ENGAGING THE
NEW VOLUNTEER
WORKFORCE
CHANGING ROLES CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS
BY TARA FINGLAS
Learning objectives:
+ Different generations – Millennials v Babyboomers
+ Global perspectives of volunteering
+ United St...
Two generations of volunteers
+ Millennials and Babyboomers
Who are Millennials?
+ Born in the early 1980s up to the 2000s
+ Use technology to connect, socialize and work
+ Always tu...
The social media generation
+ More than 350 million users suffer from a Facebook
addiction
+ If Twitter were a country it ...
Millennials as volunteers
+ 63% of millennials volunteered with a nonprofit in
2011
+ 41% of millennials planned to volunt...
How Millennials communicate
+ Online
+ Websites
+ Social media
+ E-newsletters
Millennials like to share
+ 74% share information about Cool events
+ 69% share statistics
+ 65% share news stories
+ 61% ...
Working with Millennials
+ Impact!
+ Want to make a difference
+ Interested in several causes
Who are Babyboomers?
+ Born after World War 2
+ Challenged traditions
+ Wealthy, active and healthy
The change generation
+ This generation cares deeply about the world and
wants to have an impact.
Babyboomers as volunteers
+ 29% volunteered in 2011
+ 38% volunteer on religious related issues
+ 22% volunteer on educati...
How Babyboomers communicate
+ Direct mail
+ Like new technology but still value the personal
touch
+ Fastest growing group...
Global perspective: United States
+ In 2011, 29% of the population volunteered
+ This is 64.3 million Americans
+ The stat...
Culture of volunteering: United States
+ Part of American society
+ Peace Corps was set up in 1961
+ More than 220,000 peo...
Global perspective: Ireland
+ In 2012, 15,400 people volunteered in Ireland
+ Amounted to 465, 550 volunteer hours
Culture of volunteering: Ireland
+ Volunteer industry
+ Overseas volunteering
+ Professional volunteers
Global perspective: South Africa
+ In 2011, 1.2 million people volunteered
+ Amounted to 370 million volunteer hours
+ Des...
Culture of volunteering: South Africa
+ Younger volunteers
+ Create their own projects
+ Fill gaps in society
Why a global perspective?
+ Share ideas
+ Inspire innovation
+ Appreciate differences
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Engaging The New Volunteer Workforce

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  • MODERATOR In today’s webinar, you will learn: - How to move from goal to action to implementation - How to build partnerships - How to communicate for success - How to draft your own communications strategy
  • It is for this reason that the RI Board of Directors endorsed a membership goal of 1.3 million Rotarians by 30 June 2015, reflecting 3 percent net growth for three years beginning in 2012-13. However the Board recognized that membership challenges will vary from region to region and so it is the responsibility of club and district leaders to create strategies that will work best with their members and their communities.
  • Simply creating a plan and a strategy will not deliver increased growth. The success of your strategy will depend on the commitment and efforts of Rotarians in your clubs and districts in implementing your regional plans, and steering the course to membership growth. Once your regional plan has been endorsed by your districts and clubs, the next step is to drill down and create specific goals. It is no use just having general “feel good” statements. When I asked some a District Governor-elect at the recent International Assembly, what he felt his role was in growing membership, he said “my role is to encourage the clubs to implement the plan”. That is all very well, but encouragement is not enough. It is going to take a concerted effort with a dedicated team from the club member to the RI director to increase membership. Nick will elaborate more on how the plan can be communicated.
  • Now, let’s look at an example of a specific goal. One of the goals for Zone 7B and 8 is to “ Enhance brand recognition, understanding and growth” . Once the goal is articulated, the next stage is to pose the question “ How” do you plan to do this? Perhaps your plan may be to: Develop an Ambassador’s Club to promote membership of Rotary Promote Rotary Week and Rotary achievements Rejuvenate website, social media and public image assets Establish and publicize “Whole of Club” projects Support non-Rotarians to attend District Conferences Once you have broken down your goals into bite size pieces, you need to develop an action plan for each piece. For this, I find that the simplest way is to create a grid as shown on the screen for each task. The first issue to identify is: what is the task? What is the purpose of the task? (or why are we undertaking this task? What steps do you need to take to implement the task, and Follow through, with the proven formula of – who, what, when, where, and how.
