factoring a Number: 3/3
Divisor = 3 ! now we only worry about odd factors
DO ! Try 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 ....
Handling End-of-File: 1/3Handling End of File: 1/3
Very frequently we don’t know the number ofVery frequently we don t kno...
Handling End-of-File: 2/3Handling End of File: 2/3
Every file is ended with a special character.Every file is ended with a...
Handling End-of-File: 3/3Handling End of File: 3/3
i t t t
INTEGER :: io, x, sum 1
3
The total is 8
input output
sum = 0
D...
Computing Means, etc: 1/4Computing Means, etc: 1/4
Let us compute the arithmetic, geometric andLet us compute the arithmet...
Computing Means, etc: 2/4Computing Means, etc: 2/4
PROGRAM ComputingMeansPROGRAM ComputingMeans
IMPLICIT NONE
REAL :: X
RE...
Computing Means, etc: 3/4Computing Means, etc: 3/4
DO
READ(*,*,IOSTAT=IO) X ! read in data
IF (IO < 0) EXIT ! IO < 0 means...
Computing Means, etc: 4/4Computing Means, etc: 4/4
WRITE(*,*)
IF (TotalValid > 0) THEN
Arithmetic = Sum / TotalValid
Geome...
Fortran 90 ArraysFortran 90 Arrays
Program testing can be used to show the presence of bugsProgram testing can be used to ...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 1/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 1/6
A Fortran 90 program uses the DIMENSIONp g
attribute to declare a...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 2/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 2/6
The rank and shape of an array is representedThe rank and shape o...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 3/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 3/6
The extent is written as m:n, where m and n (mThe extent is writt...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 4/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 4/6
The DIMENSION attribute has the followingg
form:
DIMENSION(extent...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 5/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 5/6
Here are some examples:Here are some examples:
DIMENSION(-1:1) is...
The DIMENSION Attribute: 6/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 6/6
Array declaration is simple. Add they p
DIMENSION attribute to a ...
Use of Arrays: 1/3Use of Arrays: 1/3
Fortran 90 has, in general, three different ways, g , y
to use arrays: referring to i...
Use of Arrays: 2/3Use of Arrays: 2/3
Suppose we have the following declarationsSuppose we have the following declarations
...
Use of Arrays: 3/3Use of Arrays: 3/3
Suppose we have the following declarations:
INTEGER, PARAMETER :: L_BOUND = 3, U_BOUN...
The Implied DO: 1/7The Implied DO: 1/7
Fortran has the implied DO that can generatep g
efficiently a set of values and/or ...
The Implied DO: 2/7The Implied DO: 2/7
The execution of an implied DO below lets variablep
v to start with initial, and st...
The Implied DO: 3/7The Implied DO: 3/7
Implied DO may be nested.p y
(i*k,(j*j,i*j,j=1,3), i=2,4)
In the above (j*j i*j j 1...
The Implied DO: 4/7The Implied DO: 4/7
Continue with the previous examplep p
(i*k,(j*j,i*j,j=1,3), i=2,4)
When i = 3, it g...
The Implied DO: 5/7The Implied DO: 5/7
The following generates a multiplication table:The following generates a multiplica...
The Implied DO: 6/7The Implied DO: 6/7
The following produces all upper triangularThe following produces all upper triangu...
The Implied DO: 7/7The Implied DO: 7/7
The following produces all upper triangularThe following produces all upper triangu...
Array Input/Output: 1/8Array Input/Output: 1/8
Implied DO can be used in READ(*,*) andp ( , )
WRITE(*,*) statements.
When ...
Array Input/Output: 2/8Array Input/Output: 2/8
The following shows three ways of reading ng y g
data items into an one dim...
Array Input/Output: 3/8Array Input/Output: 3/8
Suppose we wish to fill a(1), a(2) and a(3)pp ( ), ( ) ( )
with 10, 20 and ...
Array Input/Output: 4/8Array Input/Output: 4/8
What if the input is changed to the following?What if the input is changed ...
Array Input/Output: 5/8Array Input/Output: 5/8
What if the input is changed to the following?What if the input is changed ...
Array Input/Output: 6/8Array Input/Output: 6/8
Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y ()
INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,...
Array Input/Output: 7/8Array Input/Output: 7/8
Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y ()
INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,...
Array Input/Output: 8/8Array Input/Output: 8/8
Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y ()
INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,...
Matrix Multiplication: 1/2Matrix Multiplication: 1/2
Read a l m matrix Al m and a m n matrix Bm n,Read a l m matrix Al m a...
Matrix Multiplication: 2/2Matrix Multiplication: 2/2
The following does multiplication and outputThe following does multip...
Arrays as Arguments: 1/4Arrays as Arguments: 1/4
Arrays may also be used as arguments passingy y g p g
to functions and su...
Arrays as Arguments: 2/4Arrays as Arguments: 2/4
The extent in each dimension is an expressionThe extent in each dimension...
Arrays as Arguments: 3/4Arrays as Arguments: 3/4
Fortran 90 automatically passes an array and itsFortran 90 automatically ...
Arrays as Arguments: 4/4Arrays as Arguments: 4/4
One more exampleOne more example
REAL, DIMENSION(1:3,1:4) :: x, ( , )
INT...
The SIZE() Intrinsic Function: 1/2The SIZE() Intrinsic Function: 1/2
How do I know the shape of an array?p y
Use the SIZE(...
The SIZE() Intrinsic Function : 2/2The SIZE() Intrinsic Function : 2/2
INTEGER,DIMENSION(-1:1,3:6):: Empty
CALL Fill(Empty...
Local Arrays: 1/2Local Arrays: 1/2
Fortran 90 permits to declare local arrays usingFortran 90 permits to declare local arr...
Local Arrays: 2/2Local Arrays: 2/2
Just like you learned in C/C++ and Java,
memory of local variables and local arrays in
...
The ALLOCATBLE AttributeThe ALLOCATBLE Attribute
In many situations, one does not know exactlyIn many situations, one does...
The ALLOCATE Statement: 1/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 1/3
The ALLOCATE statement has the followingg
syntax:
ALLOCATE(array-1 ...
The ALLOCATE Statement: 2/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 2/3
ALLOCATE only allocates arrays with they y
ALLOCATABLE attribute.
T...
The ALLOCATE Statement: 3/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 3/3
ALLOCATE can be used in subprograms.p g
Formal arrays are not ALLOC...
The DEALLOCATE StatementThe DEALLOCATE Statement
Allocated arrays may be deallocated by theAllocated arrays may be dealloc...
The ALLOCATED Intrinsic FunctionThe ALLOCATED Intrinsic Function
The ALLOCATED(a) function returns .TRUE.( )
if ALLOCATABL...
Fortran 90 SubprogramsFortran 90 Subprograms
If Fortran is the lingua franca, then certainly it must
be true that BASIC is...
Functions and SubroutinesFunctions and Subroutines
Fortran 90 has two types of subprograms,Fortran 90 has two types of sub...
Function Syntax: 1/3Function Syntax: 1/3
A Fortran function, or function subprogram,, p g ,
has the following syntax:
type...
Function Syntax: 2/3Function Syntax: 2/3
A function is a self-contained unit that receives
some “input” from the outside w...
Function Syntax: 3/3Function Syntax: 3/3
In a type specification, formal argumentsyp p , g
should have a new attribute INT...
Function ExampleFunction Example
Note that functions can have no formal argument.Note that functions can have no formal ar...
Common Problems: 1/2Common Problems: 1/2
forget function type forget INTENT(IN) not an error
FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b)
IM...
Common Problems: 2/2Common Problems: 2/2
REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b)
IMPLICIT NONE
REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b)
IMP...
Using FunctionsUsing Functions
The use of a user-defined function is similar toThe use of a user defined function is simil...
Argument Association : 1/5Argument Association : 1/5
Argument association is a way of passing valuesArgument association i...
Argument Association : 2/5Argument Association : 2/5
Actual arguments are variables:Actual arguments are variables:
a b cW...
Argument Association : 3/5Argument Association : 3/5
Expressions as actual arguments. Dashed lineExpressions as actual arg...
Argument Association : 4/5Argument Association : 4/5
Constants as actual arguments. Dashed lineConstants as actual argumen...
Argument Association : 5/5Argument Association : 5/5
A variable in () is considered as an expression.() p
Dashed line boxe...
Where Do Functions Go: 1/2Where Do Functions Go: 1/2
Fortran 90 functions can be internal or external.Fortran 90 functions...
Where Do Functions Go: 2/2Where Do Functions Go: 2/2
The right shows PROGRAM TwoFunctionsg
two internal
functions,
PROGRAM...
Scope Rules: 1/5Scope Rules: 1/5
Scope rules tell us if an entity (i.e., variable,Scope rules tell us if an entity (i.e., ...
Scope Rules: 2/5Scope Rules: 2/5
Scope Rule #1: The scope of an entity is the
program or function in which it is declared....
Scope Rules: 3/5Scope Rules: 3/5
Scope Rule #2 :A global entity is visible to allp
contained functions.
PROGRAM Scope_2
IM...
Scope Rules: 4/5Scope Rules: 4/5
Scope Rule #2 :A global entity is visible to allp
contained functions.
PROGRAM Global
IMP...
Scope Rules: 5/5Scope Rules: 5/5
Scope Rule #3 :An entity declared in the scope of
th tit i l diff t ifanother entity is a...
Example: 1/4Example: 1/4
If a triangle has side lengths a, b and c, the HeronIf a triangle has side lengths a, b and c, th...
Example: 2/4Example: 2/4
LOGICAL Function TriangleTest() makesg ()
sure all sides are positive, and the sum of any
two is ...
Example: 3/4Example: 3/4
This function implements the Heron formula.This function implements the Heron formula.
Note that ...
Example: 4/4Example: 4/4
Here is the main program!
PROGRAM HeronFormula
IMPLICIT NONE
REAL :: a, b, c, TriangleArea
DODO
W...
Subroutines: 1/2Subroutines: 1/2
A Fortran 90 function takes values from itsA Fortran 90 function takes values from its
fo...
Subroutines: 2/2Subroutines: 2/2
The following is Fortran 90 subroutine syntax:The following is Fortran 90 subroutine synt...
The INTENT() Attribute: 1/2The INTENT() Attribute: 1/2
Since subroutines use formal arguments toSince subroutines use form...
The INTENT() Attribute: 2/2The INTENT() Attribute: 2/2
Two simple examples:Two simple examples:
SUBROUTINE Means(a, b, c, ...
The CALL Statement: 1/2The CALL Statement: 1/2
Unlike C/C++ and Java, to use a Fortran 90Unlike C/C and Java, to use a For...
The CALL Statement: 2/2The CALL Statement: 2/2
PROGRAM Test PROGRAM SecondDegreePROGRAM Test
IMPLICIT NONE
REAL :: a, b
RE...
