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Fa30 culture
 

Fa30 culture

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  • Rapport is…Rapport is… Confidence which leads to a willingness to cooperate. (FM 2-22.3)Rapport is… Based on mutual respect and fostered by treating [individuals] with dignity and humanity. (Cross Cultural, Rapport Based Interrogation, FBI)-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Fire team Image Source: http://www4.army.mil/armyimages/armyimage.php?photo=11359Fire Team Image Permission: Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible. Fire Team Narrative: by Department of the Army, September 8, 2006. Soldiers from Battery B, 3rd Battalion, 320th Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, pause at the end of a patrol near Wynot, Iraq. This photo appeared on www.army.mil.
  • Essential Components(Animated slide: positivity” and “coordination” fade in on instructor cue)The foundation word behind the principle of building rapport is “attention”. Attention to the other person, their circumstance, their concerns, and their Values, Beliefs, and Norms.If “attention” is the foundation, think of “Positivity” and “Coordination” as the two critical, but negotiable components of rapport: you have to have them if you want rapport, but their function changes over time.Sources:Murphy, Moira & Valdez, Cecilia. (2005). Ravaging resistance: A model for building rapport in a collaborative learning classroom. Radical Pedagogy. ISSN: 1524-6345.Tickle-Degnen, Linda & Rosenthal, Robert. (1990). The nature of rapport and its nonverbal correlates. Psychological Inquiry, 1 (4), pp. 285-293.US Army FM 2-22.3FBI Manual on Cross Cultural Rapport Based Interrogation------------------------------------------------------------Arm wrestle Image Source: http://www4.army.mil/armyimages/armyimage.php?photo=9343Arm wrestle Permission: Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible. Arm wrestle Narrative: by Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Larson, February 17, 2006. Spc. Derek Castro, from the 490th Civil Affairs Battalion, engages in some good-natured arm wrestling with an Iraqi boy during a humanitarian visit to the town of Istaqal. This photo appeared on www.army.mil.
  • Attention(Animated slide: components and sub-components fade in on instructor cue.)Attention, or attentiveness, refers to an interest in the relationship and desire to establish mutual goals. This component works toward a unity or “feeling as one” and is other-focused rather than egocentric. The importance of attention remains constant throughout the relationship, though the nature of its expression varies. Interest in “other”Small talk – talking about things that don’t really matter – gives you the opportunity to listen.Listening is the easiest way to demonstrate your interest in the other person. Your non-verbal communication – facial expressions, eye-contact, and affirmations – will say much more than your “uh-huh” and “yeah”.Interest in the relationship“How do you do.” sends a different message than “How wonderful to finally meet you!” Non verbals like an embrace, a hand-shake (aside: think of the hand-shake as a mini-embrace), or the manner of your salute are all part of a proper greeting.Over time appropriate interaction changes. Here’s and example: A visitor, new to your home to meet the family, brings your spouse a box of expensive chocolates. Now, a long-time friend brings a box of expensive chocolates for your spouse to a family dinner. The same behavior has changed as the relationship has changed: in the first case the behavior may be inappropriate, while in the second case the chocolates would be a considerate gift.Mutual GoalsMutual goals are the very reason for the rapport, and they also change over time. Think of mutual goals as common areas of interest. The buyer wants the merchandise and the seller wants to move the inventory: the possession of something is the mutual goal. Here’s another: The Soldier wants harassing fire from insurgents to stop and the citizen wants peace in their neighborhood. Sources:Murphy, Moira & Valdez, Cecilia. (2005). Ravaging resistance: A model for building rapport in a collaborative learning classroom. Radical Pedagogy. ISSN: 1524-6345.Tickle-Degnen, Linda & Rosenthal, Robert. (1990). The nature of rapport and its nonverbal correlates. Psychological Inquiry, 1 (4), pp. 285-293.US Army FM 2-22.3FBI Manual on Cross Cultural Rapport Based InterrogationElders Image Source: http://www4.army.mil/armyimages/armyimage.php?photo=5108Elders Permission: Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible. Elders Narrative: by SGT Douglas W Plummer, March 7, 2005. LTC Robin Minonas conducts a village assessment and negotiates the needs with the village elders and educational leaders. The goal is to provide some 1,200 children using tent schools some security before winter arrives.
