20+10+X Architecture Awards  4th Cycle, June 2009   www.worldarchitecture.org
●  Selected by the votes of Honorary Members  (20 projects) ●  Cited by Honorary Members  (+  30  projects) The constituen...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS 3LHD Architects |  Memor...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   3LHD Architects | Memorial Bridge, Rijeka | Croatia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   3LHD Architects | Memorial Bridge, Rijeka | Croatia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Alain Sarfati |  The Sca...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Alain Sarfati | The Scarab of Roanne | France
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Alain Sarfati | The Scarab of Roanne | France
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Architects Office S A A ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Architects Office S A A I | Icheon SKMS Institute | South Korea
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Architects Office S A A I | Icheon SKMS Institute | South Korea
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Marco Casagrande  |  Che...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Marco Casagrande  |  Chen House  |  Taiwan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Marco Casagrande  |  Chen House  |  Taiwan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Gudmundur Jonsson Arkit...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor NORVEG Coast Cultural Center N or...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor NORVEG Coast Cultural Center N or...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Suprio Bhattacharjee  `R...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Suprio Bhattacharjee  `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Suprio Bhattacharjee  `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Romi Khosla Design Studi...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Romi Khosla Design Studios  |  M.F.Husain Art Gallery  |  India
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Romi Khosla Design Studios  |  M.F.Husain Art Gallery  |  India
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Can Kaya   |  Republic S...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Can Kaya  |  Republic Square, Datca  |  Turkey
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Can Kaya  |  Republic Square, Datca  |  Turkey
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Pino Marchese Renovatio...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Pino Marchese   |  Renovation & Landscaping for Private House   | ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Pino Marchese   |  Renovation & Landscaping for Private House   | ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Palace  |   Casitas  |  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Palace  |  Casitas  |  Spain
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Palace  |  Casitas  |  Spain
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Ellen Depoorter  |   Urb...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ellen Depoorter  |  Urban Plant  |  United States
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ellen Depoorter  |  Urban Plant  |  United States
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Brendan Meney, Ilpurla ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Brendan Meney   |  Ilpurla Substance Misuse Rehabilitation Centre ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Brendan Meney   |  Ilpurla Substance Misuse Rehabilitation Centre ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Uthit Krueabuddee  |  Kr...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Uthit Krueabuddee  |  Krung Tep Pattana Community  |  Thailand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Uthit Krueabuddee  |  Krung Tep Pattana Community  |  Thailand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Architecture Project   |...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Architecture Project  |  Cruise Passenger Terminal  |  Malta
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Architecture Project  |  Cruise Passenger Terminal  |  Malta
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Saken Narynov , Memoria...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Saken Narynov Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Easter...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Saken Narynov Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Easter...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Joseph Cory ,  Farah Far...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Joseph Cory ,  Farah Farah and Flavio Adriani, Contour Museum - Um...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Joseph Cory ,  Farah Farah and Flavio Adriani, Contour Museum - Um...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Sheila Carney  | Radioph...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Sheila Carney Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston United...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Sheila Carney Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston United...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Holzer Kobler Architekt...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Holzer Kobler Architekturen   |  Nebra   |  Germany
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Holzer Kobler Architekturen   |  Nebra   |  Germany
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Hyo Man Kim   |  Lim Geo...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Hyo Man Kim   |  Lim Geo Dang  |  South Korea
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Hyo Man Kim   |  Lim Geo Dang  |  South Korea
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Ryuichi Ashizawa ,  Set...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ryuichi Ashizawa   |  Setre Chapel   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ryuichi Ashizawa   |  Setre Chapel   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Kazunori Fujimoto  |  House...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Kazunori Fujimoto  |  House on Mt.Yataka  |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Kazunori Fujimoto  |  House on Mt.Yataka  |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS E&L Architects ,   Tulipan...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   E&L Architects   |  Tulipan House   |  Polan d
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   E&L Architects   |  Tulipan House   |  Polan d
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Tetsuya Matsui Hoshikusa, ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Tetsuya Matsui   |  Hoshikusa   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Tetsuya Matsui   |  Hoshikusa   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Roberto Ramirez   |  Centro...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Roberto Ramirez  |  Centro Cultural CECIJEMA  |  Mexico
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Roberto Ramirez  |  Centro Cultural CECIJEMA  |  Mexico
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Budi Pradono   |  Tetaring ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Budi Pradono  |  Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant  |  Indonesia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Budi Pradono  |  Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant  |  Indonesia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Public Elementary School: E...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Pedro Barran Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Pedro Barran Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Yatin Pandya   |  Manavsadh...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Yatin Pandya  |  Manavsadhna Activity Centre  |  India
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Yatin Pandya  |  Manavsadhna Activity Centre  |  India
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Elliot Justin Giovacchini  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Elliot Justin Giovacchini  |  NUI Deli Corner Food Experience  |  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Elliot Justin Giovacchini  |  NUI Deli Corner Food Experience  |  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Carlo Fantacci , The Churc...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Carlo Fantacci   |  The Church of Saint Spirit   |  Italy
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Carlo Fantacci   |  The Church of Saint Spirit   |  Italy
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Keizo Ikemura , HOUSE-R, J...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Keizo Ikemura   |  HOUSE-R   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Keizo Ikemura   |  HOUSE-R   |  Japan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS ARC Studio ,  Ghigos Ideas...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   ARC Studio, Ghigos Ideas and Id – Lab MAF - Museo di Arti Femminil...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   ARC Studio, Ghigos Ideas and Id – Lab MAF - Museo di Arti Femminil...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Arquitectura x   |   X Hous...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Arquitectura x  |  X House  |  Ecuador
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Arquitectura x  |  X House  |  Ecuador
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Adil Azhiyev   |   Saint Go...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Adil Azhiyev  |  Saint Gobain Contest Office Building  |  Kazakhst...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Adil Azhiyev  |  Saint Gobain Contest Office Building  |  Kazakhst...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Patricio Mora  and  Daniela...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Patricio Mora and Daniela Garcia Letelier  |  Childhood Evocative ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Patricio Mora and Daniela Garcia Letelier  |  Childhood Evocative ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Folded Bamboo + Paper House...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ming Tang  |  Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for E...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ming Tang  |  Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for E...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Kyuseon Hong , Helical Sta...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Kyuseon Hong   |  Helical Stair Gallery   |  United Kingdom
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Kyuseon Hong   |  Helical Stair Gallery   |  United Kingdom
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Jungsoo Kim  |   Universal ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Jungsoo Kim  |  Universal Public Library - For Disabled  |  United...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Jungsoo Kim  |  Universal Public Library - For Disabled  |  United...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Ignacio Montaldo  |   Sarmi...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ignacio Montaldo  |  Sarmiento Square  |  Argentina
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ignacio Montaldo  |  Sarmiento Square  |  Argentina
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Emergency Architects , Nga...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Emergency Architects   |  Ngari School   |  Solomon Islands
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Emergency Architects   |  Ngari School   |  Solomon Islands
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gezim Pacarizi   |  Buqalla...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gezim Pacarizi  |  Buqalla Pools & Hotel  |  Kosovo
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gezim Pacarizi  |  Buqalla Pools & Hotel  |  Kosovo
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand and Daniel Jauslin | Spriral House Pign...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand and Daniel Jauslin | Spriral House Pign...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Jeeyong Ann , National Wil...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Jeeyong Ann   |  National Wildflower Centre   |  United Kingdom
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Jeeyong Ann   |  National Wildflower Centre   |  United Kingdom
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Shailendra Arbole   |  Cant...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Shailendra Arbole  |  Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital  |  In...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Shailendra Arbole  |  Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital  |  In...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gianluca Aresta,  Gianpiero...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gianluca Aresta, Gianpiero Conserva and Paolo Tarì  |  Instant Hou...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gianluca Aresta, Gianpiero Conserva and Paolo Tarì  |  Instant Hou...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Gela Chachua , Modern Art ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gela Chachua   |  Modern Art Museum   |  Georgia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Gela Chachua   |  Modern Art Museum   |  Georgia
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Evgeniya Yatsyuk   |  Water...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Evgeniya Yatsyuk  |  Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Evgeniya Yatsyuk Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center Rus...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Eman Assi, Rashad Bukha...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Eman Assi, Rashad Bukhash   and Ahmad Mahmood  Mohammed Sharif Sul...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Eman Assi, Rashad Bukhash   and Ahmad Mahmood  Mohammed Sharif Sul...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF  HONORARY MEMBERS Javier Sánchez , Temisctoc...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Javier Sánchez   |  Temisctocles 12   |  Mexico
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Javier Sánchez   |  Temisctocles 12   |  Mexico
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Daniel Moreno Creative Offi...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Daniel Moreno Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Archi...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Daniel Moreno Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Archi...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Lennard Carlier  |  Symbiot...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Lennard Carlier  |  Symbiotic Housing Link  |  New Zealand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Lennard Carlier  |  Symbiotic Housing Link  |  New Zealand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi Winner of the 2nd...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi Winner of the 2nd Annual Persian School Ar...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Armon Choros Architektonikis  |  Olympic ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Armon Choros Architektonikis  |  Olympic House and Park in Nicosia...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Armon Choros Architektonikis  |  Olympic House and Park in Nicosia...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Michelangelo Acciaro  and  Nora Lau Chica...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Michelangelo Acciaro  and Nora Lau   |  Chicago City Library  |  U...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Michelangelo Acciaro  and Nora Lau   |  Chicago City Library  |  U...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Ulisses Morato   |  House in Nova Lima - ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ulisses Morato  |  House in Nova Lima - MG  |  Brazil
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Ulisses Morato  |  House in Nova Lima - MG  |  Brazil
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS M.L.Varudh Varavarn   |  Floating Space  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   M.L.Varudh Varavarn  |  Floating Space  |  Thailand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   M.L.Varudh Varavarn  |  Floating Space  |  Thailand
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Meryem Ozturkoglu   |  CITY-PARK  |  Turkey
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Meryem Ozturkoglu  |  CITY-PARK  |  Turkey
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Meryem Ozturkoglu  |  CITY-PARK  |  Turkey
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS LOKOMOTIV.archs Absolute Architecture. Ci...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   LOKOMOTIV.archs   |  Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl   |  It...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   LOKOMOTIV.archs   |  Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl   |  It...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Daniel Bolojan  |   Public Library - Buch...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Daniel Bolojan  |  Public Library - Bucharest  |  Romania
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Daniel Bolojan  |  Public Library - Bucharest  |  Romania
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Rafael Yee Chandelier Bridge at Metropoli...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Rafael Yee   |  Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Rafael Yee   |  Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Alessandro Console  and  Gina Oliva   |  ...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Alessandro Console and Gina Oliva  |  Hortus Officinalis  |  Taiwan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Alessandro Console and Gina Oliva  |  Hortus Officinalis  |  Taiwan
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X" PROJECTS Francis Kéré  |   High Sc...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Francis Kéré  |  High School in Dano  |  Burkina Faso
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Francis Kéré  |  High School in Dano  |  Burkina Faso
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X" PROJECTS Marina Gousia   |   Vivie...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Marina Gousia  |  Viviendas en Ángel 2  |  Nicaragua
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Marina Gousia  |  Viviendas en Ángel 2  |  Nicaragua
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X PROJECTS Drozdov&Partners  |  Residentia...
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Drozdov&Partners |  Residential Building in Odessa  |  Ukraine
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   Drozdov&Partners |  Residential Building in Odessa  |  Ukraine
www.worldarchitecture.org   www.worldarchitecture.org   June 2009   [email_address]
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WA 4. Cycle Fullcourseware, June 2009

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Full version presentations of the 4th Cycle winner projects, June 2009- To be engaged with contemporary trends

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  • 1 Memorial Bridge, Rijeka Location: Rijeka, Croatia Project: 1997 Type: Public competition, winner Client: City of Rijeka, Croatia Start of construction: 09/2001 End of construction: 12/2001 Overall length: 47.0 m Clear span: 35.7 m Width: 5.4 m Construction thickness 65 cm Verticals: 9 m Budget: 1.2 million $ Author: 3LHD Project team: Silvije Novak, Marko Dabrovic, Sasa Begovic, Tanja Grozdanic, Sinisa Glusica Structural engineers: CES doo Rijeka - Jean Wolf, Zoran Novacki, Dusan Srejic – bridge, UPI-2M doo Zagreb - Berislav Medic - bench and handrail Main contractors: GP Krk (general), Shipyard 3.Maj (steel construction), Almes (aluminium, glass), Ribaric (lighting) Collaborators: B.Jurjevic (Almes), M.Lindquist (SAPA aluminium), NOVA Karlovac (square and memorial surface), carpentry Rudolf (benches, handrail), Aljosa Sribar (OSRAM - LED), Ciril Zlobec (glass prisms) Photos: Aljosa Brajdic, 3LHD Archive The basic concept is to give the utilitarian form a monumental character. The bridge starts from the Downtown, goes over the channel and ends on the other bank with a monumental vertical - accent. We would like to emphasize that the bridge is a monument so that in this sense we equate the walking surface of the bridge with the covering of the vertical accent. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. This spatial intervention is public urban object; it is construction with tactile qualities, and also symbolic object. This is Memorial Pedestrian Bridge in the City of Rijeka. The site is in the very centre of the town on the canal separating the historical centre from the former port area presently used as a parking lot which will become City Park in the future. Besides its utilitarian function (purpose) this pedestrian crossing is also monument to Croatian defenders, a place of memory and place of social encounter as well. Memorial Bridge is conceived as an extremely thin board spanned over the canal in a characteristic L-shape. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. These two archetype elements would be impossible to accomplish without the use of the internet (we can say thank you, Google!). Every part of this product was designed like industrially conceived product. The elements are industrially produced and then put together on site! This 150 tons construction was entirely produced in one piece in local Shipyard. And then the Bridge construction was lifted and put on the specially designed barge and then it was transported to its position in canal. The barge was designed so that can be sunken down and with the help of high and low tide we were able to lower down and pull it under the two existing bridges. It was of course major social event that day and also on the opening day. Night illumination makes this place magical. This urban-public hybrid changed the image of the city both in physic
  • 1 Memorial Bridge, Rijeka Location: Rijeka, Croatia Project: 1997 Type: Public competition, winner Client: City of Rijeka, Croatia Start of construction: 09/2001 End of construction: 12/2001 Overall length: 47.0 m Clear span: 35.7 m Width: 5.4 m Construction thickness 65 cm Verticals: 9 m Budget: 1.2 million $ Author: 3LHD Project team: Silvije Novak, Marko Dabrovic, Sasa Begovic, Tanja Grozdanic, Sinisa Glusica Structural engineers: CES doo Rijeka - Jean Wolf, Zoran Novacki, Dusan Srejic – bridge, UPI-2M doo Zagreb - Berislav Medic - bench and handrail Main contractors: GP Krk (general), Shipyard 3.Maj (steel construction), Almes (aluminium, glass), Ribaric (lighting) Collaborators: B.Jurjevic (Almes), M.Lindquist (SAPA aluminium), NOVA Karlovac (square and memorial surface), carpentry Rudolf (benches, handrail), Aljosa Sribar (OSRAM - LED), Ciril Zlobec (glass prisms) Photos: Aljosa Brajdic, 3LHD Archive The basic concept is to give the utilitarian form a monumental character. The bridge starts from the Downtown, goes over the channel and ends on the other bank with a monumental vertical - accent. We would like to emphasize that the bridge is a monument so that in this sense we equate the walking surface of the bridge with the covering of the vertical accent. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. This spatial intervention is public urban object; it is construction with tactile qualities, and also symbolic object. This is Memorial Pedestrian Bridge in the City of Rijeka. The site is in the very centre of the town on the canal separating the historical centre from the former port area presently used as a parking lot which will become City Park in the future. Besides its utilitarian function (purpose) this pedestrian crossing is also monument to Croatian defenders, a place of memory and place of social encounter as well. Memorial Bridge is conceived as an extremely thin board spanned over the canal in a characteristic L-shape. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. These two archetype elements would be impossible to accomplish without the use of the internet (we can say thank you, Google!). Every part of this product was designed like industrially conceived product. The elements are industrially produced and then put together on site! This 150 tons construction was entirely produced in one piece in local Shipyard. And then the Bridge construction was lifted and put on the specially designed barge and then it was transported to its position in canal. The barge was designed so that can be sunken down and with the help of high and low tide we were able to lower down and pull it under the two existing bridges. It was of course major social event that day and also on the opening day. Night illumination makes this place magical. This urban-public hybrid changed the image of the city both in physic
  • 1 Memorial Bridge, Rijeka Location: Rijeka, Croatia Project: 1997 Type: Public competition, winner Client: City of Rijeka, Croatia Start of construction: 09/2001 End of construction: 12/2001 Overall length: 47.0 m Clear span: 35.7 m Width: 5.4 m Construction thickness 65 cm Verticals: 9 m Budget: 1.2 million $ Author: 3LHD Project team: Silvije Novak, Marko Dabrovic, Sasa Begovic, Tanja Grozdanic, Sinisa Glusica Structural engineers: CES doo Rijeka - Jean Wolf, Zoran Novacki, Dusan Srejic – bridge, UPI-2M doo Zagreb - Berislav Medic - bench and handrail Main contractors: GP Krk (general), Shipyard 3.Maj (steel construction), Almes (aluminium, glass), Ribaric (lighting) Collaborators: B.Jurjevic (Almes), M.Lindquist (SAPA aluminium), NOVA Karlovac (square and memorial surface), carpentry Rudolf (benches, handrail), Aljosa Sribar (OSRAM - LED), Ciril Zlobec (glass prisms) Photos: Aljosa Brajdic, 3LHD Archive The basic concept is to give the utilitarian form a monumental character. The bridge starts from the Downtown, goes over the channel and ends on the other bank with a monumental vertical - accent. We would like to emphasize that the bridge is a monument so that in this sense we equate the walking surface of the bridge with the covering of the vertical accent. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. This spatial intervention is public urban object; it is construction with tactile qualities, and also symbolic object. This is Memorial Pedestrian Bridge in the City of Rijeka. The site is in the very centre of the town on the canal separating the historical centre from the former port area presently used as a parking lot which will become City Park in the future. Besides its utilitarian function (purpose) this pedestrian crossing is also monument to Croatian defenders, a place of memory and place of social encounter as well. Memorial Bridge is conceived as an extremely thin board spanned over the canal in a characteristic L-shape. Definition of public space is achieved entirely through the build structure, which at the same time had to be recognized as a memorial building. These two archetype elements would be impossible to accomplish without the use of the internet (we can say thank you, Google!). Every part of this product was designed like industrially conceived product. The elements are industrially produced and then put together on site! This 150 tons construction was entirely produced in one piece in local Shipyard. And then the Bridge construction was lifted and put on the specially designed barge and then it was transported to its position in canal. The barge was designed so that can be sunken down and with the help of high and low tide we were able to lower down and pull it under the two existing bridges. It was of course major social event that day and also on the opening day. Night illumination makes this place magical. This urban-public hybrid changed the image of the city both in physic
  • 2 The Scarab of Roanne The Scarab is a multifunction space with economic, public and cultural events purpose. Within its conception the Scarab hides different construction modes.Concrete which constitutes the main enveloppe for its acoustic qualities.Steel for its capacities of great bearing : the grill, the structure of the outer enveloppe. Inside the iron stairs take an animal dimension and increase the slightness and transparency of the collective spaces. The shell made of golden aluminium gives the Scarab its magic beyond its thermal functionality.
  • 2 The Scarab of Roanne The Scarab is a multifunction space with economic, public and cultural events purpose. Within its conception the Scarab hides different construction modes.Concrete which constitutes the main enveloppe for its acoustic qualities.Steel for its capacities of great bearing : the grill, the structure of the outer enveloppe. Inside the iron stairs take an animal dimension and increase the slightness and transparency of the collective spaces. The shell made of golden aluminium gives the Scarab its magic beyond its thermal functionality.
  • 2 The Scarab of Roanne The Scarab is a multifunction space with economic, public and cultural events purpose. Within its conception the Scarab hides different construction modes.Concrete which constitutes the main enveloppe for its acoustic qualities.Steel for its capacities of great bearing : the grill, the structure of the outer enveloppe. Inside the iron stairs take an animal dimension and increase the slightness and transparency of the collective spaces. The shell made of golden aluminium gives the Scarab its magic beyond its thermal functionality.
  • 3 Icheon SKMS Institute Project name - Icheon SKMS Institute Function - Institute Office name - Architect Office S A A I Project team – Park Chang-Hyun, Lee Jin-Oh, Yim Tae-byoung Client - SK corporation Design date – 04. 2007 ~ 07. 2008 Completion date – 09. 2008 Area - 4,108 ㎡ References - http://www.vmspace.com/eng/ (November 2008) A gentle hill flows into another topography, shaped by the rich branches of the nearby chestnut trees and ginseng farms. The mystical first impression of a chestnut forest with its loosely spaced trees (for better quality, not quantity, of production), the refreshing wetness of the land given by the morning dew, and the soft wind that rustles the young leaves and tree branches, wake up our senses. For the chestnut orchard to look so appealing today, much hard work went into reshaping the rugged hill over a long time. The spirit and memories of those who have cared for the rough environment, and the communication with nature that awakens our senses : It was believed that the former will explain the enterprising spirit, and the latter will free up our philosophical thinking. Our work being by looking for the potential of the land and by finding ways to build an architecture with minimum traces. The program is juxtaposed along the long boundary between the chestnut forest and the newly created site. Based on the simple method that shaped the nearby ginseng farm, we make sure that the building will be part of the scenery, and not a hard edifice. We create an environment where, throught this loose framework, a different time can be experienced at a longer pace, where nature is absorbed into architecture. Thus, this architecture becomes part of the environment, part of the continuum with the land, and a framework for thinking, through communication with nature. We hope that the traces we left will, over the years, become part of the land.
  • 3 Icheon SKMS Institute Project name - Icheon SKMS Institute Function - Institute Office name - Architect Office S A A I Project team – Park Chang-Hyun, Lee Jin-Oh, Yim Tae-byoung Client - SK corporation Design date – 04. 2007 ~ 07. 2008 Completion date – 09. 2008 Area - 4,108 ㎡ References - http://www.vmspace.com/eng/ (November 2008) A gentle hill flows into another topography, shaped by the rich branches of the nearby chestnut trees and ginseng farms. The mystical first impression of a chestnut forest with its loosely spaced trees (for better quality, not quantity, of production), the refreshing wetness of the land given by the morning dew, and the soft wind that rustles the young leaves and tree branches, wake up our senses. For the chestnut orchard to look so appealing today, much hard work went into reshaping the rugged hill over a long time. The spirit and memories of those who have cared for the rough environment, and the communication with nature that awakens our senses : It was believed that the former will explain the enterprising spirit, and the latter will free up our philosophical thinking. Our work being by looking for the potential of the land and by finding ways to build an architecture with minimum traces. The program is juxtaposed along the long boundary between the chestnut forest and the newly created site. Based on the simple method that shaped the nearby ginseng farm, we make sure that the building will be part of the scenery, and not a hard edifice. We create an environment where, throught this loose framework, a different time can be experienced at a longer pace, where nature is absorbed into architecture. Thus, this architecture becomes part of the environment, part of the continuum with the land, and a framework for thinking, through communication with nature. We hope that the traces we left will, over the years, become part of the land.
  • 3 Icheon SKMS Institute Project name - Icheon SKMS Institute Function - Institute Office name - Architect Office S A A I Project team – Park Chang-Hyun, Lee Jin-Oh, Yim Tae-byoung Client - SK corporation Design date – 04. 2007 ~ 07. 2008 Completion date – 09. 2008 Area - 4,108 ㎡ References - http://www.vmspace.com/eng/ (November 2008) A gentle hill flows into another topography, shaped by the rich branches of the nearby chestnut trees and ginseng farms. The mystical first impression of a chestnut forest with its loosely spaced trees (for better quality, not quantity, of production), the refreshing wetness of the land given by the morning dew, and the soft wind that rustles the young leaves and tree branches, wake up our senses. For the chestnut orchard to look so appealing today, much hard work went into reshaping the rugged hill over a long time. The spirit and memories of those who have cared for the rough environment, and the communication with nature that awakens our senses : It was believed that the former will explain the enterprising spirit, and the latter will free up our philosophical thinking. Our work being by looking for the potential of the land and by finding ways to build an architecture with minimum traces. The program is juxtaposed along the long boundary between the chestnut forest and the newly created site. Based on the simple method that shaped the nearby ginseng farm, we make sure that the building will be part of the scenery, and not a hard edifice. We create an environment where, throught this loose framework, a different time can be experienced at a longer pace, where nature is absorbed into architecture. Thus, this architecture becomes part of the environment, part of the continuum with the land, and a framework for thinking, through communication with nature. We hope that the traces we left will, over the years, become part of the land.