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
F90 basics
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Transcript of "F90 basics"

  1. 1. Fortran 90 BasicsFortran 90 Basics I don’t know what the programming languageI don t know what the programming language of the year 2000 will look like, but I know it will be called FORTRAN. 1 Charles Anthony Richard Hoare Fall 2010
  2. 2. F90 Program StructureF90 Program Structure A Fortran 90 program has the following form:A Fortran 90 program has the following form: program-name is the name of that program specification-part execution-part andspecification part, execution part, and subprogram-part are optional. Although IMPLICIT NONE is also optional, this isg p , required in this course to write safe programs. PROGRAM program-name IMPLICIT NONE [ ifi ti t][specification-part] [execution-part] [subprogram-part] 2 [subprogram part] END PROGRAM program-name
  3. 3. Program CommentsProgram Comments Comments start with a !Comments start with a ! Everything following ! will be ignored This is similar to // in C/C++This is similar to // in C/C++ ! This is an example ! PROGRAM Comment .......... READ(*,*) Year ! read in the value of Year .................... Year = Year + 1 ! add 1 to Year .......... END PROGRAM Comment 3 END PROGRAM Comment
  4. 4. Continuation LinesContinuation Lines Fortran 90 is not completely format-free!Fortran 90 is not completely format free! A statement must starts with a new line. If t t t i t l t fit li it hIf a statement is too long to fit on one line, it has to be continued. The continuation character is &, which is not part of the statement. Total = Total + & Amount * Payments ! Total = Total + Amount*Payments! Total = Total + Amount*Payments PROGRAM & i i i 4 ContinuationLine ! PROGRAM ContinuationLine
  5. 5. AlphabetsAlphabets Fortran 90 alphabets include the following:Fortran 90 alphabets include the following: Upper and lower cases letters Di itDigits Special characters space ' " ( ) * + - / : = _ ! & $ ; < > % ? , . 5
  6. 6. Constants: 1/6Constants: 1/6 A Fortran 90 constant may be an integer, real,A Fortran 90 constant may be an integer, real, logical, complex, and character string. We will not discuss complex constantsWe will not discuss complex constants. An integer constant is a string of digits with an optional sign: 12345 345 +789 +0optional sign: 12345, -345, +789, +0. 6
  7. 7. Constants: 2/6Constants: 2/6 A real constant has two forms, decimal andA real constant has two forms, decimal and exponential: In the decimal form a real constant is aIn the decimal form, a real constant is a string of digits with exactly one decimal point A real constant may include anpoint. A real constant may include an optional sign. Example: 2.45, .13, 13., -0 12 - 120.12, .12. 7
  8. 8. Constants: 3/6Constants: 3/6 A real constant has two forms, decimal andA real constant has two forms, decimal and exponential: In the exponential form a real constantIn the exponential form, a real constant starts with an integer/real, followed by a E/e, followed by an integer (i e the exponent)followed by an integer (i.e., the exponent). Examples: 12E3 (12 103) 12e3 ( 12 103)12E3 (12 103), -12e3 (-12 103), 3.45E-8 (3.45 10-8), -3.45e-8 ( 3 45 10-8)(-3.45 10-8). 0E0 (0 100=0). 12.34-5 is wrong! 8
  9. 9. Constants: 4/6Constants: 4/6 A logical constant is either .TRUE. or .FALSE.g S Note that the periods surrounding TRUE and FALSE are required!FALSE are required! 9
  10. 10. Constants: 5/6Constants: 5/6 A character string or character constant is aA character string or character constant is a string of characters enclosed between two double quotes or two single quotes. Examples:double quotes or two single quotes. Examples: “abc”, ‘John Dow’, “#$%^”, and ‘()()’. The content of a character string consists of allThe content of a character string consists of all characters between the quotes. Example: The content of ‘John Dow’ is John Dowcontent of John Dow is John Dow. The length of a string is the number of h t b t th t Th l th fcharacters between the quotes. The length of ‘John Dow’is 8, space included. 10
  11. 11. Constants: 6/6Constants: 6/6 A string has length zero (i.e., no content) is ang g ( , ) empty string. If single (or double) quotes are used in a string,g ( ) q g, then use double (or single) quotes as delimiters. Examples: “Adam’s cat” and ‘I said “go away”’. Two consecutive quotes are treated as one! ‘Lori’’s Apple’ is Lori’s Apple “double quote””” is double quote” `abc’’def”x’’y’ is abc’def”x’y “abc””def’x””y” is abc”def’x”y 11 abc def x y is abc def x y
  12. 12. Identifiers: 1/2Identifiers: 1/2 A Fortran 90 identifier can have no more thanA Fortran 90 identifier can have no more than 31 characters. The first one must be a letter The remainingThe first one must be a letter. The remaining characters, if any, may be letters, digits, or underscoresunderscores. Fortran 90 identifiers are CASE INSENSITIVE. Examples: A, Name, toTAL123, System_, myFile_01, my_1st_F90_program_X_. Identifiers Name, nAmE, naME and NamE are the same. 12
  13. 13. Identifiers: 2/2Identifiers: 2/2 Unlike Java, C, C++, etc, Fortran 90 does not, , , , have reserved words. This means one may use Fortran keywords as identifiers. Therefore, PROGRAM, end, IF, then, DO, etc may be used as identifiers. Fortran 90 compilers are able to recognize keywords from their “positions” in a statement. Yes, end = program + if/(goto – while) is legal! However, avoid the use of Fortran 90 keywords as identifiers to minimize confusion. 13
  14. 14. Declarations: 1/3Declarations: 1/3 Fortran 90 uses the following for variableFortran 90 uses the following for variable declarations, where type-specifier is one of the following keywords: INTEGER, REAL,g y , , LOGICAL, COMPLEX and CHARACTER, and list is a sequence of identifiers separated byq p y commas. type-specifier :: listtype specifier :: list Examples: INTEGER :: Zip, Total, counter REAL :: AVERAGE, x, Difference LOGICAL :: Condition, OK 14 COMPLEX :: Conjugate
  15. 15. Declarations: 2/3Declarations: 2/3 Character variables require additionalCharacter variables require additional information, the string length: Keyword CHARACTER must be followed byKeyword CHARACTER must be followed by a length attribute (LEN = l) , where l is the length of the stringthe length of the string. The LEN= part is optional. If the length of a string is 1, one may use CHARACTER without length attribute. Other length attributes will be discussed later. 15
  16. 16. Declarations: 3/3Declarations: 3/3 Examples:Examples: CHARACTER(LEN=20) :: Answer, Quote Variables Answer and Quote can holdVariables Answer and Quote can hold strings up to 20 characters. CHARACTER(20) :: Answer, Quote is the same as above. CHARACTER :: Keypress means variable Keypress can only hold ONE character (i.e., length 1). 16
  17. 17. The PARAMETER Attribute: 1/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 1/4 A PARAMETER identifier is a name whose value cannot be modified. In other words, it is a named constant.named constant. The PARAMETER attribute is used after the type keywordkeyword. Each identifier is followed by a = and followed b l f th t id tifiby a value for that identifier. INTEGER PARAMETER :: MAXIMUM = 10INTEGER, PARAMETER :: MAXIMUM = 10 REAL, PARAMETER :: PI = 3.1415926, E = 2.17828 LOGICAL, PARAMETER :: TRUE = .true., FALSE = .false. 17
  18. 18. The PARAMETER Attribute: 2/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 2/4 Since CHARACTER identifiers have a lengthg attribute, it is a little more complex when used with PARAMETER. Use (LEN = *) if one does not want to count the number of characters in a PARAMETERthe number of characters in a PARAMETER character string, where = * means the length of this string is determined elsewherethis string is determined elsewhere. CHARACTER(LEN=3), PARAMETER :: YES = “yes” ! Len = 3y CHARACTER(LEN=2), PARAMETER :: NO = “no” ! Len = 2 CHARACTER(LEN=*), PARAMETER :: & PROMPT = “What do you want?” ! Len = 17 18
  19. 19. The PARAMETER Attribute: 3/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 3/4 Since Fortran 90 strings are of fixed length, oneSince Fortran 90 strings are of fixed length, one must remember the following: If a string is longer than the PARAMETERIf a string is longer than the PARAMETER length, the right end is truncated. If a string is shorter than the PARAMETERIf a string is shorter than the PARAMETER length, spaces will be added to the right. CHARACTER(LEN=4), PARAMETER :: ABC = “abcdef” CHARACTER(LEN=4), PARAMETER :: XYZ = “xy” a b c dABC = x yXYZ = 19 a b c dABC yXYZ
  20. 20. The PARAMETER Attribute: 4/4The PARAMETER Attribute: 4/4 By convention, PARAMETER identifiers use ally , upper cases. However, this is not mandatory. For maximum flexibility constants other than 0For maximum flexibility, constants other than 0 and 1 should be PARAMETERized. A PARAMETER is an alias of a value and is not aA PARAMETER is an alias of a value and is not a variable. Hence, one cannot modify the content of a PARAMETER identifiera PARAMETER identifier. One can may a PARAMETER identifier anywhere in a program. It is equivalent to replacing the identifier with its value. 20 The value part can use expressions.
  21. 21. Variable Initialization: 1/2Variable Initialization: 1/2 A variable receives its value withA variable receives its value with Initialization: It is done once before the program runsprogram runs. Assignment: It is done when the program t i t t t texecutes an assignment statement. Input: It is done with a READ statement. 21
  22. 22. Variable Initialization: 2/2Variable Initialization: 2/2 Variable initialization is very similar to what weVariable initialization is very similar to what we learned with PARAMETER. A variable name is followed by a = followed byA variable name is followed by a =, followed by an expression in which all identifiers must be constants or PARAMETERs defined previouslyconstants or PARAMETERs defined previously. Using an un-initialized variable may cause un- t d ti di t ltexpected, sometimes disastrous results. REAL :: Offset = 0.1, Length = 10.0, tolerance = 1.E-7 CHARACTER(LEN=2) :: State1 = "MI", State2 = "MD“ INTEGER, PARAMETER :: Quantity = 10, Amount = 435 INTEGER, PARAMETER :: Period = 3 22 INTEGER :: Pay = Quantity*Amount, Received = Period+5
  23. 23. Arithmetic OperatorsArithmetic Operators There are four types of operators in Fortran 90:There are four types of operators in Fortran 90: arithmetic, relational, logical and character. The following shows the first three types:The following shows the first three types: Type Operator Associativity Arithmetic ** right to left * / left to right + - left to right+ - left to right Relational < <= > >= == /= none .NOT. right to left Logical g f .AND. left to right .OR. left to right 23 .EQV. .NEQV. left to right
  24. 24. Operator PriorityOperator Priority ** is the highest; * and / are the next, followedg ; / , by + and -. All relational operators are next. Of the 5 logical operators EQV and NEQVOf the 5 logical operators, .EQV. and .NEQV. are the lowest. Type Operator Associativity hi hType Operator Associativity Arithmetic ** right to left * / left to right highest priority + - left to right Relational < <= > >= == /= none Logical .NOT. right to left .AND. left to right .OR. left to right 24 .OR. left to right .EQV. .NEQV. left to right
  25. 25. Expression EvaluationExpression Evaluation Expressions are evaluated from left to right.Expressions are evaluated from left to right. If an operator is encountered in the process of evaluation its priority is compared with that ofevaluation, its priority is compared with that of the next one if th t i l l t th tif the next one is lower, evaluate the current operator with its operands; if the next one is equal to the current, the associativity laws are used to determine which one should be evaluated; if the next one is higher, scanning continues 25
  26. 26. Single Mode ExpressionSingle Mode Expression A single mode arithmetic expression is anA single mode arithmetic expression is an expression all of whose operands are of the same type.same type. If the operands are INTEGERs (resp., REALs), the result is also an INTEGER (resp REAL)the result is also an INTEGER (resp., REAL). 1.0 + 2.0 * 3.0 / ( 6.0*6.0 + 5.0*44.0) ** 0.25 --> 1.0 + 6.0 / (6.0*6.0 + 5.0*44.0) ** 0.25 --> 1.0 + 6.0 / (36.0 + 5.0*44.0) ** 0.25 --> 1.0 + 6.0 / (36.0 + 220.0) ** 0.25 1 0 6 0 / 256 0 ** 0 25--> 1.0 + 6.0 / 256.0 ** 0.25 --> 1.0 + 6.0 / 4.0 --> 1.0 + 1.5 > 2 5 26 --> 2.5
  27. 27. Mixed Mode Expression: 1/2Mixed Mode Expression: 1/2 If operands have different types, it is mixedIf operands have different types, it is mixed mode. INTEGER and REAL yields REAL and theINTEGER and REAL yields REAL, and the INTEGER operand is converted to REAL before evaluation Example: 3 5*4 is converted toevaluation. Example: 3.5 4 is converted to 3.5*4.0 becoming single mode. Exception: x**INTEGER: x**3 is x*x*x andException: x**INTEGER: x**3 is x*x*x and x**(-3) is 1.0/(x*x*x). i l d i h dx**REAL is evaluated with log() and exp(). Logical and character cannot be mixed with 27 arithmetic operands.
  28. 28. Mixed Mode Expression: 2/2Mixed Mode Expression: 2/2 Note that a**b**c is a**(b**c) instead of( ) (a**b)**c, and a**(b**c) (a**b)**c. This can be a big trap!This can be a big trap! 5 * (11.0 - 5) ** 2 / 4 + 9 --> 5 * (11.0 - 5.0) ** 2 / 4 + 9 --> 5 * 6.0 ** 2 / 4 + 9 /--> 5 * 36.0 / 4 + 9 --> 5.0 * 36.0 / 4 + 9 --> 180.0 / 4 + 9 > 180 0 / 4 0 + 9 6.0**2 is evaluated as 6.0*6.0 rather than converted to 6.0**2.0! --> 180.0 / 4.0 + 9 --> 45.0 + 9 --> 45.0 + 9.0 > 54 0 28 --> 54.0 red: type conversion
  29. 29. The Assignment Statement: 1/2The Assignment Statement: 1/2 The assignment statement has a form ofThe assignment statement has a form of variable = expression If the type of ariable and e pression areIf the type of variable and expression are identical, the result is saved to variable. If the type of variable and expression are not identical, the result of expression is fconverted to the type of variable. If expression is REAL and variable is INTEGER, the result is truncated. 29
  30. 30. The Assignment Statement: 2/2The Assignment Statement: 2/2 The left example uses an initialized variableThe left example uses an initialized variable Unit, and the right uses a PARAMETER PI. INTEGER :: Total, Amount INTEGER :: Unit = 5 REAL, PARAMETER :: PI = 3.1415926 REAL :: Area INTEGER :: Radius Amount = 100.99 Total = Unit * Amount INTEGER :: Radius Radius = 5 Area = (Radius ** 2) * PI This one is equivalent to Radius ** 2 * PI 30
  31. 31. Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 1/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 1/4 Fortran provides many commonly usedFortran provides many commonly used functions, referred to as intrinsic functions. To use an intrinsic function we need to know:To use an intrinsic function, we need to know: Name and meaning of the function (e.g., SQRT() for square root)SQRT() for square root) Number of arguments The type and range of each argument (e.g., the argument of SQRT() must be non- negative) The type of the returned function value. 31 e ype o e e u ed u c o v ue.
  32. 32. Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 2/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 2/4 Some mathematical functions:Some mathematical functions: Function Meaning Arg. Type Return Type b l l f INTEGER INTEGER ABS(x) absolute value of x REAL REAL SQRT(x) square root of x REAL REAL SIN(x) sine of x radian REAL REAL COS(x) cosine of x radian REAL REAL TAN(x) tangent of x radian REAL REALTAN(x) tangent of x radian REAL REAL ASIN(x) arc sine of x REAL REAL ACOS(x) arc cosine of x REAL REAL ATAN(x) arc tangent of x REAL REAL EXP(x) exponential ex REAL REAL 32 LOG(x) natural logarithm of x REAL REAL LOG10(x) is the common logarithm of x!
  33. 33. Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 3/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 3/4 Some conversion functions:Some conversion functions: Function Meaning Arg. Type Return Type INT(x) truncate to integer part x REAL INTEGERINT(x) truncate to integer part x REAL INTEGER NINT(x) round nearest integer to x REAL INTEGER FLOOR(x) greatest integer less than or equal to x REAL INTEGER FRACTION(x) the fractional part of x REAL REAL REAL(x) convert x to REAL INTEGER REAL INT(-3.5) -3 NINT(3.5) 4Examples: NINT(-3.4) -3 FLOOR(3.6) 3 FLOOR(-3.5) -4 C O (12 3) 0 3 33 FRACTION(12.3) 0.3 REAL(-10) -10.0
  34. 34. Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 4/4Fortran Intrinsic Functions: 4/4 Other functions:Other functions: Function Meaning Arg. Type Return Type INTEGER INTEGER MAX(x1, x2, ..., xn) maximum of x1, x2, ... xn INTEGER INTEGER REAL REAL MIN(x1 x2 xn) minimum of x1 x2 xn INTEGER INTEGER MIN(x1, x2, ..., xn) minimum of x1, x2, ... xn REAL REAL MOD(x,y) remainder x - INT(x/y)*y INTEGER INTEGER REAL REAL 34
  35. 35. Expression EvaluationExpression Evaluation Functions have the highest priority. Function arguments are evaluated first. The returned function value is treated as aThe returned function value is treated as a value in the expression. REAL :: A = 1.0, B = -5.0, C = 6.0, RREAL :: A 1.0, B 5.0, C 6.0, R R = (-B + SQRT(B*B - 4.0*A*C))/(2.0*A) / R gets 3.0 (-B + SQRT(B*B - 4.0*A*C))/(2.0*A) --> (5.0 + SQRT(B*B - 4.0*A*C))/(2.0*A) --> (5.0 + SQRT(25.0 - 4.0*A*C))/(2.0*A) --> (5.0 + SQRT(25.0 - 4.0*C))/(2.0*A)(5.0 SQRT(25.0 4.0 C))/(2.0 A) --> (5.0 + SQRT(25.0 - 24.0))/(2.0*A) --> (5.0 + SQRT(1.0))/(2.0*A) --> (5.0 + 1.0)/(2.0*A) 6 0/(2 0* ) 35 --> 6.0/(2.0*A) --> 6.0/2.0 --> 3.0
  36. 36. What is IMPLICIT NONE?What is IMPLICIT NONE? Fortran has an interesting tradition: allg variables starting with i, j, k, l, m and n, if not declared, are of the INTEGER type by default. This handy feature can cause serious consequences if it is not used with care. IMPLICIT NONE means all names must be declared and there is no implicitly assumed INTEGER type. All programs in this class must use IMPLICIT NONE. Points will be deducted if you do not use itPoints will be deducted if you do not use it! 36
  37. 37. List-Directed READ: 1/5List Directed READ: 1/5 Fortran 90 uses the READ(*,*) statement to( , ) read data into variables from keyboard: READ(* *) v1 v2 vnREAD( , ) v1, v2, …, vn READ(*,*) The second form has a special meaning that will be discussed later. INTEGER :: Age REAL :: Amount, Rate CHARACTER(LEN=10) :: Name READ(*,*) Name, Age, Rate, Amount 37
  38. 38. List-Directed READ: 2/5List Directed READ: 2/5 Data Preparation GuidelinesData Preparation Guidelines READ(*,*) reads data from keyboard by default although one may use inputdefault, although one may use input redirection to read from a file. If READ(* *) has n variables there mustIf READ(*,*) has n variables, there must be n Fortran constants. Each constant must have the type of the corresponding variable. Integers can be d i i bl b iread into REAL variables but not vice versa. Data items are separated by spaces and may 38 spread into multiple lines.
