Healthy Eating in the Dorm
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Healthy Eating in the Dorm

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This presentation was given to RA\'s at North Central College and included numerous tips on nutrition and ways to eat healthy while away at university.

This presentation was given to RA\'s at North Central College and included numerous tips on nutrition and ways to eat healthy while away at university.

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  • Try to choose the least processed forms of food such as fruits, veggies and whole grains. No excuses, eat 5-8 meals/day
  • The top sources of calories have been estimated using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-06. For this analysis and others like it found in the policy document in pie charts, foods and beverages reported in the survey were grouped into 97 categories. Here the categories were ranked according to calorie contribution to the diet. The number one calorie contributor in the diets of Americans ages 2 years is grain-based desserts, followed by yeast breads, chicken and chicken mixed dishes, soda and energy and sports drinks, and pizza. Although some of these are important sources of nutrients, others provide calories with few nutrients. Many of the foods and beverages most often consumed within these categories are high in solid fats and/or added sugars, thereby contributing excess calories to the diet. For example, grain-based dessertsare typically high in added sugars and solid fats; and chicken is often breaded and fried, and that adds a substantial number of calories to the chicken. [Additional information:Total mean intake = 2,157 kcal/dCalories from each of the top 5 sources:Grain-based desserts (138 kcal/d)Yeast breads (129 kcal/d)Chicken and chicken mixed dishes (121 kcal/d)Soda/energy/sports drinks (114 kcal/d)Pizza (98 kcal/d)Source: NHANES 2005-2006, Available at http://riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/ ]The top sources of calories have been estimated using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-06. For this analysis and others like it found in the policy document in pie charts, foods and beverages reported in the survey were grouped into 97 categories. Here the categories were ranked according to calorie contribution to the diet. The number one calorie contributor in the diets of Americans ages 2 years is grain-based desserts, followed by yeast breads, chicken and chicken mixed dishes, soda and energy and sports drinks, and pizza. Although some of these are important sources of nutrients, others provide calories with few nutrients. Many of the foods and beverages most often consumed within these categories are high in solid fats and/or added sugars, thereby contributing excess calories to the diet. For example, grain-based dessertsare typically high in added sugars and solid fats; and chicken is often breaded and fried, and that adds a substantial number of calories to the chicken. [Additional information:Total mean intake = 2,157 kcal/dCalories from each of the top 5 sources:Grain-based desserts (138 kcal/d)Yeast breads (129 kcal/d)Chicken and chicken mixed dishes (121 kcal/d)Soda/energy/sports drinks (114 kcal/d)Pizza (98 kcal/d)Source: NHANES 2005-2006, Available at http://riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/ ]The top sources of calories have been estimated using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-06. For this analysis and others like it found in the policy document in pie charts, foods and beverages reported in the survey were grouped into 97 categories. Here the categories were ranked according to calorie contribution to the diet. The number one calorie contributor in the diets of Americans ages 2 years is grain-based desserts, followed by yeast breads, chicken and chicken mixed dishes, soda and energy and sports drinks, and pizza. Although some of these are important sources of nutrients, others provide calories with few nutrients. Many of the foods and beverages most often consumed within these categories are high in solid fats and/or added sugars, thereby contributing excess calories to the diet. For example, grain-based dessertsare typically high in added sugars and solid fats; and chicken is often breaded and fried, and that adds a substantial number of calories to the chicken. [Additional information:Total mean intake = 2,157 kcal/dCalories from each of the top 5 sources:Grain-based desserts (138 kcal/d)Yeast breads (129 kcal/d)Chicken and chicken mixed dishes (121 kcal/d)Soda/energy/sports drinks (114 kcal/d)Pizza (98 kcal/d)Source: NHANES 2005-2006, Available at http://riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/ ]
  • These preservatives can cause many health issues such as allergies & headaches.
  • Drinks like fruit and vegetable juices, milk and herbal teas can contribute to the amount of water you should get each day. Even caffeinated drinks, such as coffee, tea and soda, count toward your daily water intake – up to a point. But it’s best to limit these since caffeine may cause some people to urinate more frequently, or feel anxious or jittery. A moderate amount of caffeine, 200 to 300 milligrams (about the amount in 2 to 4 8-ounce cups of coffee), is not harmful for most people.Water can also be found in fruits and vegetables, such as watermelon, tomatoes and lettuce, and in soup broths.
  • The reason that alcohol has such a bad reputation when it comes to weight loss has a lot to do with the fact that it acts as a potent appetizer.In other words, you'll eat more food if a meal is served with an alcoholic drink than you would if that same meal was served with a soft drink [5, 8].
  • Tuna, chicken canned, beans (microwave), low fat dairy, & eggs
  • Keep basics on hand
  • False, not always but 4-6 pounds is the average.True, alcohol is high in calories especially if consumed in excess.True, many not in college sports and still eat like an athleteTrue, studies show that during freshman year, females are more vulnerable to weight gain than females.
  • Mindless eating