  • 4 Chen House CHEN HOUSE Architects C-Laboratory: Marco Casagrande Frank Chen Construction work: Marco Casagrande, Frank Chen, Shi-Ding Chen, Nikita Wu, Shu-Gi Bai Local Knowledge: Missis Lee Location: Sanjhih, Taipei County, Taiwan Site: 3890 m2 farm land, Datun Mountains Building foot print: 138 m2 Interior space: 62,5 m2 Materials: mahogany, concrete Completed: 2008 The house is realized on an old Japanese cherry-farm in the Datun -mountains of North-Taiwan. It is designed as a vessel to react on the demanding wind, flooding and heat conditions on the site. The house is a stick raised above the ground in order to let the flood waters run under it. The different spaces are connected to a flexible movement within the axis of outdoor and indoor functions. The smaller bathroom and kitchen unit acts as a kicker stabilizing the wooden structure during the frequent typhoons and earthquakes. The bio-climatic architecture is designed to catch the cool breeze from the Datun -river during the hot days and to let in the small winds circulating on the site between the fresh water reservoir pond and the farmlands. A fire place is used during the winter for heating and for cooking tea. In connection with the bathroom is a small sauna. The house is not strong or heavy – it is weak and flexible. It is also not closing the environment out, but designed to give the farmers a needed shelter. Ruin is when man-made has become part of nature. With this house we were looking forward to design a ruin. In a dream last night, I saw a great storm. It seized the scaffolding. It tore the cross-clasps, the iron ones, down. But what was made of wood, swayed and remained. - Bertolt Brecht
  • 4 Chen House CHEN HOUSE Architects C-Laboratory: Marco Casagrande Frank Chen Construction work: Marco Casagrande, Frank Chen, Shi-Ding Chen, Nikita Wu, Shu-Gi Bai Local Knowledge: Missis Lee Location: Sanjhih, Taipei County, Taiwan Site: 3890 m2 farm land, Datun Mountains Building foot print: 138 m2 Interior space: 62,5 m2 Materials: mahogany, concrete Completed: 2008 The house is realized on an old Japanese cherry-farm in the Datun -mountains of North-Taiwan. It is designed as a vessel to react on the demanding wind, flooding and heat conditions on the site. The house is a stick raised above the ground in order to let the flood waters run under it. The different spaces are connected to a flexible movement within the axis of outdoor and indoor functions. The smaller bathroom and kitchen unit acts as a kicker stabilizing the wooden structure during the frequent typhoons and earthquakes. The bio-climatic architecture is designed to catch the cool breeze from the Datun -river during the hot days and to let in the small winds circulating on the site between the fresh water reservoir pond and the farmlands. A fire place is used during the winter for heating and for cooking tea. In connection with the bathroom is a small sauna. The house is not strong or heavy – it is weak and flexible. It is also not closing the environment out, but designed to give the farmers a needed shelter. Ruin is when man-made has become part of nature. With this house we were looking forward to design a ruin. In a dream last night, I saw a great storm. It seized the scaffolding. It tore the cross-clasps, the iron ones, down. But what was made of wood, swayed and remained. - Bertolt Brecht
  • 4 Chen House CHEN HOUSE Architects C-Laboratory: Marco Casagrande Frank Chen Construction work: Marco Casagrande, Frank Chen, Shi-Ding Chen, Nikita Wu, Shu-Gi Bai Local Knowledge: Missis Lee Location: Sanjhih, Taipei County, Taiwan Site: 3890 m2 farm land, Datun Mountains Building foot print: 138 m2 Interior space: 62,5 m2 Materials: mahogany, concrete Completed: 2008 The house is realized on an old Japanese cherry-farm in the Datun -mountains of North-Taiwan. It is designed as a vessel to react on the demanding wind, flooding and heat conditions on the site. The house is a stick raised above the ground in order to let the flood waters run under it. The different spaces are connected to a flexible movement within the axis of outdoor and indoor functions. The smaller bathroom and kitchen unit acts as a kicker stabilizing the wooden structure during the frequent typhoons and earthquakes. The bio-climatic architecture is designed to catch the cool breeze from the Datun -river during the hot days and to let in the small winds circulating on the site between the fresh water reservoir pond and the farmlands. A fire place is used during the winter for heating and for cooking tea. In connection with the bathroom is a small sauna. The house is not strong or heavy – it is weak and flexible. It is also not closing the environment out, but designed to give the farmers a needed shelter. Ruin is when man-made has become part of nature. With this house we were looking forward to design a ruin. In a dream last night, I saw a great storm. It seized the scaffolding. It tore the cross-clasps, the iron ones, down. But what was made of wood, swayed and remained. - Bertolt Brecht
  • 5 NORVEG Coast Cultural Center
  • 5 NORVEG Coast Cultural Center
  • 5 NORVEG Coast Cultural Center
  • 6 `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal Reclaiming the city- urban nexus 2020 [2001-2003] Design & Research: Suprio Bhattacharjee 3D Visualisation: Neville Fernandes Project Mentor: Vidya P. Raghu PUBLICATION: ‘ Archiprix International 2001/2003’; O1Opubishers, NAi, Rotterdam, 2004 BRIEF Sustainable Infrastructure and Growth Model for dense cities such as Mumbai. Station redeveloped with speculative development, retail, a hotel, cultural facilities [two 500-seater auditoria and a 1000-seat concert hall] along with a multiplex cinema with 5 screens. Project involved the use of green roofs over concrete slabs acting as heat sinks cooling the station below, self-shading strategy in the orientation of towers, bio-climatic design principles for the office towers such as east-west orientation, narrow floor plates [average width 12-14m] to maximize daylight penetration and natural ventilation, use of terracotta and GRC jaalis on the south façade of office towers and planted terraces [sky gardens] on sunward sides. ISSUES This prospective global city faces crises at multitude levels. Placeless objects in the name of new age architecture are slowly obliterating a sense of cohesive social structure and unique scale specific to each place and community – does the city loose its layered identity in favour of a place-less plastic imagery? Besides, the city needs to address other issues important for its survival – such as sustainable models of growth, the issue of sprawl; and the indiscriminate destruction of verdant land and natural eco-systems for development purposes when brownfield and greyfield sites are more than available. THE CITY AS A HYPER-NETWORKED ENTITY The premise of this project works on the reality that the city functions as a series of node-places where each railway station becomes the hub of each suburb – since it is most accessible. Going on the dictum of maximum density at the place of maximum connectivity, a city structure for Bombay can be envisaged wherein each suburb shall act as a self-sustaining fragment of a larger urban system – connected by a web of non-linear mass movement system, creating a hyper-networked entity. This would encourage and initiate balanced growth within the city and would ensure a sustainable vision for the city into the future. ARCHITECTURE AS BEING EMBEDDED URBAN NEXUS – RECLAIMING THE CITY – PROJECT FOR THE ANDHERI INTERMODAL Large-scale architectural interventions can evolve from the forces that inhabit the site to become extensions of the city, embedding themselves in diverse immediate conditions while being differentially scaled so that each part responds to a specific and changing urban situation – pieces of cityscape rather than an imposed monolith. About a million and a half people use the Andheri Station Precinct every day. In addition to being a center of small-scale industry and a prominent dormitory suburb, andheri has become the unofficial hub of the service industry in the city, a fact aided by its strategic geographic centrality, its proximity to the international airport and a growing hotel and business district. This project was conceived in anticipation of such a growth. Contradicting the official stand of the city government, it proposed an intensification of the urban experience at the station through a densely layered spatial organisation – all integrated into one seamless whole. The station site was imagined as a crossing point or a ‘nexus’ in a city traditionally divided into inaccessible easts and wests by broad swathes of railway tracks cutting across it. The project would need to suture these deep gashes - healing the cityscape and reclaiming precious land lost. Conceptually, it begins with stretching across a membrane of connectivity forming a fluid public space allowing for visual clarity and easy orientation. This membrane becomes the crossing or nexus accommodating a number of super-imposed built forms hovering above. These would be of two kinds – low-scaled linear multi-use buildings oriented N-S along courtyard spines to maximize daylight and natural ventilation – and narrow-plate office towers oriented E-W, raised on massive concrete undercrofts cantilevering over the activities below. The two orientations are meant to express the two important flow patterns inherent on the site. The relentless N-S motion of the railways intersecting the much-desired attempt to bind the E-W divisions created. The taller buildings along the E-W axis huddle and congregate, becoming a visual barometer to indicate the main crossing points on the site, while the linear buildings at their base act as their entry points. This orientation helps in reducing solar heat gain as well as maximizing natural ventilation and daylight, while adequate plantations on open deck levels at each floor moderate internal temperatures. These towers impart the project with strong colours when seen from the south through the use of an outer scrim of terracotta or GRC panels in vivid earth tones that act as mega-scaled jaalis modulating the light quality inside. the idea of the nexus evolves into an undulating landscape - a shallow ‘mound’ formed by surfaces that gently heave up to form the roof/deck, marked by vertical shafts of towers, that would bring back memories of rock formations and lost geological treasures - unique basalt cliffs with hexagonal rock formations soaring over 300 feet high that once marked the landscape of Andheri before they were all mindlessly quarried away in the early 1900’s. Spatially, it generates an indeterminate urban topography of generous ramps and raked surfaces - which blurs boundaries and the distinction between levels, and accommodates the irregular nature of the site. from this roof deck, the presence of the station below is discovered through incidental gaps between the raked surfaces. The drama of the space unfolds as one descends into the bowels of the station (the platform levels), from where the complexity of the layered space above is revealed through unexpected glimpses and shafts of light and vision. The individual becomes immersed in an intense urban experience that is always incomplete – and in the process of unfolding through repeated uses. A lasting comment that this project also attempts to convey is that Bombay/Mumbai is not flat . . . as most people and planners have considered it to be (the July 2005 floods awoke everyone from their slumber to realise this) and giving back a sense of its lost topography in an urban condition that has forgotten that the ground in Bombay was never meant to be flat, is a dire need.
  • 6 `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal Reclaiming the city- urban nexus 2020 [2001-2003] Design & Research: Suprio Bhattacharjee 3D Visualisation: Neville Fernandes Project Mentor: Vidya P. Raghu PUBLICATION: ‘ Archiprix International 2001/2003’; O1Opubishers, NAi, Rotterdam, 2004 BRIEF Sustainable Infrastructure and Growth Model for dense cities such as Mumbai. Station redeveloped with speculative development, retail, a hotel, cultural facilities [two 500-seater auditoria and a 1000-seat concert hall] along with a multiplex cinema with 5 screens. Project involved the use of green roofs over concrete slabs acting as heat sinks cooling the station below, self-shading strategy in the orientation of towers, bio-climatic design principles for the office towers such as east-west orientation, narrow floor plates [average width 12-14m] to maximize daylight penetration and natural ventilation, use of terracotta and GRC jaalis on the south façade of office towers and planted terraces [sky gardens] on sunward sides. ISSUES This prospective global city faces crises at multitude levels. Placeless objects in the name of new age architecture are slowly obliterating a sense of cohesive social structure and unique scale specific to each place and community – does the city loose its layered identity in favour of a place-less plastic imagery? Besides, the city needs to address other issues important for its survival – such as sustainable models of growth, the issue of sprawl; and the indiscriminate destruction of verdant land and natural eco-systems for development purposes when brownfield and greyfield sites are more than available. THE CITY AS A HYPER-NETWORKED ENTITY The premise of this project works on the reality that the city functions as a series of node-places where each railway station becomes the hub of each suburb – since it is most accessible. Going on the dictum of maximum density at the place of maximum connectivity, a city structure for Bombay can be envisaged wherein each suburb shall act as a self-sustaining fragment of a larger urban system – connected by a web of non-linear mass movement system, creating a hyper-networked entity. This would encourage and initiate balanced growth within the city and would ensure a sustainable vision for the city into the future. ARCHITECTURE AS BEING EMBEDDED URBAN NEXUS – RECLAIMING THE CITY – PROJECT FOR THE ANDHERI INTERMODAL Large-scale architectural interventions can evolve from the forces that inhabit the site to become extensions of the city, embedding themselves in diverse immediate conditions while being differentially scaled so that each part responds to a specific and changing urban situation – pieces of cityscape rather than an imposed monolith. About a million and a half people use the Andheri Station Precinct every day. In addition to being a center of small-scale industry and a prominent dormitory suburb, andheri has become the unofficial hub of the service industry in the city, a fact aided by its strategic geographic centrality, its proximity to the international airport and a growing hotel and business district. This project was conceived in anticipation of such a growth. Contradicting the official stand of the city government, it proposed an intensification of the urban experience at the station through a densely layered spatial organisation – all integrated into one seamless whole. The station site was imagined as a crossing point or a ‘nexus’ in a city traditionally divided into inaccessible easts and wests by broad swathes of railway tracks cutting across it. The project would need to suture these deep gashes - healing the cityscape and reclaiming precious land lost. Conceptually, it begins with stretching across a membrane of connectivity forming a fluid public space allowing for visual clarity and easy orientation. This membrane becomes the crossing or nexus accommodating a number of super-imposed built forms hovering above. These would be of two kinds – low-scaled linear multi-use buildings oriented N-S along courtyard spines to maximize daylight and natural ventilation – and narrow-plate office towers oriented E-W, raised on massive concrete undercrofts cantilevering over the activities below. The two orientations are meant to express the two important flow patterns inherent on the site. The relentless N-S motion of the railways intersecting the much-desired attempt to bind the E-W divisions created. The taller buildings along the E-W axis huddle and congregate, becoming a visual barometer to indicate the main crossing points on the site, while the linear buildings at their base act as their entry points. This orientation helps in reducing solar heat gain as well as maximizing natural ventilation and daylight, while adequate plantations on open deck levels at each floor moderate internal temperatures. These towers impart the project with strong colours when seen from the south through the use of an outer scrim of terracotta or GRC panels in vivid earth tones that act as mega-scaled jaalis modulating the light quality inside. the idea of the nexus evolves into an undulating landscape - a shallow ‘mound’ formed by surfaces that gently heave up to form the roof/deck, marked by vertical shafts of towers, that would bring back memories of rock formations and lost geological treasures - unique basalt cliffs with hexagonal rock formations soaring over 300 feet high that once marked the landscape of Andheri before they were all mindlessly quarried away in the early 1900’s. Spatially, it generates an indeterminate urban topography of generous ramps and raked surfaces - which blurs boundaries and the distinction between levels, and accommodates the irregular nature of the site. from this roof deck, the presence of the station below is discovered through incidental gaps between the raked surfaces. The drama of the space unfolds as one descends into the bowels of the station (the platform levels), from where the complexity of the layered space above is revealed through unexpected glimpses and shafts of light and vision. The individual becomes immersed in an intense urban experience that is always incomplete – and in the process of unfolding through repeated uses. A lasting comment that this project also attempts to convey is that Bombay/Mumbai is not flat . . . as most people and planners have considered it to be (the July 2005 floods awoke everyone from their slumber to realise this) and giving back a sense of its lost topography in an urban condition that has forgotten that the ground in Bombay was never meant to be flat, is a dire need.
  • 6 `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal Reclaiming the city- urban nexus 2020 [2001-2003] Design & Research: Suprio Bhattacharjee 3D Visualisation: Neville Fernandes Project Mentor: Vidya P. Raghu PUBLICATION: ‘ Archiprix International 2001/2003’; O1Opubishers, NAi, Rotterdam, 2004 BRIEF Sustainable Infrastructure and Growth Model for dense cities such as Mumbai. Station redeveloped with speculative development, retail, a hotel, cultural facilities [two 500-seater auditoria and a 1000-seat concert hall] along with a multiplex cinema with 5 screens. Project involved the use of green roofs over concrete slabs acting as heat sinks cooling the station below, self-shading strategy in the orientation of towers, bio-climatic design principles for the office towers such as east-west orientation, narrow floor plates [average width 12-14m] to maximize daylight penetration and natural ventilation, use of terracotta and GRC jaalis on the south façade of office towers and planted terraces [sky gardens] on sunward sides. ISSUES This prospective global city faces crises at multitude levels. Placeless objects in the name of new age architecture are slowly obliterating a sense of cohesive social structure and unique scale specific to each place and community – does the city loose its layered identity in favour of a place-less plastic imagery? Besides, the city needs to address other issues important for its survival – such as sustainable models of growth, the issue of sprawl; and the indiscriminate destruction of verdant land and natural eco-systems for development purposes when brownfield and greyfield sites are more than available. THE CITY AS A HYPER-NETWORKED ENTITY The premise of this project works on the reality that the city functions as a series of node-places where each railway station becomes the hub of each suburb – since it is most accessible. Going on the dictum of maximum density at the place of maximum connectivity, a city structure for Bombay can be envisaged wherein each suburb shall act as a self-sustaining fragment of a larger urban system – connected by a web of non-linear mass movement system, creating a hyper-networked entity. This would encourage and initiate balanced growth within the city and would ensure a sustainable vision for the city into the future. ARCHITECTURE AS BEING EMBEDDED URBAN NEXUS – RECLAIMING THE CITY – PROJECT FOR THE ANDHERI INTERMODAL Large-scale architectural interventions can evolve from the forces that inhabit the site to become extensions of the city, embedding themselves in diverse immediate conditions while being differentially scaled so that each part responds to a specific and changing urban situation – pieces of cityscape rather than an imposed monolith. About a million and a half people use the Andheri Station Precinct every day. In addition to being a center of small-scale industry and a prominent dormitory suburb, andheri has become the unofficial hub of the service industry in the city, a fact aided by its strategic geographic centrality, its proximity to the international airport and a growing hotel and business district. This project was conceived in anticipation of such a growth. Contradicting the official stand of the city government, it proposed an intensification of the urban experience at the station through a densely layered spatial organisation – all integrated into one seamless whole. The station site was imagined as a crossing point or a ‘nexus’ in a city traditionally divided into inaccessible easts and wests by broad swathes of railway tracks cutting across it. The project would need to suture these deep gashes - healing the cityscape and reclaiming precious land lost. Conceptually, it begins with stretching across a membrane of connectivity forming a fluid public space allowing for visual clarity and easy orientation. This membrane becomes the crossing or nexus accommodating a number of super-imposed built forms hovering above. These would be of two kinds – low-scaled linear multi-use buildings oriented N-S along courtyard spines to maximize daylight and natural ventilation – and narrow-plate office towers oriented E-W, raised on massive concrete undercrofts cantilevering over the activities below. The two orientations are meant to express the two important flow patterns inherent on the site. The relentless N-S motion of the railways intersecting the much-desired attempt to bind the E-W divisions created. The taller buildings along the E-W axis huddle and congregate, becoming a visual barometer to indicate the main crossing points on the site, while the linear buildings at their base act as their entry points. This orientation helps in reducing solar heat gain as well as maximizing natural ventilation and daylight, while adequate plantations on open deck levels at each floor moderate internal temperatures. These towers impart the project with strong colours when seen from the south through the use of an outer scrim of terracotta or GRC panels in vivid earth tones that act as mega-scaled jaalis modulating the light quality inside. the idea of the nexus evolves into an undulating landscape - a shallow ‘mound’ formed by surfaces that gently heave up to form the roof/deck, marked by vertical shafts of towers, that would bring back memories of rock formations and lost geological treasures - unique basalt cliffs with hexagonal rock formations soaring over 300 feet high that once marked the landscape of Andheri before they were all mindlessly quarried away in the early 1900’s. Spatially, it generates an indeterminate urban topography of generous ramps and raked surfaces - which blurs boundaries and the distinction between levels, and accommodates the irregular nature of the site. from this roof deck, the presence of the station below is discovered through incidental gaps between the raked surfaces. The drama of the space unfolds as one descends into the bowels of the station (the platform levels), from where the complexity of the layered space above is revealed through unexpected glimpses and shafts of light and vision. The individual becomes immersed in an intense urban experience that is always incomplete – and in the process of unfolding through repeated uses. A lasting comment that this project also attempts to convey is that Bombay/Mumbai is not flat . . . as most people and planners have considered it to be (the July 2005 floods awoke everyone from their slumber to realise this) and giving back a sense of its lost topography in an urban condition that has forgotten that the ground in Bombay was never meant to be flat, is a dire need.
  • 7 M.F.Husain Art Gallery Jamia art gallery The university of Jamia was established in the 1930's. As the university evolved, it introduced a wide range of contemporary academic disciplines such as media studies and central Asian studies. Jamia university is popularly regarded as a progressive avant garde campus. In 2008, the vice chancellor proposed a new cultural hub for the university that would have as its core a contemporary students canteen, a unique art gallery and landscaped lawns. The architects chose white marble in the canteen and white metal louvers in the art gallery to express this contemporary identity. The art gallery has become a community space for gathering alternative expressions of culture and identity. This role signalled the canteen and the art gallery as iconic models of architectural expression in contemporary indian academic institutions. The art gallery has three main parts to it. The front gallery that is naturally lit and primarily designed for the dispplay of popular art and student exhibitions. The second space is the main internal gallery which is light by controlled light and canbe divided into 2 smaller galleries with the help of the central pivoting wall. This gallery is designed for the great university art collection, as well as for external artists who want to exhibit their work here. The third exhibition space is the open air sculpture court at the rear of the building. Other than this, the art gallery also has two artist studios adjacent to the sculpture court which are designed for short term stay of visiting artists.
  • 7 M.F.Husain Art Gallery Jamia art gallery The university of Jamia was established in the 1930's. As the university evolved, it introduced a wide range of contemporary academic disciplines such as media studies and central Asian studies. Jamia university is popularly regarded as a progressive avant garde campus. In 2008, the vice chancellor proposed a new cultural hub for the university that would have as its core a contemporary students canteen, a unique art gallery and landscaped lawns. The architects chose white marble in the canteen and white metal louvers in the art gallery to express this contemporary identity. The art gallery has become a community space for gathering alternative expressions of culture and identity. This role signalled the canteen and the art gallery as iconic models of architectural expression in contemporary indian academic institutions. The art gallery has three main parts to it. The front gallery that is naturally lit and primarily designed for the dispplay of popular art and student exhibitions. The second space is the main internal gallery which is light by controlled light and canbe divided into 2 smaller galleries with the help of the central pivoting wall. This gallery is designed for the great university art collection, as well as for external artists who want to exhibit their work here. The third exhibition space is the open air sculpture court at the rear of the building. Other than this, the art gallery also has two artist studios adjacent to the sculpture court which are designed for short term stay of visiting artists.
  • 7 M.F.Husain Art Gallery Jamia art gallery The university of Jamia was established in the 1930's. As the university evolved, it introduced a wide range of contemporary academic disciplines such as media studies and central Asian studies. Jamia university is popularly regarded as a progressive avant garde campus. In 2008, the vice chancellor proposed a new cultural hub for the university that would have as its core a contemporary students canteen, a unique art gallery and landscaped lawns. The architects chose white marble in the canteen and white metal louvers in the art gallery to express this contemporary identity. The art gallery has become a community space for gathering alternative expressions of culture and identity. This role signalled the canteen and the art gallery as iconic models of architectural expression in contemporary indian academic institutions. The art gallery has three main parts to it. The front gallery that is naturally lit and primarily designed for the dispplay of popular art and student exhibitions. The second space is the main internal gallery which is light by controlled light and canbe divided into 2 smaller galleries with the help of the central pivoting wall. This gallery is designed for the great university art collection, as well as for external artists who want to exhibit their work here. The third exhibition space is the open air sculpture court at the rear of the building. Other than this, the art gallery also has two artist studios adjacent to the sculpture court which are designed for short term stay of visiting artists.
  • 8 Republic Square, Datca REPUBLIC SQUARE OF DATCA, TURKEY project name: Republic Square of Datça,Turkey function: Urban Public Space chief architect/office name: Can Kaya / Kiyida Mimarlik project team: Can Kaya client: Datça Municipality design date: January 2008 completion date: September 2008 area: 3000 m2 Project explanation: SPACE. The area previously used as a public square was fully occupied up with police and tourism information desks, a decorative fountain, electric poles and telephone cables. The first act has been getting rid of all this excess. The area which was stationed below the road level has been hightened to the same elevation and was covered with a uniform material {hammered white Mugla marble} and an ‘empty’ platform was created. BUILD UP. A branch from the coastal pedestrian path, previously detached from the square has been redirected towards the street. Marble seating blocks were designed on the square and the areas with these blocks have been forested. The stairs in the square facing the coastline have been covered with wood, creating a massive bench housing upto 200 people. This way the square has been turned into a public space for people to gather together and rest, or for children to ride their bikes and enjoy the sun any time in the day.MOTION. Water was used as an element that could attract people’s interest and pep up the daily atmosphere throughout the square. With the fountainless water jets, a direct relationship between water and the people was established.
  • 8 Republic Square, Datca REPUBLIC SQUARE OF DATCA, TURKEY project name: Republic Square of Datça,Turkey function: Urban Public Space chief architect/office name: Can Kaya / Kiyida Mimarlik project team: Can Kaya client: Datça Municipality design date: January 2008 completion date: September 2008 area: 3000 m2 Project explanation: SPACE. The area previously used as a public square was fully occupied up with police and tourism information desks, a decorative fountain, electric poles and telephone cables. The first act has been getting rid of all this excess. The area which was stationed below the road level has been hightened to the same elevation and was covered with a uniform material {hammered white Mugla marble} and an ‘empty’ platform was created. BUILD UP. A branch from the coastal pedestrian path, previously detached from the square has been redirected towards the street. Marble seating blocks were designed on the square and the areas with these blocks have been forested. The stairs in the square facing the coastline have been covered with wood, creating a massive bench housing upto 200 people. This way the square has been turned into a public space for people to gather together and rest, or for children to ride their bikes and enjoy the sun any time in the day.MOTION. Water was used as an element that could attract people’s interest and pep up the daily atmosphere throughout the square. With the fountainless water jets, a direct relationship between water and the people was established.
  • 8 Republic Square, Datca REPUBLIC SQUARE OF DATCA, TURKEY project name: Republic Square of Datça,Turkey function: Urban Public Space chief architect/office name: Can Kaya / Kiyida Mimarlik project team: Can Kaya client: Datça Municipality design date: January 2008 completion date: September 2008 area: 3000 m2 Project explanation: SPACE. The area previously used as a public square was fully occupied up with police and tourism information desks, a decorative fountain, electric poles and telephone cables. The first act has been getting rid of all this excess. The area which was stationed below the road level has been hightened to the same elevation and was covered with a uniform material {hammered white Mugla marble} and an ‘empty’ platform was created. BUILD UP. A branch from the coastal pedestrian path, previously detached from the square has been redirected towards the street. Marble seating blocks were designed on the square and the areas with these blocks have been forested. The stairs in the square facing the coastline have been covered with wood, creating a massive bench housing upto 200 people. This way the square has been turned into a public space for people to gather together and rest, or for children to ride their bikes and enjoy the sun any time in the day.MOTION. Water was used as an element that could attract people’s interest and pep up the daily atmosphere throughout the square. With the fountainless water jets, a direct relationship between water and the people was established.
  • 9 Renovation & Landscaping for Private House Architect: Pino Marchese & Sheril Castelino Construction: Giorgio Luciani Area: 125 sqm + facade makeover Cost: Rs.15 lacs Period: 2004/2006 As one approaches the house two large walls offset and split open in the centre to provide the 'gateway' that spills onto the expanse of a grand & minutely cured garden on the inside. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. The service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. Here again solar photovoltaics are used to meet the hot water demand of the whole house. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. Materials of Construction Details: * Mud plastered compound walls * R.C.C. frame structure and brick walls. * Aerocon comfort tiles on roof slab. * Polycarbonate skylights * Solar pump & energy demand partly met by photovoltaics Special features: * The house is in a egoless- timeless style with north south orientation and openings aligned for maximum south east wind. The language for the house goes beyond fads & doesn't struggle to be new or inventive for the sake of it. * In the rural set-up of Auroville where technologies and materials connected with modern architecture are hard to procure, the challenge and joy is in reinventing old techniques along with the knowledge of social and climatic conditions. * The architecture expressed by the dreams and aspirations of a nation or a community stand as an expression of its core values in matter and the multiplicity of styles and typologies found in Auroville reflect the cultural, ideological, ecological and climatic factors that have shaped it until over the four decades. The renovation and extension of this house in Auroville is in an ‘egoless- timeless’ style which goes beyond fads & doesn’t struggle to be ‘new’ or ‘inventive’ for the sake of it. The original house had been added onto in bits and pieces over the years and the challenge for the makeover was to maintain a delicate balance of the old with the new. Lily and fish Pond Sub tropical plant variety, TDEF species & exotic Landscaping, Auroville India The latest additions were to be the makeover of the entrance area, an entire service section to the house that included a laundry area with washing & drying facilities, stores & ample walk-in wardrobe area and the creation of a pond to liven up the landscaping. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. A solar pump operates the water bubbling out of the rock in the pond. The new service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes & the context of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. The two individual bathrooms have been treated in a distinct masculine and feminine style. Yellow, white and glass for the feminine feel whereas grey, black & ochre with white cedar wood for the male.
  • 9 Renovation & Landscaping for Private House Architect: Pino Marchese & Sheril Castelino Construction: Giorgio Luciani Area: 125 sqm + facade makeover Cost: Rs.15 lacs Period: 2004/2006 As one approaches the house two large walls offset and split open in the centre to provide the 'gateway' that spills onto the expanse of a grand & minutely cured garden on the inside. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. The service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. Here again solar photovoltaics are used to meet the hot water demand of the whole house. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. Materials of Construction Details: * Mud plastered compound walls * R.C.C. frame structure and brick walls. * Aerocon comfort tiles on roof slab. * Polycarbonate skylights * Solar pump & energy demand partly met by photovoltaics Special features: * The house is in a egoless- timeless style with north south orientation and openings aligned for maximum south east wind. The language for the house goes beyond fads & doesn't struggle to be new or inventive for the sake of it. * In the rural set-up of Auroville where technologies and materials connected with modern architecture are hard to procure, the challenge and joy is in reinventing old techniques along with the knowledge of social and climatic conditions. * The architecture expressed by the dreams and aspirations of a nation or a community stand as an expression of its core values in matter and the multiplicity of styles and typologies found in Auroville reflect the cultural, ideological, ecological and climatic factors that have shaped it until over the four decades. The renovation and extension of this house in Auroville is in an ‘egoless- timeless’ style which goes beyond fads & doesn’t struggle to be ‘new’ or ‘inventive’ for the sake of it. The original house had been added onto in bits and pieces over the years and the challenge for the makeover was to maintain a delicate balance of the old with the new. Lily and fish Pond Sub tropical plant variety, TDEF species & exotic Landscaping, Auroville India The latest additions were to be the makeover of the entrance area, an entire service section to the house that included a laundry area with washing & drying facilities, stores & ample walk-in wardrobe area and the creation of a pond to liven up the landscaping. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. A solar pump operates the water bubbling out of the rock in the pond. The new service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes & the context of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. The two individual bathrooms have been treated in a distinct masculine and feminine style. Yellow, white and glass for the feminine feel whereas grey, black & ochre with white cedar wood for the male.