  39. 39. List-Directed READ: 3/5List Directed READ: 3/5 The execution of READ(*,*) always starts withf ( , ) y a new line! Then it reads each constant into theThen, it reads each constant into the corresponding variable. CHARACTER(LEN=5) :: Name REAL :: height, length INTEGER :: count, MaxLength READ(*,*) Name, height, count, length, MaxLength "Smith" 100.0 25 123.579 10000Input: 39 put:
  40. 40. List-Directed READ: 4/5List Directed READ: 4/5 Be careful when input items are on multiple lines.Be careful when input items are on multiple lines. INTEGER :: I,J,K,L,M,N Input: READ(*,*) I, J READ(*,*) K, L, M READ(*,*) N 100 200 300 400 500 600 INTEGER :: I,J,K,L,M,N ignored! READ(*,*) I, J, K READ(*,*) L, M, N 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 READ(*,*) always starts with a new line 40
  41. 41. List-Directed READ: 5/5List Directed READ: 5/5 Since READ(*,*) always starts with a new line,( , ) y , a READ(*,*) without any variable means skipping the input line!skipping the input line! INTEGER :: P, Q, R, SINTEGER :: P, Q, R, S READ(*,*) P, Q READ(*,*) 100 200 300 400 500 600( , ) READ(*,*) R, S 400 500 600 700 800 900 41
  42. 42. List-Directed WRITE: 1/3List Directed WRITE: 1/3 Fortran 90 uses the WRITE(*,*) statement to( , ) write information to screen. WRITE(* *) has two forms where exp1WRITE( , ) has two forms, where exp1, exp2, …, expn are expressions WRITE(* *) e p1 e p2 e pnWRITE(*,*) exp1, exp2, …, expn WRITE(*,*) WRITE(*,*) evaluates the result of each expression and prints it on screen. WRITE(*,*) always starts with a new line! 42
  43. 43. List-Directed WRITE: 2/3List Directed WRITE: 2/3 Here is a simple example:Here is a simple example: INTEGER :: Target means length is determined by actual count REAL :: Angle, Distance CHARACTER(LEN=*), PARAMETER :: & Time = "The time to hit target “, & IS = " is “, & UNIT = " sec." ti ti li Output:Target = 10 Angle = 20.0 Distance = 1350.0 WRITE(* *) 'A l ' A l continuation lines Output: Angle = 20.0 Distance = 1350.0 The time to hit target 10 is 27000.0 sec. WRITE(*,*) 'Angle = ', Angle WRITE(*,*) 'Distance = ', Distance WRITE(*,*) WRITE(* *) Time Target IS & The time to hit target 10 is 27000.0 sec. 43 WRITE(*,*) Time, Target, IS, & Angle * Distance, UNIT print a blank line
  44. 44. List-Directed WRITE: 3/3List Directed WRITE: 3/3 The previous example used LEN=* , whichp p , means the length of a CHARACTER constant is determined by actual count. WRITE(*,*) without any expression advances to the next line, producing a blank one. A Fortran 90 compiler will use the best way to print each value. Thus, indentation and alignment are difficult to achieve with WRITE(*,*). One must use the FORMAT statement to produce good looking output. 44
  45. 45. Complete Example: 1/4Complete Example: 1/4 This program computes the position (x and yp g p p ( y coordinates) and the velocity (magnitude and direction) of a projectile, given t, the time since launch, u, the i i i i ilaunch velocity, a, the initial angle of launch (in degree), and g=9.8, the acceleration due to gravity. The horizontal and vertical displacements, x and y, are computed as follows: x u a tcos( ) g t2 y u a t g t sin( ) 2 45 2
  46. 46. Complete Example: 2/4Complete Example: 2/4 The horizontal and vertical components of the velocityp y vector are computed as cos( )V u acos( )xV u a sin( )yV u a g t The magnitude of the velocity vector is ( )y g V V V2 2 The angle between the ground and the velocity vector is V V Vx y 2 2 tan( ) V V x 46 Vy
  47. 47. Complete Example: 3/4Complete Example: 3/4 Write a program to read in the launch angle a, the timep g g , since launch t, and the launch velocity u, and compute the position, the velocity and the angle with the ground. PROGRAM Projectile IMPLICIT NONE REAL, PARAMETER :: g = 9.8 ! acceleration due to gravity REAL, PARAMETER :: PI = 3.1415926 ! you know this. don't you? REAL :: Angle ! launch angle in degree REAL :: Time ! time to flight REAL :: Theta ! direction at time in degreeREAL :: Theta ! direction at time in degree REAL :: U ! launch velocity REAL :: V ! resultant velocity REAL :: Vx ! horizontal velocity REAL :: Vy ! vertical velocity REAL :: X ! horizontal displacement REAL :: Y ! vertical displacement Other executable statements 47 …… Other executable statements …… END PROGRAM Projectile
  48. 48. Complete Example: 4/4Complete Example: 4/4 Write a program to read in the launch angle a, the timep g g , since launch t, and the launch velocity u, and compute the position, the velocity and the angle with the ground. READ(*,*) Angle, Time, U Angle = Angle * PI / 180.0 ! convert to radianAngle Angle PI / 180.0 ! convert to radian X = U * COS(Angle) * Time Y = U * SIN(Angle) * Time - g*Time*Time / 2.0 Vx = U * COS(Angle)g Vy = U * SIN(Angle) - g * Time V = SQRT(Vx*Vx + Vy*Vy) Theta = ATAN(Vy/Vx) * 180.0 / PI ! convert to degree WRITE(*,*) 'Horizontal displacement : ', X WRITE(*,*) 'Vertical displacement : ', Y 48 WRITE(*,*) 'Resultant velocity : ', V WRITE(*,*) 'Direction (in degree) : ', Theta
  49. 49. CHARACTER Operator //CHARACTER Operator // Fortran 90 uses // to concatenate two strings.// g If strings A and B have lengths m and n, the concatenation A // B is a string of length m+nconcatenation A // B is a string of length m+n. CHARACTER(LEN=4) :: John = "John", Sam = "Sam" CHARACTER(LEN=6) :: Lori = "Lori", Reagan = "Reagan" CHARACTER(LEN=10) :: Ans1, Ans2, Ans3, Ans4 Ans1 = John // Lori ! Ans1 = “JohnLori ” Ans2 = Sam // Reagan ! Ans2 = “Sam Reagan” Ans3 = Reagan // Sam ! Ans3 = “ReaganSam ” Ans4 = Lori // Sam ! Ans4 = “Lori Sam ” 49
  50. 50. CHARACTER Substring: 1/3CHARACTER Substring: 1/3 A consecutive portion of a string is a substring.p g g To use substrings, one may add an extent specifier to a CHARACTER variable.p f An extent specifier has the following form: ( integer-exp1 : integer-exp2 )( integer-exp1 : integer-exp2 ) The first and the second expressions indicate the start and end: (3:8) means 3 to 8the start and end: (3:8) means 3 to 8, If A = “abcdefg” , then A(3:5) means A’s substring from position 3 to position 5 (i esubstring from position 3 to position 5 (i.e., “cde” ). 50
  51. 51. CHARACTER Substring: 2/3CHARACTER Substring: 2/3 In (integer-exp1:integer-exp2), if the( g p g p ), first exp1 is missing, the substring starts from the first character, and if exp2 is missing, the, p g, substring ends at the last character. If A = “12345678” then A(:5) is “12345”If A = 12345678 , then A(:5) is 12345 and A(3+x:) is “5678” where x is 2. A d i ti i lAs a good programming practice, in general, the first expression exp1 should be no less than 1 and the second expression exp2 should be no1, and the second expression exp2 should be no greater than the length of the string. 51
  52. 52. CHARACTER Substring: 3/3CHARACTER Substring: 3/3 Substrings can be used on either side of theg assignment operator. Suppose LeftHand = “123456789”pp (length is 10) . LeftHand(3:5) = "abc” yields LeftHand = “12abc67890” LeftHand(4:) = "lmnopqr” yields LeftHand = "123lmnopqr“LeftHand = "123lmnopqr“ LeftHand(3:8) = "abc” yields LeftHand = "12abc 90“ LeftHand(4:7) = "lmnopq” yields LeftHand = "123lmno890" 52
  53. 53. Example: 1/5Example: 1/5 This program uses the DATE AND TIME()p g _ _ () Fortran 90 intrinsic function to retrieve the system date and system time. Then, it convertssystem date and system time. Then, it converts the date and time information to a readable format. This program demonstrates the use offormat. This program demonstrates the use of concatenation operator // and substring. System date is a string ccyymmdd where cc =System date is a string ccyymmdd, where cc century, yy = year, mm = month, and dd = day. System time is a string hhmmss.sss, where hh = hour, mm = minute, and ss.sss = second. 53
  54. 54. Example: 2/5Example: 2/5 The following shows the specification part.g p p Note the handy way of changing string length. PROGRAM DateTime IMPLICIT NONE CHARACTER(LEN = 8) :: DateINFO ! ccyymmdd CHARACTER(LEN = 4) :: Year, Month*2, Day*2 CHARACTER(LEN = 10) :: TimeINFO, PrettyTime*12 ! hhmmss.sss CHARACTER(LEN = 2) :: Hour, Minute, Second*6 CALL DATE_AND_TIME(DateINFO, TimeINFO) …… other executable statements …… END PROGRAM DateTime 54 This is a handy way of changing string length
  55. 55. Example: 3/5Example: 3/5 Decompose DateINFO into year, month andp y , day. DateINFO has a form of ccyymmdd, where cc = century, yy = year, mm = month,y, yy y , , and dd = day. Year = DateINFO(1:4) Month = DateINFO(5:6) Day = DateINFO(7:8) WRITE(* *) 'Date information -> ' DateINFOWRITE(*,*) Date information -> , DateINFO WRITE(*,*) ' Year -> ', Year WRITE(*,*) ' Month -> ', Month WRITE(*,*) ' Day -> ', Day Date information -> 19970811 Year -> 1997 Output: 55 Year -> 1997 Month -> 08 Day -> 11
  56. 56. Example: 4/5Example: 4/5 Now do the same for time:Now do the same for time: Hour = TimeINFO(1:2) Minute = TimeINFO(3:4)Minute = TimeINFO(3:4) Second = TimeINFO(5:10) PrettyTime = Hour // ':' // Minute // ':' // Second WRITE(*,*) WRITE(*,*) 'Time Information -> ', TimeINFO WRITE(*,*) ' Hour -> ', Hour WRITE(*,*) ' Minute -> ', Minute WRITE(*,*) ' Second -> ', SecondWRITE( , ) Second > , Second WRITE(*,*) ' Pretty Time -> ', PrettyTime Time Information -> 010717.620 Hour -> 01 Minute -> 07 S d 17 620 Output: 56 Second -> 17.620 Pretty Time -> 01:07:17.620
  57. 57. Example: 5/5Example: 5/5 We may also use substring to achieve the samey g result: PrettyTime = “ “ ! Initialize to all blanks PrettyTime( :2) = Hour PrettyTime(3:3) = ':'PrettyTime(3:3) = ':' PrettyTime(4:5) = Minute PrettyTime(6:6) = ':' PrettyTime(7: ) = SecondPrettyTime(7: ) = Second WRITE(*,*) WRITE(*,*) ' Pretty Time -> ', PrettyTimeWRITE( , ) Pretty Time > , PrettyTime 57
  58. 58. What KIND Is It?What KIND Is It? Fortran 90 has a KIND attribute for selectingg the precision of a numerical constant/variable. The KIND of a constant/variable is a positiveThe KIND of a constant/variable is a positive integer (more on this later) that can be attached to a constantto a constant. Example: i i f126_3 : 126 is an integer of KIND 3 3.1415926_8 : 3.1415926 is a real of KIND 8 58
  59. 59. What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 1/2What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 1/2 Function SELECTED_INT_KIND(k) selects the_ _ KIND of an integer, where the value of k, a positive integer, means the selected integer k kKIND has a value between -10k and 10k. Thus, the value of k is approximately the number of digits of that KIND. For example, SELECTED_INT_KIND(10) means an integer KIND of no more than 10 digitsKIND of no more than 10 digits. If SELECTED_INT_KIND() returns -1, this th h d d t t thmeans the hardware does not support the requested KIND. 59
  60. 60. What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 2/2What KIND Is It (INTEGER)? 2/2 SELECTED_INT_KIND() is usually used in the_ _ y specification part like the following: INTEGER, PARAMETER :: SHORT = SELECTED_INT_KIND(2)_ _ INTEGER(KIND=SHORT) :: x, y The above declares an INTEGER PARAMETER SHORT with SELECTED_INT_KIND(2), which is the KIND of 2-digit integers. Then, the KIND= attribute specifies that INTEGER variables x and y can hold 2-digit integers. In a program, one may use -12_SHORT and 9_SHORT to write constants of that KIND. 60
  61. 61. What KIND Is It (REAL)? 1/2What KIND Is It (REAL)? 1/2 Use SELECTED REAL KIND(k,e) to specify aS _ _ ( , ) p y KIND for REAL constants/variables, where k is the number of significant digits and e is thethe number of significant digits and e is the number of digits in the exponent. Both k and e must be positive integers.must be positive integers. Note that e is optional. SELECTED REAL KIND(7 3) selects a REALSELECTED_REAL_KIND(7,3) selects a REAL KIND of 7 significant digits and 3 digits for the t 0 10 yyyexponent: 0.xxxxxxx 10 yyy 61
  62. 62. What KIND Is It (REAL)? 2/2What KIND Is It (REAL)? 2/2 Here is an example:Here is an example: INTEGER, PARAMETER :: & SINGLE=SELECTED REAL KIND(7,2), &SINGLE=SELECTED_REAL_KIND(7,2), & DOUBLE=SELECTED_REAL_KIND(15,3) REAL(KIND=SINGLE) :: x REAL(KIND=DOUBLE) :: Sum 123 4x = 123.45E-5_SINGLE Sum = Sum + 12345.67890_DOUBLE 62
  63. 63. Why KIND, etc? 1/2Why KIND, etc? 1/2 Old Fortran used INTEGER*2, REAL*8,, , DOUBLE PRECISION, etc to specify the “precision” of a variable. For example, REAL*8 means the use of 8 bytes to store a real value. This is not very portable because some computers may not use bytes as their basic t it hil th t 2storage unit, while some others cannot use 2 bytes for a short integer (i.e., INTEGER*2). M l t t h d fiMoreover, we also want to have more and finer precision control. 63
  64. 64. Why KIND, etc? 2/2Why KIND, etc? 2/2 Due to the differences among computerDue to the differences among computer hardware architectures, we have to be careful: The requested KIND may not be satisfiedThe requested KIND may not be satisfied. For example, SELECTED_INT_KIND(100) may not be realistic on most computersmay not be realistic on most computers. Compilers will find the best way good enough (i e larger) for the requested KIND(i.e., larger) for the requested KIND. If a “larger” KIND value is stored to a “ ll ” i bl di bl“smaller” KIND variable, unpredictable result may occur. 64 Use KIND carefully for maximum portability.
