Communication Theory (Influence + Social Judgement theory)

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  • The larger the discrepancy between a speaker’s position and a listener’s point of view, the greater the change in attitude—as long as the message is within the hearer's latitude of acceptance. High ego-involvement usually indicates a wide latitude of rejection. Messages that fall there may have a boomerang effect. (Socio-psychological tradition)
  • Getting a person to play a role in an unfamiliar situation can be a powerful method of influence
  • Perception and evaluation of an idea by comparing it with current attitudes
  • Acceptance: Range of ideas that a person sees as reasonable of worthy of consideration
    Rejection: Range of ideas that a person sees as unreasonable or objectionable
    Non-Commitment: Range of ideas that a person sees as neither acceptable or objectionable
  • Often demonstrated by membership in a group with a known stand
  • Two step mental process that is triggered what a person hears or reads a message.
    Judgement - Evaluate the content of the message to see where it falls vis-a-vis your own position
    Discrepancy & Attitude Change - How will you adjust your anchored attitude toward or away from the message encountered.
  • We use our anchored position as a comparison point when we hear a discrepant message.
    Contrast: Perceptual error whereby people judge messages that fall within their latitude of rejection as further from their anchor than they really are
    Assimilation: Perceptual error whereby people judge messages that fall within their latitude of acceptance as less discrepant from their anchor than they really are
  • See Boomerang effect
  • See research on drinking. Griffin. 202
  • Communication Theory (Influence + Social Judgement theory)

    1. 1. Influence & Social Judgement Theory Tara Wilkinson-McClean. PhD Candidate Media + Communications Lecturer
    2. 2. Influence • Immediacy • Personal Involvement • Nonverbal Messages
    3. 3. Social Judgement Theory - Key Words • Social Judgement Involvement • Latitude of Acceptance • Latitude of Rejection • Latitude of Non-commitment • Ego Involvement • Contrast • Assimilation • Boomerang Effect
    4. 4. Social Judgement Involvement “We weigh every new idea by comparing it with our present point of view”
    5. 5. Latitude of Attitude Accepta nce Rejectio n Non Commit ment
    6. 6. Ego Involvement Importance or centrality of an issue in a person’s life
    7. 7. Two Step Mental Process Judging the Message 2 Step Mental Process Discrepa ncy & Attitude Change Occurs Below Consciousnes s
    8. 8. Contrast vs. Assimilation Contrast Assimilati on
    9. 9. Latitude of Acceptance If we judge a message to be within our latitude of acceptance. We will adjust our attitude somewhat to accommodate the new input. The persuasive effect will be positive but partial. We won’t travel the whole distance, but there will be some measurable movement toward the speaker’s perceived position.
    10. 10. Latitude of Rejection If we judge a message to be within our latitude of rejection. We will adjust our attitude away from what the speaker is advocating. Since people who are highly ego-involved in a topic have a broad range of rejection, most messages aimed to persuade them are in danger of actually driving them further away.
    11. 11. Boomerang Effect Attitude change in the opposite direction of what the message advocates; listeners driven away from rather than drawn to an idea.
    12. 12. Reference Groups The only way to stimulate large-scale change is through a series of small, successive movements. Persuasion is a gradual process. It’s also a social process.
    13. 13. Pluralistic Ignorance The mistaken idea that everyone else is doing or thinking something that they aren’t
    14. 14. Critique • Practical Utility • Prediction of Future • Explanation of Data • Quantitative Research • Testable Hypothesis

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