  • 9 Renovation & Landscaping for Private House Architect: Pino Marchese & Sheril Castelino Construction: Giorgio Luciani Area: 125 sqm + facade makeover Cost: Rs.15 lacs Period: 2004/2006 As one approaches the house two large walls offset and split open in the centre to provide the 'gateway' that spills onto the expanse of a grand & minutely cured garden on the inside. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. The service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. Here again solar photovoltaics are used to meet the hot water demand of the whole house. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. Materials of Construction Details: * Mud plastered compound walls * R.C.C. frame structure and brick walls. * Aerocon comfort tiles on roof slab. * Polycarbonate skylights * Solar pump & energy demand partly met by photovoltaics Special features: * The house is in a egoless- timeless style with north south orientation and openings aligned for maximum south east wind. The language for the house goes beyond fads & doesn't struggle to be new or inventive for the sake of it. * In the rural set-up of Auroville where technologies and materials connected with modern architecture are hard to procure, the challenge and joy is in reinventing old techniques along with the knowledge of social and climatic conditions. * The architecture expressed by the dreams and aspirations of a nation or a community stand as an expression of its core values in matter and the multiplicity of styles and typologies found in Auroville reflect the cultural, ideological, ecological and climatic factors that have shaped it until over the four decades. The renovation and extension of this house in Auroville is in an ‘egoless- timeless’ style which goes beyond fads & doesn’t struggle to be ‘new’ or ‘inventive’ for the sake of it. The original house had been added onto in bits and pieces over the years and the challenge for the makeover was to maintain a delicate balance of the old with the new. Lily and fish Pond Sub tropical plant variety, TDEF species & exotic Landscaping, Auroville India The latest additions were to be the makeover of the entrance area, an entire service section to the house that included a laundry area with washing & drying facilities, stores & ample walk-in wardrobe area and the creation of a pond to liven up the landscaping. At the entrance there are podiums of dry landscaping with pebbles & boulders that direct to the main door. Upon entering the living cum dining space one experiences the T-shape of the house that opens out to a dry desert type landscaped swimming pool area on one side and lush tropical gardenscape with the pond on the other. A solar pump operates the water bubbling out of the rock in the pond. The new service area is accessed from the kitchen. Generously lit by big polycarbonate skylights, each of the spaces has beautiful diffused light thus explaining the small wall fenestrations in the form of slits in one area and grid of small square openings in the other. The house is painted in two tropical shades of orange that highlight the different volumes & the context of the house. Dry zen gardens fill in the voids creating the transition between the green landscape and the house. The two individual bathrooms have been treated in a distinct masculine and feminine style. Yellow, white and glass for the feminine feel whereas grey, black & ochre with white cedar wood for the male.
  • 10 Casitas Referencing work of the structuralists of the 60s, the project provides additions to delapitaded houses and a re-cultivates a dis-used plaza in Granada, southern Spain. Like a Peer-to-Peer framework - a network of `Casitas` {small houses} are centralised with public resources - a relatively low number of services {gardens, theatre, a greenhouse, food bank...} provide the core value to the functionality of the plaza. One can share content, space and experience. The ownership of such a `Casita` directly feeds back to the plaza as tool to be involved, and to share. A licence to be active. http://www.palacepalace.com/
  • 10 Casitas Referencing work of the structuralists of the 60s, the project provides additions to delapitaded houses and a re-cultivates a dis-used plaza in Granada, southern Spain. Like a Peer-to-Peer framework - a network of `Casitas` {small houses} are centralised with public resources - a relatively low number of services {gardens, theatre, a greenhouse, food bank...} provide the core value to the functionality of the plaza. One can share content, space and experience. The ownership of such a `Casita` directly feeds back to the plaza as tool to be involved, and to share. A licence to be active. http://www.palacepalace.com/
  • 10 Casitas Referencing work of the structuralists of the 60s, the project provides additions to delapitaded houses and a re-cultivates a dis-used plaza in Granada, southern Spain. Like a Peer-to-Peer framework - a network of `Casitas` {small houses} are centralised with public resources - a relatively low number of services {gardens, theatre, a greenhouse, food bank...} provide the core value to the functionality of the plaza. One can share content, space and experience. The ownership of such a `Casita` directly feeds back to the plaza as tool to be involved, and to share. A licence to be active. http://www.palacepalace.com/
  • 11 Urban Plant WINNING PROJECT: URBAN PLANT project name: URBAN PLANT function: URBAN PLANT is a model for a residential building that is fully sustainable. Not only does it operate on renewable cycles of energy and water, it also has a renewable food cycle through the use of hydroponic culture on site. chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Not Applicable, this is a conceptual project consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Not Applicable, design date: ongoing conceptual design that was started in January 2009; our intent is to continue developing this concept and adapt it to different situations such as retail and commercial environments, settlements in developing countries, infrastructures, etc. completion date: Not Applicable area: RELATED LINKS 1. Our web site: www.ddsao.com 2. URBAN PLANT wins 5th Place in Food For Thought competition http://www.24-7sandwichshop.org/?p=453 3. D+DS architecture Office is invited to participate in the Terrefarm Summer Lab 2009 http://www.terreform.org/farm.html PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1. URBAN PLANT is published in Design Mind, issue #10 “POWER”, in the “Motes” section http://designmind.frogdesign.com/magazine/power/undefined DESCRIPTION URBAN PLANT or how to integrate urban living, energy and vegetable production and loving it. URBAN PLANT is an architectural design proposal that deals with current global issues of energy, water, transport, food and integrates them in a new whole. It is a tower with hydroponic vegetable gardens and integrated renewable energy systems that reduces energy use and brings the urban dweller in close contact with nature and natural cycles. URBAN PLANT deals with our energy addiction by designing an integrated product of living, energy production and vegetable production and thereby freeing the urban dweller of future energy constrains. This close integration reduces the need for transport of energy and goods. Context The realignment of human needs in self sustaining cycles that are economically, culturally and politically viable is one of the biggest challenges facing the world. The intensive integration of nature and new technologies concentrated in one system to create a highly self sustaining human and plant habitat and thereby reducing and producing energy is the challenge that URBAN PLANT addresses. Population growth and technological developments are leading to an ever accelerating urbanization. Densely built cities are very effective in providing housing, transport, work and culture since they are shared by a large population. While providing numerous benefits, cities don’t provide food or energy for their population. Food production is mostly carbon based and needs to be transported into the city. It needs chemical fertilizers, pesticides, farm machinery, food processing, packaging and transportation. URBAN PLANT integrates clean renewable energy and food systems into new and existing buildings and reduces carbon emissions. URBAN PLANT provides a holistic approach to human needs and dwelling in an urban context. It integrates human needs of shelter, food, light & air, energy, community into a comprehensive self sustaining whole. Inherent in the design are perpetual food, energy and water cycles which are powered by the sun and wind. For example, through sunlight and photosynthesis plants grow, providing food. Green and human waste is composted. Methane gas from compost provides energy. All of this happens in proximity of one another reducing the need for transportation. Location The site is located on the East River in New York just north of the Manhattan Bridge. Currently there is a big box store and an asphalt parking lot. The 50 story tower houses 400 apartments. There are communal spaces at mid height and a winter garden on top of building. The podium houses retail and is covered with a landscape, orchard, chicken run, bio swale, sport facilities, performance pavilion and reconnects the building and city with the East River. ¬Form The form is modelled to optimize direct solar access by minimizing extreme north facing facade, to evenly distribute direct sunlight and to reduce shadows cast by the tower. The tower is orientated to receive maximum sun exposure on the east, south and west. Vegetables A glass enclosed private terrace is located at each apartment and houses the vegetable garden that uses hydroponic system to grow plants year round that produce abundant vegetables to provide a family of four with a healthy diet. The terrace also provides outdoor space, shades the building and thereby reduces the heat load on the building. Solar shading and operable windows provide the appropriate temperature for growing plants. On the façade a light shelf with solar panels provides solar energy and projects light deeper into the terrace. Energy Energy is generated by wind turbines at the edge of the building where the wind speeds are the highest due to the prevailing winds and the shape of the building. Solar panels at every floor of the building capture sun light and provide shading in the summer. ADDITIONAL PROJECT: REEBOK POP UP STORE project name: Reebok Pop Up Store function: Temporary store for promotion of Reebok “Flash” sneaker line chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Reebok collaboration partners: Sebastien Agneessens / Formavision design date: October 2009 completion date: November 2008 area: 13,000 sq ft PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1.Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Frame issue #67 (March/April 2009) http://www.framemag.com/ 2. Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Dezeen http://www.dezeen.com/2008/11/19/reebok-flash-store-by-formavision/ PRESS RELEASE Formavision in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o. has created a pop-up store for sportswear brand Reebok in New York, USA. Located in a 3,000 square-foot gallery space, the shop sells limited edition shoes and clothing designed in collaboration with visual artists Rolland Berry, John Maeda and the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, alongside Reebok shoes designed in the 1980’s. Experiential design and creative services agency Formavision, which conceived and developed the concept store in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o, took inspiration from Vorticsim, an English arts movement from the early 20th century noted for its dynamic interpretation of Cubist and Futurist principles. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns, a camouflaging technique reminiscent of the Royal Navy’s dazzle ship graphics from the First World War. “ Our intent is to provoke and perhaps confound visitors by making them feel as if they are stepping into a poster rather than a store. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns,” says Formavision. Credits: Creative direction & Design: Sebastien Agneessens // Design: DDSao: Jeroen De Schrijver & Ellen Depoorter // Graphic design: Jonas Hjertberg & Mai Kato // Painting: Shinya Nakamura // Production: Chris Hoover.
  • 11 Urban Plant WINNING PROJECT: URBAN PLANT project name: URBAN PLANT function: URBAN PLANT is a model for a residential building that is fully sustainable. Not only does it operate on renewable cycles of energy and water, it also has a renewable food cycle through the use of hydroponic culture on site. chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Not Applicable, this is a conceptual project consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Not Applicable, design date: ongoing conceptual design that was started in January 2009; our intent is to continue developing this concept and adapt it to different situations such as retail and commercial environments, settlements in developing countries, infrastructures, etc. completion date: Not Applicable area: RELATED LINKS 1. Our web site: www.ddsao.com 2. URBAN PLANT wins 5th Place in Food For Thought competition http://www.24-7sandwichshop.org/?p=453 3. D+DS architecture Office is invited to participate in the Terrefarm Summer Lab 2009 http://www.terreform.org/farm.html PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1. URBAN PLANT is published in Design Mind, issue #10 “POWER”, in the “Motes” section http://designmind.frogdesign.com/magazine/power/undefined DESCRIPTION URBAN PLANT or how to integrate urban living, energy and vegetable production and loving it. URBAN PLANT is an architectural design proposal that deals with current global issues of energy, water, transport, food and integrates them in a new whole. It is a tower with hydroponic vegetable gardens and integrated renewable energy systems that reduces energy use and brings the urban dweller in close contact with nature and natural cycles. URBAN PLANT deals with our energy addiction by designing an integrated product of living, energy production and vegetable production and thereby freeing the urban dweller of future energy constrains. This close integration reduces the need for transport of energy and goods. Context The realignment of human needs in self sustaining cycles that are economically, culturally and politically viable is one of the biggest challenges facing the world. The intensive integration of nature and new technologies concentrated in one system to create a highly self sustaining human and plant habitat and thereby reducing and producing energy is the challenge that URBAN PLANT addresses. Population growth and technological developments are leading to an ever accelerating urbanization. Densely built cities are very effective in providing housing, transport, work and culture since they are shared by a large population. While providing numerous benefits, cities don’t provide food or energy for their population. Food production is mostly carbon based and needs to be transported into the city. It needs chemical fertilizers, pesticides, farm machinery, food processing, packaging and transportation. URBAN PLANT integrates clean renewable energy and food systems into new and existing buildings and reduces carbon emissions. URBAN PLANT provides a holistic approach to human needs and dwelling in an urban context. It integrates human needs of shelter, food, light & air, energy, community into a comprehensive self sustaining whole. Inherent in the design are perpetual food, energy and water cycles which are powered by the sun and wind. For example, through sunlight and photosynthesis plants grow, providing food. Green and human waste is composted. Methane gas from compost provides energy. All of this happens in proximity of one another reducing the need for transportation. Location The site is located on the East River in New York just north of the Manhattan Bridge. Currently there is a big box store and an asphalt parking lot. The 50 story tower houses 400 apartments. There are communal spaces at mid height and a winter garden on top of building. The podium houses retail and is covered with a landscape, orchard, chicken run, bio swale, sport facilities, performance pavilion and reconnects the building and city with the East River. ¬Form The form is modelled to optimize direct solar access by minimizing extreme north facing facade, to evenly distribute direct sunlight and to reduce shadows cast by the tower. The tower is orientated to receive maximum sun exposure on the east, south and west. Vegetables A glass enclosed private terrace is located at each apartment and houses the vegetable garden that uses hydroponic system to grow plants year round that produce abundant vegetables to provide a family of four with a healthy diet. The terrace also provides outdoor space, shades the building and thereby reduces the heat load on the building. Solar shading and operable windows provide the appropriate temperature for growing plants. On the façade a light shelf with solar panels provides solar energy and projects light deeper into the terrace. Energy Energy is generated by wind turbines at the edge of the building where the wind speeds are the highest due to the prevailing winds and the shape of the building. Solar panels at every floor of the building capture sun light and provide shading in the summer. ADDITIONAL PROJECT: REEBOK POP UP STORE project name: Reebok Pop Up Store function: Temporary store for promotion of Reebok “Flash” sneaker line chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Reebok collaboration partners: Sebastien Agneessens / Formavision design date: October 2009 completion date: November 2008 area: 13,000 sq ft PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1.Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Frame issue #67 (March/April 2009) http://www.framemag.com/ 2. Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Dezeen http://www.dezeen.com/2008/11/19/reebok-flash-store-by-formavision/ PRESS RELEASE Formavision in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o. has created a pop-up store for sportswear brand Reebok in New York, USA. Located in a 3,000 square-foot gallery space, the shop sells limited edition shoes and clothing designed in collaboration with visual artists Rolland Berry, John Maeda and the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, alongside Reebok shoes designed in the 1980’s. Experiential design and creative services agency Formavision, which conceived and developed the concept store in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o, took inspiration from Vorticsim, an English arts movement from the early 20th century noted for its dynamic interpretation of Cubist and Futurist principles. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns, a camouflaging technique reminiscent of the Royal Navy’s dazzle ship graphics from the First World War. “ Our intent is to provoke and perhaps confound visitors by making them feel as if they are stepping into a poster rather than a store. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns,” says Formavision. Credits: Creative direction & Design: Sebastien Agneessens // Design: DDSao: Jeroen De Schrijver & Ellen Depoorter // Graphic design: Jonas Hjertberg & Mai Kato // Painting: Shinya Nakamura // Production: Chris Hoover.
  • 11 Urban Plant WINNING PROJECT: URBAN PLANT project name: URBAN PLANT function: URBAN PLANT is a model for a residential building that is fully sustainable. Not only does it operate on renewable cycles of energy and water, it also has a renewable food cycle through the use of hydroponic culture on site. chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Not Applicable, this is a conceptual project consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Not Applicable, design date: ongoing conceptual design that was started in January 2009; our intent is to continue developing this concept and adapt it to different situations such as retail and commercial environments, settlements in developing countries, infrastructures, etc. completion date: Not Applicable area: RELATED LINKS 1. Our web site: www.ddsao.com 2. URBAN PLANT wins 5th Place in Food For Thought competition http://www.24-7sandwichshop.org/?p=453 3. D+DS architecture Office is invited to participate in the Terrefarm Summer Lab 2009 http://www.terreform.org/farm.html PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1. URBAN PLANT is published in Design Mind, issue #10 “POWER”, in the “Motes” section http://designmind.frogdesign.com/magazine/power/undefined DESCRIPTION URBAN PLANT or how to integrate urban living, energy and vegetable production and loving it. URBAN PLANT is an architectural design proposal that deals with current global issues of energy, water, transport, food and integrates them in a new whole. It is a tower with hydroponic vegetable gardens and integrated renewable energy systems that reduces energy use and brings the urban dweller in close contact with nature and natural cycles. URBAN PLANT deals with our energy addiction by designing an integrated product of living, energy production and vegetable production and thereby freeing the urban dweller of future energy constrains. This close integration reduces the need for transport of energy and goods. Context The realignment of human needs in self sustaining cycles that are economically, culturally and politically viable is one of the biggest challenges facing the world. The intensive integration of nature and new technologies concentrated in one system to create a highly self sustaining human and plant habitat and thereby reducing and producing energy is the challenge that URBAN PLANT addresses. Population growth and technological developments are leading to an ever accelerating urbanization. Densely built cities are very effective in providing housing, transport, work and culture since they are shared by a large population. While providing numerous benefits, cities don’t provide food or energy for their population. Food production is mostly carbon based and needs to be transported into the city. It needs chemical fertilizers, pesticides, farm machinery, food processing, packaging and transportation. URBAN PLANT integrates clean renewable energy and food systems into new and existing buildings and reduces carbon emissions. URBAN PLANT provides a holistic approach to human needs and dwelling in an urban context. It integrates human needs of shelter, food, light & air, energy, community into a comprehensive self sustaining whole. Inherent in the design are perpetual food, energy and water cycles which are powered by the sun and wind. For example, through sunlight and photosynthesis plants grow, providing food. Green and human waste is composted. Methane gas from compost provides energy. All of this happens in proximity of one another reducing the need for transportation. Location The site is located on the East River in New York just north of the Manhattan Bridge. Currently there is a big box store and an asphalt parking lot. The 50 story tower houses 400 apartments. There are communal spaces at mid height and a winter garden on top of building. The podium houses retail and is covered with a landscape, orchard, chicken run, bio swale, sport facilities, performance pavilion and reconnects the building and city with the East River. ¬Form The form is modelled to optimize direct solar access by minimizing extreme north facing facade, to evenly distribute direct sunlight and to reduce shadows cast by the tower. The tower is orientated to receive maximum sun exposure on the east, south and west. Vegetables A glass enclosed private terrace is located at each apartment and houses the vegetable garden that uses hydroponic system to grow plants year round that produce abundant vegetables to provide a family of four with a healthy diet. The terrace also provides outdoor space, shades the building and thereby reduces the heat load on the building. Solar shading and operable windows provide the appropriate temperature for growing plants. On the façade a light shelf with solar panels provides solar energy and projects light deeper into the terrace. Energy Energy is generated by wind turbines at the edge of the building where the wind speeds are the highest due to the prevailing winds and the shape of the building. Solar panels at every floor of the building capture sun light and provide shading in the summer. ADDITIONAL PROJECT: REEBOK POP UP STORE project name: Reebok Pop Up Store function: Temporary store for promotion of Reebok “Flash” sneaker line chief architect/office name: Ellen Depoorter, LEED AP / D+DS architecture office project team: Ellen Depoorter, Architect, LEED AP Jeroen De Schrijver, Architect, LEED AP client: Reebok collaboration partners: Sebastien Agneessens / Formavision design date: October 2009 completion date: November 2008 area: 13,000 sq ft PREVIOUS PUBLICATIONS 1.Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Frame issue #67 (March/April 2009) http://www.framemag.com/ 2. Reebok Pop Up Store is published in Dezeen http://www.dezeen.com/2008/11/19/reebok-flash-store-by-formavision/ PRESS RELEASE Formavision in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o. has created a pop-up store for sportswear brand Reebok in New York, USA. Located in a 3,000 square-foot gallery space, the shop sells limited edition shoes and clothing designed in collaboration with visual artists Rolland Berry, John Maeda and the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, alongside Reebok shoes designed in the 1980’s. Experiential design and creative services agency Formavision, which conceived and developed the concept store in collaboration with D.D.S.a.o, took inspiration from Vorticsim, an English arts movement from the early 20th century noted for its dynamic interpretation of Cubist and Futurist principles. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns, a camouflaging technique reminiscent of the Royal Navy’s dazzle ship graphics from the First World War. “ Our intent is to provoke and perhaps confound visitors by making them feel as if they are stepping into a poster rather than a store. The design of the space plays with sense of depth and perspective, tricking the eye by extending three dimensional shapes into distorted graphic patterns,” says Formavision. Credits: Creative direction & Design: Sebastien Agneessens // Design: DDSao: Jeroen De Schrijver & Ellen Depoorter // Graphic design: Jonas Hjertberg & Mai Kato // Painting: Shinya Nakamura // Production: Chris Hoover.
  • 12 Ilpurla S ubstance M isuse R ehabilitation Centre Project Team: Brendan J Meney Architects in Association with Richard Layton & Associates Construction: Probuild ( NT) Pty Ltd Project Date: 2006-08 Area: 420 m2 internal floor ( 900 m2 under roof) Address: Ilpurla Community Located 220 kms South West of Alice Springs Photographer: Brendan Meney & others The Ilpurla Substance Misuse centre was established to provide rehabilitation through care and education to young aboriginals who are caught up in the vicious cycle of alcohol, drugs and petrol stiffing. The building provides a safe and comfortable environment for the control, supervision, education and general health improvement of all the clients within the greater Ilpurla outstation community through dormitory style accommodation with kitchen, dining, twin share rooms, education rooms, recreation rooms and offices for the cultural focused administration of the program. The centre at this remote aboriginal community was established over 15 years ago by Barry Abbott and his family with minimal resourcing to assist young aboriginal people to kick their debilitating and life destroying habits that had become entrenched in their everyday lives and was destroying the social fabrics of remote aboriginal communities across the region. They continue their dedication to reform through a number of successful programs that focus on removing the youth from the causes and instilling life skills and cultural self respect and self determination back into their lives. The design of the building supports this approach through the provision of a series of semi - private living spaces for the young men and women which they become responsible for during their stay, together with the interactive communal spaces for the provision of both formal and informal education and general every day living activities. The large roof canopy, natural ventilation system to the roof space and the thermal mass of the walls assist in stabilising the internal temperatures which are not reliant on mechanical air conditioning. The building is powered from a remote solar hybrid power station and has efficient systems which take into account the limitations on supply. The hot water is from solar glycol heat exchange and the sewer is via septic tank black water and reticulated grey water sub surface systems. The project was undertaken in association Richard Layton & Associates Project Management and constructed by the team from Probuild (NT) .
  • 12 Ilpurla S ubstance M isuse R ehabilitation Centre Project Team: Brendan J Meney Architects in Association with Richard Layton & Associates Construction: Probuild ( NT) Pty Ltd Project Date: 2006-08 Area: 420 m2 internal floor ( 900 m2 under roof) Address: Ilpurla Community Located 220 kms South West of Alice Springs Photographer: Brendan Meney & others The Ilpurla Substance Misuse centre was established to provide rehabilitation through care and education to young aboriginals who are caught up in the vicious cycle of alcohol, drugs and petrol stiffing. The building provides a safe and comfortable environment for the control, supervision, education and general health improvement of all the clients within the greater Ilpurla outstation community through dormitory style accommodation with kitchen, dining, twin share rooms, education rooms, recreation rooms and offices for the cultural focused administration of the program. The centre at this remote aboriginal community was established over 15 years ago by Barry Abbott and his family with minimal resourcing to assist young aboriginal people to kick their debilitating and life destroying habits that had become entrenched in their everyday lives and was destroying the social fabrics of remote aboriginal communities across the region. They continue their dedication to reform through a number of successful programs that focus on removing the youth from the causes and instilling life skills and cultural self respect and self determination back into their lives. The design of the building supports this approach through the provision of a series of semi - private living spaces for the young men and women which they become responsible for during their stay, together with the interactive communal spaces for the provision of both formal and informal education and general every day living activities. The large roof canopy, natural ventilation system to the roof space and the thermal mass of the walls assist in stabilising the internal temperatures which are not reliant on mechanical air conditioning. The building is powered from a remote solar hybrid power station and has efficient systems which take into account the limitations on supply. The hot water is from solar glycol heat exchange and the sewer is via septic tank black water and reticulated grey water sub surface systems. The project was undertaken in association Richard Layton & Associates Project Management and constructed by the team from Probuild (NT) .
  • 12 Ilpurla S ubstance M isuse R ehabilitation Centre Project Team: Brendan J Meney Architects in Association with Richard Layton & Associates Construction: Probuild ( NT) Pty Ltd Project Date: 2006-08 Area: 420 m2 internal floor ( 900 m2 under roof) Address: Ilpurla Community Located 220 kms South West of Alice Springs Photographer: Brendan Meney & others The Ilpurla Substance Misuse centre was established to provide rehabilitation through care and education to young aboriginals who are caught up in the vicious cycle of alcohol, drugs and petrol stiffing. The building provides a safe and comfortable environment for the control, supervision, education and general health improvement of all the clients within the greater Ilpurla outstation community through dormitory style accommodation with kitchen, dining, twin share rooms, education rooms, recreation rooms and offices for the cultural focused administration of the program. The centre at this remote aboriginal community was established over 15 years ago by Barry Abbott and his family with minimal resourcing to assist young aboriginal people to kick their debilitating and life destroying habits that had become entrenched in their everyday lives and was destroying the social fabrics of remote aboriginal communities across the region. They continue their dedication to reform through a number of successful programs that focus on removing the youth from the causes and instilling life skills and cultural self respect and self determination back into their lives. The design of the building supports this approach through the provision of a series of semi - private living spaces for the young men and women which they become responsible for during their stay, together with the interactive communal spaces for the provision of both formal and informal education and general every day living activities. The large roof canopy, natural ventilation system to the roof space and the thermal mass of the walls assist in stabilising the internal temperatures which are not reliant on mechanical air conditioning. The building is powered from a remote solar hybrid power station and has efficient systems which take into account the limitations on supply. The hot water is from solar glycol heat exchange and the sewer is via septic tank black water and reticulated grey water sub surface systems. The project was undertaken in association Richard Layton & Associates Project Management and constructed by the team from Probuild (NT) .
  • 14 Krung T ep P attana C ommunity Krungteppattana is a poor community in Bangkok. Krungteppattana have 74 household under the expressway in Bangkok. Participation design with 8 sub group. How’re live in the future<design>. We have 74 new house, new facility and new community center.
  • 14 Krung T ep P attana C ommunity Krungteppattana is a poor community in Bangkok. Krungteppattana have 74 household under the expressway in Bangkok. Participation design with 8 sub group. How’re live in the future<design>. We have 74 new house, new facility and new community center.
  • 14 Krung T ep P attana C ommunity Krungteppattana is a poor community in Bangkok. Krungteppattana have 74 household under the expressway in Bangkok. Participation design with 8 sub group. How’re live in the future<design>. We have 74 new house, new facility and new community center.