  65. 65. Fortran 90 Control StructuresFortran 90 Control Structures Computer programming is an art form, like the creation of poetry or music. 1 Donald Ervin Knuth Fall 2010
  66. 66. LOGICAL VariablesLOGICAL Variables A LOGIAL variable can only hold either .TRUE.y or .FALSE. , and cannot hold values of any other type.other type. Use T or F for LOGICAL variable READ(*,*) WRITE(* *) prints T or F for TRUEWRITE(*,*) prints T or F for .TRUE. and .FALSE., respectively. LOGICAL, PARAMETER :: Test = .TRUE. LOGICAL :: C1, C2 C1 = .true. ! correct C2 = 123 ! Wrong READ(*,*) C1, C2 2 C2 = .false. WRITE(*,*) C1, C2
  67. 67. Relational Operators: 1/4Relational Operators: 1/4 Fortran 90 has six relational operators: <, <=,p , , >, >=, ==, /=. Each of these six relational operators takes twop expressions, compares their values, and yields .TRUE. or .FALSE. Thus, a < b < c is wrong, because a < b is LOGICAL and c is REAL or INTEGER. COMPLEX values can only use == and /= LOGICAL values should use .EQV. or .NEQV. for equal and not-equal comparison. 3
  68. 68. Relational Operators: 2/4Relational Operators: 2/4 Relational operators have lower priority thanRelational operators have lower priority than arithmetic operators, and //. Thus 3 + 5 > 10 is FALSE and “a” //Thus, 3 + 5 > 10 is .FALSE. and a // “b” == “ab” is .TRUE. Ch t l d d Diff tCharacter values are encoded. Different standards (e.g., BCD, EBCDIC, ANSI) have diff t didifferent encoding sequences. These encoding sequences may not be compatible with each other. 4
  69. 69. Relational Operators: 3/4Relational Operators: 3/4 For maximum portability, only assume thep y, y following orders for letters and digits. Thus, “A” < “X”, ‘f’ <= “u”, and “2” <, , , “7” yield .TRUE. But, we don’t know the results of “S” < “s” and “t” >= “%”. However, equal and not-equal such as “S” /= “s” and “t” == “5” are fine. A < B < C < D < E < F < G < H < I < J < K < L < M < N < O < P < Q < R < S < T < U < V < W < X < Y < Z a < b < c < d < e < f < g < h < i < j < k < l < m < n < o < p < q < r < s < t < u < v < w < x < y < z 5 0 < 1 < 2 < 3 < 4 < 5 < 6 < 7 < 8 < 9
  70. 70. Relational Operators: 4/4Relational Operators: 4/4 String comparison rules:g p Start scanning from the first character. If the current two are equal go for the nextIf the current two are equal, go for the next If there is no more characters to compare, the strings are equal (e.g., “abc” == “abc”) If one string has no more character, the shorter string is smaller (e.g., “ab” < “abc” is TRUE )is .TRUE.) If the current two are not equal, the string has the smaller character is smaller (e ghas the smaller character is smaller (e.g., “abcd” is smaller than “abct”). 6
  71. 71. LOGICAL Operators: 1/2LOGICAL Operators: 1/2 There are 5 LOGICAL operators in Fortranp 90: .NOT., .OR., .AND., .EQV. and .NEQV. NOT is the highest followed by OR.NOT. is the highest, followed by .OR. and .AND., .EQV. and .NEQV. are the lowest. Recall that NOT is evaluated from right to leftRecall that .NOT. is evaluated from right to left. If both operands of .EQV. (equivalence) are the isame, .EQV. yields .TRUE.. .NEQV. is the opposite of .EQV. (not equivalence). If the operands of .NEQV. have different values, .NEQV. yields .TRUE. 7
  72. 72. LOGICAL Operators: 2/2LOGICAL Operators: 2/2 If INTEGER variables m, n, x and y have, , y values 3, 5, 4 and 2, respectively. .NOT. (m > n .AND. x < y) .NEQV. (m <= n .AND. x >= y) .NOT. (3 > 5 .AND. 4 < 2) .NEQV. (3 <= 5 .AND. 4 >= 2) .NOT. (.FALSE. .AND. 4 < 2) .NEQV. (3 <= 5 .AND. 4 >= 2) .NOT. (.FALSE. .AND. .FALSE.) .NEQV. (3 <= 5 .AND. 4 >= 2) .NOT. .FALSE. .NEQV. (3 <= 5 .AND. 4 >= 2) TRUE NEQV (3 5 AND 4 2).TRUE. .NEQV. (3 <= 5 .AND. 4 >= 2) .TRUE. .NEQV. (.TRUE. .AND. 4 >= 2) .TRUE. .NEQV. (.TRUE. .AND. .TRUE.) TRUE NEQV TRUE.TRUE. .NEQV. .TRUE. .FALSE. 8 .NOT. is higher than .NEQV.
  73. 73. IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 1/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 1/4 Fortran 90 has three if-then-else forms. The most complete one is the IF-THEN-ELSE- IF-END IF An old logical IF statement may be very handy when it is needed. There is an old and obsolete arithmetic IF that you are not encouraged to use. We won’t talky g about it at all. Details are in the next few slides. 9
  74. 74. IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 2/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 2/4 IF-THEN-ELSE-IF-END IF is the following.g Logical expressions are evaluated sequentially (i.e., top- down). The statement sequence that corresponds to the expression evaluated to .TRUE. will be executed. Otherwise, the ELSE sequence is executed. IF (logical-expression-1) THEN statement sequence 1 ELSE IF (logical expression 2) THENELSE IF (logical-expression-2) THEN statement seqence 2 ELSE IF (logical-expression-3) THEN statement sequence 3statement sequence 3 ELSE IF (.....) THEN ........... ELSE 10 ELSE statement sequence ELSE END IF
  75. 75. IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 3/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 3/4 Two Examples:Two Examples: Find the minimum of a, b and c and saves the result to Result Letter grade for x IF (a < b .AND. a < c) THEN Result = a ELSE IF (b < a .AND. b < c) THEN INTEGER :: x CHARACTER(LEN=1) :: Grade and saves the result to Result g f ( ) Result = b ELSE Result = c END IF IF (x < 50) THEN Grade = 'F' ELSE IF (x < 60) THEN G d 'D'END IF Grade = 'D' ELSE IF (x < 70) THEN Grade = 'C' ELSE IF (x < 80) THEN( ) Grade = 'B' ELSE Grade = 'A' END IF 11 END IF
  76. 76. IF-THEN-ELSE Statement: 4/4IF THEN ELSE Statement: 4/4 The ELSE-IF part and ELSE part are optional.p p p If the ELSE part is missing and none of the logical expressions is .TRUE., the IF-THEN-g p , ELSE has no effect. no ELSE-IF no ELSE IF (logical-expression-1) THEN statement sequence 1 ELSE IF (logical-expression-1) THEN statement sequence 1 ELSE IF (logical-expression-2) THEN statement sequence ELSE END IF statement sequence 2 ELSE IF (logical-expression-3) THEN statement sequence 3 ELSE IF ( ) THENELSE IF (.....) THEN ........... END IF 12
  77. 77. Example: 1/2Example: 1/2 Given a quadratic equation ax2 +bx + c = 0,Given a quadratic equation ax bx c 0, where a 0, its roots are computed as follows: b b2 4 x b b a c a 2 4 2 However, this is a very poor and unreliable way of computing roots. Will return to this soon. PROGRAM QuadraticEquation IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: a, b, c REAL :: d REAL :: root1, root2 13 …… other executable statement …… END PROGRAM QuadraticEquation
  78. 78. Example: 2/2Example: 2/2 The following shows the executable partThe following shows the executable part READ(*,*) a, b, c WRITE(*,*) 'a = ', a WRITE(*,*) 'b = ', b WRITE(*,*) 'c = ', c WRITE(*,*) d = b*b - 4.0*a*c IF (d >= 0.0) THEN ! is it solvable? d = SQRT(d) root1 = (-b + d)/(2.0*a) ! first root root2 = (-b - d)/(2.0*a) ! second root WRITE(* *) 'R t ' t1 ' d ' t2WRITE(*,*) 'Roots are ', root1, ' and ', root2 ELSE ! complex roots WRITE(*,*) 'There is no real roots!' WRITE(* *) 'Discriminant = ' d 14 WRITE(*,*) 'Discriminant = ', d END IF
  79. 79. IF-THEN-ELSE Can be Nested: 1/2IF THEN ELSE Can be Nested: 1/2 Another look at the quadratic equation solver.Another look at the quadratic equation solver. IF (a == 0.0) THEN ! could be a linear equation IF (b == 0 0) THEN ! the input becomes c = 0IF (b == 0.0) THEN ! the input becomes c = 0 IF (c == 0.0) THEN ! all numbers are roots WRITE(*,*) 'All numbers are roots' ELSE ! unsolvableELSE ! unsolvable WRITE(*,*) 'Unsolvable equation' END IF ELSE ! linear equation bx + c = 0ELSE ! linear equation bx + c 0 WRITE(*,*) 'This is linear equation, root = ', -c/b END IF ELSE ! ok, we have a quadratic equation, q q ...... solve the equation here …… END IF 15
  80. 80. IF-THEN-ELSE Can be Nested: 2/2IF THEN ELSE Can be Nested: 2/2 Here is the big ELSE part:g S p d b*b 4 0*a*cd = b*b - 4.0*a*c IF (d > 0.0) THEN ! distinct roots? d = SQRT(d) root1 = (-b + d)/(2 0*a) ! first rootroot1 = (-b + d)/(2.0*a) ! first root root2 = (-b - d)/(2.0*a) ! second root WRITE(*,*) 'Roots are ', root1, ' and ', root2 ELSE IF (d == 0.0) THEN ! repeated roots?ELSE IF (d == 0.0) THEN ! repeated roots? WRITE(*,*) 'The repeated root is ', -b/(2.0*a) ELSE ! complex roots WRITE(*,*) 'There is no real roots!'( , ) WRITE(*,*) 'Discriminant = ', d END IF 16
  81. 81. Logical IFLogical IF The logical IF is from Fortran 66, which is ang , improvement over the Fortran I arithmetic IF. If logical-expression is .TRUE. , statement isg p , executed. Otherwise, execution goes though. The statement can be assignment andg input/output. IF (logical-expression) statementIF (logical expression) statement Smallest = b Cnt = Cnt + 1Smallest = b IF (a < b) Smallest = a Cnt = Cnt + 1 IF (MOD(Cnt,10) == 0) WRITE(*,*) Cnt 17
  82. 82. The SELECT CASE Statement: 1/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 1/7 Fortran 90 has the SELECT CASE statement forS S selective execution if the selection criteria are based on simple values in INTEGER, LOGICALp , and CHARACTER. No, REAL is not applicable. SELECT CASE (selector) CASE (label-list-1) statements-1 CASE (label-list-2) 2 selector is an expression evaluated to an INTEGER, LOGICAL or CHARACTER value statements-2 CASE (label-list-3) statements-3 other cases label-list is a set of constants or PARAMETERS of the same type …… other cases …… CASE (label-list-n) statements-n CASE DEFAULT yp as the selector statements is one or more 18 CASE DEFAULT statements-DEFAULT END SELECT statements s o e o o e executable statements
  83. 83. The SELECT CASE Statement: 2/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 2/7 The label-list is a list of the following forms:The label list is a list of the following forms: value a specific value al e1 al e2 values betweenvalue1 : value2 values between value1 and value2, including value1 and al e2 and al e1 < al e2value2, and value1 <= value2 value1 : values larger than or equal to value1 : value2 values less than or equal to value2 Reminder: value, value1 and value2 must 19 , be constants or PARAMETERs.
  84. 84. The SELECT CASE Statement: 3/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 3/7 The SELECT CASE statement is SELECT CASE (selector) executed as follows: Compare the value of SELECT CASE (selector) CASE (label-list-1) statements-1 CASE (label-list-2) selector with the labels in each case. If a match is f d t th ( ) statements-2 CASE (label-list-3) statements-3 found, execute the corresponding statements. If no match is found and if …… other cases …… CASE (label-list-n) statements-n If no match is found and if CASE DEFAULT is there, execute the statements- CASE DEFAULT statements-DEFAULT END SELECT DEFAULT. Execute the next statement optional 20 following the SELECT CASE.
  85. 85. The SELECT CASE Statement: 4/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 4/7 Some important notes:Some important notes: The values in label-lists should be unique. Otherwise it is not known which CASEOtherwise, it is not known which CASE would be selected. CASE DEFAULT should be used whenever itCASE DEFAULT should be used whenever it is possible, because it guarantees that there is l t d thi ( )a place to do something (e.g., error message) if no match is found. b h iCASE DEFAULT can be anywhere in a SELECT CASE statement; but, a preferred l i h l i h li 21 place is the last in the CASE list.