Healthy Eating in the Dorm Healthy Eating in the Dorm Presentation Transcript

  • Healthy Eating @ College & In the Dorm Tara J. Oliva Dietetic Intern Benedictine University Fall 2011
  • 10 Nutrition Rules to Live By1. COME BACK TO EARTH!2. Eat BREAKFAST everyday.3. Eat smaller portions more often, spread evenly throughout the day.4. Stay HYDRATED!5. Include a LEAN protein source with every meal.
  • 6. Choose foods, especially carbohydrates rich in FIBER (25-35g).7. Add a MVI and an omega 3 into your daily routine8. Eat Fruits & Veggies w/each meal. Green!9. Drink a mixture of carb & protein before/after workout.10. Get some REST. The body recovers and repairs while it is sleeping.Source: www.rd411.com
  • Top Sources of Calories Among Americans 2 Years and Older1. Grain-based desserts  Cake, cookies, pie, cobbler, sweet rolls, pastries, and donuts2. Yeast breads  White bread and rolls, mixed-grain bread, flavored bread, whole-wheat bread, and bagels3. Chicken and chicken mixed dishes  Fried and baked chicken parts, chicken strips/patties, stir- fries, casseroles, sandwiches, salads, and other chicken mixed dishes4. Soda/energy/sports drinks  Sodas, energy drinks, sports drinks, and sweetened bottled water including vitamin water5. PizzaNHANES 2005-2006, http://riskfactor.cancer.gov/diet/foodsources/ ]
  • Eat Natural Foods can be labeled natural:  Does not contain artificial flavors  Does not contain colors  Does not contain synthetic substances Preservatives to limit  BHA otherwise known as Butylated Hydroxyanisole,  BHT otherwise also known as Butylated Hydroxyanisole,  TBHQ otherwise known as Tertiary Butyl Hydroquinone  MSG  sodium benzoate  nitrites  calcium propionates Sources: http://www.livestrong.com/article/521237-does-eating-all-natural-and-organic-help-you-lose-weight/#ixzz1Vxyt99Cp & http://EzineArticles.com/2187034
  • Nutrient-dense foods and beverages:Nutrient-dense foods and beverages: Provide vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial substances and relatively few calories without  Solid fats in the food or added to it  Added sugars  Added refined starches  Added sodium  Retain naturally occurring components, such as dietary fiber All vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood, eggs, beans and peas, unsalted nuts and seeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy, and lean meats and poultry are nutrient dense when prepared without solid fats or sugars
  • “Strength is thecapacity to break achocolate bar intofour pieces with yourbare hands ― andthen eat just one ofthe pieces.” ~Judith Viorst
  • Breakfast is VitalEnergy to start the day!Help your body get moving! Oatmeal w/FF milk instead of water Add fruit to whole grain/high fiber cereal Lowfat yogurt layered w/cereal & fruit Flour tortilla w/PB & banana Lean ham/Lowfat cheese on grain english muffin START w/FIBER!
  • Smart Snacking Boost energy & supply essential vitamins Think of snacks as mini-meals that contribute nutrient-rich foods. You can fit snack calories into your personal healthy eating plan without over-spending your day’s calorie budget. Snack only when you’re hungry. Skip nibbling Plan ahead
  • Snack Ideas Choose wisely: < 200 kcals  1 Tbsp. peanut butter on medium apple  1 cup tomato soup w/ 5 whole grain crackers  3 cups air popped corn w/ 3 Tbsp grated parmesan  Tricolor veggie snack ( 6 baby carrots, 10 sugar snap peas, 6 cherry tomatoes & 2 Tbsp reduced fat dressing)  Top baked potato w/ salsa  Smoothie (1 cup ff milk, ½ banana & ½ cup berries)
  • Promoting Calories Balance Monitor food and beverage intake, physical activity, and body weight Reduce portion sizes When eating out, make better choices Limit screen time
  • Portion Sizes
  • ChooseMYPLATE.gov Balancing Calories ● Enjoy your food, but eat less. ● Avoid oversized portionsFoods to Increase Foods to Reduce● Make half your plate fruits and ● Compare sodium in foods likevegetables. soup, bread, and frozen meals ― and● Make at least half your grains whole choose the foods with lower numbers.grains. ● Drink water instead of sugary drinks.● Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%)
  • Stay HydratedHydration is simply one of the most important things that are needed by our body to maintain its optimum health, appearance and ability to function at a vigorous levelDehydration include: Little or no urine, or being darker than usual Dry mouth/extreme thirst Sleepiness or fatigue Headache/confusion Feeling dizzy or lightheaded/low BP No tears when crying Cramps
  • Calories in Alcohol 7 kcals/g and natural starches & sugar 2 glasses of white wine provides 370 kcals, 20% of your recommended intake. Avg. wine drinker takes in 3000 kcals per month An unhealthy breakfast usually follows a evening of cocktails. Drinking 5 pints of lager/week adds up to 44,200 calories over 1 year. www.nhs.uk
