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Unit 3 pp #3 6th grade
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Unit 3 pp #3 6th grade

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Transcript

  • 1. Section 1 Florida's Land Resources
    Chapter 15
    The Natural Landscape
    • Florida’s land surface is about 36,000,000 acres.
    • 2. Florida’s major ecological communities include woodland forests, dry prairies, wetlands, and beaches.
    • 3. Woodland forests are located primarily in northern Florida, and dry prairies are found mainly in central Florida. Wetlands include the Everglades in southern Florida.
  • Chapter 15
    Section 1 Florida's Land Resources
  • 4. Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater
    • Groundwater is one of Florida’s most valuable resources. It’s stored in formations called aquifers.
    • 5. An aquifer is a body of rock or sediment that stores groundwater and allows the flow of groundwater.
    • 6. Aquifers provide nearly 90% of Florida’s drinking water.
  • Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater
  • 7. Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater, continued
    • The Floridan Aquifer underlies most of Florida and parts of three other states. It is one of the largest aquifers in the world.
    • 8. Water from aquifers can rise to the surface to form springs.
    • 9. Every day, nearly 9 billion gallons of water flows from more than 700 springs in Florida.
  • Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater, continued
    • Wells and Groundwater Groundwater is usually pumped to the surface from wells drilled in Earth’s crust.
    • 10. As it flows down through rocks and sediments in an aquifer, groundwater becomes filtered and purified.
    • 11. Therefore, deep wells can provide water that is free of pollutants.
  • Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater, continued
    • Threats to Florida’s Groundwater include overwithdrawal, saltwater intrusion, and pollution.
    • 12. Overwithdrawal occurs when water is removed from an aquifer faster than it can be replaced.
    • 13. In extreme cases, overwithdrawal causes part of the aquifer to collapse, forming a sinkhole. It can also cause springs and streams to dry up.
  • Section 2 Florida's Freshwater Resources
    Chapter 15
    Groundwater, continued
    • Overwithdrawal in coastal aquifers can cause ocean water to flow into the aquifer, in a process called saltwater intrusion.
    • 14. Since nearly 90% of Floridians live near the coast, saltwater intrusion is a problem in many aquifers.
    • 15. Pollution from agricultural and lawn care chemicals and leaking underground fuel tanks also threatens groundwater.
  • Section3 Water Underground
    Chapter 16
    The Location of Groundwater
    • Surface water seeps underground into the soil and rock. The water passes through an area called the zone of aeration and collects in an area called the zone of saturation.
    • 16. The boundary between the two zones is known as the water table.
  • Section3 Water Underground
    Chapter 16
  • 17. Section3 Water Underground
    Chapter 16
    Underground Erosion and Deposition
    • Cave Formation Although caves are formed by erosion, they also show signs of deposition. Water that drips from a crack in a cave’s ceiling leaves behind deposits of calcium carbonate.
    • 18. Sinkholes When the water table is lower than the level of a cave, the cave is no longer supported by the water underneath. The roof of the cave can then collapse, which leaves a circular depression called a sinkhole.