  • Positivity(Animated slide: components and sub-components fade in on instructor cue.)Positivity is a sense of “mutual friendliness and caring.”Warm and FriendlyA smile is the quickest way to convey friendliness. Many people will automatically respond to a smile with a smile. Touch (when appropriate) also communicates warmth and friendliness.Show HospitalityFood and DrinkThis is gift-giving and gift accepting. Accepting the gift validates the gift and the gift-giver. Rejecting the food or drink is a rejection of the gift, and so a rejection of the gift-giver. Here’s an important note on gift-giving: no relationship with a foundation on gifts can endure. The receiver begins to see the giver as a resource for stuff and the giver begins to resent the receiver. Gift giving must never be confused with “rapport”.RelaxCommunicating “I am relaxed” tells the other party “I feel safe with you”. If this safety is conditioned on matching firepower, you don’t have rapport you have an arms race. Looking relaxed often leads to the other person feeling relaxed.C A R EAll of these items on building rapport are both given and received if there is going to be genuine rapport. Think of your first love. If your affections were reciprocated, you had rapport and positive feelings. If they were received but not returned, you had frustration.A fair way to build rapport is to meet the other person half-way: to gage your intensity and timing just a little beyond their intensity and timing.Concern – Listening is one way to demonstrate concern. Enabling another person to meet their goals is another way to demonstrate concern. Concern makes you partners in the goal.Acknowledge – Validation is another word for acknowledge, it just didn’t fit my acronym! Acknowledge their authority and strengths, validate the reality of their concerns to them, the simple statement “I agree” has a high payoff in communicating acknowledgement.Respect – The Army Values define respect as “Treating people as they should be treated”. “Should be treated” is a combination of your cultural values, beliefs, behaviors, and norms combined with the other persons values, beliefs, behaviors, and norms.Empathize – Empathy never says “I’m sorry”, that’s sympathy. Empathy says “I understand”. To achieve empathy you need to feel what the other person is feeling. You need to understand their frustration, their fear, and their happiness. You are not responsible for their frustrations, fears, and happiness: you just need to feel it. Sources:American Psychiatric Association (1994). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. pp. 645–650. ISBN 0-89042-061-0.Murphy, Moira & Valdez, Cecilia. (2005). Ravaging resistance: A model for building rapport in a collaborative learning classroom. Radical Pedagogy. ISSN: 1524-6345.Tickle-Degnen, Linda & Rosenthal, Robert. (1990). The nature of rapport and its nonverbal correlates. Psychological Inquiry, 1 (4), pp. 285-293.US Army FM 2-22.3FBI Manual on Cross Cultural Rapport Based InterrogationLaugh Image Source: http://www4.army.mil/armyimages/armyimage.php?photo=132Laugh Permission: Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible. Laugh Narrative: by 1st Class Arlo K. Abrahamson, April 8, 2003. Iraqis share a laugh with a Spc. Michael Toro of the 101st Airborne in the city of Najaf during the unit's effort to distribute food to needy residents.
  • Coordination(Animated slide: components and sub-components fade in on instructor cue.)Coordination refers to the level of predictability and understanding in the relationship between all parties. Awkward at firstEveryone in a new relationship feels awkward and manages the feeling differently. However the other person is managing their awkwardness, you can manage your awkwardness by convincing yourself that you are comfortable. This will create the illusion that you are comfortable and will put the other person at ease. Laughter goes a long way if you are laughing with each other. This can’t be the silly “I’m nervous” kind of laughter. Laughing about your own awkwardness works, and laughing when the other person laughs works too.Lots of reassurance“Thank you” expresses gratitude and tells the other person they did something right. This expression of gratitude is on every language “must learn” list because saying thank you is a powerful way to build rapport.Forgive errorsForgiveness tells the other person that they are more important than their mistake. Forgiveness is important to the rapport of every relationship because it is the substance that repairs the inevitable damage that occurs during every relationship. You must be a master at forgiveness is you need long-term rapport.Clarify communicationCommunication is fraught with misunderstanding when we share the same culture. Communication is more likely to be misunderstood when the communicants are from different cultures. Ensure the message you sent across a cultural divide, over a language barrier, and through social filters is the same message received. Additionally, ensure the message you received is the message sent.Establish trustYour vulnerability is an opportunity for the other person to invest in the rapport relationship: not that the whole relationship should be formed on vulnerability! We have a couple of phrases that demonstrates the kind of vulnerability I’m talking about: “I got your back”, and “I’m covering your six”. When you allow the other person to cover your six, you are building trust.Start with little promises and ensure you keep them. If you fail on a promise, you must do all that’s reasonable to obtain forgiveness (which builds rapport) and then deliver on subsequent promises. Be aware that promises mean different things in different culturesSources:Murphy, Moira & Valdez, Cecilia. (2005). Ravaging resistance: A model for building rapport in a collaborative learning classroom. Radical Pedagogy. ISSN: 1524-6345.Tickle-Degnen, Linda & Rosenthal, Robert. (1990). The nature of rapport and its nonverbal correlates. Psychological Inquiry, 1 (4), pp. 285-293.US Army FM 2-22.3FBI Manual on Cross Cultural Rapport Based InterrogationBalance Image Source: http://www4.army.mil/armyimages/armyimage.php?photo=10355Balance Permission: Images on the Army Web site are cleared for release and are considered in the public domain. Request credit be given as "Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army" and credit to individual photographer whenever possible. Balance Narrative: by Jerry Harben, May 22, 2006. Sgt. Nathan Henry balances on rolling logs during the EFMC obstacle course. Henry is senior line medic for A Company, 2nd Battalion, 9th Infantry at Camp Casey, Korea.