  • 14 Cruise Passenger Terminal Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal and Waterfront Information Text Architect Architecture Project (AP) Client VISET (Malta) plc Location Floriana, Malta Project Date 1999 – 2007 During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the fortified military town of Valletta, built ex novo during the immediate aftermath of the Great Siege of 1565, underwent a relentless change in identity becoming one of the foremost commercial centers in the Mediterranean. This transformation was not fortuitous. The Order of St. John of Jerusalem was quick to identify the potential of Valletta as a safe haven for vessels crossing the Mediterranean that could supply the necessary infrastructure for the stocking and maintenance of seafaring vessels, as well as provide efficient medical and quarantine structures for ships arriving from the east. To this end, land was appropriated between the outer enceinte of walls and the waterfront for the construction of stores and magazines. This led to a gradual but vital transformation of the town fabric and the creation of a new image of the town, characterized as it is to this day by the harmonious scaling down of built volumes towards the sea. The insertion of a new Valletta Cruise Passenger Terminal at the foot of these baroque stores develops out of, and contributes to, the genus loci of Valletta and has added yet another layer to the rich historic stratification of the Grand Harbour. It has had, in turn, important implications on the organization of commercial activities in the town, and has contributed to the creation of a new and contemporary image of the entrance to the harbour. The project itself consisted of the restoration of the Baroque stores and the ancient seawall (which had been lost with the gradual extension of the quay throughout the years), the creation of a marina for small seafaring craft that separates the public pedestrian area from the secure zone dedicated to the flows of cruise liner visitors, and the building of the terminal itself. The latter is a low lying building at the edge of the water below the public concourse, its roof forming part of the landscaping of the area and serving as a base to the existing historical buildings. In this way, the public and visitor pedestrian flows are physically and visually separated and the historical fabric on the site is never upstaged by the contemporary intervention. The rehabilitation of the Waterfront has upgraded the image of the seaward gateway to Valletta. The whole site has consequently become an important destination where the commercial and leisure activities housed in the new and historic buildings have succeeded in breathing new life in this once abandoned area of the town.
  • 14 Cruise Passenger Terminal Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal and Waterfront Information Text Architect Architecture Project (AP) Client VISET (Malta) plc Location Floriana, Malta Project Date 1999 – 2007 During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the fortified military town of Valletta, built ex novo during the immediate aftermath of the Great Siege of 1565, underwent a relentless change in identity becoming one of the foremost commercial centers in the Mediterranean. This transformation was not fortuitous. The Order of St. John of Jerusalem was quick to identify the potential of Valletta as a safe haven for vessels crossing the Mediterranean that could supply the necessary infrastructure for the stocking and maintenance of seafaring vessels, as well as provide efficient medical and quarantine structures for ships arriving from the east. To this end, land was appropriated between the outer enceinte of walls and the waterfront for the construction of stores and magazines. This led to a gradual but vital transformation of the town fabric and the creation of a new image of the town, characterized as it is to this day by the harmonious scaling down of built volumes towards the sea. The insertion of a new Valletta Cruise Passenger Terminal at the foot of these baroque stores develops out of, and contributes to, the genus loci of Valletta and has added yet another layer to the rich historic stratification of the Grand Harbour. It has had, in turn, important implications on the organization of commercial activities in the town, and has contributed to the creation of a new and contemporary image of the entrance to the harbour. The project itself consisted of the restoration of the Baroque stores and the ancient seawall (which had been lost with the gradual extension of the quay throughout the years), the creation of a marina for small seafaring craft that separates the public pedestrian area from the secure zone dedicated to the flows of cruise liner visitors, and the building of the terminal itself. The latter is a low lying building at the edge of the water below the public concourse, its roof forming part of the landscaping of the area and serving as a base to the existing historical buildings. In this way, the public and visitor pedestrian flows are physically and visually separated and the historical fabric on the site is never upstaged by the contemporary intervention. The rehabilitation of the Waterfront has upgraded the image of the seaward gateway to Valletta. The whole site has consequently become an important destination where the commercial and leisure activities housed in the new and historic buildings have succeeded in breathing new life in this once abandoned area of the town.
  • 14 Cruise Passenger Terminal Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal and Waterfront Information Text Architect Architecture Project (AP) Client VISET (Malta) plc Location Floriana, Malta Project Date 1999 – 2007 During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the fortified military town of Valletta, built ex novo during the immediate aftermath of the Great Siege of 1565, underwent a relentless change in identity becoming one of the foremost commercial centers in the Mediterranean. This transformation was not fortuitous. The Order of St. John of Jerusalem was quick to identify the potential of Valletta as a safe haven for vessels crossing the Mediterranean that could supply the necessary infrastructure for the stocking and maintenance of seafaring vessels, as well as provide efficient medical and quarantine structures for ships arriving from the east. To this end, land was appropriated between the outer enceinte of walls and the waterfront for the construction of stores and magazines. This led to a gradual but vital transformation of the town fabric and the creation of a new image of the town, characterized as it is to this day by the harmonious scaling down of built volumes towards the sea. The insertion of a new Valletta Cruise Passenger Terminal at the foot of these baroque stores develops out of, and contributes to, the genus loci of Valletta and has added yet another layer to the rich historic stratification of the Grand Harbour. It has had, in turn, important implications on the organization of commercial activities in the town, and has contributed to the creation of a new and contemporary image of the entrance to the harbour. The project itself consisted of the restoration of the Baroque stores and the ancient seawall (which had been lost with the gradual extension of the quay throughout the years), the creation of a marina for small seafaring craft that separates the public pedestrian area from the secure zone dedicated to the flows of cruise liner visitors, and the building of the terminal itself. The latter is a low lying building at the edge of the water below the public concourse, its roof forming part of the landscaping of the area and serving as a base to the existing historical buildings. In this way, the public and visitor pedestrian flows are physically and visually separated and the historical fabric on the site is never upstaged by the contemporary intervention. The rehabilitation of the Waterfront has upgraded the image of the seaward gateway to Valletta. The whole site has consequently become an important destination where the commercial and leisure activities housed in the new and historic buildings have succeeded in breathing new life in this once abandoned area of the town.
  • 15 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 Competitive idea of the project. Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004. Tsunami has carried away hundred thousand lives. We have lost our wives, children, fathers, friends, and all these are the irreplaceable losses. But the sorrow and great grief do not bring us to weakness and to dejection. The memory of the dead makes us clarified and inspired. We want to make this Memorial in such way as our far ancestors made similar places in the epoch of heathenism. They believed in that the dead live and are in good health absolutely near to alive – in the next world, opposite to ours. In the given case, the situation itself and topography of the area push us to the search idea of binary oppositions. The community, located not so far from the bank of the river, is interpreted by us as “village”, while the bank and the bottom of the offshore strip are treated as “anti - village”. This opposition denies at once the interpretation of the memorial as the place of sorrow, the feeling of tragedy and hopelessness. On the contrary, we want to show that the dead with their pleasure and anxiety live practically close to us – in their special world, in “ghostly houses”. The main idea of the project offer is to create the binary oppositions which can be perceived by visitors of the memorial on the level of subconscious archetypes: the power ness of untamed elements of ocean – the fragility and vulnerability of human civilization; Tangible – ephemeral; Ordinary – sacral; Alive – dead; gone with the sea, imaginary, living only in the memory; East {“the side where alive live”} – West {“the side where the dead have gone”}. For location of Memorial to victims of tsunami of 2004 is supposed to use the territory of the coast which is separated from the existing community Bygdoy by woods, is extended on an axis “north - south” and is organized as sand beach leaving the coast in water. This territory is separated from the woods by parapet which represents in the plan an arch, north and south ends of which descending to the shear of water, and the prominence directed from the sea to the dry land - the woods and located behind it community. To the middle of the arch the height ness of the parapet is increasing due to bulk earth basis. The parapet from the woods side represents pedestrian area paved by stone plates and the site for watching from height in 1-6 meters of sand beach – the main dislocation of objects symbolizing ruins and victims which have been brought by tsunami. At the review from the seaside, the parapet represents retaining wall faced with granite of black colour. The upper stone surface of parapet is slightly lop – sided in the direction of the woods and there are metal tablets with the texts of devotions in the memory of victims of tsunami in 6 -12 languages and with symbols of their confession to the key world religions. The main object which can be observed on the parapet is the sand beach. Every morning on a beach before the attendance of visitors of the survey platform the representatives of staff of the memorial leave the chains of traces of bare feet lasting in a direction from the shear of water to the parapet. But for these, “traces of human souls” in occasional places in daytime, there are some attributes of beach rest – deck – chair, chaise longue, towel and the like. But the sand of beach should be special. It should be different in colours and texture in this area. For example, it may be of blue – violet colour. Thus, texture and colour decision must promote the creation of sudden contrast with characteristic location of Memorial landscape for the region. “Ghostly houses” of symbolic coastal community gradually “rise, emerge, come out” from the seaside to the beach zone. Some of these frameworks of dwelling are located on such level of shelf that they can be seen only through the sheet of water even under the lower level of low – tide. Titanic coating is applied on the constructions of stylized frameworks of ruined dwellings made of stainless steel, which provides mirror shine even in grey weather, under low level of illuminating. The reflectivity of constructions will say of frailty of terrestrial existence, necessity of reference to the searches of God in own souls. There are paths made of local stone plates on the shelf and partially on the beach among “frameworks of houses”. The planning of paths partially repeats the planning of the streets, located behind the woods of community which is presumably visited before that as the visitor will appear on a survey platform. This will strengthen the feeling of emotional contrast among lives keeping memory of the compatriots gone with the sea elements, living here Norwegians, the ancestors of which composed legends of “underwater, other life” and will cast over elegiac recollections of victims of tsunami. There are hidden sound –conducting systems {acoustic speaker systems} at 6 -12 points of a beach, with the help of which “phonogram of the life” is constantly transmitted, typical for South – Eastern Asia of coastal community – scraps of conversation in many languages of local population and the tourists from across the world, monkey chattering, shouting of birds and children… But it is mixed in the way that the voices sound hush fully and calm down stop short as “faltering conversation of phantoms”, “wail of the dead souls”. In aggregate with continuous sound of the sea – surf it should strengthen emotional feelings of visitor. There are special sources of light on the underwater part of a beach, which are dispatching dispersed rays in nighttime through the sheet of water on the peak of parapet and the place of its descending to the sea. It promotes to the creation of feeling of continuity of the life even after that as the terrestrial way of the man interrupts owing to violence of elements. Creative team: Narynov S.Z., architect Troshchinskiy A., architect
  • 15 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 Competitive idea of the project. Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004. Tsunami has carried away hundred thousand lives. We have lost our wives, children, fathers, friends, and all these are the irreplaceable losses. But the sorrow and great grief do not bring us to weakness and to dejection. The memory of the dead makes us clarified and inspired. We want to make this Memorial in such way as our far ancestors made similar places in the epoch of heathenism. They believed in that the dead live and are in good health absolutely near to alive – in the next world, opposite to ours. In the given case, the situation itself and topography of the area push us to the search idea of binary oppositions. The community, located not so far from the bank of the river, is interpreted by us as “village”, while the bank and the bottom of the offshore strip are treated as “anti - village”. This opposition denies at once the interpretation of the memorial as the place of sorrow, the feeling of tragedy and hopelessness. On the contrary, we want to show that the dead with their pleasure and anxiety live practically close to us – in their special world, in “ghostly houses”. The main idea of the project offer is to create the binary oppositions which can be perceived by visitors of the memorial on the level of subconscious archetypes: the power ness of untamed elements of ocean – the fragility and vulnerability of human civilization; Tangible – ephemeral; Ordinary – sacral; Alive – dead; gone with the sea, imaginary, living only in the memory; East {“the side where alive live”} – West {“the side where the dead have gone”}. For location of Memorial to victims of tsunami of 2004 is supposed to use the territory of the coast which is separated from the existing community Bygdoy by woods, is extended on an axis “north - south” and is organized as sand beach leaving the coast in water. This territory is separated from the woods by parapet which represents in the plan an arch, north and south ends of which descending to the shear of water, and the prominence directed from the sea to the dry land - the woods and located behind it community. To the middle of the arch the height ness of the parapet is increasing due to bulk earth basis. The parapet from the woods side represents pedestrian area paved by stone plates and the site for watching from height in 1-6 meters of sand beach – the main dislocation of objects symbolizing ruins and victims which have been brought by tsunami. At the review from the seaside, the parapet represents retaining wall faced with granite of black colour. The upper stone surface of parapet is slightly lop – sided in the direction of the woods and there are metal tablets with the texts of devotions in the memory of victims of tsunami in 6 -12 languages and with symbols of their confession to the key world religions. The main object which can be observed on the parapet is the sand beach. Every morning on a beach before the attendance of visitors of the survey platform the representatives of staff of the memorial leave the chains of traces of bare feet lasting in a direction from the shear of water to the parapet. But for these, “traces of human souls” in occasional places in daytime, there are some attributes of beach rest – deck – chair, chaise longue, towel and the like. But the sand of beach should be special. It should be different in colours and texture in this area. For example, it may be of blue – violet colour. Thus, texture and colour decision must promote the creation of sudden contrast with characteristic location of Memorial landscape for the region. “Ghostly houses” of symbolic coastal community gradually “rise, emerge, come out” from the seaside to the beach zone. Some of these frameworks of dwelling are located on such level of shelf that they can be seen only through the sheet of water even under the lower level of low – tide. Titanic coating is applied on the constructions of stylized frameworks of ruined dwellings made of stainless steel, which provides mirror shine even in grey weather, under low level of illuminating. The reflectivity of constructions will say of frailty of terrestrial existence, necessity of reference to the searches of God in own souls. There are paths made of local stone plates on the shelf and partially on the beach among “frameworks of houses”. The planning of paths partially repeats the planning of the streets, located behind the woods of community which is presumably visited before that as the visitor will appear on a survey platform. This will strengthen the feeling of emotional contrast among lives keeping memory of the compatriots gone with the sea elements, living here Norwegians, the ancestors of which composed legends of “underwater, other life” and will cast over elegiac recollections of victims of tsunami. There are hidden sound –conducting systems {acoustic speaker systems} at 6 -12 points of a beach, with the help of which “phonogram of the life” is constantly transmitted, typical for South – Eastern Asia of coastal community – scraps of conversation in many languages of local population and the tourists from across the world, monkey chattering, shouting of birds and children… But it is mixed in the way that the voices sound hush fully and calm down stop short as “faltering conversation of phantoms”, “wail of the dead souls”. In aggregate with continuous sound of the sea – surf it should strengthen emotional feelings of visitor. There are special sources of light on the underwater part of a beach, which are dispatching dispersed rays in nighttime through the sheet of water on the peak of parapet and the place of its descending to the sea. It promotes to the creation of feeling of continuity of the life even after that as the terrestrial way of the man interrupts owing to violence of elements. Creative team: Narynov S.Z., architect Troshchinskiy A., architect
  • 15 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 Competitive idea of the project. Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004. Tsunami has carried away hundred thousand lives. We have lost our wives, children, fathers, friends, and all these are the irreplaceable losses. But the sorrow and great grief do not bring us to weakness and to dejection. The memory of the dead makes us clarified and inspired. We want to make this Memorial in such way as our far ancestors made similar places in the epoch of heathenism. They believed in that the dead live and are in good health absolutely near to alive – in the next world, opposite to ours. In the given case, the situation itself and topography of the area push us to the search idea of binary oppositions. The community, located not so far from the bank of the river, is interpreted by us as “village”, while the bank and the bottom of the offshore strip are treated as “anti - village”. This opposition denies at once the interpretation of the memorial as the place of sorrow, the feeling of tragedy and hopelessness. On the contrary, we want to show that the dead with their pleasure and anxiety live practically close to us – in their special world, in “ghostly houses”. The main idea of the project offer is to create the binary oppositions which can be perceived by visitors of the memorial on the level of subconscious archetypes: the power ness of untamed elements of ocean – the fragility and vulnerability of human civilization; Tangible – ephemeral; Ordinary – sacral; Alive – dead; gone with the sea, imaginary, living only in the memory; East {“the side where alive live”} – West {“the side where the dead have gone”}. For location of Memorial to victims of tsunami of 2004 is supposed to use the territory of the coast which is separated from the existing community Bygdoy by woods, is extended on an axis “north - south” and is organized as sand beach leaving the coast in water. This territory is separated from the woods by parapet which represents in the plan an arch, north and south ends of which descending to the shear of water, and the prominence directed from the sea to the dry land - the woods and located behind it community. To the middle of the arch the height ness of the parapet is increasing due to bulk earth basis. The parapet from the woods side represents pedestrian area paved by stone plates and the site for watching from height in 1-6 meters of sand beach – the main dislocation of objects symbolizing ruins and victims which have been brought by tsunami. At the review from the seaside, the parapet represents retaining wall faced with granite of black colour. The upper stone surface of parapet is slightly lop – sided in the direction of the woods and there are metal tablets with the texts of devotions in the memory of victims of tsunami in 6 -12 languages and with symbols of their confession to the key world religions. The main object which can be observed on the parapet is the sand beach. Every morning on a beach before the attendance of visitors of the survey platform the representatives of staff of the memorial leave the chains of traces of bare feet lasting in a direction from the shear of water to the parapet. But for these, “traces of human souls” in occasional places in daytime, there are some attributes of beach rest – deck – chair, chaise longue, towel and the like. But the sand of beach should be special. It should be different in colours and texture in this area. For example, it may be of blue – violet colour. Thus, texture and colour decision must promote the creation of sudden contrast with characteristic location of Memorial landscape for the region. “Ghostly houses” of symbolic coastal community gradually “rise, emerge, come out” from the seaside to the beach zone. Some of these frameworks of dwelling are located on such level of shelf that they can be seen only through the sheet of water even under the lower level of low – tide. Titanic coating is applied on the constructions of stylized frameworks of ruined dwellings made of stainless steel, which provides mirror shine even in grey weather, under low level of illuminating. The reflectivity of constructions will say of frailty of terrestrial existence, necessity of reference to the searches of God in own souls. There are paths made of local stone plates on the shelf and partially on the beach among “frameworks of houses”. The planning of paths partially repeats the planning of the streets, located behind the woods of community which is presumably visited before that as the visitor will appear on a survey platform. This will strengthen the feeling of emotional contrast among lives keeping memory of the compatriots gone with the sea elements, living here Norwegians, the ancestors of which composed legends of “underwater, other life” and will cast over elegiac recollections of victims of tsunami. There are hidden sound –conducting systems {acoustic speaker systems} at 6 -12 points of a beach, with the help of which “phonogram of the life” is constantly transmitted, typical for South – Eastern Asia of coastal community – scraps of conversation in many languages of local population and the tourists from across the world, monkey chattering, shouting of birds and children… But it is mixed in the way that the voices sound hush fully and calm down stop short as “faltering conversation of phantoms”, “wail of the dead souls”. In aggregate with continuous sound of the sea – surf it should strengthen emotional feelings of visitor. There are special sources of light on the underwater part of a beach, which are dispatching dispersed rays in nighttime through the sheet of water on the peak of parapet and the place of its descending to the sea. It promotes to the creation of feeling of continuity of the life even after that as the terrestrial way of the man interrupts owing to violence of elements. Creative team: Narynov S.Z., architect Troshchinskiy A., architect
  • 16 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 project name: Contour Museum function: Um el Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art chief architect/office name: Studio GEOTECTURA project team: Architect Dr. Joseph Cory, Architect Farah Farah, Flavio Adriani client: Um el-Phahem Gallery consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): YENON - Research and Design ASA-AHARONY Consulting Engineering Solar Systems Electric design date: 2009 completion date: Conceptual area: 12,000 sq.m. related links www.geotectura.com references (if published before): Exhibitions: 40 Architects under 40 in Israel, Jaffa, 2009 Architectural Planning Competition for the Um el-Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art - Final 6, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, 2008 Catalogs: Daniela Nitsan Kehat and Mahamood Agbaria (production). The Architects' Contest for the Design of The Umm el-Fahem Museum of Contemporary Art, Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery, 2008, pp. 37-48. short description: The Museum of Contemporary Art (won 2nd prize in the competition) that was supposed to erect in the Arab town Um el-Phahem in Israel has minimal footprint in the local and dramatic environment using floating structure frames are floating above the main street. In this way galleries are acting as spatial terraces being part of nature with constant awareness to nature and time. The museum is born from the earth and bridges between the cliff and the grove allowing synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west. The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach in the spirit of the local identity, giving contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations. The entrance floors behave as urban balconies gradual connecting between city and nature. Sustainable architecture is used in the entire design via minimal impact on the ground, creating clean energy, green roofs and using energy efficient systems inside the museum. The interior is letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with traditional Tizana elements and glass walls allowing maximum exposure to the view. Modern Mashrabia in the well of light connects the masses. The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism for local residents, tourists and professional from around the world transforming the city to become a key player in the world of art discussion. The museum has clear and simple appearance but yet striking from different angles. It can be built in phases while each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness. Design Principles Preservation and connectivity using innovative hovering Minimal footprint in the site: doubling open area by using a floating structure Lower parking place on metal grills allowing small vegetation growth and ongoing water flow The museums frames floating above the main street Galleries acting as spatial terraces Being part of nature The museum frames its surroundings: structural transparency and constant awareness to nature and time Unique structure in the dramatic topography Nature enhancement Public areas landscaping accessible 24 hours a day Green roofs: soil, local vegetation and rocks as an integral part of the design Minimal interference: low negative impact on the environment Preserving the local grove and allowing access by foot Walkways and bicycle paths around the museum in the green open spaces of the city Preserving the land and allowing storm water infiltration Open, shaded and roofed spaces using local vegetation and the building shape for winter and summer activities Using light and shadow as a dramatic and dynamic design tools for the interior and the exterior The museum is created from the rock and bridges between the cliff and the grove Unique viewpoint from the museum outside and from the city and nature inside Exterior, yet roofed sculpture garden protecting the sculptures and allowing full year activities Synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west The museum entrance has minimal yet apparent touch in the landscape The museum exterior walls allow projection of video performances enhancing the environment The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach as of the local identity, allowing contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations Notion of Belonging by preserving identity values of local materials and vegetations Connection to the modernism and contemporary art while developing a dialogue between local and modern through architecture representation Art in the center Art display in a variety of spaces (vertical and horizontal galleries) The museum contour performs inner observation of the art The museum, as the art it is holding within acts as a bridge between time and gaps protesting against injustice and giving hope for the future Being part of a city and country Letting the city and its residents into the museum, connecting the city despite of the height difference Connecting the city with nature and nature with the city, connecting children and grownups, Arab and Jews Different activity zones in and around the museum for 24 hours a day activities The museum with its open spaces as a meeting and cultural place for the local residents The entrance floors as urban balconies Creating iconic identity in its location Gradual connectivity between city and nature The museum can be viewed from the main road below and from the city above Direct access to the museum Maximizing the use of the existing stadium parking place Transportation Two roundabouts allowing easy and safe traffic flow Sufficient parking places for private and public vehicles Disconnecting the existing hazardous road and transforming it into green urban area Spatial experience while approaching the building Sustainable architecture Building green with minimal impact on the site, creating clean energy and using energy efficient systems Creating acoustic barrier between the local residents and the future road Letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with Tizana elements and glass walls Putting photovoltaic cells on top of the technical roof and in the upper parking place Maximum exposure to the view The museum performs as a sun watch and has green roofs with heat isolation effect The design was created with advanced software Solar tests during crucial days of the year Reuse of storm water for irrigation Local material usage The structure of the "bridge like" museum can be realized using metal or concrete Inner controlling systems for air, light and volume parameters Passive (positioning, isolation, shadow, natural ventilation) and active climatic strategy Accessibility to handicaps Tradition and modernism Local stone and expertise with modern construction Modern mashrabia in the well of light that connects the masses Cultural Israeli-Arab icon The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism Exposure to nature and city Tourists and professional magnetism from around the world Transforming the city into a strong element in the world of art discussion Simplicity Peaceful and honorable platform respecting the art it presenting and the location it is in Simple materials that last long and easy to maintain Easy and direct access to loading areas Design flexibility in optimal rectangular space Clear appearance but yet striking and exiting from different angles Regular and emergency circulation Phases Can be constructed in several phases Each frame is a phase Each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness Compact and economic design allowing the feasibility of future phases Optimal use of the programma area Maximal saving of public ground