  86. 86. The SELECT CASE Statement: 5/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 5/7 Two examples of SELECT CASE:p S S CHARACTER(LEN=4) :: Title INTEGER :: DrMD = 0, PhD = 0 CHARACTER(LEN=1) :: c INTEGER :: DrMD 0, PhD 0 INTEGER :: MS = 0, BS = 0 INTEGER ::Others = 0 i SELECT CASE (c) CASE ('a' : 'j') WRITE(*,*) ‘First ten letters' SELECT CASE (Title) CASE ("DrMD") DrMD = DrMD + 1 CASE ("PhD") CASE ('l' : 'p', 'u' : 'y') WRITE(*,*) & 'One of l,m,n,o,p,u,v,w,x,y' CASE ('z', 'q' : 't')CASE ( PhD ) PhD = PhD + 1 CASE ("MS") MS = MS + 1 ( ) CASE ( z , q : t ) WRITE(*,*) 'One of z,q,r,s,t' CASE DEFAULT WRITE(*,*) 'Other characters' CASE ("BS") BS = BS + 1 CASE DEFAULT Others = Others + 1 END SELECT 22 Ot e s Ot e s END SELECT
  87. 87. The SELECT CASE Statement: 6/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 6/7 Here is a more complex example:Here is a more complex example: INTEGER :: Number, Range Number Range Why? <= -10 1 CASE (:-10, 10:) SELECT CASE (Number) CASE ( : -10, 10 : ) Range = 1 <= 10 1 CASE (: 10, 10:) -9,-8,-7,-6 6 CASE DEFAULT -5,-4,-3 2 CASE (-5:-3, 6:9) CASE (-5:-3, 6:9) Range = 2 CASE (-2:2) -2,-1,0,1,2 3 CASE (-2:2) 3 4 CASE (3, 5) Range = 3 CASE (3, 5) Range = 4 4 5 CASE (4) 5 4 CASE (3, 5) 6,7,8,9 2 CASE (-5:-3, 6:9) CASE (4) Range = 5 CASE DEFAULT R 6 6,7,8,9 2 CASE ( 5: 3, 6:9) >= 10 1 CASE (:-10, 10:) 23 Range = 6 END SELECT
  88. 88. The SELECT CASE Statement: 7/7The SELECT CASE Statement: 7/7 PROGRAM CharacterTesting IMPLICIT NONE CHARACTER(LEN=1) :: Input This program reads in a character and determines if it is a vowel, a consonant, CHARACTER(LEN=1) :: Input READ(*,*) Input SELECT CASE (Input) CASE ('A' : 'Z', 'a' : 'z') ! rule out letters a digit, one of the four arithmetic operators, a space, or something else (i.e., %, $, @, etc). WRITE(*,*) 'A letter is found : "', Input, '"' SELECT CASE (Input) ! a vowel ? CASE ('A', 'E', 'I', 'O', 'U', 'a', 'e', 'i', 'o','u') WRITE(* *) 'It is a vowel'WRITE( , ) It is a vowel CASE DEFAULT ! it must be a consonant WRITE(*,*) 'It is a consonant' END SELECT CASE ('0' : '9') ! a digit WRITE(*,*) 'A digit is found : "', Input, '"' CASE ('+', '-', '*', '/') ! an operator WRITE(*,*) 'An operator is found : "', Input, '"'WRITE( , ) An operator is found : , Input, CASE (' ') ! space WRITE(*,*) 'A space is found : "', Input, '"' CASE DEFAULT ! something else 24 WRITE(*,*) 'Something else found : "', Input, '"' END SELECT END PROGRAM CharacterTesting
  89. 89. The Counting DO Loop: 1/6The Counting DO Loop: 1/6 Fortran 90 has two forms of DO loop: thep counting DO and the general DO. The counting DO has the following form:The counting DO has the following form: DO control-var = initial, final [, step] statementsstatements END DO control-var is an INTEGER variable,control var is an INTEGER variable, initial, final and step are INTEGER expressions; however, step cannot be zero.expressions; however, step cannot be zero. If step is omitted, its default value is 1. t bl t t t f th O 25 statements are executable statements of the DO.
  90. 90. The Counting DO Loop: 2/6The Counting DO Loop: 2/6 Before a DO-loop starts, expressions initial,p , p , final and step are evaluated exactly once. When executing the DO-loop, these values willg p, not be re-evaluated. Note again the value of step cannot be zeroNote again, the value of step cannot be zero. If step is positive, this DO counts up; if step is negative this DO counts downnegative, this DO counts down DO control-var = initial final [ step]DO control-var = initial, final [, step] statements END DO 26
  91. 91. The Counting DO Loop: 3/6The Counting DO Loop: 3/6 If step is positive:p p The control-var receives the value of initial. If the value of control-var is less than or equal toIf the value of control var is less than or equal to the value of final, the statements part is executed. Then, the value of step is added to control-var, and goes back and compares the values of control-var and final. If the value of control-var is greater than the value of final, the DO-loop completes and the statement following END DO is executedstatement following END DO is executed. 27
  92. 92. The Counting DO Loop: 4/6The Counting DO Loop: 4/6 If step is negative:p g The control-var receives the value of initial. If the value of control-var is greater than orIf the value of control var is greater than or equal to the value of final, the statements part is executed. Then, the value of step is added to control-var, goes back and compares the values of control-var and final. If the value of control-var is less than the value of final, the DO-loop completes and the statement following END DO is executedfollowing END DO is executed. 28
  93. 93. The Counting DO Loop: 5/6The Counting DO Loop: 5/6 Two simple examples:Two simple examples: INTEGER :: N, k odd integers between 1 & N READ(*,*) N WRITE(*,*) “Odd number between 1 and “, N DO k = 1, N, 2 between 1 & N WRITE(*,*) k END DO INTEGER, PARAMETER :: LONG = SELECTED_INT_KIND(15) INTEGER(KIND=LONG) :: Factorial, i, N READ(* *) N factorial of N READ(*,*) N Factorial = 1_LONG DO i = 1, N Factorial = Factorial * i 29 END DO WRITE(*,*) N, “! = “, Factorial
  94. 94. The Counting DO Loop: 6/6The Counting DO Loop: 6/6 Important Notes:Important Notes: The step size step cannot be zero N h th l f i bl iNever change the value of any variable in control-var and initial, final, and stepstep. For a count-down DO-loop, step must be i “ ” inegative. Thus, “do i = 10, -10” is not a count-down DO-loop, and the statements portion is not executed. Fortran 77 allows REAL variables in DO; but, 30 don’t use it as it is not safe.
  95. 95. General DO-Loop with EXIT: 1/2General DO Loop with EXIT: 1/2 The general DO-loop has the following form:The general DO loop has the following form: DO statementsstatements END DO t t t ill b t d t dlstatements will be executed repeatedly. To exit the DO-loop, use the EXIT or CYCLE statement. The EXIT statement brings the flow of control to the statement following (i.e., exiting) the END DO. The CYCLE statement starts the next iteration 31 e C C state e t sta ts t e e t te at o (i.e., executing statements again).
  96. 96. General DO-Loop with EXIT: 2/2General DO Loop with EXIT: 2/2 REAL PARAMETER :: Lower = 1 0 Upper = 1 0 Step = 0 25REAL, PARAMETER :: Lower = -1.0, Upper = 1.0, Step = 0.25 REAL :: x x = Lower ! initialize the control variable DO IF (x > Upper) EXIT ! is it > final-value? WRITE(*,*) x ! no, do the loop body x = x + Step ! increase by step-sizex = x + Step ! increase by step-size END DO INTEGER :: InputINTEGER :: Input DO WRITE(*,*) 'Type in an integer in [0, 10] please --> ' READ(*,*) Input IF (0 <= Input .AND. Input <= 10) EXIT WRITE(*,*) 'Your input is out of range. Try again' END DO 32 END DO
  97. 97. Example, exp(x): 1/2Example, exp(x): 1/2 The exp(x) function has an infinite series:The exp(x) function has an infinite series: exp( ) ! ! .... ! ......x x x x x i i 1 2 3 2 3 Sum each term until a term’s absolute value is ! ! !i2 3 less than a tolerance, say 0.00001. PROGRAM Exponential IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: Count ! # of terms used REAL :: Term ! a term REAL :: Sum ! the sum REAL :: X ! the input x REAL, PARAMETER :: Tolerance = 0.00001 ! tolerance 33 …… executable statements …… END PROGRAM Exponential
  98. 98. Example, exp(x): 2/2Example, exp(x): 2/2 Note: 1 ( 1)! ! 1 i i x x x i i i This is not a good solution, though. ( 1)! ! 1i i i This is not a good solution, though. READ(*,*) X ! read in x Count = 1 ! the first term is 1 iSum = 1.0 ! thus, the sum starts with 1 Term = X ! the second term is x DO ! for each term IF (ABS(T ) < T l ) EXIT ! if t ll itIF (ABS(Term) < Tolerance) EXIT ! if too small, exit Sum = Sum + Term ! otherwise, add to sum Count = Count + 1 ! count indicates the next term Term = Term * (X / Count) ! compute the value of next termTerm = Term * (X / Count) ! compute the value of next term END DO WRITE(*,*) 'After ', Count, ' iterations:' WRITE(* *) ' Exp(' X ') = ' Sum 34 WRITE( , ) Exp( , X, ) = , Sum WRITE(*,*) ' From EXP() = ', EXP(X) WRITE(*,*) ' Abs(Error) = ', ABS(Sum - EXP(X))
  99. 99. Example, Prime Checking: 1/2Example, Prime Checking: 1/2 A positive integer n >= 2 is a prime number if theA positive integer n 2 is a prime number if the only divisors of this integer are 1 and itself. If n = 2 it is a primeIf n = 2, it is a prime. If n > 2 is even (i.e., MOD(n,2) == 0), not a prime. If n is odd, then: If the odd numbers between 3 and n-1 cannot divide n, n is a prime! Do we have to go up to n-1? No, SQRT(n) isg p , Q ( ) good enough. Why? 35
  100. 100. Example, Prime Checking: 2/2Example, Prime Checking: 2/2 INTEGER :: Number ! the input number INTEGER :: Divisor ! the running divisor READ(*,*) Number ! read in the input IF (Number < 2) THEN ! not a prime if < 2 WRITE(* *) 'Illegal input'WRITE(*,*) 'Illegal input' ELSE IF (Number == 2) THEN ! is a prime if = 2 WRITE(*,*) Number, ' is a prime' ELSE IF (MOD(Number,2) == 0) THEN ! not a prime if even WRITE(*,*) Number, ' is NOT a prime' ELSE ! an odd number here Divisor = 3 ! divisor starts with 3 DO ! divide the input numberDO ! divide the input number IF (Divisor*Divisor > Number .OR. MOD(Number, Divisor) == 0) EXIT Divisor = Divisor + 2 ! increase to next odd END DO IF (Divisor*Divisor > Number) THEN ! which condition fails? WRITE(*,*) Number, ' is a prime' ELSE WRITE(* *) Number ' is NOT a prime' 36 WRITE(*,*) Number, is NOT a prime END IF END IF this is better than SQRT(REAL(Divisor)) > Number
  101. 101. Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 1/2Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 1/2 The previous program can be modified to findThe previous program can be modified to find all prime numbers between 2 and n. PROGRAM Primes IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: Range, Number, Divisor, Count WRITE(*,*) 'What is the range ? ' DO ! keep trying to read a good input READ(*,*) Range ! ask for an input integer IF (Range >= 2) EXIT ! if it is GOOD, exit WRITE(*,*) 'The range value must be >= 2. Your input = ', Range WRITE(*,*) 'Please try again:' ! otherwise, bug the user END DOEND DO …… we have a valid input to work on here …… END PROGRAM Primes 37
  102. 102. Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 2/2Finding All Primes in [2,n]: 2/2 Count = 1 ! input is correct. start counting WRITE(*,*) ! 2 is a prime WRITE(*,*) 'Prime number #', Count, ': ', 2 DO Number = 3, Range, 2 ! try all odd numbers 3, 5, 7, ... Divisor = 3 ! divisor starts with 3 DO i i i i i iIF (Divisor*Divisor > Number .OR. MOD(Number,Divisor) == 0) EXIT Divisor = Divisor + 2 ! not a divisor, try next END DO IF (Divisor*Divisor > Number) THEN ! divisors exhausted?IF (Divisor Divisor > Number) THEN ! divisors exhausted? Count = Count + 1 ! yes, this Number is a prime WRITE(*,*) 'Prime number #', Count, ': ', Number END IF END DO WRITE(*,*) WRITE(*,*) 'There are ', Count, ' primes in the range of 2 and ', Range 38 ( , ) e e a e , Cou t, p es t e a ge o a d , a ge
  103. 103. Factoring a Number: 1/3Factoring a Number: 1/3 Given a positive integer, one can always factorizep g , y it into prime factors. The following is an example: 586390350 = 2 3 52 72 13 17 192 Here, 2, 3, 5, 7, 13, 17 and 19 are prime factors., , , , , , p It is not difficult to find all prime factors. We can repeatedly divide the input by 2.We can repeatedly divide the input by 2. Do the same for odd numbers 3, 5, 7, 9, …. But we said “prime” factors No problemBut, we said “prime” factors. No problem, multiples of 9 are eliminated by 3 in an earlier stage! 39 stage!
  104. 104. Factoring a Number: 2/3Factoring a Number: 2/3 PROGRAM Factorize IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: Input INTEGER :: Divisor INTEGER :: Count WRITE(*,*) 'This program factorizes any integer >= 2 --> ' READ(*,*) Input Count = 0 DO ! remove all factors of 2 IF (MOD(I t 2) / 0 OR I t 1) EXITIF (MOD(Input,2) /= 0 .OR. Input == 1) EXIT Count = Count + 1 ! increase count WRITE(*,*) 'Factor # ', Count, ': ', 2 Input = Input / 2 ! remove this factorInput = Input / 2 ! remove this factor END DO …… use odd numbers here …… END PROGRAM Factorize 40 END PROGRAM Factorize
  105. 105. Factoring a Number: 3/3Factoring a Number: 3/3 Divisor = 3 ! now we only worry about odd factors DO ! Try 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 .... IF (Divisor > Input) EXIT ! factor is too large, exit and done DO ! try this factor repeatedlyDO ! try this factor repeatedly IF (MOD(Input,Divisor) /= 0 .OR. Input == 1) EXIT Count = Count + 1 WRITE(*,*) 'Factor # ', Count, ': ', Divisor Input = Input / Divisor ! remove this factor from Input END DO Divisor = Divisor + 2 ! move to next odd number END DOEND DO Note that even 9 15 49 will be used they would only be usedNote that even 9, 15, 49, … will be used, they would only be used once because Divisor = 3 removes all multiples of 3 (e.g., 9, 15, …), Divisor = 5 removes all multiples of 5 (e.g., 15, 25, …), and Divisor = 7 removes all multiples of 7 (e.g., 21, 35, 49, …), etc. 41 Divisor 7 removes all multiples of 7 (e.g., 21, 35, 49, …), etc.
  106. 106. Handling End-of-File: 1/3Handling End of File: 1/3 Very frequently we don’t know the number ofVery frequently we don t know the number of data items in the input. Fortran uses IOSTAT= for I/O error handling:Fortran uses IOSTAT= for I/O error handling: READ(*,*,IOSTAT=v) v1, v2, …, vn In the above, v is an INTEGER variable. After the execution of READ(*,*): If v = 0, READ(*,*) was executed successfully If v > 0, an error occurred in READ(*,*) and not all variables received values. If v < 0, encountered end-of-file, and not all 42 variables received values.