  • ETOH-Tips to Avoid Weight Gain  Recommend: Men ≤ 2 drinks/day, Women ≤ 1 drink/day  Alternate alcoholic drink with water-this will also help with dehydration  Eat a healthy dinner before drinking;Do not drink on empty stomach  Drink at your own pace  Potent appetizer = eat more  Go for the lighter options. Vodka w/diet coke, gin with low calorie tonic, mint julep , mojito, or lighter beers.
  • Lean Protein Lean protein provides you with a sense of satiety and can help prevent overeating. Many sources can be heated in microwave & refrigerated.
  • FIBER 1. Go with whole fruit instead of juice. Whole apples and whole oranges are packed with a lot more fiber and a lot fewer calories than their liquid counterparts. 2. Break the fast with fruit. Get off to a great start by adding fruit, like berries or melon, to your breakfast every day. 3. Check the label for fiber-filled whole grains. Choose foods that list whole grains (like whole wheat or whole oats) as a first ingredient. Bread, cereal, crackers and other grain foods should have at least 3 grams of fiber per serving. 4. Eat more beans. Its easy to forget about beans, but they are a great tasting, cheap source of fiber, good carbs, protein, and other important nutrients. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fiber/
  • FRUIT & VEGGIESGo for color and variety—dark green, yellow, orange, and red.Choose 9 servings dailyBenefits include: Lower blood pressure reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, and probably some cancers lower risk of eye and digestive problems A mellowing effect on blood sugar that can help keep appetite in check.Convenience: Keep a bowl of fruit within easy reach on the kitchen counter or your desk at work so that you can grab a piece of fruit when youre hungry. Buy packaged, ready-to-eat fresh vegetables and fruits. These cut down on preparation time. Keep dried fruit on hand for a snack that is easy to take with you when youre away from home and add to salads Use the microwave to quickly cook vegetables. Freeze grapeshttp://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vegetables-and-fruits/index.html
  • Color your Plate w/ SaladLEAFY VEGETABLES GREENS  Artichoke hearts  Beets  Broccoli/cauliflower Arugula  Corn Boston lettuce  Green, red, yellow Green/red leaf , orange peppers Radicchio  Carrots Romaine  Onions Spinach  Peas Escarole  Tomatoes  Water chestnuts  Zucchini
  • Salad Add-OnsFruits: dried cranberries Cheese: blue & cheese, cheddar, feta, apricots, apples, blue mozzarella & parmesan. berries, grapes, mand arin Others: Real bacon oranges, melon, pears bits, chow mein , raisins & noodles, olives, sunflow strawberries. er seedsBeans: COMBOS: Black, chickpeas, eda 1. romaine w/grape mame, kidney & white tomatoes, cucumber, c beans. arrots,& avocado 2. Mixed greens:Nuts:What is your favorite combination? almonds, cashews, pe olives, feta, canned
  • Avoid Extra Weight Gain All Freshman gain 15lbs in their first year of school ? One type of liquid beverage often causes excessive weight gain for college students? Many high school athletes gain weight in college? Freshman women are more prone to gain weight than men?
  • Instead of this try……………..INSTEAD OF: TRY:Fried foods Grilled or baked foodsRefined grains(white Whole grain pastas, bread & rice) (breads, pasta, & rice)Whole milk Fat free dairyFrench Fries Baked/sweet potatoSweetened drinks Water ,seltzer or gatoradeSweetened desserts Fruit
  • Dorm Room Ideas  Popcorn Animal crackers  Pudding/Jello Canned fruit  Soup Cracker (whole-grain)  Trail Mix Fresh fruit  Tuna High fiber cereal  Baby carrots/celery Nuts  Hummus Oatmeal (packets)  String Cheese Smoothies  Yogurt Microwave Rice
  • Dietary Guidelines 2010 What you need to know Balance Calories:  Order small-sized options  Eat off smaller plates  Choose low calorie options Foods to Increase  Make ½ your grains whole  Gradually switch to fat free milk Foods to Reduce  Sodium (1500 mg)  Sugary Beverages http://food.unl.edu/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=729c5682-b74d-4849-bd4e-e253f8d1e582&groupId=4089458&.pdf
  • Healthy Tips Find a healthy budget and stay on it. Don’t eat out of boredom or studying Drink water instead of unhealthy snacking Pack almonds in backpack so you don’t binge later Be prepared-Stock fridge w/ healthy foods Schedule meals Sleep and exercise No food in the library – keep studying & eating separate Only one new food at each meal! http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=206
  • “Your stomachshouldnt bea waist basket.” ~ AuthorUnknown
  • Thank you for your time! Questions????