  • 16 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 project name: Contour Museum function: Um el Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art chief architect/office name: Studio GEOTECTURA project team: Architect Dr. Joseph Cory, Architect Farah Farah, Flavio Adriani client: Um el-Phahem Gallery consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): YENON - Research and Design ASA-AHARONY Consulting Engineering Solar Systems Electric design date: 2009 completion date: Conceptual area: 12,000 sq.m. related links www.geotectura.com references (if published before): Exhibitions: 40 Architects under 40 in Israel, Jaffa, 2009 Architectural Planning Competition for the Um el-Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art - Final 6, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, 2008 Catalogs: Daniela Nitsan Kehat and Mahamood Agbaria (production). The Architects' Contest for the Design of The Umm el-Fahem Museum of Contemporary Art, Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery, 2008, pp. 37-48. short description: The Museum of Contemporary Art (won 2nd prize in the competition) that was supposed to erect in the Arab town Um el-Phahem in Israel has minimal footprint in the local and dramatic environment using floating structure frames are floating above the main street. In this way galleries are acting as spatial terraces being part of nature with constant awareness to nature and time. The museum is born from the earth and bridges between the cliff and the grove allowing synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west. The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach in the spirit of the local identity, giving contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations. The entrance floors behave as urban balconies gradual connecting between city and nature. Sustainable architecture is used in the entire design via minimal impact on the ground, creating clean energy, green roofs and using energy efficient systems inside the museum. The interior is letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with traditional Tizana elements and glass walls allowing maximum exposure to the view. Modern Mashrabia in the well of light connects the masses. The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism for local residents, tourists and professional from around the world transforming the city to become a key player in the world of art discussion. The museum has clear and simple appearance but yet striking from different angles. It can be built in phases while each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness. Design Principles Preservation and connectivity using innovative hovering Minimal footprint in the site: doubling open area by using a floating structure Lower parking place on metal grills allowing small vegetation growth and ongoing water flow The museums frames floating above the main street Galleries acting as spatial terraces Being part of nature The museum frames its surroundings: structural transparency and constant awareness to nature and time Unique structure in the dramatic topography Nature enhancement Public areas landscaping accessible 24 hours a day Green roofs: soil, local vegetation and rocks as an integral part of the design Minimal interference: low negative impact on the environment Preserving the local grove and allowing access by foot Walkways and bicycle paths around the museum in the green open spaces of the city Preserving the land and allowing storm water infiltration Open, shaded and roofed spaces using local vegetation and the building shape for winter and summer activities Using light and shadow as a dramatic and dynamic design tools for the interior and the exterior The museum is created from the rock and bridges between the cliff and the grove Unique viewpoint from the museum outside and from the city and nature inside Exterior, yet roofed sculpture garden protecting the sculptures and allowing full year activities Synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west The museum entrance has minimal yet apparent touch in the landscape The museum exterior walls allow projection of video performances enhancing the environment The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach as of the local identity, allowing contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations Notion of Belonging by preserving identity values of local materials and vegetations Connection to the modernism and contemporary art while developing a dialogue between local and modern through architecture representation Art in the center Art display in a variety of spaces (vertical and horizontal galleries) The museum contour performs inner observation of the art The museum, as the art it is holding within acts as a bridge between time and gaps protesting against injustice and giving hope for the future Being part of a city and country Letting the city and its residents into the museum, connecting the city despite of the height difference Connecting the city with nature and nature with the city, connecting children and grownups, Arab and Jews Different activity zones in and around the museum for 24 hours a day activities The museum with its open spaces as a meeting and cultural place for the local residents The entrance floors as urban balconies Creating iconic identity in its location Gradual connectivity between city and nature The museum can be viewed from the main road below and from the city above Direct access to the museum Maximizing the use of the existing stadium parking place Transportation Two roundabouts allowing easy and safe traffic flow Sufficient parking places for private and public vehicles Disconnecting the existing hazardous road and transforming it into green urban area Spatial experience while approaching the building Sustainable architecture Building green with minimal impact on the site, creating clean energy and using energy efficient systems Creating acoustic barrier between the local residents and the future road Letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with Tizana elements and glass walls Putting photovoltaic cells on top of the technical roof and in the upper parking place Maximum exposure to the view The museum performs as a sun watch and has green roofs with heat isolation effect The design was created with advanced software Solar tests during crucial days of the year Reuse of storm water for irrigation Local material usage The structure of the "bridge like" museum can be realized using metal or concrete Inner controlling systems for air, light and volume parameters Passive (positioning, isolation, shadow, natural ventilation) and active climatic strategy Accessibility to handicaps Tradition and modernism Local stone and expertise with modern construction Modern mashrabia in the well of light that connects the masses Cultural Israeli-Arab icon The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism Exposure to nature and city Tourists and professional magnetism from around the world Transforming the city into a strong element in the world of art discussion Simplicity Peaceful and honorable platform respecting the art it presenting and the location it is in Simple materials that last long and easy to maintain Easy and direct access to loading areas Design flexibility in optimal rectangular space Clear appearance but yet striking and exiting from different angles Regular and emergency circulation Phases Can be constructed in several phases Each frame is a phase Each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness Compact and economic design allowing the feasibility of future phases Optimal use of the programma area Maximal saving of public ground
  • 16 Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 project name: Contour Museum function: Um el Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art chief architect/office name: Studio GEOTECTURA project team: Architect Dr. Joseph Cory, Architect Farah Farah, Flavio Adriani client: Um el-Phahem Gallery consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): YENON - Research and Design ASA-AHARONY Consulting Engineering Solar Systems Electric design date: 2009 completion date: Conceptual area: 12,000 sq.m. related links www.geotectura.com references (if published before): Exhibitions: 40 Architects under 40 in Israel, Jaffa, 2009 Architectural Planning Competition for the Um el-Phahem Museum of Contemporary Art - Final 6, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, 2008 Catalogs: Daniela Nitsan Kehat and Mahamood Agbaria (production). The Architects' Contest for the Design of The Umm el-Fahem Museum of Contemporary Art, Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery, 2008, pp. 37-48. short description: The Museum of Contemporary Art (won 2nd prize in the competition) that was supposed to erect in the Arab town Um el-Phahem in Israel has minimal footprint in the local and dramatic environment using floating structure frames are floating above the main street. In this way galleries are acting as spatial terraces being part of nature with constant awareness to nature and time. The museum is born from the earth and bridges between the cliff and the grove allowing synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west. The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach in the spirit of the local identity, giving contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations. The entrance floors behave as urban balconies gradual connecting between city and nature. Sustainable architecture is used in the entire design via minimal impact on the ground, creating clean energy, green roofs and using energy efficient systems inside the museum. The interior is letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with traditional Tizana elements and glass walls allowing maximum exposure to the view. Modern Mashrabia in the well of light connects the masses. The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism for local residents, tourists and professional from around the world transforming the city to become a key player in the world of art discussion. The museum has clear and simple appearance but yet striking from different angles. It can be built in phases while each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness. Design Principles Preservation and connectivity using innovative hovering Minimal footprint in the site: doubling open area by using a floating structure Lower parking place on metal grills allowing small vegetation growth and ongoing water flow The museums frames floating above the main street Galleries acting as spatial terraces Being part of nature The museum frames its surroundings: structural transparency and constant awareness to nature and time Unique structure in the dramatic topography Nature enhancement Public areas landscaping accessible 24 hours a day Green roofs: soil, local vegetation and rocks as an integral part of the design Minimal interference: low negative impact on the environment Preserving the local grove and allowing access by foot Walkways and bicycle paths around the museum in the green open spaces of the city Preserving the land and allowing storm water infiltration Open, shaded and roofed spaces using local vegetation and the building shape for winter and summer activities Using light and shadow as a dramatic and dynamic design tools for the interior and the exterior The museum is created from the rock and bridges between the cliff and the grove Unique viewpoint from the museum outside and from the city and nature inside Exterior, yet roofed sculpture garden protecting the sculptures and allowing full year activities Synergetic dialog between urban and nature, tradition and modernity, old and new, east and west The museum entrance has minimal yet apparent touch in the landscape The museum exterior walls allow projection of video performances enhancing the environment The landscape architecture has a minimal design approach as of the local identity, allowing contemporary interpretation to local terms such as terraces, Mediterranean groves and plantations Notion of Belonging by preserving identity values of local materials and vegetations Connection to the modernism and contemporary art while developing a dialogue between local and modern through architecture representation Art in the center Art display in a variety of spaces (vertical and horizontal galleries) The museum contour performs inner observation of the art The museum, as the art it is holding within acts as a bridge between time and gaps protesting against injustice and giving hope for the future Being part of a city and country Letting the city and its residents into the museum, connecting the city despite of the height difference Connecting the city with nature and nature with the city, connecting children and grownups, Arab and Jews Different activity zones in and around the museum for 24 hours a day activities The museum with its open spaces as a meeting and cultural place for the local residents The entrance floors as urban balconies Creating iconic identity in its location Gradual connectivity between city and nature The museum can be viewed from the main road below and from the city above Direct access to the museum Maximizing the use of the existing stadium parking place Transportation Two roundabouts allowing easy and safe traffic flow Sufficient parking places for private and public vehicles Disconnecting the existing hazardous road and transforming it into green urban area Spatial experience while approaching the building Sustainable architecture Building green with minimal impact on the site, creating clean energy and using energy efficient systems Creating acoustic barrier between the local residents and the future road Letting optimal natural light in and saving on artificial light with Tizana elements and glass walls Putting photovoltaic cells on top of the technical roof and in the upper parking place Maximum exposure to the view The museum performs as a sun watch and has green roofs with heat isolation effect The design was created with advanced software Solar tests during crucial days of the year Reuse of storm water for irrigation Local material usage The structure of the "bridge like" museum can be realized using metal or concrete Inner controlling systems for air, light and volume parameters Passive (positioning, isolation, shadow, natural ventilation) and active climatic strategy Accessibility to handicaps Tradition and modernism Local stone and expertise with modern construction Modern mashrabia in the well of light that connects the masses Cultural Israeli-Arab icon The museum symbolizes progress, modesty and optimism Exposure to nature and city Tourists and professional magnetism from around the world Transforming the city into a strong element in the world of art discussion Simplicity Peaceful and honorable platform respecting the art it presenting and the location it is in Simple materials that last long and easy to maintain Easy and direct access to loading areas Design flexibility in optimal rectangular space Clear appearance but yet striking and exiting from different angles Regular and emergency circulation Phases Can be constructed in several phases Each frame is a phase Each phase has its own aesthetic identity and completeness Compact and economic design allowing the feasibility of future phases Optimal use of the programma area Maximal saving of public ground
  • 17 Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston Radiopharmaceutical Production unit for the production of Radioactive isotopes in a GMP environment for the use in diagnostics in cancer patients. Building comprised a medical cyclotron, clean rooms, laboratory, production areas, dministration and plant rooms. Entire building set under a green landscaped mound to minimise the impact to surrounding neighbours and school opposite the site
  • 17 Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston Radiopharmaceutical Production unit for the production of Radioactive isotopes in a GMP environment for the use in diagnostics in cancer patients. Building comprised a medical cyclotron, clean rooms, laboratory, production areas, dministration and plant rooms. Entire building set under a green landscaped mound to minimise the impact to surrounding neighbours and school opposite the site
  • 17 Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston Radiopharmaceutical Production unit for the production of Radioactive isotopes in a GMP environment for the use in diagnostics in cancer patients. Building comprised a medical cyclotron, clean rooms, laboratory, production areas, dministration and plant rooms. Entire building set under a green landscaped mound to minimise the impact to surrounding neighbours and school opposite the site
  • 18 Nebra Project name: Nebra Ark Visitor Center and Observation Tower Function: Visitor Center for Sky Disc of Nebra Chief Architect/ Office Name: Holzer Kobler Architekturen, Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler / Ankerstrasse 3, CH-8004 Zürich Project Team: Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler, Klaus Romberg, Nadine Jerchau, Annett Landsmann, Volker Mau Client: Kreisverwaltung des Burgenlandes (Sachsen-Anhalt), D-06681 Naumburg Collaboration Partners: Boy und Partner Ingenieurbüro für Bauwesen GmbH, Naumburg Planungsgruppe M+M AG, Naumburg Design Date: 2004 Completion Date: June 2007 Site area: 3,550 sqm (visitor center) I 15,000 sqm (tower) Built area: 570 sqm (visitor center) I 42 sqm (tower) Architectural Landmark for the Nebra Sky Disc Visible far over the Unstrut River, the Nebra Ark Visitor Center floats at the foot of the Mittelberg. The building references a motif on the sky disc of Nebra, the golden “solar bark,” and points to the 30-meter-high observation tower located at the discovery site of the sky disc. Both visitor center and observation tower on the Mittelberg are architectural landmarks for this exceptional archaeological discovery. They represent the fascination for astronomy and archaeology, the history of measuring time and the cultural roots of the region. With the Nebra Ark, the Unstrut valley has obtained a new attraction that radiates far beyond the borders of the region. Nebra Ark – the Visitor Center The emblematic architecture of the Nebra Ark embeds the history of the sky disc into its place of discovery. The building is directed toward the excavation site of the sky disc approximately one kilometer away. Varying with the sunlight illuminating the golden facade, the glazed front side of the visitor center offers a subtle play of light reflecting heaven and earth. The volume of the visitor center is divided into three horizontal bodies. The foundation appears as if thrust out of the landscape. Through an open joint at the transparent entrance area the visitors are able to enter the building at ground level. The luminescent golden solar bark, the core of the Nebra Ark, floats over the entrance area. The 60-meter-long building houses a permanent presentation about the site and the historical background of the sky disc. The main presentation room frames a view of the Mittelberg and is focused toward the discovery site. The space at the opposite end of the building offers a panoramic view of the Unstrut valley and provides space for special presentations. The two presentation areas are connected through an open floor plan. An atrium opens vertically to the upper floors. The planetarium is centrally located, housed on the upper floor, explaining the astronomical background of the oldest known celestial depiction. The observation tower at the sky disc discovery site An observation tower marks the place on the Mittelberg where the sky disc was discovered. Leaning slightly to one side, the 30-meter-high tower has been designed like the pointer of a giant sundial. During the summer solstice the sunset can be seen through a vertical slit in the tower on the visual axis to the Brocken. The orientation of the sky disc is aligned by the visual axis of the Mittelberg to the Brocken exactly on this day. A footpath connects the visitor center with the tower, which is situated 100 meters higher than the visitor center one kilometer away. Via a flight of stairs, visitors reach the 30-meter high viewing platform where references to the landscape are marked on the balustrade. The staircase follows the bright yellow interior of the tower, without crossing the vertical cut in the building. Project Data Competition: 2004 Ground breaking: October 3, 2005 Opening: June 21, 2007 Visitor Center Reinforced concrete construction Length: 60 m Height: 15 m Number of stories: 3 Volume: 10,000 m3 The entire building is heated and cooled with geothermal energy. The heating and ventilation system is based on the latest environmental technology. Foundation: poured in place concrete, plastered Ground floor: Buttressing core with stairs and elevator. Each reinforced concrete pillar carries approximately 1,000 tons. Upper floors: ceiling made of prefabricated concrete elements; facade made of anodized aluminum. Tower Reinforced concrete construction Height: 30 m Volume: 1,500 m3 10° tilt to the north Permanent Exhibition The concept of the presentation is based on two aspects that have been defined by the character of the visitor center. The first being the absence of the original discovery of the Nebra depot, the second, the immediate proximity to the place where the sky disc was used and then buried 3,600 years ago. The landscape around the Mittelberg forms the brackets for the design and content of the presentation: on one side the surrounding landscape is framed by the large windows of the main presentation area, on the other, the landscape has been modeled on the opposite wall of the room. Between the two landscape images is a "piece of heaven," a perspectival spatial composition that upon entering the room makes the motifs of the sky disc – Pleiades, full and crescent moon – visible. The central themes of the main presentation are the sky disc and its astronomical significance, the period of its manufacture and the story of its discovery. The presentation form accommodates both the visitors’ need for comprehensive information, yet the content is playfully communicated through digital and analogue media such as animated films, cartoons, hand-puppet theater and 3D animations. For the visitor the sky disc can be experienced from multiple perspectives. New views are opened and enable an individual view of the interpretation and history of this fascinating discovery
  • 18 Nebra Project name: Nebra Ark Visitor Center and Observation Tower Function: Visitor Center for Sky Disc of Nebra Chief Architect/ Office Name: Holzer Kobler Architekturen, Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler / Ankerstrasse 3, CH-8004 Zürich Project Team: Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler, Klaus Romberg, Nadine Jerchau, Annett Landsmann, Volker Mau Client: Kreisverwaltung des Burgenlandes (Sachsen-Anhalt), D-06681 Naumburg Collaboration Partners: Boy und Partner Ingenieurbüro für Bauwesen GmbH, Naumburg Planungsgruppe M+M AG, Naumburg Design Date: 2004 Completion Date: June 2007 Site area: 3,550 sqm (visitor center) I 15,000 sqm (tower) Built area: 570 sqm (visitor center) I 42 sqm (tower) Architectural Landmark for the Nebra Sky Disc Visible far over the Unstrut River, the Nebra Ark Visitor Center floats at the foot of the Mittelberg. The building references a motif on the sky disc of Nebra, the golden “solar bark,” and points to the 30-meter-high observation tower located at the discovery site of the sky disc. Both visitor center and observation tower on the Mittelberg are architectural landmarks for this exceptional archaeological discovery. They represent the fascination for astronomy and archaeology, the history of measuring time and the cultural roots of the region. With the Nebra Ark, the Unstrut valley has obtained a new attraction that radiates far beyond the borders of the region. Nebra Ark – the Visitor Center The emblematic architecture of the Nebra Ark embeds the history of the sky disc into its place of discovery. The building is directed toward the excavation site of the sky disc approximately one kilometer away. Varying with the sunlight illuminating the golden facade, the glazed front side of the visitor center offers a subtle play of light reflecting heaven and earth. The volume of the visitor center is divided into three horizontal bodies. The foundation appears as if thrust out of the landscape. Through an open joint at the transparent entrance area the visitors are able to enter the building at ground level. The luminescent golden solar bark, the core of the Nebra Ark, floats over the entrance area. The 60-meter-long building houses a permanent presentation about the site and the historical background of the sky disc. The main presentation room frames a view of the Mittelberg and is focused toward the discovery site. The space at the opposite end of the building offers a panoramic view of the Unstrut valley and provides space for special presentations. The two presentation areas are connected through an open floor plan. An atrium opens vertically to the upper floors. The planetarium is centrally located, housed on the upper floor, explaining the astronomical background of the oldest known celestial depiction. The observation tower at the sky disc discovery site An observation tower marks the place on the Mittelberg where the sky disc was discovered. Leaning slightly to one side, the 30-meter-high tower has been designed like the pointer of a giant sundial. During the summer solstice the sunset can be seen through a vertical slit in the tower on the visual axis to the Brocken. The orientation of the sky disc is aligned by the visual axis of the Mittelberg to the Brocken exactly on this day. A footpath connects the visitor center with the tower, which is situated 100 meters higher than the visitor center one kilometer away. Via a flight of stairs, visitors reach the 30-meter high viewing platform where references to the landscape are marked on the balustrade. The staircase follows the bright yellow interior of the tower, without crossing the vertical cut in the building. Project Data Competition: 2004 Ground breaking: October 3, 2005 Opening: June 21, 2007 Visitor Center Reinforced concrete construction Length: 60 m Height: 15 m Number of stories: 3 Volume: 10,000 m3 The entire building is heated and cooled with geothermal energy. The heating and ventilation system is based on the latest environmental technology. Foundation: poured in place concrete, plastered Ground floor: Buttressing core with stairs and elevator. Each reinforced concrete pillar carries approximately 1,000 tons. Upper floors: ceiling made of prefabricated concrete elements; facade made of anodized aluminum. Tower Reinforced concrete construction Height: 30 m Volume: 1,500 m3 10° tilt to the north Permanent Exhibition The concept of the presentation is based on two aspects that have been defined by the character of the visitor center. The first being the absence of the original discovery of the Nebra depot, the second, the immediate proximity to the place where the sky disc was used and then buried 3,600 years ago. The landscape around the Mittelberg forms the brackets for the design and content of the presentation: on one side the surrounding landscape is framed by the large windows of the main presentation area, on the other, the landscape has been modeled on the opposite wall of the room. Between the two landscape images is a "piece of heaven," a perspectival spatial composition that upon entering the room makes the motifs of the sky disc – Pleiades, full and crescent moon – visible. The central themes of the main presentation are the sky disc and its astronomical significance, the period of its manufacture and the story of its discovery. The presentation form accommodates both the visitors’ need for comprehensive information, yet the content is playfully communicated through digital and analogue media such as animated films, cartoons, hand-puppet theater and 3D animations. For the visitor the sky disc can be experienced from multiple perspectives. New views are opened and enable an individual view of the interpretation and history of this fascinating discovery
  • 18 Nebra Project name: Nebra Ark Visitor Center and Observation Tower Function: Visitor Center for Sky Disc of Nebra Chief Architect/ Office Name: Holzer Kobler Architekturen, Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler / Ankerstrasse 3, CH-8004 Zürich Project Team: Barbara Holzer, Tristan Kobler, Klaus Romberg, Nadine Jerchau, Annett Landsmann, Volker Mau Client: Kreisverwaltung des Burgenlandes (Sachsen-Anhalt), D-06681 Naumburg Collaboration Partners: Boy und Partner Ingenieurbüro für Bauwesen GmbH, Naumburg Planungsgruppe M+M AG, Naumburg Design Date: 2004 Completion Date: June 2007 Site area: 3,550 sqm (visitor center) I 15,000 sqm (tower) Built area: 570 sqm (visitor center) I 42 sqm (tower) Architectural Landmark for the Nebra Sky Disc Visible far over the Unstrut River, the Nebra Ark Visitor Center floats at the foot of the Mittelberg. The building references a motif on the sky disc of Nebra, the golden “solar bark,” and points to the 30-meter-high observation tower located at the discovery site of the sky disc. Both visitor center and observation tower on the Mittelberg are architectural landmarks for this exceptional archaeological discovery. They represent the fascination for astronomy and archaeology, the history of measuring time and the cultural roots of the region. With the Nebra Ark, the Unstrut valley has obtained a new attraction that radiates far beyond the borders of the region. Nebra Ark – the Visitor Center The emblematic architecture of the Nebra Ark embeds the history of the sky disc into its place of discovery. The building is directed toward the excavation site of the sky disc approximately one kilometer away. Varying with the sunlight illuminating the golden facade, the glazed front side of the visitor center offers a subtle play of light reflecting heaven and earth. The volume of the visitor center is divided into three horizontal bodies. The foundation appears as if thrust out of the landscape. Through an open joint at the transparent entrance area the visitors are able to enter the building at ground level. The luminescent golden solar bark, the core of the Nebra Ark, floats over the entrance area. The 60-meter-long building houses a permanent presentation about the site and the historical background of the sky disc. The main presentation room frames a view of the Mittelberg and is focused toward the discovery site. The space at the opposite end of the building offers a panoramic view of the Unstrut valley and provides space for special presentations. The two presentation areas are connected through an open floor plan. An atrium opens vertically to the upper floors. The planetarium is centrally located, housed on the upper floor, explaining the astronomical background of the oldest known celestial depiction. The observation tower at the sky disc discovery site An observation tower marks the place on the Mittelberg where the sky disc was discovered. Leaning slightly to one side, the 30-meter-high tower has been designed like the pointer of a giant sundial. During the summer solstice the sunset can be seen through a vertical slit in the tower on the visual axis to the Brocken. The orientation of the sky disc is aligned by the visual axis of the Mittelberg to the Brocken exactly on this day. A footpath connects the visitor center with the tower, which is situated 100 meters higher than the visitor center one kilometer away. Via a flight of stairs, visitors reach the 30-meter high viewing platform where references to the landscape are marked on the balustrade. The staircase follows the bright yellow interior of the tower, without crossing the vertical cut in the building. Project Data Competition: 2004 Ground breaking: October 3, 2005 Opening: June 21, 2007 Visitor Center Reinforced concrete construction Length: 60 m Height: 15 m Number of stories: 3 Volume: 10,000 m3 The entire building is heated and cooled with geothermal energy. The heating and ventilation system is based on the latest environmental technology. Foundation: poured in place concrete, plastered Ground floor: Buttressing core with stairs and elevator. Each reinforced concrete pillar carries approximately 1,000 tons. Upper floors: ceiling made of prefabricated concrete elements; facade made of anodized aluminum. Tower Reinforced concrete construction Height: 30 m Volume: 1,500 m3 10° tilt to the north Permanent Exhibition The concept of the presentation is based on two aspects that have been defined by the character of the visitor center. The first being the absence of the original discovery of the Nebra depot, the second, the immediate proximity to the place where the sky disc was used and then buried 3,600 years ago. The landscape around the Mittelberg forms the brackets for the design and content of the presentation: on one side the surrounding landscape is framed by the large windows of the main presentation area, on the other, the landscape has been modeled on the opposite wall of the room. Between the two landscape images is a "piece of heaven," a perspectival spatial composition that upon entering the room makes the motifs of the sky disc – Pleiades, full and crescent moon – visible. The central themes of the main presentation are the sky disc and its astronomical significance, the period of its manufacture and the story of its discovery. The presentation form accommodates both the visitors’ need for comprehensive information, yet the content is playfully communicated through digital and analogue media such as animated films, cartoons, hand-puppet theater and 3D animations. For the visitor the sky disc can be experienced from multiple perspectives. New views are opened and enable an individual view of the interpretation and history of this fascinating discovery
  • 19 Lim Geo Dang project name: LIM GEO DANG function: Individual residence chief architect/office name: HyoMan Kim, IROJE KHM Architects. design date: 1999 completion date: 2000 area: 199.22 ㎡ Traditional but Modern "Traditional but modern!" That the requirement of clients, in their thirties, who worked as authors and publishers. For a long time, successful translation of tradition of tradition expressed in a modern vocabulary has been a goal of design for Korean architects presently . That has been a very complex puzzle and a difficult problem to solve. However, it's essential to study the heritage of tradition, since tradition could be the motive of creation. Dramatic sequence of space & Picturesque frame The spatial design concept set for this small house was based on is dramatic circulation, which was characteristic of traditional architecture in Korea. The circulation of ancient Korea continues infinitely in space, overlaps and penetrates each other asymmetrically, and finally, produces several picturesque frames by surrounding nature and building. Eight places of "Madang"(traditional innercourt) At this time, the house has to be a shelter from the outer world. It is necessary to contact with nature which brings the urban house rich changes and variation during its life time(i.e., witnessing the blossoming and decaying of flowers). "Madang"(open court yard) was the very "nature" in ancient Korea. Spatial Korean traits Eight places of "madang" located in different levels were planned to produce attractive and interesting drama of spaces. All the major spaces of this house were designed to have a direct relationship to "madang". Entrance court, basement courts Ⅰ&Ⅱ, jungja(pavilion), service court, inner court, and upper court & were all the "madangs" at different levels that linked each other with both horizontal and vertical circulation. There are interesting changes, variety, through the circulation between the "madang". It is a very small site to have exterior spaces of desirable size by common layout of rooms at ground level. To have as wide an area of "madang" as possible, only a living room and a dining room are placed on he ground level; the others are either below ground or above ground. Moreover, the bed-zone-mass of the upper floor was built with a piloti structure; therefore, the space below can be used as "madang", too. This so called "RU" type program brings the house several merits of architectural condition. First of all, it gives the inner court a comfortable atmosphere because of the surrounding "madangs" which play important roles. Secondly, it creates another "madang", which was a part of the inner court, covered with a roof. Last, without any fence ( a solid fence cannot be built in this area according to the regional building code), it separates the house from public road, and, at the same time, it solves the problem of relationship between the "privacy" inside and the neighborhood outside. "Madang" is a buffer zone between the house and he public road. It is also the place to contact with the neighborhood. Visual Korean traits A heavy mass of woods flying over the roadside was expected to evoke the "flying" image from traditional architecture were used in this project. "T" shaped metal ties used to fasten wooden members to each other, over hanging doors, and steel rods which hang out the doors are the traditional elements; however, they can be modernized and recall past as the same time. Traditional culture is the origin of present ideas. The study of this project was only an experiment to read inheritance in modern language.
  • 19 Lim Geo Dang project name: LIM GEO DANG function: Individual residence chief architect/office name: HyoMan Kim, IROJE KHM Architects. design date: 1999 completion date: 2000 area: 199.22 ㎡ Traditional but Modern "Traditional but modern!" That the requirement of clients, in their thirties, who worked as authors and publishers. For a long time, successful translation of tradition of tradition expressed in a modern vocabulary has been a goal of design for Korean architects presently . That has been a very complex puzzle and a difficult problem to solve. However, it's essential to study the heritage of tradition, since tradition could be the motive of creation. Dramatic sequence of space & Picturesque frame The spatial design concept set for this small house was based on is dramatic circulation, which was characteristic of traditional architecture in Korea. The circulation of ancient Korea continues infinitely in space, overlaps and penetrates each other asymmetrically, and finally, produces several picturesque frames by surrounding nature and building. Eight places of "Madang"(traditional innercourt) At this time, the house has to be a shelter from the outer world. It is necessary to contact with nature which brings the urban house rich changes and variation during its life time(i.e., witnessing the blossoming and decaying of flowers). "Madang"(open court yard) was the very "nature" in ancient Korea. Spatial Korean traits Eight places of "madang" located in different levels were planned to produce attractive and interesting drama of spaces. All the major spaces of this house were designed to have a direct relationship to "madang". Entrance court, basement courts Ⅰ&Ⅱ, jungja(pavilion), service court, inner court, and upper court & were all the "madangs" at different levels that linked each other with both horizontal and vertical circulation. There are interesting changes, variety, through the circulation between the "madang". It is a very small site to have exterior spaces of desirable size by common layout of rooms at ground level. To have as wide an area of "madang" as possible, only a living room and a dining room are placed on he ground level; the others are either below ground or above ground. Moreover, the bed-zone-mass of the upper floor was built with a piloti structure; therefore, the space below can be used as "madang", too. This so called "RU" type program brings the house several merits of architectural condition. First of all, it gives the inner court a comfortable atmosphere because of the surrounding "madangs" which play important roles. Secondly, it creates another "madang", which was a part of the inner court, covered with a roof. Last, without any fence ( a solid fence cannot be built in this area according to the regional building code), it separates the house from public road, and, at the same time, it solves the problem of relationship between the "privacy" inside and the neighborhood outside. "Madang" is a buffer zone between the house and he public road. It is also the place to contact with the neighborhood. Visual Korean traits A heavy mass of woods flying over the roadside was expected to evoke the "flying" image from traditional architecture were used in this project. "T" shaped metal ties used to fasten wooden members to each other, over hanging doors, and steel rods which hang out the doors are the traditional elements; however, they can be modernized and recall past as the same time. Traditional culture is the origin of present ideas. The study of this project was only an experiment to read inheritance in modern language.