  • Short-Term Rapport(Animated slide: answers wipe down on instructor cue)True rapport, based on trust and confidence, is not really possible in the short-term. However, the first 48 hours of interaction lays the foundation or sets the stage for the relationship. Short-term rapport is about 3-minutes to 3-days, and I’ve already given you all the considerations for short-term rapportI’m going to display the considerations and you tell me how that consideration looks when you see it.QUESTION: What behaviors communicate “Attention”?QUESTION: What behaviors communicate “Positivity”?QUESTION: What behaviors communicate “Coordination”?Please note the difference in the size of the circles. This is a graphic way to demonstrate that Attention and Positivity are the most important characteristics of short-term rapport, with Coordination being there but not as important.((Optional Business card PE: I handed out my business card to you at the beginning of training this morning. For Americans, our identity is found in what we do. What have you done with the “me” embodied in my business card? How might this affect our rapport?))
  • Medium–Term Rapport(Animated slide: sub-topics wipe down on instructor cue.)Medium-term rapport is about 3 days to 3 months. You may notice that all the circles are about the same size.Here’s a useful indicator that your efforts at rapport-building are working: If you get an introduction to someone you have not yet met: a family member, business partner, religious or political leader; you are effectively building rapport. Don’t ask for the introduction, but rejoice when it happens.AttentionSustain sincerity, patience, and consistency in dialogue. Remember details about family, home, and concerns: this lets the other person know you are really listening to what they say.Begin to establish mutual goals or easy to achieve and measure tasks. This gets the relationship and the team into the habit of success.PositivityTrust begins to develop as you gain familiarity with each otherAddress concerns with validation of their importance to the other personAllow disagreement without judgmentCoordinationIf there are agreements, they are likely to be “soft agreements”. These are generally easy to accomplish without much investment of time and resources. These soft-agreements are a positive sign that the relationship is developing a positive rapport.The soft-agreements allow for some testing of the sincerity of the rapport-builders. There may be a testing of the boundaries of the relationship, determining “how far you are willing to bend.” This is a good thing because it means the other person feels sufficiently safe to test the boundary.
  • Long-Term RapportLong-term rapport is the duration of the relationship beyond three months.UNLESS … something negative happens to the rapport and you have to take a step back to fix it.Notice how “Coordination” has become the most important component of long-term rapport.AttentionRegular reinforcement of positive contact and behaviors ensures you keep getting the positive behaviors. You don’t have to be friends to have long-term rapport, but friendship could accidently develop. This friendship is a genuine emotional attachment to the welfare of the other person. Friendship is a good and an okay thing provided you understand it could influence your professional decisions.PositivityFocusing on what is working instead of what is not working will sustain a cooperative relationship. It’s okay to address what is not working, but that must not become the focus of the relationship if you want to maintain a positive rapport.Make note of every success and share it with the other person. Recognize their unique and important contribution to your successful team. Remember to say “thank you”.CoordinationFirm agreements can be achieved and expected in long-term rapport because firm agreements require an investment of some kind by all the participants in the rapport. The team has already coordinated small things requiring simple actions, so now they can coordinate big things require complex actions. Be aware that there may still be huge cultural differences between both parties that will still need to be addressed. With successful rapport building, you have sufficient investment in each other to explore those differences without damaging the relationship.

Fa30 culture Fa30 culture Presentation Transcript

  • FA30
  • TCC
    Timothy Baignet
    520-483-5424 (cell)
    timothy.g.baigent.civ@mail.mil
    https://ikn.army.mil/apps/tccv2
    Classes
    Smart cards
    Smart books
  • Baigent’s hierarchy of cultural needs
    Knowledge = facts. Understanding is the ability to use those facts in the correct way.