  • Let us use as an example the plan to “Rejuvenate website, social media and public image assets” Our action plan would be: Who: Rotary Public Image coordinator, PI Chair, regional magazine editor, and others with the right IT and social media skills. Perhaps even a person outside of Rotary who is on the outside looking in. Far too often our websites, which are portals for the world to look in at Rotary, are too introspective. When : You will need a timeline for the material, and IT support to work by, and a launch date. Where: Why not the District Assembly or changeover? How : Using the Public Image chair as the manager of the project. Engaging an IT company to create the system. The membership chairs, Rotary coordinator and Public image coordinator to provide feedback and review the information. For the presentation to District Assembly, use the PI chair, district training team and Rotaract to give a live demonstration. You then need to visualize the end state – what will the task look like when finished?
  • The next stage is to assess what resources are required to undertake the task. See the chart on the screen. You will note that resources means more than money, it includes, skills, people, equipment, venue and more.
  • The third step is to evaluate your plan. You need to know that your goal was met, on time, on budget and it achieved its purpose.
  • As you can see from the example, the key to success is using the right people to get a job done. Each zone, district, club and community, has people with time, talent and treasure (to quote Bill Gates senior) that they are prepared to donate, if asked. Zone key people RI Director – who can assist at the strategic level, and also inspire Rotary coordinator – has a wealth of knowledge and ideas to assist with new clubs and strategies to re-invigorate tired clubs Rotary Public Image coordinator – knows the right message for the right audience and can assist with campaigns, from a national level to the local community. They also have the capacity to create major strategic partners in the media or gain major sponsorship. And, don’t forget about skilled Rotarians in other districts. In Australia our Regional magazine – Rotary Down Under, has on its website a list called “Rotarians doing Business”. If we need specialist assistance for a project, we know where to look.
  • Governor + G train (DG elect and DGN), as often the Governor is caught up I the day to day needs of a district. Some districts make membership the key role of the DGN. Assistant Governors. This year, some governors have appointed specialist AGs to monitor and mentor struggling clubs. Public Image chair Membership chair District Rotaract team – who understand what type of club would attract them to join. And our Alumni.
  • probably the most important group is the club members The new members with fresh ideas Members with skills Members who contribute financially to special projects, such as sponsoring events for interested members in the community You need a club board who is prepared to invest in targeted marketing and a good website, which maintains an outward focus, rather than using the website as simply a bulletin board. The service chair who directs community activities. Who would want to join a club where the members do nothing but meet once a week, listen to a speaker and share a meal. The club must reflect the exciting image that we see on the RI website, on Rotary showcase and on our websites.
  • With the assistance of the AGs conduct regular club forums to review club health Health check Define what a healthy club is and get clubs to do a health check AGs to follow up gaps in health checks If gaps remain after AG follow-up, DG to step in personally Encourage clubs to regularly review their health and their performance District trainer to undertake club visioning and strategic planning exercise with clubs.
  • Understand different skills in clubs – assist them to grow missing skills and to use them, by undertaking: Classification Survey. encourages clubs to strive toward a balanced and diverse membership across all classifications by comparing the local community’s professional makeup to that of the club. The reason why we need a range of skills is that our projects we undertake also require multiple skills. Membership Diversity Assessment. Designed for full-club participation, encourages the development of a club membership that truly reflects the local community’s age, gender, religious, and ethnic composition. Membership Satisfaction Questionnaire. This anonymous survey asks current club members to comment on what they most appreciate about their club as well as what they believe needs improvement.
  • List all club members and the place them into categories Who is fully engaged in the club? How? Who is disengaged? Why? And How can you get them re-engaged? Who is likely to leave the club in the next year? Why? Relocating? Work? Family? Health? Conflict? Loss of interest/disengaged? You need to have a strategy to assist those club members to remain in Rotary, even if it means “transferring” to another club.
  • The RI website has several other tools that can assist. Finally, don’t forget Rotary Club Central. Rotary Club Central is an online tool (reached via Member Access) to help clubs monitor club progress and achievements in three key performance areas: membership initiatives, service activities, and Rotary Foundation giving.