  • 19 Lim Geo Dang project name: LIM GEO DANG function: Individual residence chief architect/office name: HyoMan Kim, IROJE KHM Architects. design date: 1999 completion date: 2000 area: 199.22 ㎡ Traditional but Modern "Traditional but modern!" That the requirement of clients, in their thirties, who worked as authors and publishers. For a long time, successful translation of tradition of tradition expressed in a modern vocabulary has been a goal of design for Korean architects presently . That has been a very complex puzzle and a difficult problem to solve. However, it's essential to study the heritage of tradition, since tradition could be the motive of creation. Dramatic sequence of space & Picturesque frame The spatial design concept set for this small house was based on is dramatic circulation, which was characteristic of traditional architecture in Korea. The circulation of ancient Korea continues infinitely in space, overlaps and penetrates each other asymmetrically, and finally, produces several picturesque frames by surrounding nature and building. Eight places of "Madang"(traditional innercourt) At this time, the house has to be a shelter from the outer world. It is necessary to contact with nature which brings the urban house rich changes and variation during its life time(i.e., witnessing the blossoming and decaying of flowers). "Madang"(open court yard) was the very "nature" in ancient Korea. Spatial Korean traits Eight places of "madang" located in different levels were planned to produce attractive and interesting drama of spaces. All the major spaces of this house were designed to have a direct relationship to "madang". Entrance court, basement courts Ⅰ&Ⅱ, jungja(pavilion), service court, inner court, and upper court & were all the "madangs" at different levels that linked each other with both horizontal and vertical circulation. There are interesting changes, variety, through the circulation between the "madang". It is a very small site to have exterior spaces of desirable size by common layout of rooms at ground level. To have as wide an area of "madang" as possible, only a living room and a dining room are placed on he ground level; the others are either below ground or above ground. Moreover, the bed-zone-mass of the upper floor was built with a piloti structure; therefore, the space below can be used as "madang", too. This so called "RU" type program brings the house several merits of architectural condition. First of all, it gives the inner court a comfortable atmosphere because of the surrounding "madangs" which play important roles. Secondly, it creates another "madang", which was a part of the inner court, covered with a roof. Last, without any fence ( a solid fence cannot be built in this area according to the regional building code), it separates the house from public road, and, at the same time, it solves the problem of relationship between the "privacy" inside and the neighborhood outside. "Madang" is a buffer zone between the house and he public road. It is also the place to contact with the neighborhood. Visual Korean traits A heavy mass of woods flying over the roadside was expected to evoke the "flying" image from traditional architecture were used in this project. "T" shaped metal ties used to fasten wooden members to each other, over hanging doors, and steel rods which hang out the doors are the traditional elements; however, they can be modernized and recall past as the same time. Traditional culture is the origin of present ideas. The study of this project was only an experiment to read inheritance in modern language.
  • 20 Setre Chapel SETRE Chapel Project name: SETRE Chapel function: CHAPEL chief architect/office name: Ryuichi   Ashizawa/RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES project team: RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES Nakata engineering works (NAKATA BULDING) Structural design studio client: HOLONIC CORPORATION consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): MasayukiIgari design date: 2004.08 ~ 2005.04 completion date: 2005.05 ~ 2005.09 area: 296.69 ㎡ (optional) related links: http://www.r-a-architects.com/English/works/fin-setre.htm (optional) references (if published before): Wallpaper(United Kingdom) ‘06.march Shoten kenchiku(Japan) ‘06 July BRUTUS(Japan) no.600 ‘06 Japan times(Japan)      ‘ 06August INTERNI(Italy) ’07 June Nikkei architecture (Japan) 08 April Japanese architect in present * best architecture2007 (Japan)     ’ 08 July iA 10(Japan)                          ’ 08 July Beauty house(China)                       ’ 08 September The international magazine of space design ‘BOB 050’ (Austria)       ’ 08 September SHOP DESIGN SERIES SHOP FACADES & SIGNS (Japan)         ’ 09 February ARCHITECTRUE HIGH-LIGHT 2 (China)              ’ 09 April Text ::   Located on a dramatic site along Kobe’s Seto Inland Sea coast in Japan, this small chapel has a fantastic view of both Akashi Bridge and Awajishima. This chapel was designed as a main facility for regenerating old hotel on the sea. My main goal was to unite the beauty of these spectacular surroundings with the architecture and make them one and the same. The chapel rises slightly towards the sky from ground level so that it is more connected with sea and sky rather than just the ground plane. The raised volume is supported and connected with grade through translucent glass walls which contain all service rooms. The exterior concrete façade is a mottled paint finish, which gives the impression of clouds and further joins the structure with its surroundings. In order to focus the visitor’s view on the sea and sky vista, the western elevation is fully glazed. The interior floors, walls, and ceiling are all highly reflective white surfaces which catch the natural light. Moreover, the volume’s slope adds to the room’s reflectivity. The quality of light within the space is intimately linked with the exterior environment, and changes throughout the day before climaxing with the spectacular sunsets. This chapel has no religious icons to mark occasions but rather uses the natural phenomena of the site to imbue the space with a sense of the sacred and the wonder of nature. Changing natural expression appears as a strong phenomenon and generates special space for this site and the time. (251 words)
  • 20 Setre Chapel SETRE Chapel Project name: SETRE Chapel function: CHAPEL chief architect/office name: Ryuichi   Ashizawa/RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES project team: RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES Nakata engineering works (NAKATA BULDING) Structural design studio client: HOLONIC CORPORATION consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): MasayukiIgari design date: 2004.08 ~ 2005.04 completion date: 2005.05 ~ 2005.09 area: 296.69 ㎡ (optional) related links: http://www.r-a-architects.com/English/works/fin-setre.htm (optional) references (if published before): Wallpaper(United Kingdom) ‘06.march Shoten kenchiku(Japan) ‘06 July BRUTUS(Japan) no.600 ‘06 Japan times(Japan)      ‘ 06August INTERNI(Italy) ’07 June Nikkei architecture (Japan) 08 April Japanese architect in present * best architecture2007 (Japan)     ’ 08 July iA 10(Japan)                          ’ 08 July Beauty house(China)                       ’ 08 September The international magazine of space design ‘BOB 050’ (Austria)       ’ 08 September SHOP DESIGN SERIES SHOP FACADES & SIGNS (Japan)         ’ 09 February ARCHITECTRUE HIGH-LIGHT 2 (China)              ’ 09 April Text ::   Located on a dramatic site along Kobe’s Seto Inland Sea coast in Japan, this small chapel has a fantastic view of both Akashi Bridge and Awajishima. This chapel was designed as a main facility for regenerating old hotel on the sea. My main goal was to unite the beauty of these spectacular surroundings with the architecture and make them one and the same. The chapel rises slightly towards the sky from ground level so that it is more connected with sea and sky rather than just the ground plane. The raised volume is supported and connected with grade through translucent glass walls which contain all service rooms. The exterior concrete façade is a mottled paint finish, which gives the impression of clouds and further joins the structure with its surroundings. In order to focus the visitor’s view on the sea and sky vista, the western elevation is fully glazed. The interior floors, walls, and ceiling are all highly reflective white surfaces which catch the natural light. Moreover, the volume’s slope adds to the room’s reflectivity. The quality of light within the space is intimately linked with the exterior environment, and changes throughout the day before climaxing with the spectacular sunsets. This chapel has no religious icons to mark occasions but rather uses the natural phenomena of the site to imbue the space with a sense of the sacred and the wonder of nature. Changing natural expression appears as a strong phenomenon and generates special space for this site and the time. (251 words)
  • 20 Setre Chapel SETRE Chapel Project name: SETRE Chapel function: CHAPEL chief architect/office name: Ryuichi   Ashizawa/RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES project team: RYUICHI ASHIZAWA ARCHITECTS&ASSOCIATES Nakata engineering works (NAKATA BULDING) Structural design studio client: HOLONIC CORPORATION consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): MasayukiIgari design date: 2004.08 ~ 2005.04 completion date: 2005.05 ~ 2005.09 area: 296.69 ㎡ (optional) related links: http://www.r-a-architects.com/English/works/fin-setre.htm (optional) references (if published before): Wallpaper(United Kingdom) ‘06.march Shoten kenchiku(Japan) ‘06 July BRUTUS(Japan) no.600 ‘06 Japan times(Japan)      ‘ 06August INTERNI(Italy) ’07 June Nikkei architecture (Japan) 08 April Japanese architect in present * best architecture2007 (Japan)     ’ 08 July iA 10(Japan)                          ’ 08 July Beauty house(China)                       ’ 08 September The international magazine of space design ‘BOB 050’ (Austria)       ’ 08 September SHOP DESIGN SERIES SHOP FACADES & SIGNS (Japan)         ’ 09 February ARCHITECTRUE HIGH-LIGHT 2 (China)              ’ 09 April Text ::   Located on a dramatic site along Kobe’s Seto Inland Sea coast in Japan, this small chapel has a fantastic view of both Akashi Bridge and Awajishima. This chapel was designed as a main facility for regenerating old hotel on the sea. My main goal was to unite the beauty of these spectacular surroundings with the architecture and make them one and the same. The chapel rises slightly towards the sky from ground level so that it is more connected with sea and sky rather than just the ground plane. The raised volume is supported and connected with grade through translucent glass walls which contain all service rooms. The exterior concrete façade is a mottled paint finish, which gives the impression of clouds and further joins the structure with its surroundings. In order to focus the visitor’s view on the sea and sky vista, the western elevation is fully glazed. The interior floors, walls, and ceiling are all highly reflective white surfaces which catch the natural light. Moreover, the volume’s slope adds to the room’s reflectivity. The quality of light within the space is intimately linked with the exterior environment, and changes throughout the day before climaxing with the spectacular sunsets. This chapel has no religious icons to mark occasions but rather uses the natural phenomena of the site to imbue the space with a sense of the sacred and the wonder of nature. Changing natural expression appears as a strong phenomenon and generates special space for this site and the time. (251 words)
  • 21 House on Mt.Yataka House on Mt.Yataka This is a house for a stone-sculptor located on the top of Mt.Yataka (300m height above sea) distant from downtown. In this rich and sometimes severe environment, I wanted to make this house as a maximum-opened shelter, where can be open to nature and can also be protected according to the outside conditions.Two roof slabs, the original form of a shelter, covers sloping ground, and make four different level floors following site slope. These four spaces are connected into one-room space and integrated into its surroundings.Interior is planed to take in landscape and temperate outdoor climate with glass facade. On the other hand, deep eaves and corridor with spandrel wall protect the living space against sunshine.The house is made into un-homogeneous space. In Interior, by variations of height of wall and ceiling, the degree of opening-sense changes with different floor levels.Concrete is chosen as the optimal material that can oppose natural severity. In minimum expression by using concrete, I tried to bring out the transparency and the lightness of space with solid weighty material. project name:House on Mt.Yataka function:house chief architect/office name:Kazunori Fujimoto / Kazunori Fujimoto Architect & Associates client:private design date:2001.Apr 〜 2002.Aprcompletion date:2003.Jan. area:Okayama Pre. Japan (optional) related links http://www.jutok.jp/en/ http://www.jutok.jp/en/work/yataka.html
  • 21 House on Mt.Yataka House on Mt.Yataka This is a house for a stone-sculptor located on the top of Mt.Yataka (300m height above sea) distant from downtown. In this rich and sometimes severe environment, I wanted to make this house as a maximum-opened shelter, where can be open to nature and can also be protected according to the outside conditions.Two roof slabs, the original form of a shelter, covers sloping ground, and make four different level floors following site slope. These four spaces are connected into one-room space and integrated into its surroundings.Interior is planed to take in landscape and temperate outdoor climate with glass facade. On the other hand, deep eaves and corridor with spandrel wall protect the living space against sunshine.The house is made into un-homogeneous space. In Interior, by variations of height of wall and ceiling, the degree of opening-sense changes with different floor levels.Concrete is chosen as the optimal material that can oppose natural severity. In minimum expression by using concrete, I tried to bring out the transparency and the lightness of space with solid weighty material. project name:House on Mt.Yataka function:house chief architect/office name:Kazunori Fujimoto / Kazunori Fujimoto Architect & Associates client:private design date:2001.Apr 〜 2002.Aprcompletion date:2003.Jan. area:Okayama Pre. Japan (optional) related links http://www.jutok.jp/en/ http://www.jutok.jp/en/work/yataka.html
  • 21 House on Mt.Yataka House on Mt.Yataka This is a house for a stone-sculptor located on the top of Mt.Yataka (300m height above sea) distant from downtown. In this rich and sometimes severe environment, I wanted to make this house as a maximum-opened shelter, where can be open to nature and can also be protected according to the outside conditions.Two roof slabs, the original form of a shelter, covers sloping ground, and make four different level floors following site slope. These four spaces are connected into one-room space and integrated into its surroundings.Interior is planed to take in landscape and temperate outdoor climate with glass facade. On the other hand, deep eaves and corridor with spandrel wall protect the living space against sunshine.The house is made into un-homogeneous space. In Interior, by variations of height of wall and ceiling, the degree of opening-sense changes with different floor levels.Concrete is chosen as the optimal material that can oppose natural severity. In minimum expression by using concrete, I tried to bring out the transparency and the lightness of space with solid weighty material. project name:House on Mt.Yataka function:house chief architect/office name:Kazunori Fujimoto / Kazunori Fujimoto Architect & Associates client:private design date:2001.Apr 〜 2002.Aprcompletion date:2003.Jan. area:Okayama Pre. Japan (optional) related links http://www.jutok.jp/en/ http://www.jutok.jp/en/work/yataka.html
  • 22 Tulipan House Project Name: Tulipan House Warsaw, Poland Function: Work Place - Office Chief Architect/Office Name: Piotr Cegielko, E&L Architects sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Client: Tulipan House I sp. z o.o. Pl. Andersa 5, 61-894 Poznan Structural design: Arcade Polska sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Technical installation design: INTEC Projekt sp. z o.o. Ul. Smocza 27, 01-048 Warsaw, Poland Design Date: 2006 Completion Date: 2008 Lettable Area: 17 900m² Total Area: 34 300m² Related Links : http://www.el-architects.pl/ When amongst all functional solutions one picks the prettiest form – architecture becomes art. Travelling along the streets of downtown Mokotow -Warsaw’s new business district – passing by modern, tall facades, perforated by cascades of windows, all of a sudden we fall into a breach in them shining walls of contemporary architecture. It only takes to go there personally to fully appreciate what Tulipan House really is about... You are going to be struck by it’s low rise and apparent low volume. You will be intrigued to see the front facade being a full-height entrance to the building. It will attract you to enter the very peculiar internal atrium: a space that is both dignified and intimate. When you discover the quality of spacious, column-free plan of office floors you may realise that you have underestimated the significance of the building from the beginning. It is as adequate and proportional as tailor-made suit for the evening. Not enough surprises? Wait until you see it illuminated by night! Form follows function – this once progressive idea has now been bought up and degenerated by the means of commercial architecture. We live in the realm where the office building’s aesthetics are mostly driven by practical reasons. In a consequence of the ubiquitous urge to be competitive and economical, we are being surrounded by successive clones of financially efficient, architectural shells, with only one reason to exist: making enough margin of profit. There’s nothing wrong with the search for profit...unless mercantilism tries to rule the space in which we are living! We are a part of material world, but we must not replace our emotions with pure rationalism. We need to fulfil our ambitions as much as we have to provide for our life’s requirements – but we should not resign the esthetical evaluation of our living space. We are destined for the compromise. We have to applaud those rare cases of commercial buildings where utilitarian substance and transcendental form have met half way. Existence of Tulipan House proves that the economical budget, flexible design, efficient structure and rapid execution are not necessarily in contradiction with high quality architecture. Indeed, the deeper you dive into the Tulipan House’s innards, the more obvious become subtle qualities that the building has up its sleeve. There’s that spectacular atrium space, of course - with open galleries, connecting all four levels into one, big, communal space, spreading through transparent, glass barrier onto the representative courtyard - “cour d’honneur” - in front of the building. It is not the front facade, however, that is of the essence - it is the area to be rented to tenants: carefully chosen height and depth of future offices, allowing the natural lightning and optimising circulation around personal workspace. Modest form, logical dimensions and practised proportions – all sum up to the friendly, human scale of the whole edifice. When the building is practically a product put to sale, the architect must walk a very narrow path between the responsibility for commercial success and faithfulness to the basic commandments of his craftsmanship: building should not only be solid and practical, but also...beautiful! Is it possible to fully reconcile professional liability with lofty ideals? Is it possible for commercial building to stand out from the crowd not only by economical merits but also by the perceived beauty of the design? Tulipan House remains the pleasant surprise. There were those, who disbelieved that such a building would be a success in given time and place. The same people are now willing to recognise it as the exception that proves the rule!
  • 22 Tulipan House Project Name: Tulipan House Warsaw, Poland Function: Work Place - Office Chief Architect/Office Name: Piotr Cegielko, E&L Architects sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Client: Tulipan House I sp. z o.o. Pl. Andersa 5, 61-894 Poznan Structural design: Arcade Polska sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Technical installation design: INTEC Projekt sp. z o.o. Ul. Smocza 27, 01-048 Warsaw, Poland Design Date: 2006 Completion Date: 2008 Lettable Area: 17 900m² Total Area: 34 300m² Related Links : http://www.el-architects.pl/ When amongst all functional solutions one picks the prettiest form – architecture becomes art. Travelling along the streets of downtown Mokotow -Warsaw’s new business district – passing by modern, tall facades, perforated by cascades of windows, all of a sudden we fall into a breach in them shining walls of contemporary architecture. It only takes to go there personally to fully appreciate what Tulipan House really is about... You are going to be struck by it’s low rise and apparent low volume. You will be intrigued to see the front facade being a full-height entrance to the building. It will attract you to enter the very peculiar internal atrium: a space that is both dignified and intimate. When you discover the quality of spacious, column-free plan of office floors you may realise that you have underestimated the significance of the building from the beginning. It is as adequate and proportional as tailor-made suit for the evening. Not enough surprises? Wait until you see it illuminated by night! Form follows function – this once progressive idea has now been bought up and degenerated by the means of commercial architecture. We live in the realm where the office building’s aesthetics are mostly driven by practical reasons. In a consequence of the ubiquitous urge to be competitive and economical, we are being surrounded by successive clones of financially efficient, architectural shells, with only one reason to exist: making enough margin of profit. There’s nothing wrong with the search for profit...unless mercantilism tries to rule the space in which we are living! We are a part of material world, but we must not replace our emotions with pure rationalism. We need to fulfil our ambitions as much as we have to provide for our life’s requirements – but we should not resign the esthetical evaluation of our living space. We are destined for the compromise. We have to applaud those rare cases of commercial buildings where utilitarian substance and transcendental form have met half way. Existence of Tulipan House proves that the economical budget, flexible design, efficient structure and rapid execution are not necessarily in contradiction with high quality architecture. Indeed, the deeper you dive into the Tulipan House’s innards, the more obvious become subtle qualities that the building has up its sleeve. There’s that spectacular atrium space, of course - with open galleries, connecting all four levels into one, big, communal space, spreading through transparent, glass barrier onto the representative courtyard - “cour d’honneur” - in front of the building. It is not the front facade, however, that is of the essence - it is the area to be rented to tenants: carefully chosen height and depth of future offices, allowing the natural lightning and optimising circulation around personal workspace. Modest form, logical dimensions and practised proportions – all sum up to the friendly, human scale of the whole edifice. When the building is practically a product put to sale, the architect must walk a very narrow path between the responsibility for commercial success and faithfulness to the basic commandments of his craftsmanship: building should not only be solid and practical, but also...beautiful! Is it possible to fully reconcile professional liability with lofty ideals? Is it possible for commercial building to stand out from the crowd not only by economical merits but also by the perceived beauty of the design? Tulipan House remains the pleasant surprise. There were those, who disbelieved that such a building would be a success in given time and place. The same people are now willing to recognise it as the exception that proves the rule!
  • 22 Tulipan House Project Name: Tulipan House Warsaw, Poland Function: Work Place - Office Chief Architect/Office Name: Piotr Cegielko, E&L Architects sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Client: Tulipan House I sp. z o.o. Pl. Andersa 5, 61-894 Poznan Structural design: Arcade Polska sp. z o.o. ul.Szyszkowa 34, 02-285 Warsaw, Poland Technical installation design: INTEC Projekt sp. z o.o. Ul. Smocza 27, 01-048 Warsaw, Poland Design Date: 2006 Completion Date: 2008 Lettable Area: 17 900m² Total Area: 34 300m² Related Links : http://www.el-architects.pl/ When amongst all functional solutions one picks the prettiest form – architecture becomes art. Travelling along the streets of downtown Mokotow -Warsaw’s new business district – passing by modern, tall facades, perforated by cascades of windows, all of a sudden we fall into a breach in them shining walls of contemporary architecture. It only takes to go there personally to fully appreciate what Tulipan House really is about... You are going to be struck by it’s low rise and apparent low volume. You will be intrigued to see the front facade being a full-height entrance to the building. It will attract you to enter the very peculiar internal atrium: a space that is both dignified and intimate. When you discover the quality of spacious, column-free plan of office floors you may realise that you have underestimated the significance of the building from the beginning. It is as adequate and proportional as tailor-made suit for the evening. Not enough surprises? Wait until you see it illuminated by night! Form follows function – this once progressive idea has now been bought up and degenerated by the means of commercial architecture. We live in the realm where the office building’s aesthetics are mostly driven by practical reasons. In a consequence of the ubiquitous urge to be competitive and economical, we are being surrounded by successive clones of financially efficient, architectural shells, with only one reason to exist: making enough margin of profit. There’s nothing wrong with the search for profit...unless mercantilism tries to rule the space in which we are living! We are a part of material world, but we must not replace our emotions with pure rationalism. We need to fulfil our ambitions as much as we have to provide for our life’s requirements – but we should not resign the esthetical evaluation of our living space. We are destined for the compromise. We have to applaud those rare cases of commercial buildings where utilitarian substance and transcendental form have met half way. Existence of Tulipan House proves that the economical budget, flexible design, efficient structure and rapid execution are not necessarily in contradiction with high quality architecture. Indeed, the deeper you dive into the Tulipan House’s innards, the more obvious become subtle qualities that the building has up its sleeve. There’s that spectacular atrium space, of course - with open galleries, connecting all four levels into one, big, communal space, spreading through transparent, glass barrier onto the representative courtyard - “cour d’honneur” - in front of the building. It is not the front facade, however, that is of the essence - it is the area to be rented to tenants: carefully chosen height and depth of future offices, allowing the natural lightning and optimising circulation around personal workspace. Modest form, logical dimensions and practised proportions – all sum up to the friendly, human scale of the whole edifice. When the building is practically a product put to sale, the architect must walk a very narrow path between the responsibility for commercial success and faithfulness to the basic commandments of his craftsmanship: building should not only be solid and practical, but also...beautiful! Is it possible to fully reconcile professional liability with lofty ideals? Is it possible for commercial building to stand out from the crowd not only by economical merits but also by the perceived beauty of the design? Tulipan House remains the pleasant surprise. There were those, who disbelieved that such a building would be a success in given time and place. The same people are now willing to recognise it as the exception that proves the rule!
  • 23 Hoshikusa project name: HOSHIKUSA function: residence (g uesthouse ) chief architect/office name: Tetsuya Matsui + Tomoko Murata  / UZU design date: March, 2007 ~ March, 2008 completion date: March, 2008 ~ July, 2008 area: 180.38 ㎡ (optional) related links:   http://www.uzu-a.com (optional) references (if published before):   http://www.e-architect.org/architects/uzu.htm Photographer :  Akiyoshi   Fukuzawa   I want the following two conditions when the project is published. Photos of project after renovation (15 color cuts) are taken by Mr. Akiyoshi Fukuzawa. The condition of use is as follows. 1   To represent as credit of 「 photo a. fukuzawa 」 2   Please send 3 magazines for photographer, architect and client as dedication to the following address of our office. Address:   401 Albion, 1-6-21, Hattorihonmachi, Toyonaka-shi, 561-0852,JAPAN caption 1 .   approach 2 .   approach >> terrace 3 .   terrace >> approach 4 .   south outer wall surface 5 .   terrace >> entrance hall 6 .   entrance hall >> terrace 7 .   hall (1F) 8 .   corridor (2F) 9 . corridor >> entrance hall (2F)    10 .   entrance hall (2F) 11 .   guest room 1 12 .   guest room 3 13 .   guest room 4 14 .   south outer wall surface (evening) 15 .   terrace >> approach (evening) introduction of the project: It is located at the corner of the street, where a prostitute is said to live long years ago, in an old spring hot resort “Arima”. Forty five years have passed since this renovated common house was built after the Second World War. It features tiled roofs, mortar outside walls, bases of clay walls, plaster walls with cotton-wool fiber and glass   sliding   screens with wooden frame. Big and old maple trees in the neighbors are growing at the approach. At night stars shine over the trees. Our client provides it as a personal guest house for his many friends in other countries. We would like the guests to relax in the atmosphere with history and nature in this place to keep a structure of the former Japanese residence. We left wooden poles and removed ceiling boards to show the existing structure such as wall bases in the ceiling without drastic change of shape and painted dirty and cracked walls as if they put on light makeup, leaving the feeling of original materials. At last we softly installed nets made of linen with light and shadow generating there on the wooden poles and at the back of paper sliding screens. We adjust the old style to the new style, and appreciate the harmony. We wanted to express something like the trace of prostitute who turned into the breeze rustling maple leaves many years later.
  • 23 Hoshikusa project name: HOSHIKUSA function: residence (g uesthouse ) chief architect/office name: Tetsuya Matsui + Tomoko Murata  / UZU design date: March, 2007 ~ March, 2008 completion date: March, 2008 ~ July, 2008 area: 180.38 ㎡ (optional) related links:   http://www.uzu-a.com (optional) references (if published before):   http://www.e-architect.org/architects/uzu.htm Photographer :  Akiyoshi   Fukuzawa   I want the following two conditions when the project is published. Photos of project after renovation (15 color cuts) are taken by Mr. Akiyoshi Fukuzawa. The condition of use is as follows. 1   To represent as credit of 「 photo a. fukuzawa 」 2   Please send 3 magazines for photographer, architect and client as dedication to the following address of our office. Address:   401 Albion, 1-6-21, Hattorihonmachi, Toyonaka-shi, 561-0852,JAPAN caption 1 .   approach 2 .   approach >> terrace 3 .   terrace >> approach 4 .   south outer wall surface 5 .   terrace >> entrance hall 6 .   entrance hall >> terrace 7 .   hall (1F) 8 .   corridor (2F) 9 . corridor >> entrance hall (2F)    10 .   entrance hall (2F) 11 .   guest room 1 12 .   guest room 3 13 .   guest room 4 14 .   south outer wall surface (evening) 15 .   terrace >> approach (evening) introduction of the project: It is located at the corner of the street, where a prostitute is said to live long years ago, in an old spring hot resort “Arima”. Forty five years have passed since this renovated common house was built after the Second World War. It features tiled roofs, mortar outside walls, bases of clay walls, plaster walls with cotton-wool fiber and glass   sliding   screens with wooden frame. Big and old maple trees in the neighbors are growing at the approach. At night stars shine over the trees. Our client provides it as a personal guest house for his many friends in other countries. We would like the guests to relax in the atmosphere with history and nature in this place to keep a structure of the former Japanese residence. We left wooden poles and removed ceiling boards to show the existing structure such as wall bases in the ceiling without drastic change of shape and painted dirty and cracked walls as if they put on light makeup, leaving the feeling of original materials. At last we softly installed nets made of linen with light and shadow generating there on the wooden poles and at the back of paper sliding screens. We adjust the old style to the new style, and appreciate the harmony. We wanted to express something like the trace of prostitute who turned into the breeze rustling maple leaves many years later.