  107. 107. Handling End-of-File: 2/3Handling End of File: 2/3 Every file is ended with a special character.Every file is ended with a special character. Unix and Windows use Ctrl-D and Ctrl-Z. When using keyboard to enter data toWhen using keyboard to enter data to READ(*,*), Ctrl-D means end-of-file in Unix. If IOSTAT returns a positive value we onlyIf IOSTAT= returns a positive value, we only know something was wrong in READ(*,*) such t i t h h fil d i tas type mismatch, no such file, device error, etc. We really don’t know exactly what happened because the returned value is system dependent. 43
  108. 108. Handling End-of-File: 3/3Handling End of File: 3/3 i t t t INTEGER :: io, x, sum 1 3 The total is 8 input output sum = 0 DO READ(*,*,IOSTAT=io) x IF (io > 0) THEN 4 inputIF (io > 0) THEN WRITE(*,*) 'Check input. Something was wrong' EXIT ELSE IF (io < 0) THEN (* *) h l i 1 & 4 no output WRITE(*,*) 'The total is ', sum EXIT ELSE sum = sum + x END IF END DO 44
  109. 109. Computing Means, etc: 1/4Computing Means, etc: 1/4 Let us compute the arithmetic, geometric andLet us compute the arithmetic, geometric and harmonic means of unknown number of values: arithmetic mean = x x xn1 2 ...... arithmetic mean = geometric mean = n x x xn n 1 2 ...... harmonic mean = n 1 1 1 Note that only positive values will be considered x x xn1 2 ...... Note that only positive values will be considered. This naïve way is not a good method. 45
  110. 110. Computing Means, etc: 2/4Computing Means, etc: 2/4 PROGRAM ComputingMeansPROGRAM ComputingMeans IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: X REAL :: Sum, Product, InverseSum, , REAL :: Arithmetic, Geometric, Harmonic INTEGER :: Count, TotalValid INTEGER :: IO ! for IOSTAT= Sum = 0.0 Product = 1.0 InverseSum = 0.0 TotalValid = 0 Count = 0 …… other computation part …… END PROGRAM ComputingMeans 46
  111. 111. Computing Means, etc: 3/4Computing Means, etc: 3/4 DO READ(*,*,IOSTAT=IO) X ! read in data IF (IO < 0) EXIT ! IO < 0 means end-of-file reached Count = Count + 1 ! otherwise, got some value IF (IO > 0) THEN ! IO > 0 means something wrongIF (IO > 0) THEN ! IO > 0 means something wrong WRITE(*,*) 'ERROR: something wrong in your input' WRITE(*,*) 'Try again please' ELSE ! IO = 0 means everything is normal WRITE(*,*) 'Input item ', Count, ' --> ', X IF (X <= 0.0) THEN WRITE(*,*) 'Input <= 0. Ignored' ELSEELSE TotalValid = TotalValid + 1 Sum = Sum + X Product = Product * X InverseSum = InverseSum + 1.0/X END IF END IF END DO 47 END DO
  112. 112. Computing Means, etc: 4/4Computing Means, etc: 4/4 WRITE(*,*) IF (TotalValid > 0) THEN Arithmetic = Sum / TotalValid Geometric = Product**(1.0/TotalValid) Harmonic = TotalValid / InverseSum WRITE(*,*) '# of items read --> ', Count WRITE(*,*) '# of valid items -> ', TotalValidWRITE( , ) # of valid items > , TotalValid WRITE(*,*) 'Arithmetic mean --> ', Arithmetic WRITE(*,*) 'Geometric mean --> ', Geometric WRITE(*,*) 'Harmonic mean --> ', Harmonic ELSE WRITE(*,*) 'ERROR: none of the input is positive' END IF 48
  113. 113. Fortran 90 ArraysFortran 90 Arrays Program testing can be used to show the presence of bugsProgram testing can be used to show the presence of bugs, but never to show their absence Edsger W. Dijkstra 1 Fall 2009
  114. 114. The DIMENSION Attribute: 1/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 1/6 A Fortran 90 program uses the DIMENSIONp g attribute to declare arrays. The DIMENSION attribute requires threeq components in order to complete an array specification, rank, shape, and extent. The rank of an array is the number of “indices” or “subscripts.” The maximum rank is 7 (i.e., seven-dimensional). The shape of an array indicates the number of elements in each “dimension.” 2
  115. 115. The DIMENSION Attribute: 2/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 2/6 The rank and shape of an array is representedThe rank and shape of an array is represented as (s1,s2,…,sn), where n is the rank of the array and si (1 i n) is the number of elements in theand si (1 i n) is the number of elements in the i-th dimension. (7) means a rank 1 array with 7 elements(7) means a rank 1 array with 7 elements (5,9) means a rank 2 array (i.e., a table) h fi t d d di i h 5whose first and second dimensions have 5 and 9 elements, respectively. (10,10,10,10) means a rank 4 array that has 10 elements in each dimension. 3
  116. 116. The DIMENSION Attribute: 3/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 3/6 The extent is written as m:n, where m and n (mThe extent is written as m:n, where m and n (m n) are INTEGERs. We saw this in the SELECT CASE, substring, etc., g, Each dimension has its own extent. A t t f di i i th f itAn extent of a dimension is the range of its index. If m: is omitted, the default is 1. i i i 3 2 1 0-3:2 means possible indices are -3, -2 , -1, 0, 1, 2 5:8 means possible indices are 5,6,7,8 7 means possible indices are 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 4 p , , , , , ,
  117. 117. The DIMENSION Attribute: 4/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 4/6 The DIMENSION attribute has the followingg form: DIMENSION(extent-1, extent-2, …, extent-n)( , , , ) Here, extent-i is the extent of dimension i. This means an array of dimension n (i.e., nThis means an array of dimension n (i.e., n indices) whose i-th dimension index has a range given by extent-i.g y Just a reminder: Fortran 90 only allows maximum 7 dimensions. Exercise: given a DIMENSION attribute, determine its shape. 5 p
  118. 118. The DIMENSION Attribute: 5/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 5/6 Here are some examples:Here are some examples: DIMENSION(-1:1) is a 1-dimensional array with possible indices -1 0 1array with possible indices -1,0,1 DIMENSION(0:2,3) is a 2-dimensional (i t bl ) P ibl l f tharray (i.e., a table). Possible values of the first index are 0,1,2 and the second 1,2,3 i 3 i iDIMENSION(3,4,5) is a 3-dimensional array. Possible values of the first index are 1,2,3, the second 1,2,3,4, and the third 1,2,3,4,5. 6
  119. 119. The DIMENSION Attribute: 6/6The DIMENSION Attribute: 6/6 Array declaration is simple. Add they p DIMENSION attribute to a type declaration. Values in the DIMENSION attribute are usuallyy PARAMETERs to make program modifications easier. INTEGER, PARAMETER :: SIZE=5, LOWER=3, UPPER = 5 INTEGER, PARAMETER :: SMALL = 10, LARGE = 15 REAL, DIMENSION(1:SIZE) :: x INTEGER, DIMENSION(LOWER:UPPER,SMALL:LARGE) :: a,b, ( , ) , LOGICAL, DIMENSION(2,2) :: Truth_Table 7
  120. 120. Use of Arrays: 1/3Use of Arrays: 1/3 Fortran 90 has, in general, three different ways, g , y to use arrays: referring to individual array element, referring to the whole array, and referring to a section of an array. The first one is very easy. One just starts with the array name, followed by () between which are the indices separated by ,. Note that each index must be an INTEGER or an expression evaluated to an INTEGER, and the l f i d t b i th f thvalue of an index must be in the range of the corresponding extent. But, Fortran 90 won’t check it for you 8 check it for you.
  121. 121. Use of Arrays: 2/3Use of Arrays: 2/3 Suppose we have the following declarationsSuppose we have the following declarations INTEGER, PARAMETER :: L_BOUND = 3, U_BOUND = 10 INTEGER, DIMENSION(L BOUND:U BOUND) :: xINTEGER, DIMENSION(L_BOUND:U_BOUND) :: x DO i = L_BOUND, U_BOUND x(i) = i DO i = L_BOUND, U_BOUND IF (MOD(i,2) == 0) THEN iEND DO x(i) = 0 ELSE x(i) = 1 array x() has 3,4,5,…, 10 END IF END DO array x() has 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 9 array x() has 1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0
  122. 122. Use of Arrays: 3/3Use of Arrays: 3/3 Suppose we have the following declarations: INTEGER, PARAMETER :: L_BOUND = 3, U_BOUND = 10 INTEGER, DIMENSION(L_BOUND:U_BOUND, & L_BOUND:U_BOUND) :: a DO i = L_BOUND, U_BOUND DO j = L_BOUND, U_BOUND a(i j) = 0 DO i = L_BOUND, U_BOUND DO j = i+1, U_BOUND t = a(i,j)a(i,j) = 0 END DO a(i,i) = 1 t a(i,j) a(i,j) = a(j,i) a(j,i) = t END DO END DO END DO generate an identity matrix Swapping the lower and upper diagonal parts (i e 10 upper diagonal parts (i.e., the transpose of a matrix)
  123. 123. The Implied DO: 1/7The Implied DO: 1/7 Fortran has the implied DO that can generatep g efficiently a set of values and/or elements. The implied DO is a variation of the DO-loop.p p The implied DO has the following syntax: (item-1 item-2 item-n v=initial final step)(item 1, item 2, …,item n, v=initial,final,step) Here, item-1, item-2, …, item-n are variables or expressions, v is an INTEGERvariables or expressions, v is an INTEGER variable, and initial, final, and step are INTEGER expressions.p “v=initial,final,step” is exactly what we saw in a DO-loop. 11 p
  124. 124. The Implied DO: 2/7The Implied DO: 2/7 The execution of an implied DO below lets variablep v to start with initial, and step though to final with a step size step. (item 1 item 2 item n v=initial final step)(item-1, item-2, …,item-n, v=initial,final,step) The result is a sequence of items. (i+1, i=1,3) generates 2 3 4(i+1, i=1,3) generates 2, 3, 4. (i*k, i+k*i, i=1,8,2) generates k, 1+k (i = 1), 3*k, 3+k*3 (i = 3), 5*k, 5+k*5 (i = 5),), , ( ), , ( ), 7*k, 7+k*7 (i = 7). (a(i),a(i+2),a(i*3-1),i*4,i=3,5) t (3) ( ) (8) 12 (i 3) (4)generates a(3), a(5), a(8) , 12 (i=3), a(4), a(6), a(11), 16 (i=4), a(5), a(7), a(14), 20. 12
  125. 125. The Implied DO: 3/7The Implied DO: 3/7 Implied DO may be nested.p y (i*k,(j*j,i*j,j=1,3), i=2,4) In the above (j*j i*j j 1 3) is nested inIn the above, (j*j,i*j,j=1,3) is nested in the implied i loop. Here are the results: When i = 2, the implied DO generates 2*k, (j*j,2*j,j=1,3) Then j goes from 1 to 3 and generatesThen, j goes from 1 to 3 and generates 2*k, 1*1, 2*1, 2*2, 2*2, 3*3, 2*3 j = 1 j = 2 j = 3 13 j = 1 j = 2 j = 3
  126. 126. The Implied DO: 4/7The Implied DO: 4/7 Continue with the previous examplep p (i*k,(j*j,i*j,j=1,3), i=2,4) When i = 3, it generates the following:g g 3*k, (j*j,3*j,j=1,3) Expanding the j loop yields:p g j p y 3*k, 1*1, 3*1, 2*2, 3*2, 3*3, 3*3 When i = 4, the i loop generates, p g 4*k, (j*j, 4*j, j=1,3) Expanding the j loop yieldsp g j p y 4*k, 1*1, 4*1, 2*2, 4*2, 3*3, 4*3 14j = 1 j = 2 j = 3
  127. 127. The Implied DO: 5/7The Implied DO: 5/7 The following generates a multiplication table:The following generates a multiplication table: ((i*j,j=1,9),i=1,9) When i 1 the inner j implied DO loopWhen i = 1, the inner j implied DO-loop produces 1*1, 1*2, …, 1*9 When i = 2, the inner j implied DO-loop produces 2*1, 2*2, …, 2*9 When i = 9, the inner j implied DO-loop produces 9*1, 9*2, …, 9*9 15
  128. 128. The Implied DO: 6/7The Implied DO: 6/7 The following produces all upper triangularThe following produces all upper triangular entries, row-by-row, of a 2-dimensional array: ((a(p q) q = p n) p = 1 n)((a(p,q),q = p,n),p = 1,n) When p = 1, the inner q loop produces a(1,1), a(1 2) a(1 n)a(1,2), …, a(1,n) When p=2, the inner q loop produces a(2,2), a(2,3), …., a(2,n) When p=3, the inner q loop produces a(3,3), a(3,4), …, a(3,n) When p=n, the inner q loop produces a(n,n) 16 p , q p p ( , )
  129. 129. The Implied DO: 7/7The Implied DO: 7/7 The following produces all upper triangularThe following produces all upper triangular entries, column-by-column: ((a(p q) p = 1 q) q = 1 n)((a(p,q),p = 1,q),q = 1,n) When q=1, the inner p loop produces a(1,1) When q=2, the inner p loop produces a(1,2), a(2,2) When q=3, the inner p loop produces a(1,3), a(2,3), …, a(3,3) When q=n, the inner p loop produces a(1,n), a(2,n), a(3,n), …, a(n,n) 17 ( , ), ( , ), , ( , )
  130. 130. Array Input/Output: 1/8Array Input/Output: 1/8 Implied DO can be used in READ(*,*) andp ( , ) WRITE(*,*) statements. When an implied DO is used it is equivalent toWhen an implied DO is used, it is equivalent to execute the I/O statement with the generated elementselements. The following prints out a multiplication table (* *)((i * j i*j j 1 9) i 1 9)WRITE(*,*)((i,“*”,j,“=“,i*j,j=1,9),i=1,9) The following has a better format (i.e., 9 rows): DO i = 1, 9 WRITE(*,*) (i, “*”, j, “=“, i*j, j=1,9) 18 END DO
  131. 131. Array Input/Output: 2/8Array Input/Output: 2/8 The following shows three ways of reading ng y g data items into an one dimensional array a(). Are they the same?Are they the same? READ(*,*) n,(a(i),i=1,n)(1) READ(*,*) n i i ( ) (2) READ(*,*) (a(i),i=1,n) READ(* *) n(3) READ(*,*) n DO i = 1, n READ(*,*) a(i) (3) 19 END DO
  132. 132. Array Input/Output: 3/8Array Input/Output: 3/8 Suppose we wish to fill a(1), a(2) and a(3)pp ( ), ( ) ( ) with 10, 20 and 30. The input may be: 3 10 20 303 10 20 30 Each READ starts from a new line! OKREAD(*,*) n,(a(i),i=1,n) READ(* *) n (1) (2) OK Wrong! n gets 3 andREAD(*,*) n READ(*,*) (a(i),i=1,n) (2) Wrong! n gets 3 and the second READ fails READ(*,*) n DO i = 1, n (3) Wrong! n gets 3 and the three READs fail 20 READ(*,*) a(i) END DO
  133. 133. Array Input/Output: 4/8Array Input/Output: 4/8 What if the input is changed to the following?What if the input is changed to the following? 3 10 20 30 OK 10 20 30 READ(*,*) n,(a(i),i=1,n) READ(* *) n (1) (2) OK OK. Why????READ(*,*) n READ(*,*) (a(i),i=1,n) (2) OK. Why???? READ(*,*) n DO i = 1, n (3) Wrong! n gets 3, a(1) has 10; but, the next two READs fail 21 READ(*,*) a(i) END DO READs fail
  134. 134. Array Input/Output: 5/8Array Input/Output: 5/8 What if the input is changed to the following?What if the input is changed to the following? 3 10 20 OK 20 30 READ(*,*) n,(a(i),i=1,n) READ(* *) n (1) (2) OK OKREAD(*,*) n READ(*,*) (a(i),i=1,n) (2) OK READ(*,*) n DO i = 1, n (3) OK 22 READ(*,*) a(i) END DO
  135. 135. Array Input/Output: 6/8Array Input/Output: 6/8 Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y () INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,0:1) :: a Suppose further the READ is the following:Suppose further the READ is the following: READ(*,*) ((a(i,j),j=0,1),i=2,4) What are the results for the following input? 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 0 1 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 2 3 2 3 0 1 0 1 23 3 4 5 6 3 4 5 64 4
  136. 136. Array Input/Output: 7/8Array Input/Output: 7/8 Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y () INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,0:1) :: a DO i = 2 4DO i = 2, 4 READ(*,*) (a(i,j),j=0,1) END DOEND DO What are the results for the following input? 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 97 8 9 1 2 1 2A(2,0)=1 row-by-row2 0 1 0 1 24 ? ? ? ? 4 5 7 8 A(2,1)=2 then error! y 3 4