  • List all club members and the place them into categories Who is fully engaged in the club? How? Who is disengaged? Why? And How can you get them re-engaged? Who is likely to leave the club in the next year? Why? Relocating? Work? Family? Health? Conflict? Loss of interest/disengaged? You need to have a strategy to assist those club members to remain in Rotary, even if it means “transferring” to another club.
  • The RI website has several other tools that can assist. Finally, don’t forget Rotary Club Central. Rotary Club Central is an online tool (reached via Member Access) to help clubs monitor club progress and achievements in three key performance areas: membership initiatives, service activities, and Rotary Foundation giving.
  • List all club members and the place them into categories Who is fully engaged in the club? How? Who is disengaged? Why? And How can you get them re-engaged? Who is likely to leave the club in the next year? Why? Relocating? Work? Family? Health? Conflict? Loss of interest/disengaged? You need to have a strategy to assist those club members to remain in Rotary, even if it means “transferring” to another club.
  • The RI website has several other tools that can assist. Finally, don’t forget Rotary Club Central. Rotary Club Central is an online tool (reached via Member Access) to help clubs monitor club progress and achievements in three key performance areas: membership initiatives, service activities, and Rotary Foundation giving.
  • The RI website has several other tools that can assist. Finally, don’t forget Rotary Club Central. Rotary Club Central is an online tool (reached via Member Access) to help clubs monitor club progress and achievements in three key performance areas: membership initiatives, service activities, and Rotary Foundation giving.
  • Engaging The New Volunteer Workforce

    1. 1. ENGAGING THE NEW VOLUNTEER WORKFORCE CHANGING ROLES CHANGING DEMOGRAPHICS BY TARA FINGLAS
    2. 2. Learning objectives: + Different generations – Millennials v Babyboomers + Global perspectives of volunteering + United States + Ireland + South Africa
    3. 3. Two generations of volunteers + Millennials and Babyboomers
    4. 4. Who are Millennials? + Born in the early 1980s up to the 2000s + Use technology to connect, socialize and work + Always tuned in + First generation to grow up with technology
    5. 5. The social media generation + More than 350 million users suffer from a Facebook addiction + If Twitter were a country it would be the 12th largest in the world + 1 out of every 7 minutes online is spent on Facebook
    6. 6. Millennials as volunteers + 63% of millennials volunteered with a nonprofit in 2011 + 41% of millennials planned to volunteer in 2012
    7. 7. How Millennials communicate + Online + Websites + Social media + E-newsletters
    8. 8. Millennials like to share + 74% share information about Cool events + 69% share statistics + 65% share news stories + 61% share opportunities + 47% share videos + 36% share how they have made an impact
    9. 9. Working with Millennials + Impact! + Want to make a difference + Interested in several causes
    10. 10. Who are Babyboomers? + Born after World War 2 + Challenged traditions + Wealthy, active and healthy
    11. 11. The change generation + This generation cares deeply about the world and wants to have an impact.
    12. 12. Babyboomers as volunteers + 29% volunteered in 2011 + 38% volunteer on religious related issues + 22% volunteer on education related issues + 14% volunteer on social service issues
    13. 13. How Babyboomers communicate + Direct mail + Like new technology but still value the personal touch + Fastest growing group on Facebook
    14. 14. Global perspective: United States + In 2011, 29% of the population volunteered + This is 64.3 million Americans + The state of Utah had the highest rate of volunteering
    15. 15. Culture of volunteering: United States + Part of American society + Peace Corps was set up in 1961 + More than 220,000 people have volunteered +Americorps was set up in 1993 + More than 80,000 people volunteer every year
    16. 16. Global perspective: Ireland + In 2012, 15,400 people volunteered in Ireland + Amounted to 465, 550 volunteer hours
    17. 17. Culture of volunteering: Ireland + Volunteer industry + Overseas volunteering + Professional volunteers
    18. 18. Global perspective: South Africa + In 2011, 1.2 million people volunteered + Amounted to 370 million volunteer hours + Despite widespread poverty volunteering is a major activity + Ubuntu
    19. 19. Culture of volunteering: South Africa + Younger volunteers + Create their own projects + Fill gaps in society
    20. 20. Why a global perspective? + Share ideas + Inspire innovation + Appreciate differences

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