  • 23 Hoshikusa project name: HOSHIKUSA function: residence (g uesthouse ) chief architect/office name: Tetsuya Matsui + Tomoko Murata  / UZU design date: March, 2007 ~ March, 2008 completion date: March, 2008 ~ July, 2008 area: 180.38 ㎡ (optional) related links:   http://www.uzu-a.com (optional) references (if published before):   http://www.e-architect.org/architects/uzu.htm Photographer :  Akiyoshi   Fukuzawa   I want the following two conditions when the project is published. Photos of project after renovation (15 color cuts) are taken by Mr. Akiyoshi Fukuzawa. The condition of use is as follows. 1   To represent as credit of 「 photo a. fukuzawa 」 2   Please send 3 magazines for photographer, architect and client as dedication to the following address of our office. Address:   401 Albion, 1-6-21, Hattorihonmachi, Toyonaka-shi, 561-0852,JAPAN caption 1 .   approach 2 .   approach >> terrace 3 .   terrace >> approach 4 .   south outer wall surface 5 .   terrace >> entrance hall 6 .   entrance hall >> terrace 7 .   hall (1F) 8 .   corridor (2F) 9 . corridor >> entrance hall (2F)    10 .   entrance hall (2F) 11 .   guest room 1 12 .   guest room 3 13 .   guest room 4 14 .   south outer wall surface (evening) 15 .   terrace >> approach (evening) introduction of the project: It is located at the corner of the street, where a prostitute is said to live long years ago, in an old spring hot resort “Arima”. Forty five years have passed since this renovated common house was built after the Second World War. It features tiled roofs, mortar outside walls, bases of clay walls, plaster walls with cotton-wool fiber and glass   sliding   screens with wooden frame. Big and old maple trees in the neighbors are growing at the approach. At night stars shine over the trees. Our client provides it as a personal guest house for his many friends in other countries. We would like the guests to relax in the atmosphere with history and nature in this place to keep a structure of the former Japanese residence. We left wooden poles and removed ceiling boards to show the existing structure such as wall bases in the ceiling without drastic change of shape and painted dirty and cracked walls as if they put on light makeup, leaving the feeling of original materials. At last we softly installed nets made of linen with light and shadow generating there on the wooden poles and at the back of paper sliding screens. We adjust the old style to the new style, and appreciate the harmony. We wanted to express something like the trace of prostitute who turned into the breeze rustling maple leaves many years later.
  • 24 Centro Cultural CECIJEMA Description: Surrounded by an amazing context of tangible beauty and cultural richness, CECIJEMA’s new cultural facilities, (civil partnership and subsidiary body of the National Institute of Art and History, INAH, whose main objective is the promotion and dissemination of pre-hispanic and contemporary Mayan culture) located in the tourist area of the Mayan archaeological site in Coba, Quintana Roo, quietly seek to merge with the nature and become a part of it, not trying to be the protagonist but by being an extension of the landscape. Attempting to be clear and simple, the proposal is expressed by a contemporary language of warm materials. It is composed by two walls, a platform and a roof. The platform rises off the floor to preserve what pre-existed while giving presence to the building. It develops as a mat of wood boards that overflows to the outside becoming the stairs, encouraging visitors to come in and enjoy. Coated with local stone blocks, cut and placed in a craft way, it’s walls encase nature and captivate the user. Programmatic needs of this sales point and cultural spot are reduced to services and exhibition areas. Services (housing, registration, working area and delivery area) are contained in a wood block whose geometry relates the outside to the inside, allowing it to establish a connection with the lagoon and the young tree lying as a witness of time and guiding the visitors to complete the tour with the scale model contained in the round shaped cabinet. The roof cover combines steel structures, wood beams, and a thin concrete finish, giving the lightness pursuit in the solution it self.
  • 24 Centro Cultural CECIJEMA Description: Surrounded by an amazing context of tangible beauty and cultural richness, CECIJEMA’s new cultural facilities, (civil partnership and subsidiary body of the National Institute of Art and History, INAH, whose main objective is the promotion and dissemination of pre-hispanic and contemporary Mayan culture) located in the tourist area of the Mayan archaeological site in Coba, Quintana Roo, quietly seek to merge with the nature and become a part of it, not trying to be the protagonist but by being an extension of the landscape. Attempting to be clear and simple, the proposal is expressed by a contemporary language of warm materials. It is composed by two walls, a platform and a roof. The platform rises off the floor to preserve what pre-existed while giving presence to the building. It develops as a mat of wood boards that overflows to the outside becoming the stairs, encouraging visitors to come in and enjoy. Coated with local stone blocks, cut and placed in a craft way, it’s walls encase nature and captivate the user. Programmatic needs of this sales point and cultural spot are reduced to services and exhibition areas. Services (housing, registration, working area and delivery area) are contained in a wood block whose geometry relates the outside to the inside, allowing it to establish a connection with the lagoon and the young tree lying as a witness of time and guiding the visitors to complete the tour with the scale model contained in the round shaped cabinet. The roof cover combines steel structures, wood beams, and a thin concrete finish, giving the lightness pursuit in the solution it self.
  • 24 Centro Cultural CECIJEMA Description: Surrounded by an amazing context of tangible beauty and cultural richness, CECIJEMA’s new cultural facilities, (civil partnership and subsidiary body of the National Institute of Art and History, INAH, whose main objective is the promotion and dissemination of pre-hispanic and contemporary Mayan culture) located in the tourist area of the Mayan archaeological site in Coba, Quintana Roo, quietly seek to merge with the nature and become a part of it, not trying to be the protagonist but by being an extension of the landscape. Attempting to be clear and simple, the proposal is expressed by a contemporary language of warm materials. It is composed by two walls, a platform and a roof. The platform rises off the floor to preserve what pre-existed while giving presence to the building. It develops as a mat of wood boards that overflows to the outside becoming the stairs, encouraging visitors to come in and enjoy. Coated with local stone blocks, cut and placed in a craft way, it’s walls encase nature and captivate the user. Programmatic needs of this sales point and cultural spot are reduced to services and exhibition areas. Services (housing, registration, working area and delivery area) are contained in a wood block whose geometry relates the outside to the inside, allowing it to establish a connection with the lagoon and the young tree lying as a witness of time and guiding the visitors to complete the tour with the scale model contained in the round shaped cabinet. The roof cover combines steel structures, wood beams, and a thin concrete finish, giving the lightness pursuit in the solution it self.
  • 25 Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Credit and Data Projects: Tetaring' Kayumanis Restaurant, Nusa Dua Bali. Client: Sinarto Dharmawan, PT. Pharta Stana. Status: commissioned 2002. Construction: 2002-2004. Location: Kayumanis Privatte Villa & Spa, BTDC area, Nusa Dua Bali. Site: 780m2. Indoor Restaurant: 398,19 m2. Outdoor Restaurant: 73,81 m2. Kitchen Basement: 150 m2. Architects: budi pradono architects Architects Team: Budi Pradono, Samuel Edhi, Gunadi. Maket Model: Rahmat, Maket Model final: Rudi Manek. Advisor: Tan Tjiang Ay. Complex Master plan: J. Budiman Architects; J. budiman & Denny Gondodjatmiko. Mechanical Electrical: Budi Adisuwirjo & associates. Structure Engineer: Arief, PT.. Strukturindo Kharisma Djaja. Bamboo specialist: Mego wahono, PT.. Mega Sarana. Landscape: Karl Princic Design. Contractor: Paul Tendean: PT. Cipta Kreasi Bangun Pratama. M/E contractor: Alit Suening Merta, PT. Witala Jaya Abadi. Interior Designer: Hidayat Endramukti, Endramukti Design & Associates. Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Instead of applying a modern Bali courtyard system, the design idea of this restaurant is based on a temporary building called Taring or Tetaring, which is usually built for ceremonies in Bali. It’s mass arrangement is divided into three parts that present the open space among those buildings. The high clay buildings are an interpretation of the low-tech buildings of the era of Bali Aga. Their function as a barrier for more private spaces in some private villas. The walls are built from clay. A ramp leads us to the main reception space. We are brought to a definite, narrow and tall scale. The foyer on the second floor will offer options for dining spaces, either inside or outside the buildings. The universal glass technology space concept creates a transparent space, yet one which is redefined by the moveable chapped bamboo partitions, which themselves re arrange to become sliding partitions as sun penetration device. The space created is more ambiguous, biased and becoming more private / semi private as well as more public. Meanwhile the columns and walls are liberated from their relations. The presence of those flying spaces is absolutely brought by the clear definition of the flying ceiling. The unsupported columns and floor have their limits which are also not related directly to the glass walls and columns, floors and the chapped bamboo partitions, which at once are redefinition of a vernacular architecture around Bali that for centuries have been using bamboo as the main element for building their houses.
  • 25 Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Credit and Data Projects: Tetaring' Kayumanis Restaurant, Nusa Dua Bali. Client: Sinarto Dharmawan, PT. Pharta Stana. Status: commissioned 2002. Construction: 2002-2004. Location: Kayumanis Privatte Villa & Spa, BTDC area, Nusa Dua Bali. Site: 780m2. Indoor Restaurant: 398,19 m2. Outdoor Restaurant: 73,81 m2. Kitchen Basement: 150 m2. Architects: budi pradono architects Architects Team: Budi Pradono, Samuel Edhi, Gunadi. Maket Model: Rahmat, Maket Model final: Rudi Manek. Advisor: Tan Tjiang Ay. Complex Master plan: J. Budiman Architects; J. budiman & Denny Gondodjatmiko. Mechanical Electrical: Budi Adisuwirjo & associates. Structure Engineer: Arief, PT.. Strukturindo Kharisma Djaja. Bamboo specialist: Mego wahono, PT.. Mega Sarana. Landscape: Karl Princic Design. Contractor: Paul Tendean: PT. Cipta Kreasi Bangun Pratama. M/E contractor: Alit Suening Merta, PT. Witala Jaya Abadi. Interior Designer: Hidayat Endramukti, Endramukti Design & Associates. Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Instead of applying a modern Bali courtyard system, the design idea of this restaurant is based on a temporary building called Taring or Tetaring, which is usually built for ceremonies in Bali. It’s mass arrangement is divided into three parts that present the open space among those buildings. The high clay buildings are an interpretation of the low-tech buildings of the era of Bali Aga. Their function as a barrier for more private spaces in some private villas. The walls are built from clay. A ramp leads us to the main reception space. We are brought to a definite, narrow and tall scale. The foyer on the second floor will offer options for dining spaces, either inside or outside the buildings. The universal glass technology space concept creates a transparent space, yet one which is redefined by the moveable chapped bamboo partitions, which themselves re arrange to become sliding partitions as sun penetration device. The space created is more ambiguous, biased and becoming more private / semi private as well as more public. Meanwhile the columns and walls are liberated from their relations. The presence of those flying spaces is absolutely brought by the clear definition of the flying ceiling. The unsupported columns and floor have their limits which are also not related directly to the glass walls and columns, floors and the chapped bamboo partitions, which at once are redefinition of a vernacular architecture around Bali that for centuries have been using bamboo as the main element for building their houses.
  • 25 Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Credit and Data Projects: Tetaring' Kayumanis Restaurant, Nusa Dua Bali. Client: Sinarto Dharmawan, PT. Pharta Stana. Status: commissioned 2002. Construction: 2002-2004. Location: Kayumanis Privatte Villa & Spa, BTDC area, Nusa Dua Bali. Site: 780m2. Indoor Restaurant: 398,19 m2. Outdoor Restaurant: 73,81 m2. Kitchen Basement: 150 m2. Architects: budi pradono architects Architects Team: Budi Pradono, Samuel Edhi, Gunadi. Maket Model: Rahmat, Maket Model final: Rudi Manek. Advisor: Tan Tjiang Ay. Complex Master plan: J. Budiman Architects; J. budiman & Denny Gondodjatmiko. Mechanical Electrical: Budi Adisuwirjo & associates. Structure Engineer: Arief, PT.. Strukturindo Kharisma Djaja. Bamboo specialist: Mego wahono, PT.. Mega Sarana. Landscape: Karl Princic Design. Contractor: Paul Tendean: PT. Cipta Kreasi Bangun Pratama. M/E contractor: Alit Suening Merta, PT. Witala Jaya Abadi. Interior Designer: Hidayat Endramukti, Endramukti Design & Associates. Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant Instead of applying a modern Bali courtyard system, the design idea of this restaurant is based on a temporary building called Taring or Tetaring, which is usually built for ceremonies in Bali. It’s mass arrangement is divided into three parts that present the open space among those buildings. The high clay buildings are an interpretation of the low-tech buildings of the era of Bali Aga. Their function as a barrier for more private spaces in some private villas. The walls are built from clay. A ramp leads us to the main reception space. We are brought to a definite, narrow and tall scale. The foyer on the second floor will offer options for dining spaces, either inside or outside the buildings. The universal glass technology space concept creates a transparent space, yet one which is redefined by the moveable chapped bamboo partitions, which themselves re arrange to become sliding partitions as sun penetration device. The space created is more ambiguous, biased and becoming more private / semi private as well as more public. Meanwhile the columns and walls are liberated from their relations. The presence of those flying spaces is absolutely brought by the clear definition of the flying ceiling. The unsupported columns and floor have their limits which are also not related directly to the glass walls and columns, floors and the chapped bamboo partitions, which at once are redefinition of a vernacular architecture around Bali that for centuries have been using bamboo as the main element for building their houses.
  • 26 Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Public Elementary School: (Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz) Uruguay, 2007-2009, Educational Buildings / Schools Pedro Barran (1974) project name: ETC n 330 Gutierrez Ruiz, Maronas function: Public Elementary School (Escuela de Tiempo Completo) chief architect/office name: Proyecto de Apoyo a la Escuela Publica Uruguaya (Basic Education Quality Improvement Project) project team: Project Architect: Pedro Barran; Project Coordinator: Carlos Sitya; Architectural Draftsman: Rodrigo Mediza client: Administración Nacional de Educacion Publica (Public Education National Administration) consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Structural Engineer: Jorge Rodriguez Services Engineers: Julio Raszap, Lindolfo Señorale, Felipe Burgueño Quantity Surveyor: Maria Sposito design date: 2007 completion date: 2009 area: Site: 4795m2 (51,613 square feet) Roof: 1784 m2 (19,203 square feet) Pedagogic: 831 m2 (8,945 square feet) Architectonic Program for 360 children full time: 12 classrooms, administration, multipurpose area, dining common, kitchen, services, courtyards and soccer field. (optional) related links : http://www.mecaep.edu.uy http://ideasarquitectonicas.blogspot.com (optional) references (if published before): http://www.scribd.com/doc/3271778/INTERACCIONES-Arq-Pedro-Barran Description: This public school creates a continuous environment, which is variable in form and scale and seeks to engage the community. The site is small, so we had to design the school in three levels to allow for a large courtyard. The existing slope let us divide the courtyard in terraces, from an open soccer field to 3 different playgrounds; and it suggested us to work with split levels in the building, which are close to children´s scale. The school building is a coherent system formed by different sectors. There are four classroom clusters (of different sizes, heights and color-coded identities) with subtle formal distortions seeking the best views. These clusters are unified by a triple height atrium, which flows among the volumes and integrate the educational community. Classrooms volumes are transparent to that common space and most are elevated by columns to achieve a free ground floor. This lower floor has subtle differences in levels that suggest different shared facilities (access, atrium/multipurpose area and dining common), but maintain them flexible and allow them to expand or shrink.
  • 26 Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Public Elementary School: (Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz) Uruguay, 2007-2009, Educational Buildings / Schools Pedro Barran (1974) project name: ETC n 330 Gutierrez Ruiz, Maronas function: Public Elementary School (Escuela de Tiempo Completo) chief architect/office name: Proyecto de Apoyo a la Escuela Publica Uruguaya (Basic Education Quality Improvement Project) project team: Project Architect: Pedro Barran; Project Coordinator: Carlos Sitya; Architectural Draftsman: Rodrigo Mediza client: Administración Nacional de Educacion Publica (Public Education National Administration) consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Structural Engineer: Jorge Rodriguez Services Engineers: Julio Raszap, Lindolfo Señorale, Felipe Burgueño Quantity Surveyor: Maria Sposito design date: 2007 completion date: 2009 area: Site: 4795m2 (51,613 square feet) Roof: 1784 m2 (19,203 square feet) Pedagogic: 831 m2 (8,945 square feet) Architectonic Program for 360 children full time: 12 classrooms, administration, multipurpose area, dining common, kitchen, services, courtyards and soccer field. (optional) related links : http://www.mecaep.edu.uy http://ideasarquitectonicas.blogspot.com (optional) references (if published before): http://www.scribd.com/doc/3271778/INTERACCIONES-Arq-Pedro-Barran Description: This public school creates a continuous environment, which is variable in form and scale and seeks to engage the community. The site is small, so we had to design the school in three levels to allow for a large courtyard. The existing slope let us divide the courtyard in terraces, from an open soccer field to 3 different playgrounds; and it suggested us to work with split levels in the building, which are close to children´s scale. The school building is a coherent system formed by different sectors. There are four classroom clusters (of different sizes, heights and color-coded identities) with subtle formal distortions seeking the best views. These clusters are unified by a triple height atrium, which flows among the volumes and integrate the educational community. Classrooms volumes are transparent to that common space and most are elevated by columns to achieve a free ground floor. This lower floor has subtle differences in levels that suggest different shared facilities (access, atrium/multipurpose area and dining common), but maintain them flexible and allow them to expand or shrink.
  • 26 Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Public Elementary School: (Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz) Uruguay, 2007-2009, Educational Buildings / Schools Pedro Barran (1974) project name: ETC n 330 Gutierrez Ruiz, Maronas function: Public Elementary School (Escuela de Tiempo Completo) chief architect/office name: Proyecto de Apoyo a la Escuela Publica Uruguaya (Basic Education Quality Improvement Project) project team: Project Architect: Pedro Barran; Project Coordinator: Carlos Sitya; Architectural Draftsman: Rodrigo Mediza client: Administración Nacional de Educacion Publica (Public Education National Administration) consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): Structural Engineer: Jorge Rodriguez Services Engineers: Julio Raszap, Lindolfo Señorale, Felipe Burgueño Quantity Surveyor: Maria Sposito design date: 2007 completion date: 2009 area: Site: 4795m2 (51,613 square feet) Roof: 1784 m2 (19,203 square feet) Pedagogic: 831 m2 (8,945 square feet) Architectonic Program for 360 children full time: 12 classrooms, administration, multipurpose area, dining common, kitchen, services, courtyards and soccer field. (optional) related links : http://www.mecaep.edu.uy http://ideasarquitectonicas.blogspot.com (optional) references (if published before): http://www.scribd.com/doc/3271778/INTERACCIONES-Arq-Pedro-Barran Description: This public school creates a continuous environment, which is variable in form and scale and seeks to engage the community. The site is small, so we had to design the school in three levels to allow for a large courtyard. The existing slope let us divide the courtyard in terraces, from an open soccer field to 3 different playgrounds; and it suggested us to work with split levels in the building, which are close to children´s scale. The school building is a coherent system formed by different sectors. There are four classroom clusters (of different sizes, heights and color-coded identities) with subtle formal distortions seeking the best views. These clusters are unified by a triple height atrium, which flows among the volumes and integrate the educational community. Classrooms volumes are transparent to that common space and most are elevated by columns to achieve a free ground floor. This lower floor has subtle differences in levels that suggest different shared facilities (access, atrium/multipurpose area and dining common), but maintain them flexible and allow them to expand or shrink.
  • 27 Manavsadhna Activity Centre Recycling Domestic Waste as Building Components: An Environmental, Economic and Aesthetic Imperative Manav Sadhna Activity Centre – Ahmedabad Context: Nearly 27.4 million tonnes of waste is produced daily in the urban centers of India. Cities like Ahmedabad alone produce 2750 metric tonnes. Unfortunately nothing really gets processed of the same. This waste is simply dumped openly in the landfill sites, which uses enormous volumes of fossil fuel, creating an altered, polluted, unsafe and unhealthy landscape. Thankfully India has a well-established tradition of waste recycling which is clearly demonstrated in daily practices and lifestyle. By giving waste or surplus food to beggars and animals, the leftover food waste goes beyond its primary life cycle. Food along with many other objects, are given added value for their multiple uses and diverse applications. Can the building industry not learn from these applications? An activity centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj in Ahmedabad has been one small attempt in the direction of recycling municipal/domestic waste into building materials. The activity centre is located amidst the largest squatter settlement of Ahmedabad, and was created under the initiative of the social NGO, Manav Sadhna. The multi-purpose activity centre serves as an informal school for young children, provides evening education for adults and serves as a training centre and activity workshop for the manufacturing of craft based products by women and elderly. The campus also includes a dormitory, an administrative unit and an all-religion meditation unit. The campus is built using components prepared through recycling municipal/domestic waste. This process simultaneously addresses environmental concerns, economic issues and affordable housing; As municipal waste from the domestic sector is used for producing building components, it helps to reduce waste as pollution. Through value addition processes of recycling the waste, it provides a means of economic activity for the poor as well as a sense of empowerment. Finally as the recycled building components are cheaper and of higher quality than the conventional materials, they provide affordable and superior quality building alternatives for the urban poor. Concerns: Non-polluting environment, economic empowerment and affordable built forms are the three key dimensions of this initiative. The project is an outcome of over three years of empirical research at the Vastu Shilpa Foundation for Studies and Research in Environmental Design, with the goal of converting municipal waste from the domestic sector into building components. First hand experiments and onsite explorations have led to the development of innovative building components that use waste, simple hand- operated tools and local resources and know-how. The project also demonstrates that building can become an economic activity, empowering the poor. It shows potential of becoming a cottage industry for economic self-reliance and possibilities to improve the quality of their homes using the affordable alternative building components. Construction: The campus is built as a live demonstration for the application of recycled waste as affordable, aesthetically pleasing and efficient building components. The products developed for this project, which incorporate municipal/domestic waste and are prepared with simple hand operated tools, are demonstrated in the walls, roofs/slabs, doors and windows. There are six types of materials and techniques used in the making of the walls. These include: cement bonded flyash bricks, mould-compressed bricks made from landfill site waste residue, stabilized soil blocks, recycled glass bottles, recycled plastic bottles filled with ash and waste residue, and vegetable crate wood paneling in the inner partition walls. Similarly the floor and roof slabs as applied in the activity centre include: filler slab with glass bottles, plastic bottles and bricks, stone slab, cement bonded particle board with clay tile cover, as well as light conduit pipe truss with G.I. sheet with clay tile roof. The door paneling uses shredded packaging wrapper and coated paper waste as reinforcement substitute for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). Vegetable crate wood as a frame and oil tin container as blades make the ventilation louvers in the toilets. A paneled door using vegetable crate wood and oil tin containers for the frame and cladding respectively is also provided in the administrative block office toilet. Flyash and waste residue moulded tiles with inlaid ceramic industry waste as china mosaic (applied during tile moulding itself) is also applied in patches for their demonstration. All of these products are developed and produced first hand. The products thus produced have been lab tested for their engineered performance and they prove to be economical, environmentally friendly, participatory and aesthetically pleasing solutions and express alternatives to contemporary practices. – Yatin Pandya Manav Sadhna Activity Centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj, Ahmedabad. FACT FILE: Project Cost : Rs. 3.1 Million with Landscape and Interiors Site area : 1100 sq.mts Total Built -up Area : 515 Sq.mts. + 438 Sq.mts Plinth Area Conception / Completion : 2005 January / 2006 December Design Team Architectural Design: Yatin Pandya (Principal Architectand project incharge- Vastu Shilpa Foundation)) Architectural Assistance: (Vastu Shilpa Foundation) Nirmit Jhaveri, Ruchita, Kunal, Iti, Harshita, Kanika, Naagraj, Tejal Administration: Joseph Varughese Structural Design V.V Rangarao Structural Consortium Site Engineers Devang Safi, Nayan Patel Landscaping Mukund Padshala (Green Gold) Development patron and social engineering: ManavSadhna (Jayesh Patel, Anar Patel, Viren Joshi)
  • 27 Manavsadhna Activity Centre Recycling Domestic Waste as Building Components: An Environmental, Economic and Aesthetic Imperative Manav Sadhna Activity Centre – Ahmedabad Context: Nearly 27.4 million tonnes of waste is produced daily in the urban centers of India. Cities like Ahmedabad alone produce 2750 metric tonnes. Unfortunately nothing really gets processed of the same. This waste is simply dumped openly in the landfill sites, which uses enormous volumes of fossil fuel, creating an altered, polluted, unsafe and unhealthy landscape. Thankfully India has a well-established tradition of waste recycling which is clearly demonstrated in daily practices and lifestyle. By giving waste or surplus food to beggars and animals, the leftover food waste goes beyond its primary life cycle. Food along with many other objects, are given added value for their multiple uses and diverse applications. Can the building industry not learn from these applications? An activity centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj in Ahmedabad has been one small attempt in the direction of recycling municipal/domestic waste into building materials. The activity centre is located amidst the largest squatter settlement of Ahmedabad, and was created under the initiative of the social NGO, Manav Sadhna. The multi-purpose activity centre serves as an informal school for young children, provides evening education for adults and serves as a training centre and activity workshop for the manufacturing of craft based products by women and elderly. The campus also includes a dormitory, an administrative unit and an all-religion meditation unit. The campus is built using components prepared through recycling municipal/domestic waste. This process simultaneously addresses environmental concerns, economic issues and affordable housing; As municipal waste from the domestic sector is used for producing building components, it helps to reduce waste as pollution. Through value addition processes of recycling the waste, it provides a means of economic activity for the poor as well as a sense of empowerment. Finally as the recycled building components are cheaper and of higher quality than the conventional materials, they provide affordable and superior quality building alternatives for the urban poor. Concerns: Non-polluting environment, economic empowerment and affordable built forms are the three key dimensions of this initiative. The project is an outcome of over three years of empirical research at the Vastu Shilpa Foundation for Studies and Research in Environmental Design, with the goal of converting municipal waste from the domestic sector into building components. First hand experiments and onsite explorations have led to the development of innovative building components that use waste, simple hand- operated tools and local resources and know-how. The project also demonstrates that building can become an economic activity, empowering the poor. It shows potential of becoming a cottage industry for economic self-reliance and possibilities to improve the quality of their homes using the affordable alternative building components. Construction: The campus is built as a live demonstration for the application of recycled waste as affordable, aesthetically pleasing and efficient building components. The products developed for this project, which incorporate municipal/domestic waste and are prepared with simple hand operated tools, are demonstrated in the walls, roofs/slabs, doors and windows. There are six types of materials and techniques used in the making of the walls. These include: cement bonded flyash bricks, mould-compressed bricks made from landfill site waste residue, stabilized soil blocks, recycled glass bottles, recycled plastic bottles filled with ash and waste residue, and vegetable crate wood paneling in the inner partition walls. Similarly the floor and roof slabs as applied in the activity centre include: filler slab with glass bottles, plastic bottles and bricks, stone slab, cement bonded particle board with clay tile cover, as well as light conduit pipe truss with G.I. sheet with clay tile roof. The door paneling uses shredded packaging wrapper and coated paper waste as reinforcement substitute for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). Vegetable crate wood as a frame and oil tin container as blades make the ventilation louvers in the toilets. A paneled door using vegetable crate wood and oil tin containers for the frame and cladding respectively is also provided in the administrative block office toilet. Flyash and waste residue moulded tiles with inlaid ceramic industry waste as china mosaic (applied during tile moulding itself) is also applied in patches for their demonstration. All of these products are developed and produced first hand. The products thus produced have been lab tested for their engineered performance and they prove to be economical, environmentally friendly, participatory and aesthetically pleasing solutions and express alternatives to contemporary practices. – Yatin Pandya Manav Sadhna Activity Centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj, Ahmedabad. FACT FILE: Project Cost : Rs. 3.1 Million with Landscape and Interiors Site area : 1100 sq.mts Total Built -up Area : 515 Sq.mts. + 438 Sq.mts Plinth Area Conception / Completion : 2005 January / 2006 December Design Team Architectural Design: Yatin Pandya (Principal Architectand project incharge- Vastu Shilpa Foundation)) Architectural Assistance: (Vastu Shilpa Foundation) Nirmit Jhaveri, Ruchita, Kunal, Iti, Harshita, Kanika, Naagraj, Tejal Administration: Joseph Varughese Structural Design V.V Rangarao Structural Consortium Site Engineers Devang Safi, Nayan Patel Landscaping Mukund Padshala (Green Gold) Development patron and social engineering: ManavSadhna (Jayesh Patel, Anar Patel, Viren Joshi)
  • 27 Manavsadhna Activity Centre Recycling Domestic Waste as Building Components: An Environmental, Economic and Aesthetic Imperative Manav Sadhna Activity Centre – Ahmedabad Context: Nearly 27.4 million tonnes of waste is produced daily in the urban centers of India. Cities like Ahmedabad alone produce 2750 metric tonnes. Unfortunately nothing really gets processed of the same. This waste is simply dumped openly in the landfill sites, which uses enormous volumes of fossil fuel, creating an altered, polluted, unsafe and unhealthy landscape. Thankfully India has a well-established tradition of waste recycling which is clearly demonstrated in daily practices and lifestyle. By giving waste or surplus food to beggars and animals, the leftover food waste goes beyond its primary life cycle. Food along with many other objects, are given added value for their multiple uses and diverse applications. Can the building industry not learn from these applications? An activity centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj in Ahmedabad has been one small attempt in the direction of recycling municipal/domestic waste into building materials. The activity centre is located amidst the largest squatter settlement of Ahmedabad, and was created under the initiative of the social NGO, Manav Sadhna. The multi-purpose activity centre serves as an informal school for young children, provides evening education for adults and serves as a training centre and activity workshop for the manufacturing of craft based products by women and elderly. The campus also includes a dormitory, an administrative unit and an all-religion meditation unit. The campus is built using components prepared through recycling municipal/domestic waste. This process simultaneously addresses environmental concerns, economic issues and affordable housing; As municipal waste from the domestic sector is used for producing building components, it helps to reduce waste as pollution. Through value addition processes of recycling the waste, it provides a means of economic activity for the poor as well as a sense of empowerment. Finally as the recycled building components are cheaper and of higher quality than the conventional materials, they provide affordable and superior quality building alternatives for the urban poor. Concerns: Non-polluting environment, economic empowerment and affordable built forms are the three key dimensions of this initiative. The project is an outcome of over three years of empirical research at the Vastu Shilpa Foundation for Studies and Research in Environmental Design, with the goal of converting municipal waste from the domestic sector into building components. First hand experiments and onsite explorations have led to the development of innovative building components that use waste, simple hand- operated tools and local resources and know-how. The project also demonstrates that building can become an economic activity, empowering the poor. It shows potential of becoming a cottage industry for economic self-reliance and possibilities to improve the quality of their homes using the affordable alternative building components. Construction: The campus is built as a live demonstration for the application of recycled waste as affordable, aesthetically pleasing and efficient building components. The products developed for this project, which incorporate municipal/domestic waste and are prepared with simple hand operated tools, are demonstrated in the walls, roofs/slabs, doors and windows. There are six types of materials and techniques used in the making of the walls. These include: cement bonded flyash bricks, mould-compressed bricks made from landfill site waste residue, stabilized soil blocks, recycled glass bottles, recycled plastic bottles filled with ash and waste residue, and vegetable crate wood paneling in the inner partition walls. Similarly the floor and roof slabs as applied in the activity centre include: filler slab with glass bottles, plastic bottles and bricks, stone slab, cement bonded particle board with clay tile cover, as well as light conduit pipe truss with G.I. sheet with clay tile roof. The door paneling uses shredded packaging wrapper and coated paper waste as reinforcement substitute for fiber reinforced plastic (FRP). Vegetable crate wood as a frame and oil tin container as blades make the ventilation louvers in the toilets. A paneled door using vegetable crate wood and oil tin containers for the frame and cladding respectively is also provided in the administrative block office toilet. Flyash and waste residue moulded tiles with inlaid ceramic industry waste as china mosaic (applied during tile moulding itself) is also applied in patches for their demonstration. All of these products are developed and produced first hand. The products thus produced have been lab tested for their engineered performance and they prove to be economical, environmentally friendly, participatory and aesthetically pleasing solutions and express alternatives to contemporary practices. – Yatin Pandya Manav Sadhna Activity Centre at Rama Pir Tekra, Wadaj, Ahmedabad. FACT FILE: Project Cost : Rs. 3.1 Million with Landscape and Interiors Site area : 1100 sq.mts Total Built -up Area : 515 Sq.mts. + 438 Sq.mts Plinth Area Conception / Completion : 2005 January / 2006 December Design Team Architectural Design: Yatin Pandya (Principal Architectand project incharge- Vastu Shilpa Foundation)) Architectural Assistance: (Vastu Shilpa Foundation) Nirmit Jhaveri, Ruchita, Kunal, Iti, Harshita, Kanika, Naagraj, Tejal Administration: Joseph Varughese Structural Design V.V Rangarao Structural Consortium Site Engineers Devang Safi, Nayan Patel Landscaping Mukund Padshala (Green Gold) Development patron and social engineering: ManavSadhna (Jayesh Patel, Anar Patel, Viren Joshi)
  • 28 NUI Deli Corner Food Experience Architect Elliot Justin Giovacchini (Italy) & Sw Foulkes Architects (UK). Proposal for a new Sicilian Deli Corner food experience in Leeds (UK) Project name: New Sicilian deli Corner-Food Experience Function: commercial area with food Experience Chief architect: Elliot Justin Giovacchini & Stephen Foulkes Client: Private Italian Company (NUI) in Manchester Design date: end of 2008 area: Leeds (UK) CONCEPT The urban interior becomes space. The city, under the influence of light, creates moments of life,fluid and dynamic, and architectural elements individual buildings. The philosophy of the project and its concepts express the sense of living, the tradition in its most classic conception of the Italian Piazza, source of history and passion as Renzo Piano says in an interview with Charlie Rose in the U.S: (Renzo Piano) “ Transparency and light a small miracle that creates a public space, a small square inside a closed space” (Charlie Rose) “Is this your Italian soul?” (Renzo Piano) “The piazza is an icon , it is the city of my dreams: made of light and transparence, full of water, greenery and trees together with bridges and streets.Piazza is the place where people meet, disappear and move.. So the idea that you can make a little piazza and you can create that sense of participation between the street and the building is part of the story … this is not really what you should call style it is more a kind of desire to create a space more open where you can start an adventure..an adventure means …..to understand and listen the site …and every site has a story to tell…” From this the cue to tell a story about the piazza’s life and its flavour, odour and materials atmospher Characterizing the Sicilian Italian culture a food-experience, in a conceptual space not a mere reconstruction of a cross-false and unreal cutaway. Try to create the genius loci is not reconstruction but rather create a `feeling of knowing what only a small part you can make it live and experience. Here the use of panels and animated images of a cross section of a reality, distant in time and space, smell, taste and materials that create memories that bring to mind the historical civilization and its customs, and finally the use of panels white and neutral without lifeless, in contrast with real life represented by visitors-customers who come together as people of the same plastic-model of sicilian food experience.