    Understanding of the psychology, sociology, anthropology, politics of an area
    and how to use that in their culture. (cultural understanding).
    EX. understand Arab pride and how to use that in a negotiation. Understanding
    that in many nations the second party is the radical party (Hamas/Palestine,
    Hezbollah/Lebanon, Muslim Brotherhood/Egypt, Wahab/Saud relationship)
    Good interpersonal skills, humility and cultural knowledge.
    Humility with cultural knowledge. EX. Left hand, don’t show bottom of feet…
    Humility with “know” knowledge EX. Does not know the culture also does not know
    what they don’t know. Double ignorance.
    Only self and mission (kill them all and let God sort it out)
  • Why Culture
    The use of proper cultural resources has demonstrated a proven reduction in kinetic activity. According to Col. Martin Schweitzer, Commander of the 4th BCT 82nd Airborne, the unit’s combat operations in Afghanistan had been reduced by 60 percent over a period of eight months using cultural assets. (David Rohde, October 5, 2007, "Army Enlists Anthropology in War Zones". New York Times.)
  • Joining Global Network Jihad(data from Marc Sageman, currently being updated at University of Michigan)
    Friendship: 70%
    Band of mostly normal – even nice – guys
    Idealistic, compassionate toward their “brothers”
    Kinship: 20%
    Sons, brothers, first cousins
    Importance of in-laws & marriage to cement bonds between Mujahedin
    Discipleship: 10%
    Southeast Asia: JemaahIslamiyah(OEF TRANSFER)
  • Cultural Work Sheet
    Values (what is important to the people)
    Behaviors (what people do)
    Norms/Characteristics (pride/reserved, social interaction)
    Beliefs (religion, truths, superstitions, experiences)
    Language (heart language, misunderstanding, proverbs)
    Symbols (things, events)
    Social (age, gender, social status, nomadic)
    Political (power of position vs. power of person)
    History (identity, cyclical nature can be predictor)
    Economics (Hawala, production, distribution of wealth)
    Climate (temperature, seasons, weather patterns)
    Geography (water, location, terrain)
    Military (how influential/viewed, how funded)
    Popular Culture (current events/trends. Youth/”lower class” movements)
    Food (different tastes, cultural norms around food)
    Events are captured in time and place. May not transfer. (Care of sub-cultures)
  • Cultural Work Sheet Usage
    Identify pitfalls &
    possible bridges.
    Adapt to MOS.
    American Culture
    Target Culture
  • Rapport is…
    “Confidence which leads to a willingness to cooperate.” FM 2-22.3
    “Based on mutual respect and fostered by treating [people] with dignity and humanity.” Cross Cultural, Rapport Based Interrogation, FBI
    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army
  • TIM
  • Essential Components
    Positivity
    Coordination
    Attention
    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army
  • Attention
    Interest in “Other”
    • Small Talk
    • Listen and Validate (Active Listening)
    Mutual Goal
    • Identify Common Concerns
    (Bridge Building)
    Interest in the Relationship
    • Greet Properly
    • Interact Appropriately (Humility)
    Photo’s Courtesy of U.S. Army
  • Warm and Friendly
    Positivity
    • ☺Smile☺
    • Food and Drink
    • Relax
    CARE
    • Concern
    • Acknowledge
    • Respect
    • Empathize
    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army
  • Awkward at First
    • Appear comfortable
    • Laugh with each other
    Lots of Reassurance
    • “Thank You”
    • Forgive Errors
    • Clarify Communication(reframing)
    Establish Trust
    • Be a Little Vulnerable
    • Deliver on Promises (Caution)
    Coordination
    Photo Courtesy of U.S. Army
  • Short-Term Rapport
    Attention
    • Interest in “Other”
    • Interest in Relationship
    • Mutual Goals
    Positivity
    • Warm and Friendly
    • Show Hospitality
    • CARE
    Coordination
    • Awkward at first
    • Lots of reassurance
    • Establish trust
  • Medium-Term Rapport
    Attention
    • Sustain initial gains
    • Remember details
    • Begin to establish goals
    Positivity
    • Trust rewarded
    • Validate concerns
    • Allow disagreement
    Coordination
    • “Soft-agreements”
    • Testing relationship
  • Long-Term Rapport
    Attention
    • Regular reinforcement
    • “Friendship”
    Positivity
    • Focus on what works
    • Recognize success
    Coordination
    • Firm agreements
    • 5 love languages
  • Skills
    • Bridge Building
    • Active Listening
    • Reframing
    • Mirroring
    • Stealing an argument
  • Questions?