Concept of ground cooling

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Concept of ground cooling

  1. 1. AN OVERVIEW: GEOTHERMAL CONCEPT OF GROUND COOLING FOR TAPPING THE EARTH FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING Presented by: Ar. Tanuja bhandari-Trainee teacher M.Arch (Architectural Pedagogy-final semester) (UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF AR. AAMIR KHAN)
  2. 2. Ref- http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/finding-energy-advantages-six-feet-under/ The word – Geothermal comprises of -: Geo (Greek word for earth) Thermal (heat) •Temperature Increases with Depth
  3. 3. A geothermal heat pump uses the earth as a heat source when operating in heating mode in the winter, and as a heat sink when operating in cooling mode in the summer. Working Principle Ref- http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/finding-energy-advantages-six-feet-under/
  4. 4. A Geothermal Heating/Cooling system is a more energy efficient alternative to traditional central heating/air conditioning systems that utilizes the consistent and stable heat energy available in either the ground or water to heat and cool a home All heating systems rely on three basic scientific principles. 1.) All matter contains heat. 2.) Cold is the absence of heat and exists only in terms of relation between the differing amounts of heat contained in matter. 3.) Heat moves from higher temperature matter to matter of lower temperature by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. http://cas.illinoisstate.edu/sites/gmklass/?page_id=158
  5. 5. Engineers have been able to use these principles to develop “heat exchangers” which can transfer or extract heat from one source and deliver it to another Basic Geothermal Systems Take Advantage of: Heat Differential Between Ground and Indoor Air Temperatures – Heat Pump Earth as a Natural Heat Source – Power Plants http://cas.illinoisstate.edu/sites/gmklass/?page_id=158
  6. 6. [vii][viii] Horizontal Closed Loop System This is the system which is generally the most cost effective for installation in homes. The horizontal loop system requires trenches at least 4 feet deep and two feet wide to place the piping. The length and number of trenches is dependent on the size of the lot upon which the home is to be built. Certain techniques which are able to loop the piping in each coil allow for horizontal applications to be installed on smaller lots.http://cas.illinoisstate.edu/sites/gmklass/?page_id=158 Types of Geothermal Systems[vi]
  7. 7. Vertical Closed Loop System These systems are most commonly used for larger commercial buildings and schools. This is due to the large amount of land needed for a horizontal system to provide enough energy to be cost effective. A vertical system functions the same way as a horizontal. But instead of being installed in shallow trenches that run the length of the lot, the loop is placed in holes drilled 20 feet apart and 100-400 feet deep. Types of Geothermal Systems[vi]….
  8. 8. Pond/Lake Closed Loop System For projects that are close to a substantial body of water a Pond/Lake system may be the most cost effective. In this type of system the closed loop piping is run from the building underground to the water source, at least 8 feet below the surface to avoid freezing. These systems function just like a ground loop system, except that it draws its heat energy from water and not earth. Types of Geothermal Systems[vi]….
  9. 9. Well Open Loop System This type of system is referred to as “open” because it uses water from a well or aboveground source as the fluid used in heat exchange that flows through the heat pump system. The water is then returned to the source through the well, a recharge well, or a surface discharge. Like the pond/lake system, this system is only effective if there is an adequate water source. Types of Geothermal Systems[vi]….
  10. 10. A typical geothermal heat pump system costs about $2500 per ton of capacity, not including drilling and installation. A typical residential unit will be a three ton capacity system costing $7500. Depending on the system, installation costs run from $10,000-$30,000. This translates into the up-front cost in comparison to conventional systems to be from 50-150% more expensive.[ix] Energy Star certified geothermal systems all qualify for up to a 30% federal tax rebate on all equipment and installation costs including labor.[x] For a basic cost benefit analysis we will use $37,500 as the total cost of the system and installation to reflect the highest cost for a typical residential system. Assuming the system is Energy Star rated; it qualifies for the 30% tax rebate and runs at a minimum of 45% more efficiently than a conventional system. The tax rebate would bring the up-front cost of the system down to approximately $26250. If we assume that this system is 100% (two times) more expensive than what a conventional system would have been the initial investment for geothermal would be $13,125 more. Cost and Benefit of Geothermal
  11. 11. While 16 years is a long time for an investment to begin seeing positive gains, this number assumes maximum system costs and minimal efficiency for an Energy Star system. Obviously, a less expensive and more efficient system would pay for itself more quickly. There are also other factors which influence the cost-benefit analysis of a geothermal system. Geothermal heat pump systems have better longevity and less required maintenance than conventional systems. They also add to the value to and reduce the carbon footprint of the home. While the financial value of a geothermal system can certainly be measured in the dollars and cents that a homeowner will save, what is perhaps its most important benefit cannot. The immediacy of the world’s environmental crisis must be taken into account in any discussion of alternative and renewable energy sources. Cost and Benefit of Geothermal…
  12. 12.  Geothermal energy is an important step in transforming our society in a way that will help sustain life on our planet.  cost benefit analysis we will use $37,500 as the total cost of the system and installation to reflect the highest cost for a typical residential system. Assuming the system is Energy Star rated; it qualifies for the 30% tax rebate and runs at a minimum of 45% more efficiently than a conventional system.  The tax rebate would bring the up-front cost of the system down to approximately $26250. If we assume that this system is 100% (two times) more expensive than what a conventional system would have been the initial investment for geothermal would be $13,125 more.  At minimum efficiency for an Energy Star system (45%) on a home with $1,800 yearly energy bills, the geothermal system would save $810/year. At this rate it would take approximately 16 years for the system to pay off. Cost and Benefit of Geothermal…
  13. 13. CASE STUDY: TERI-RETREAT  Located on Faridabad - Gurgaon Road, Gual Pahari, Gurgaon RETREAT (Resource Efficient TERI Retreat for Environmental Awareness and Training) is TERI's vision of building a sustainable habitat.
  14. 14. http://www.teriin.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id =32  RETREAT is a part of TERI’s Gual Pahari campus, about 30 km south of Delhi, in the northern state of Haryana. The beautifully landscaped 36-hectare site, including a garden that features prize-winning roses, is living testimony to TERI’s research. Nine years ago, the site was barren. Today, the site is transformed: green, productive, and sustainable.  Approach  TERI’s Gual Pahari campus is intended to serve as a model sustainable habitat based on new and clean technologies. Therefore, it makes full use of the most abundant source of energy, the sun, by tapping its energy both directly and indirectly.  Some innovative ways of tapping solar energy and using energy more efficiently at the RETREAT are as follows.  Solar water heaters Photovoltaic panels Gasifier Underground earth tunnels Absorption chillers Energy-efficient lighting Waste-water recycling
  15. 15.  [i] http://www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=3638  [ii] http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/home/heating_cooling/geothermal.html  [iii] http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/mytop ic=12640  [iv] http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/home/heating_cooling/geothermal.html  [v] http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=geo_heat.pr_crit_geo_heat_pumps  [vi] http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/myto pic=12650  [vii] http://www.hannabery.com/source.shtml  [viii] http://signaturesolar.com/?p=34  [ix] http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/home/heating_cooling/geothermal.html  [x] http://www.geothermalallianceofillinois.org/incentives/  PAGES  Energy & Atmosphere  Energystar Appliances and Windows  Geothermal Heating and Cooling REFERENCES:

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