  137. 137. Array Input/Output: 8/8Array Input/Output: 8/8 Suppose we have a two-dimensional array a():pp y () INTEGER, DIMENSION(2:4,0:1) :: a DO j = 0 1DO j = 0, 1 READ(*,*) (a(i,j),i=2,4) END DOEND DO What are the results for the following input? 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 97 8 9 1 ? 1 4 A(2,0)=1 A(3,0)=2 column-by-column2 0 1 0 1 25 2 ? 3 ? 2 5 3 6 A(4,0)=3 then error! y 3 4
  138. 138. Matrix Multiplication: 1/2Matrix Multiplication: 1/2 Read a l m matrix Al m and a m n matrix Bm n,Read a l m matrix Al m and a m n matrix Bm n, and compute their product Cl n = Al m Bm n. PROGRAM Matrix MultiplicationPROGRAM Matrix_Multiplication IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, PARAMETER :: SIZE = 100 INTEGER DIMENSION(1:SIZE 1:SIZE) :: A B CINTEGER, DIMENSION(1:SIZE,1:SIZE) :: A, B, C INTEGER :: L, M, N, i, j, k READ(*,*) L, M, N ! read sizes <= 100 iDO i = 1, L READ(*,*) (A(i,j), j=1,M) ! A() is L-by-M END DO DO i = 1, M READ(*,*) (B(i,j), j=1,N) ! B() is M-by-N END DO 26 …… other statements …… END PROGRAM Matrix_Multiplication
  139. 139. Matrix Multiplication: 2/2Matrix Multiplication: 2/2 The following does multiplication and outputThe following does multiplication and output DO i = 1, L DO j = 1, N C(i,j) = 0 ! for each C(i,j) DO k = 1, M ! (row i of A)*(col j of B) C(i,j) = C(i,j) + A(i,k)*B(k,j) END DO END DOEND DO END DO DO i = 1 L ! print row-by-rowDO i = 1, L ! print row-by-row WRITE(*,*) (C(i,j), j=1, N) END DO 27
  140. 140. Arrays as Arguments: 1/4Arrays as Arguments: 1/4 Arrays may also be used as arguments passingy y g p g to functions and subroutines. Formal argument arrays may be declared asg y y usual; however, Fortran 90 recommends the use of assumed-shape arrays. An assumed-shape array has its lower bound in each extent specified; but, the upper bound is not used. formal arguments REAL, DIMENSION(-3:,1:), INTENT(IN) :: x, y INTEGER, DIMENSION(:), INTENT(OUT) :: a, b 28assumed-shape
  141. 141. Arrays as Arguments: 2/4Arrays as Arguments: 2/4 The extent in each dimension is an expressionThe extent in each dimension is an expression that uses constants or other non-array formal arguments with INTENT(IN) :g ( ) SUBROUTINE Test(x,y,z,w,l,m,n) I PLICIT NONE assumed-shape IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: l, m, n REAL, DIMENSION(10:),INTENT(IN) :: x INTEGER, DIMENSION(-1:,m:), INTENT(OUT) :: y LOGICAL, DIMENSION(m,n:), INTENT(OUT) :: z REAL, DIMENSION(-5:5), INTENT(IN) :: w …… other statements …… END SUBROUTINE Test DIMENSION(1:m,n:) 29not assumed-shape
  142. 142. Arrays as Arguments: 3/4Arrays as Arguments: 3/4 Fortran 90 automatically passes an array and itsFortran 90 automatically passes an array and its shape to a formal argument. A subprogram receives the shape and uses theA subprogram receives the shape and uses the lower bound of each extent to recover the upper boundbound. INTEGER,DIMENSION(2:10)::Score …… CALL Funny(Score) shape is (9) SUBROUTINE Funny(x) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER,DIMENSION(-1:),INTENT(IN) :: x 30 …… other statements …… END SUBROUTINE Funny (-1:7)
  143. 143. Arrays as Arguments: 4/4Arrays as Arguments: 4/4 One more exampleOne more example REAL, DIMENSION(1:3,1:4) :: x, ( , ) INTEGER :: p = 3, q = 2 CALL Fast(x,p,q) shape is (3,4) SUBROUTINE Fast(a,m,n)( , , ) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER,INTENT(IN) :: m,n REAL DIMENSION(-m: n:) INTENT(IN)::aREAL,DIMENSION( m:,n:),INTENT(IN)::a …… other statements …… END SUBROUTINE Fast 31 (-m:,n:) becomes (-3:-1,2:5)
  144. 144. The SIZE() Intrinsic Function: 1/2The SIZE() Intrinsic Function: 1/2 How do I know the shape of an array?p y Use the SIZE() intrinsic function. SIZE() requires two arguments, an arraySIZE() requires two arguments, an array name and an INTEGER, and returns the size of the array in the given “dimension.”y g INTEGER,DIMENSION(-3:5,0:100):: a shape is (9,101) WRITE(*,*) SIZE(a,1), SIZE(a,2) CALL ArraySize(a) (1:9,5:105) SUBROUTINE ArraySize(x) INTEGER,DIMENSION(1:,5:),… :: x Both WRITE prints 9 and 101 32 WRITE(*,*) SIZE(x,1), SIZE(x,2) 9 and 101
  145. 145. The SIZE() Intrinsic Function : 2/2The SIZE() Intrinsic Function : 2/2 INTEGER,DIMENSION(-1:1,3:6):: Empty CALL Fill(Empty)CALL Fill(Empty) DO i = -1,1 WRITE(*,*) (Empty(i,j),j=3,6) END DO SUBROUTINE Fill(y) I PLICIT NONE END DO shape is (3,4) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER,DIMENSION(1:,1:),INTENT(OUT)::y INTEGER :: U1, U2, i, j output U1 = SIZE(y,1) U2 = SIZE(y,2) DO i = 1, U1 2 3 4 5 3 4 5 6 4 5 6 7 output (1:3 1:4) DO j = 1, U2 y(i,j) = i + j END DO 4 5 6 7 (1:3,1:4) 33 END DO END DO END SUBROUTINE Fill
  146. 146. Local Arrays: 1/2Local Arrays: 1/2 Fortran 90 permits to declare local arrays usingFortran 90 permits to declare local arrays using INTEGER formal arguments with the INTENT(IN) attribute.( ) SUBROUTINE Compute(X m n)INTEGER, & SUBROUTINE Compute(X, m, n) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER,INTENT(IN) :: m, n INTEGER DIMENSION(1 1 ) & INTEGER, & DIMENSION(100,100) & ::a, z W(1:3) Y(1:3,1:15) INTEGER,DIMENSION(1:,1:), & INTENT(IN) :: X INTEGER,DIMENSION(1:m) :: W local arrays CALL Compute(a,3,5) CALL Compute(z,6,8) REAL,DIMENSION(1:m,1:m*n)::Y …… other statements …… END SUBROUTINE ComputeW(1:6) Y(1:6,1:48) 34 W(1:6) Y(1:6,1:48)
  147. 147. Local Arrays: 2/2Local Arrays: 2/2 Just like you learned in C/C++ and Java, memory of local variables and local arrays in Fortran 90 is allocated before entering a subprogram and deallocated on return. Fortran 90 uses the formal arguments tog compute the extents of local arrays. Therefore, different calls with different valuesTherefore, different calls with different values of actual arguments produce different shape and extent for the same local array. However,and extent for the same local array. However, the rank of a local array will not change. 35
  148. 148. The ALLOCATBLE AttributeThe ALLOCATBLE Attribute In many situations, one does not know exactlyIn many situations, one does not know exactly the shape or extents of an array. As a result, one can only declare a “large enough” array.one can only declare a large enough array. The ALLOCATABLE attribute comes to rescue. The ALLOCATABLE attribute indicates that atThe ALLOCATABLE attribute indicates that at the declaration time one only knows the rank of b t t it t tan array but not its extent. Therefore, each extent has only a colon :. INTEGER,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: a REAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:,:) :: b 36 LOGICAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:,:,:) :: c
  149. 149. The ALLOCATE Statement: 1/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 1/3 The ALLOCATE statement has the followingg syntax: ALLOCATE(array-1 array-n STAT=v)ALLOCATE(array-1,…,array-n,STAT=v) Here, array-1, …, array-n are array names with complete extents as in the DIMENSIONwith complete extents as in the DIMENSION attribute, and v is an INTEGER variable. Af i f if 0After the execution of ALLOCATE, if v 0, then at least one arrays did not get memory. REAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: a LOGICAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:,:) :: x 37 INTEGER :: status ALLOCATE(a(3:5), x(-10:10,1:8), STAT=status)
  150. 150. The ALLOCATE Statement: 2/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 2/3 ALLOCATE only allocates arrays with they y ALLOCATABLE attribute. The extents in ALLOCATE can use INTEGERThe extents in ALLOCATE can use INTEGER expressions. Make sure all involved variables have been initialized properlyhave been initialized properly. INTEGER,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:,:) :: x INTEGER,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: aINTEGER,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: a INTEGER :: m, n, p READ(*,*) m, n ALLOCATE(x(1:m m+n:m*n) a(-(m*n):m*n) STAT=p)ALLOCATE(x(1:m,m+n:m*n),a(-(m*n):m*n),STAT=p) IF (p /= 0) THEN …… report error here …… 38 If m = 3 and n = 5, then we have x(1:3,8:15) and a(-15:15)
  151. 151. The ALLOCATE Statement: 3/3The ALLOCATE Statement: 3/3 ALLOCATE can be used in subprograms.p g Formal arrays are not ALLOCATABLE. I l ll t d i bIn general, an array allocated in a subprogram is a local entity, and is automatically d ll t d h th b tdeallocated when the subprogram returns. Watch for the following odd use: PROGRAM Try_not_to_do_this IMPLICIT NONE REAL,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: x CONTAINS SUBROUTINE Hey(…) ALLOCATE(x(1:10)) 39 ALLOCATE(x(1:10)) END SUBROUTINE Hey END PROGRAM Try_not_to_do_this
  152. 152. The DEALLOCATE StatementThe DEALLOCATE Statement Allocated arrays may be deallocated by theAllocated arrays may be deallocated by the DEALLOCATE() statement as shown below: DEALLOCATE(array-1 array-n STAT=v)DEALLOCATE(array-1,…,array-n,STAT=v) Here, array-1, …, array-n are the names of allocated arrays and is an INTEGER variableallocated arrays, and v is an INTEGER variable. If deallocation fails (e.g., some arrays were not ) i iallocated), the value in v is non-zero. After deallocation of an array, it is not available and any access will cause a program error. DEALLOCATE(a b c STAT=status) 40 DEALLOCATE(a, b, c, STAT=status)
  153. 153. The ALLOCATED Intrinsic FunctionThe ALLOCATED Intrinsic Function The ALLOCATED(a) function returns .TRUE.( ) if ALLOCATABLE array a has been allocated. Otherwise, it returns .FALSE., INTEGER,ALLOCATABLE,DIMENSION(:) :: Mat INTEGER :: status ALLOCATE(Mat(1:100),STAT=status) …… ALLOCATED(Mat) returns .TRUE. ….. …… other statements …… DEALLOCATE(Mat,STAT=status)DEALLOCATE(Mat,STAT status) …… ALLOCATED(Mat) returns .FALSE. …… 41
  154. 154. Fortran 90 SubprogramsFortran 90 Subprograms If Fortran is the lingua franca, then certainly it must be true that BASIC is the lingua playpen 1 Thomas E. Kurtz Co-Designer of the BASIC language Fall 2010
  155. 155. Functions and SubroutinesFunctions and Subroutines Fortran 90 has two types of subprograms,Fortran 90 has two types of subprograms, functions and subroutines. A Fortran 90 function is a function like those inA Fortran 90 function is a function like those in C/C++. Thus, a function returns a computed result via the function nameresult via the function name. If a function does not have to return a function l b tivalue, use subroutine. 2
  156. 156. Function Syntax: 1/3Function Syntax: 1/3 A Fortran function, or function subprogram,, p g , has the following syntax: type FUNCTION function-name (arg1, arg2, ..., argn) IMPLICIT NONE [specification part] [execution part]p [subprogram part] END FUNCTION function-name type is a Fortran 90 type (e g INTEGERtype is a Fortran 90 type (e.g., INTEGER, REAL, LOGICAL, etc) with or without KIND. function name is a Fortran 90 identifierfunction-name is a Fortran 90 identifier arg1, …, argn are formal arguments. 3
  157. 157. Function Syntax: 2/3Function Syntax: 2/3 A function is a self-contained unit that receives some “input” from the outside world via its formal arguments, does some computations, and returns the result with the name of the function. Somewhere in a function there has to be one or more assignment statements like this: function-name = expression where the result of expression is saved to the name of the function. Note that function-name cannot appear in the right-hand side of any expression. 4
  158. 158. Function Syntax: 3/3Function Syntax: 3/3 In a type specification, formal argumentsyp p , g should have a new attribute INTENT(IN). The meaning of INTENT(IN) is that theg function only takes the value from a formal argument and does not change its content. Any statements that can be used in PROGRAM can also be used in a FUNCTION. 5
  159. 159. Function ExampleFunction Example Note that functions can have no formal argument.Note that functions can have no formal argument. But, () is still required. INTEGER FUNCTION Factorial(n) IMPLICIT NONE REAL FUNCTION GetNumber() IMPLICIT NONE Factorial computation Read and return a positive real number IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: n INTEGER :: i, Ans IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: Input_Value DO WRITE(*,*) 'A positive number: ' Ans = 1 DO i = 1, n Ans = Ans * i END DO ( , ) p READ(*,*) Input_Value IF (Input_Value > 0.0) EXIT WRITE(*,*) 'ERROR. try again.' END DOEND DO Factorial = Ans END FUNCTION Factorial END DO GetNumber = Input_Value END FUNCTION GetNumber 6
  160. 160. Common Problems: 1/2Common Problems: 1/2 forget function type forget INTENT(IN) not an error FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: a, b REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: a, b g yp g DoSomthing = SQRT(a*a + b*b) END FUNCTION DoSomething DoSomthing = SQRT(a*a + b*b) END FUNCTION DoSomething REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE change INTENT(IN) argument forget to return a value INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: a, b IF (a > b) THEN a = a - b ELSE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: a, b INTEGER :: c c = SQRT(a*a + b*b) END FUNCTION DoSomethingELSE a = a + b END IF DoSomthing = SQRT(a*a+b*b) END FUNCTION DoSomething 7 END FUNCTION DoSomething
  161. 161. Common Problems: 2/2Common Problems: 2/2 REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE REAL FUNCTION DoSomething(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE incorrect use of function name only the most recent value is returned IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: a, b DoSomething = a*a + b*b DoSomething = SQRT(DoSomething) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: a, b DoSomething = a*a + b*b DoSomething = SQRT(a*a - b*b) END FUNCTION DoSomething END FUNCTION DoSomething 8
  162. 162. Using FunctionsUsing Functions The use of a user-defined function is similar toThe use of a user defined function is similar to the use of a Fortran 90 intrinsic function. The following uses function Factorial(n) toThe following uses function Factorial(n) to compute the combinatorial coefficient C(m,n) , where m and n are actual arguments:where m and n are actual arguments: Cmn = Factorial(m)/(Factorial(n)*Factorial(m-n)) Note that the combinatorial coefficient is defined as follows, although it is not the most efficient way: C m n m ( ) ! 9 C m n n m n ( , ) ! ( )!
  163. 163. Argument Association : 1/5Argument Association : 1/5 Argument association is a way of passing valuesArgument association is a way of passing values from actual arguments to formal arguments. If an actual argument is an expression it isIf an actual argument is an expression, it is evaluated and stored in a temporary location from which the value is passed to thefrom which the value is passed to the corresponding formal argument. If t l t i i bl it l iIf an actual argument is a variable, its value is passed to the corresponding formal argument. C d h i i blConstant and (A), where A is variable, are considered expressions. 10
  164. 164. Argument Association : 2/5Argument Association : 2/5 Actual arguments are variables:Actual arguments are variables: a b cWRITE(*,*) Sum(a,b,c) x y z INTEGER FUNCTION Sum(x,y,z) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER INTENT(IN)::x y z x y zINTEGER,INTENT(IN)::x,y,z …….. END FUNCTION Sum 11
  165. 165. Argument Association : 3/5Argument Association : 3/5 Expressions as actual arguments. Dashed lineExpressions as actual arguments. Dashed line boxes are temporary locations. a+b b+c cWRITE(*,*) Sum(a+b,b+c,c) x y z INTEGER FUNCTION Sum(x,y,z) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER INTENT(IN)::x y z x y zINTEGER,INTENT(IN)::x,y,z …….. END FUNCTION Sum 12
  166. 166. Argument Association : 4/5Argument Association : 4/5 Constants as actual arguments. Dashed lineConstants as actual arguments. Dashed line boxes are temporary locations. 1 2 3WRITE(*,*) Sum(1, 2, 3) x y z INTEGER FUNCTION Sum(x,y,z) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER INTENT(IN)::x y z x y zINTEGER,INTENT(IN)::x,y,z …….. END FUNCTION Sum 13
  167. 167. Argument Association : 5/5Argument Association : 5/5 A variable in () is considered as an expression.() p Dashed line boxes are temporary locations. (a) (b) (c)WRITE(*,*) Sum((a), (b), (c)) x y z INTEGER FUNCTION Sum(x,y,z) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER INTENT(IN)::x y z x y zINTEGER,INTENT(IN)::x,y,z …….. END FUNCTION Sum 14
  168. 168. Where Do Functions Go: 1/2Where Do Functions Go: 1/2 Fortran 90 functions can be internal or external.Fortran 90 functions can be internal or external. Internal functions are inside of a PROGRAM, the main program:main program: PROGRAM program-name IMPLICIT NONEC NON [specification part] [execution part] CONTAINSCONTAINS [functions] END PROGRAM program-name Although a function can contain other functions, i t l f ti t h i t l f ti 15 internal functions cannot have internal functions.
  169. 169. Where Do Functions Go: 2/2Where Do Functions Go: 2/2 The right shows PROGRAM TwoFunctionsg two internal functions, PROGRAM TwoFunctions IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: a, b, A_Mean, G_Mean READ(*,*) a, b ArithMean() and GeoMean(). A_Mean = ArithMean(a, b) G_Mean = GeoMean(a,b) WRITE(*,*) a, b, A_Mean, G_Mean CONTAINS They take two REAL actual t d CONTAINS REAL FUNCTION ArithMean(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a, b arguments and compute and return a REAL ArithMean = (a+b)/2.0 END FUNCTION ArithMean REAL FUNCTION GeoMean(a, b) IMPLICIT NONEreturn a REAL function value. IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a, b GeoMean = SQRT(a*b) END FUNCTION GeoMean 16 END PROGRAM TwoFunctions
  170. 170. Scope Rules: 1/5Scope Rules: 1/5 Scope rules tell us if an entity (i.e., variable,Scope rules tell us if an entity (i.e., variable, parameter and function) is visible or accessible at certain places.at certain places. Places where an entity can be accessed or visible is referred as the scope of that entityis referred as the scope of that entity. 17
  171. 171. Scope Rules: 2/5Scope Rules: 2/5 Scope Rule #1: The scope of an entity is the program or function in which it is declared. PROGRAM Scope_1 Scope of PI, m and n IMPLICIT NONE REAL, PARAMETER :: PI = 3.1415926 INTEGER :: m, n ................... CONTAINS INTEGER FUNCTION Funct1(k) IMPLICIT NONE Scope of k, f and g local to Funct1() INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: k REAL :: f, g .......... END FUNCTION Funct1END FUNCTION Funct1 REAL FUNCTION Funct2(u, v) IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(IN) :: u, v Scope of u and v local to Funct2() 18 .......... END FUNCTION Funct2 END PROGRAM Scope_1
  172. 172. Scope Rules: 3/5Scope Rules: 3/5 Scope Rule #2 :A global entity is visible to allp contained functions. PROGRAM Scope_2 IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: a = 1, b = 2, c = 3 WRITE(*,*) Add(a) a, b and c are global The first Add(a) returns 4 Th d dd tc = 4 WRITE(*,*) Add(a) WRITE(*,*) Mul(b,c) CONTAINS The second Add(a) returns 5 Mul(b,c) returns 8 INTEGER FUNCTION Add(q) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: q Add = q + c Thus, the two Add(a)’s produce different results, even though the formal arguments are the same! This is usually referred toEND FUNCTION Add INTEGER FUNCTION Mul(x, y) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: x, y are the same! This is usually referred to as side effect. Avoid using global entities! 19 Mul = x * y END FUNCTION Mul END PROGRAM Scope_2 Avoid using global entities!
  173. 173. Scope Rules: 4/5Scope Rules: 4/5 Scope Rule #2 :A global entity is visible to allp contained functions. PROGRAM Global IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: a = 10, b = 20 The first Add(a,b) returns 30 It also changes b to 30 Th 2 d WRITE(* *) h 30 INTEGER :: a 10, b 20 WRITE(*,*) Add(a,b) WRITE(*,*) b WRITE(*,*) Add(a,b) The 2nd WRITE(*,*) shows 30 The 2nd Add(a,b) returns 40 This is a bad side effect CONTAINS INTEGER FUNCTION Add(x,y) IMPLICIT NONE Avoid using global entities! INTEGER, INTENT(IN)::x, y b = x+y Add = b 20 END FUNCTION Add END PROGRAM Global
  174. 174. Scope Rules: 5/5Scope Rules: 5/5 Scope Rule #3 :An entity declared in the scope of th tit i l diff t ifanother entity is always a different one even if their names are identical. PROGRAM Scope_3 IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER :: i, Max = 5 DO i 1 Max Although PROGRAM and FUNCTION Sum() both have INTEGER variable i, They are TWO different entities. DO i = 1, Max Write(*,*) Sum(i) END DO CONTAINS y Hence, any changes to i in Sum() will not affect the i in PROGRAM. INTEGER FUNCTION Sum(n) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: n INTEGER :: i sINTEGER :: i, s s = 0 …… other computation …… Sum = s 21 END FUNCTION Sum END PROGRAM Scope_3
  175. 175. Example: 1/4Example: 1/4 If a triangle has side lengths a, b and c, the HeronIf a triangle has side lengths a, b and c, the Heron formula computes the triangle area as follows, where s = (a+b+c)/2:where s (a b c)/2: Area s s a s b s c( ) ( ) ( ) To form a triangle, a, b and c must fulfill the following two conditions: a > 0, b > 0 and c > 0 a+b > c, a+c > b and b+c > a 22
  176. 176. Example: 2/4Example: 2/4 LOGICAL Function TriangleTest() makesg () sure all sides are positive, and the sum of any two is larger than the third.two is larger than the third. LOGICAL FUNCTION TriangleTest(a, b, c)LOGICAL FUNCTION TriangleTest(a, b, c) IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a, b, c LOGICAL :: test1, test2OG C :: test , test test1 = (a > 0.0) .AND. (b > 0.0) .AND. (c > 0.0) test2 = (a + b > c) .AND. (a + c > b) .AND. (b + c > a) TriangleTest = test1 .AND. test2 ! both must be .TRUE. END FUNCTION TriangleTest 23
  177. 177. Example: 3/4Example: 3/4 This function implements the Heron formula.This function implements the Heron formula. Note that a, b and c must form a triangle. REAL FUNCTION Area(a, b, c) IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a, b, c REAL :: s s = (a + b + c) / 2.0 A SQRT( *( )*( b)*( ))Area = SQRT(s*(s-a)*(s-b)*(s-c)) END FUNCTION Area 24
  178. 178. Example: 4/4Example: 4/4 Here is the main program! PROGRAM HeronFormula IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: a, b, c, TriangleArea DODO WRITE(*,*) 'Three sides of a triangle please --> ' READ(*,*) a, b, c WRITE(*,*) 'Input sides are ', a, b, c IF (TriangleTest(a, b, c)) EXIT ! exit if they form a triangle WRITE(*,*) 'Your input CANNOT form a triangle. Try again' END DO TriangleArea = Area(a b c)TriangleArea = Area(a, b, c) WRITE(*,*) 'Triangle area is ', TriangleArea CONTAINS LOGICAL FUNCTION TriangleTest(a, b, c) …… END FUNCTION TriangleTest REAL FUNCTION Area(a, b, c) 25 …… END FUNCTION Area END PROGRAM HeronFormula
  179. 179. Subroutines: 1/2Subroutines: 1/2 A Fortran 90 function takes values from itsA Fortran 90 function takes values from its formal arguments, and returns a single value with the function name.with the function name. A Fortran 90 subroutine takes values from its formal arguments and returns some computedformal arguments, and returns some computed results with its formal arguments. A F t 90 b ti d t tA Fortran 90 subroutine does not return any value with its name. 26
  180. 180. Subroutines: 2/2Subroutines: 2/2 The following is Fortran 90 subroutine syntax:The following is Fortran 90 subroutine syntax: SUBROUTINE subroutine-name(arg1,arg2,...,argn) IMPLICIT NONE [specification part] [ ti t][execution part] [subprogram part] END SUBROUTINE subroutine-nameEND SUBROUTINE subroutine name If a subroutine does not require any formal arguments “arg1 arg2 argn” can be removed;arguments, arg1,arg2,...,argn can be removed; however, () must be there. S b ti i il t f ti 27 Subroutines are similar to functions.
  181. 181. The INTENT() Attribute: 1/2The INTENT() Attribute: 1/2 Since subroutines use formal arguments toSince subroutines use formal arguments to receive values and to pass results back, in addition to INTENT(IN), there are( ), INTENT(OUT) and INTENT(INOUT). INTENT(OUT) means a formal argument doesINTENT(OUT) means a formal argument does not receive a value; but, it will return a value to its corresponding actual argumentits corresponding actual argument. INTENT(INOUT) means a formal argument i l f d t l t itreceives a value from and returns a value to its corresponding actual argument. 28
  182. 182. The INTENT() Attribute: 2/2The INTENT() Attribute: 2/2 Two simple examples:Two simple examples: SUBROUTINE Means(a, b, c, Am, Gm, Hm) IMPLICIT NONE Am, Gm and Hm are used to return the results REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a, b, c REAL, INTENT(OUT) :: Am, Gm, Hm Am = (a+b+c)/3.0 Gm = (a*b*c)**(1 0/3 0)Gm = (a*b*c)**(1.0/3.0) Hm = 3.0/(1.0/a + 1.0/b + 1.0/c) END SUBROUTINE Means values of a and b are swapped SUBROUTINE Swap(a, b) IMPLICIT NONE INTEGER, INTENT(INOUT) :: a, b INTEGER :: cINTEGER :: c c = a a = b b = c 29 END SUBROUTINE Swap
  183. 183. The CALL Statement: 1/2The CALL Statement: 1/2 Unlike C/C++ and Java, to use a Fortran 90Unlike C/C and Java, to use a Fortran 90 subroutine, the CALL statement is needed. The CALL statement may have one of the threeThe CALL statement may have one of the three forms: CALL sub name(arg1 arg2 argn)CALL sub-name(arg1,arg2,…,argn) CALL sub-name( ) CALL sub-name The last two forms are equivalent and are forThe last two forms are equivalent and are for calling a subroutine without formal arguments. 30
  184. 184. The CALL Statement: 2/2The CALL Statement: 2/2 PROGRAM Test PROGRAM SecondDegreePROGRAM Test IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: a, b READ(*,*) a, b PROGRAM SecondDegree IMPLICIT NONE REAL :: a, b, c, r1, r2 LOGICAL :: OK CALL Swap(a,b) WRITE(*,*) a, b CONTAINS SUBROUTINE Swap(x y) READ(*,*) a, b, c CALL Solver(a,b,c,r1,r2,OK) IF (.NOT. OK) THEN WRITE(* *) “No root”SUBROUTINE Swap(x,y) IMPLICIT NONE REAL, INTENT(INOUT) :: x,y REAL :: z WRITE(*,*) “No root” ELSE WRITE(*,*) a, b, c, r1, r2 END IF z = x x = y y = z END SUBROUTINE Swap CONTAINS SUBROUTINE Solver(a,b,c,x,y,L) IMPLICIT NONE REAL INTENT(IN) :: a b cEND SUBROUTINE Swap END PROGRAM Test REAL, INTENT(IN) :: a,b,c REAL, INTENT(OUT) :: x, y LOGICAL, INTENT(OUT) :: L ……… 31 END SUBROUTINE Solver END PROGRAM SecondDegree
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