  • 28 NUI Deli Corner Food Experience Architect Elliot Justin Giovacchini (Italy) & Sw Foulkes Architects (UK). Proposal for a new Sicilian Deli Corner food experience in Leeds (UK) Project name: New Sicilian deli Corner-Food Experience Function: commercial area with food Experience Chief architect: Elliot Justin Giovacchini & Stephen Foulkes Client: Private Italian Company (NUI) in Manchester Design date: end of 2008 area: Leeds (UK) CONCEPT The urban interior becomes space. The city, under the influence of light, creates moments of life,fluid and dynamic, and architectural elements individual buildings. The philosophy of the project and its concepts express the sense of living, the tradition in its most classic conception of the Italian Piazza, source of history and passion as Renzo Piano says in an interview with Charlie Rose in the U.S: (Renzo Piano) “ Transparency and light a small miracle that creates a public space, a small square inside a closed space” (Charlie Rose) “Is this your Italian soul?” (Renzo Piano) “The piazza is an icon , it is the city of my dreams: made of light and transparence, full of water, greenery and trees together with bridges and streets.Piazza is the place where people meet, disappear and move.. So the idea that you can make a little piazza and you can create that sense of participation between the street and the building is part of the story … this is not really what you should call style it is more a kind of desire to create a space more open where you can start an adventure..an adventure means …..to understand and listen the site …and every site has a story to tell…” From this the cue to tell a story about the piazza’s life and its flavour, odour and materials atmospher Characterizing the Sicilian Italian culture a food-experience, in a conceptual space not a mere reconstruction of a cross-false and unreal cutaway. Try to create the genius loci is not reconstruction but rather create a `feeling of knowing what only a small part you can make it live and experience. Here the use of panels and animated images of a cross section of a reality, distant in time and space, smell, taste and materials that create memories that bring to mind the historical civilization and its customs, and finally the use of panels white and neutral without lifeless, in contrast with real life represented by visitors-customers who come together as people of the same plastic-model of sicilian food experience.
  • 28 NUI Deli Corner Food Experience Architect Elliot Justin Giovacchini (Italy) & Sw Foulkes Architects (UK). Proposal for a new Sicilian Deli Corner food experience in Leeds (UK) Project name: New Sicilian deli Corner-Food Experience Function: commercial area with food Experience Chief architect: Elliot Justin Giovacchini & Stephen Foulkes Client: Private Italian Company (NUI) in Manchester Design date: end of 2008 area: Leeds (UK) CONCEPT The urban interior becomes space. The city, under the influence of light, creates moments of life,fluid and dynamic, and architectural elements individual buildings. The philosophy of the project and its concepts express the sense of living, the tradition in its most classic conception of the Italian Piazza, source of history and passion as Renzo Piano says in an interview with Charlie Rose in the U.S: (Renzo Piano) “ Transparency and light a small miracle that creates a public space, a small square inside a closed space” (Charlie Rose) “Is this your Italian soul?” (Renzo Piano) “The piazza is an icon , it is the city of my dreams: made of light and transparence, full of water, greenery and trees together with bridges and streets.Piazza is the place where people meet, disappear and move.. So the idea that you can make a little piazza and you can create that sense of participation between the street and the building is part of the story … this is not really what you should call style it is more a kind of desire to create a space more open where you can start an adventure..an adventure means …..to understand and listen the site …and every site has a story to tell…” From this the cue to tell a story about the piazza’s life and its flavour, odour and materials atmospher Characterizing the Sicilian Italian culture a food-experience, in a conceptual space not a mere reconstruction of a cross-false and unreal cutaway. Try to create the genius loci is not reconstruction but rather create a `feeling of knowing what only a small part you can make it live and experience. Here the use of panels and animated images of a cross section of a reality, distant in time and space, smell, taste and materials that create memories that bring to mind the historical civilization and its customs, and finally the use of panels white and neutral without lifeless, in contrast with real life represented by visitors-customers who come together as people of the same plastic-model of sicilian food experience.
  • 29 The Church of Saint Spirit Plan scheme Project name: Church of Saint Spirit Function: Religious Buildings Chief Architect: Dott. Architetto Carlo Fantacci Via Trentino Alto Adige, 9 Loc. Fosci – 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – +30 0577 933029 Client: Arcidiocesi di Siena Colle V.E. Montalcino Piazza Duomo 5 - SIENA Design data: 1998-99 Completino data: 2000-2001 Consecration: 2002 Project Team (Collaborators) : Structures Dott. Ing Giovanni Corti Poggibonsi Geology Dott. Geologo Stefano Nastasi Poggibonsi Electrical installation P.I. Mauro Venturini Poggibonsi Warming installation P.I. Daniele Fondati Poggibonsi Holy fittings and Sculpture Renato Corsi Siena Artistic glass Prof. Otello Chiti Siena Cooperator Don Emanuele Iozzi Poggibonsi Area: Via Alessandro Volta, 55 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – Report: The church of Saint Spirit, thought as a measured organism, becomes, in its turn, unit of measure and governing unit of the same block. The entrance is placed in the corner of the building, and emphasizes the passage from the material world to the spiritual world. Such passage is moreover evidenced in the changing of the shape: the shape, externally square, is transformed in octagon, becoming then circle, as the form of the Divine perfection, in the centre of the building. The Church besides the centrality, proposes to its inside, the idea of the distance, therefore one of the generating topics of the plan is constituted by the guideline of the building from west to est, obtained through the real and symbolic passage of the square in an octagon, direction that cuts and guides the building in the same time, and that proposes the topic of the distance towards the light. The flooring made of travertine and the cement of the pillars, with their aspect nearly brutal, represent the bond that man has with the earth, and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements would symbolize the desire to turn to one more spiritual life. The white walls, permeate of light the entire building through two orders of inner windows. The diffused and shining light, is almost able to shatter the structures making them disappear in their physical consistency. The ceiling, carried out with wood bars, let the crossshaped light penetrate inside, remembering one great grill, symbol of the contrast between the captive being of the matter and desire to rise ourselves towards God. The bell tower, is a light architectonic element, representing the essence of a shape. General data Volum of elevated floors Mc. 8300 Volum of interred floors Mc. 4200 Total surface of elevated floors Mq. 1538 Total surface of interred floors Mq. 1256 External privated surface Mq. 540 External public surface Mq. 1570 Spaces in details Mq.520 Church, Chapell, Sacristy Mq.110 Parochial offices, secretary, archive, hall, toilets, cloister Mq.512 Catechism rooms, offices , store rooms, toilets Mq.170 Conference room, hall, toilets. Mq.226 Priests apartment, hall, toilets Mq.1256 Store rooms (underground) Arch. C. Fantacci The Church of Saint Spirit “ Therefore the church must not be a dominant element in the urban contest, but at the contrary it must show simplicity and strictness , and at the same time has to create a relation with the environment , to symbolize the aggregation capacity in the community: it must contain at the same time the simplicity of the interior religious act and the expressive richness that each representative building has in a community” ( Cardinale Lercaro 1965 ) This has been in short words the main line of the whole project. Using a concept of A. Siza , we could say that the language is not invented , but it transforms itself to be adapted to the reality and make it formal; that ‘s why the church needs to be in a dynamic relationship with the outside, and needs to be integrated in the urban environment towards the “ plasticity” of its elements and the use of similar materials of the closer buildings . At the same time the church is well focused in the city district, through the pureness of the shapes and as an architectural “break” made of open spaces (cloister, stairs, gardens, courtyards), underlining the public function of the religious building. The Saint Spirit’s Church, with its simple but at the same time articulated shape, wants to be in harmony with the urban environment; it has been thought as a measured element, but it becomes itself measure of the area, giving an identity to the place thanks to specific architectural references as the tower bell , focus of the area, and symbol of the believers call. If on the outside part the building is in strong relation with the environment and develops a centripetal strength as place of meditation and prayer , on the internal part the contrast is given by an intense and intimate atmosphere . If we would compare the material faith way of the believer walking into the church , to the spiritual trip he makes to join God , we could feel in the bell tower the symbol of the internal tension that guides to the spirituality , in the stairs the first act for the elevation of the spirit, and in the nearing to the gate , placed on the corner, the convinced choice of walking in a way that materially introduces into the church and spiritually carries to the communion with God. The contact point between inside and outside, i. e. exteriority and interiority , between material and spiritual world , happens through the corner gate, which is an important feature of the façade (shell shape, symbol of the pilgrim), introducing in a new dimension. This passage is particularly underlined by the shape modification between the internal and external building : the squared shape perceived from outside, symbolizing the world, transforms itself in octagon (symbol of the eight points of the Christian believe and symbol of the first day after the seventh), and being at the centre of the building becomes circle, the shape of God’s perfection. Nevertheless , even if the centrality is one of the main topic of the building, as a place of aggregation ( human solidarity) and openings ( of the own spirituality to God), the church proposes on the inside ,at the same time , the idea of the transition , symbol of the continuous research of God; it must be presented as a synthesis between axial dimension and centrality , as dynamic balance between these two basic topics, proposing the relationship of the individual with the collectivity and with God. The linearity proposed in the Church , that, as shown, starts from outside with the direction given by the bell tower, is underlined by the longitudinal axis which connects the gate to the presbytery. In this sense the light plays a basic role ; from the outside to the inside we see the passage from a bright to a darker light, that intensifies on the upper part, through small wall cuts, since joining the wooden lamellar ceiling; the ceiling lets penetrate a cross-shaped light, through a huge grill, symbol of the contrasts between the captive being of the matter and the desire to rise ourselves towards God, towards the light that , in a cross shape , shows itself in its whole splendor. The solution to this contrast is given by the light points coming from the skylights placed on east and lighting the altar in the presbytery. This light point ,symbolically placed at the end of the way access-altar , becomes symbol of hope, and solution for the human problems through a trip of faith . This is the reason why one of the theme of the project is given by the direction east-west of the building, obtained thanks to the real and at the same time symbolic passage from the square to the octagon and proposing the theme of the trip towards the light. The choice of this direction is due to specific evangelic references : Heaven is at East (Gen 2,8), from East comes the day light and Christ is real Light (Gv. 1,4-5,9) , the sun rises at East and Christ is the Sun of Justice (Ml. 3,20); moreover the light point on the apse represents the continuation of the spiritual way further the building, in direction of the light. About the choice of materials : outside it has been used the same materials of the closer buildings, but in the inside the use of different materials sharpens the tension towards the upper part. The flooring made of raw travertine (not polished) and the cement pillars, with their nearly brutal aspect, represent the bond that the man has with the earth , and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements symbolizes the wish to turn to a more spiritual life . The remaining walls are finished with white plaster, to give much more bright light to the building and shatter the structure making it disappear in its physical consistency. Also the internal dimensions of the church have been carefully analyzed : a human dimension, as starting point of the spiritual way and a divine dimension , arrival point. This is showed by two types of openings: the “human dimensioned” windows at the bottom brighten the perimeter of the building and indicate the way the man has to follow to understand his “material “being, while the upper windows hole the walls and make the matter empty. Inside, there is also a minor order, formed by the cement pillars, as tall as the pathway , and a major order, represented by the central raising , corresponding to the circle of the planning through which the light penetrates (vertical way towards God). The central part of the building therefore represents the spiritual raising and is in balance with the presbytery arrival point of the symbolic way: centrality and axial dimension in this case enter one the other and create in the church an intense , rich, total space but still in movement, symbol of the continuous “becoming” and therefore rebirth, of the believer’s faith act. The bell tower, which because of the shape , position and material has been much criticized , is deliberately a light architectonical element , representing the real essence of the shape, the essence of the tower itself, the synthesis of an element that was present in the past; and in the background the sky fills the space coming out among those pure lines. Almost a tridimensional color by number. On the nuanced sky the tower is designed with essential and pure lines. The lightness of the tower bell increases the importance of the church corpus, the box-shape evokes a ladder towards the sky. The lines give the shape and the idea , the sky gives the corpus. The Saint Spirit’s Church is also more; it is place of aggregation and relationship point, thanks to a multi-functional room , rooms for the religious classes, cloister, courtyard, priests apartments, space for voluntary associations, warehouse, all contained in 3000 square meters on an underground, ground and first floor.
  • 29 The Church of Saint Spirit Plan scheme Project name: Church of Saint Spirit Function: Religious Buildings Chief Architect: Dott. Architetto Carlo Fantacci Via Trentino Alto Adige, 9 Loc. Fosci – 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – +30 0577 933029 Client: Arcidiocesi di Siena Colle V.E. Montalcino Piazza Duomo 5 - SIENA Design data: 1998-99 Completino data: 2000-2001 Consecration: 2002 Project Team (Collaborators) : Structures Dott. Ing Giovanni Corti Poggibonsi Geology Dott. Geologo Stefano Nastasi Poggibonsi Electrical installation P.I. Mauro Venturini Poggibonsi Warming installation P.I. Daniele Fondati Poggibonsi Holy fittings and Sculpture Renato Corsi Siena Artistic glass Prof. Otello Chiti Siena Cooperator Don Emanuele Iozzi Poggibonsi Area: Via Alessandro Volta, 55 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – Report: The church of Saint Spirit, thought as a measured organism, becomes, in its turn, unit of measure and governing unit of the same block. The entrance is placed in the corner of the building, and emphasizes the passage from the material world to the spiritual world. Such passage is moreover evidenced in the changing of the shape: the shape, externally square, is transformed in octagon, becoming then circle, as the form of the Divine perfection, in the centre of the building. The Church besides the centrality, proposes to its inside, the idea of the distance, therefore one of the generating topics of the plan is constituted by the guideline of the building from west to est, obtained through the real and symbolic passage of the square in an octagon, direction that cuts and guides the building in the same time, and that proposes the topic of the distance towards the light. The flooring made of travertine and the cement of the pillars, with their aspect nearly brutal, represent the bond that man has with the earth, and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements would symbolize the desire to turn to one more spiritual life. The white walls, permeate of light the entire building through two orders of inner windows. The diffused and shining light, is almost able to shatter the structures making them disappear in their physical consistency. The ceiling, carried out with wood bars, let the crossshaped light penetrate inside, remembering one great grill, symbol of the contrast between the captive being of the matter and desire to rise ourselves towards God. The bell tower, is a light architectonic element, representing the essence of a shape. General data Volum of elevated floors Mc. 8300 Volum of interred floors Mc. 4200 Total surface of elevated floors Mq. 1538 Total surface of interred floors Mq. 1256 External privated surface Mq. 540 External public surface Mq. 1570 Spaces in details Mq.520 Church, Chapell, Sacristy Mq.110 Parochial offices, secretary, archive, hall, toilets, cloister Mq.512 Catechism rooms, offices , store rooms, toilets Mq.170 Conference room, hall, toilets. Mq.226 Priests apartment, hall, toilets Mq.1256 Store rooms (underground) Arch. C. Fantacci The Church of Saint Spirit “ Therefore the church must not be a dominant element in the urban contest, but at the contrary it must show simplicity and strictness , and at the same time has to create a relation with the environment , to symbolize the aggregation capacity in the community: it must contain at the same time the simplicity of the interior religious act and the expressive richness that each representative building has in a community” ( Cardinale Lercaro 1965 ) This has been in short words the main line of the whole project. Using a concept of A. Siza , we could say that the language is not invented , but it transforms itself to be adapted to the reality and make it formal; that ‘s why the church needs to be in a dynamic relationship with the outside, and needs to be integrated in the urban environment towards the “ plasticity” of its elements and the use of similar materials of the closer buildings . At the same time the church is well focused in the city district, through the pureness of the shapes and as an architectural “break” made of open spaces (cloister, stairs, gardens, courtyards), underlining the public function of the religious building. The Saint Spirit’s Church, with its simple but at the same time articulated shape, wants to be in harmony with the urban environment; it has been thought as a measured element, but it becomes itself measure of the area, giving an identity to the place thanks to specific architectural references as the tower bell , focus of the area, and symbol of the believers call. If on the outside part the building is in strong relation with the environment and develops a centripetal strength as place of meditation and prayer , on the internal part the contrast is given by an intense and intimate atmosphere . If we would compare the material faith way of the believer walking into the church , to the spiritual trip he makes to join God , we could feel in the bell tower the symbol of the internal tension that guides to the spirituality , in the stairs the first act for the elevation of the spirit, and in the nearing to the gate , placed on the corner, the convinced choice of walking in a way that materially introduces into the church and spiritually carries to the communion with God. The contact point between inside and outside, i. e. exteriority and interiority , between material and spiritual world , happens through the corner gate, which is an important feature of the façade (shell shape, symbol of the pilgrim), introducing in a new dimension. This passage is particularly underlined by the shape modification between the internal and external building : the squared shape perceived from outside, symbolizing the world, transforms itself in octagon (symbol of the eight points of the Christian believe and symbol of the first day after the seventh), and being at the centre of the building becomes circle, the shape of God’s perfection. Nevertheless , even if the centrality is one of the main topic of the building, as a place of aggregation ( human solidarity) and openings ( of the own spirituality to God), the church proposes on the inside ,at the same time , the idea of the transition , symbol of the continuous research of God; it must be presented as a synthesis between axial dimension and centrality , as dynamic balance between these two basic topics, proposing the relationship of the individual with the collectivity and with God. The linearity proposed in the Church , that, as shown, starts from outside with the direction given by the bell tower, is underlined by the longitudinal axis which connects the gate to the presbytery. In this sense the light plays a basic role ; from the outside to the inside we see the passage from a bright to a darker light, that intensifies on the upper part, through small wall cuts, since joining the wooden lamellar ceiling; the ceiling lets penetrate a cross-shaped light, through a huge grill, symbol of the contrasts between the captive being of the matter and the desire to rise ourselves towards God, towards the light that , in a cross shape , shows itself in its whole splendor. The solution to this contrast is given by the light points coming from the skylights placed on east and lighting the altar in the presbytery. This light point ,symbolically placed at the end of the way access-altar , becomes symbol of hope, and solution for the human problems through a trip of faith . This is the reason why one of the theme of the project is given by the direction east-west of the building, obtained thanks to the real and at the same time symbolic passage from the square to the octagon and proposing the theme of the trip towards the light. The choice of this direction is due to specific evangelic references : Heaven is at East (Gen 2,8), from East comes the day light and Christ is real Light (Gv. 1,4-5,9) , the sun rises at East and Christ is the Sun of Justice (Ml. 3,20); moreover the light point on the apse represents the continuation of the spiritual way further the building, in direction of the light. About the choice of materials : outside it has been used the same materials of the closer buildings, but in the inside the use of different materials sharpens the tension towards the upper part. The flooring made of raw travertine (not polished) and the cement pillars, with their nearly brutal aspect, represent the bond that the man has with the earth , and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements symbolizes the wish to turn to a more spiritual life . The remaining walls are finished with white plaster, to give much more bright light to the building and shatter the structure making it disappear in its physical consistency. Also the internal dimensions of the church have been carefully analyzed : a human dimension, as starting point of the spiritual way and a divine dimension , arrival point. This is showed by two types of openings: the “human dimensioned” windows at the bottom brighten the perimeter of the building and indicate the way the man has to follow to understand his “material “being, while the upper windows hole the walls and make the matter empty. Inside, there is also a minor order, formed by the cement pillars, as tall as the pathway , and a major order, represented by the central raising , corresponding to the circle of the planning through which the light penetrates (vertical way towards God). The central part of the building therefore represents the spiritual raising and is in balance with the presbytery arrival point of the symbolic way: centrality and axial dimension in this case enter one the other and create in the church an intense , rich, total space but still in movement, symbol of the continuous “becoming” and therefore rebirth, of the believer’s faith act. The bell tower, which because of the shape , position and material has been much criticized , is deliberately a light architectonical element , representing the real essence of the shape, the essence of the tower itself, the synthesis of an element that was present in the past; and in the background the sky fills the space coming out among those pure lines. Almost a tridimensional color by number. On the nuanced sky the tower is designed with essential and pure lines. The lightness of the tower bell increases the importance of the church corpus, the box-shape evokes a ladder towards the sky. The lines give the shape and the idea , the sky gives the corpus. The Saint Spirit’s Church is also more; it is place of aggregation and relationship point, thanks to a multi-functional room , rooms for the religious classes, cloister, courtyard, priests apartments, space for voluntary associations, warehouse, all contained in 3000 square meters on an underground, ground and first floor.
  • 29 The Church of Saint Spirit Plan scheme Project name: Church of Saint Spirit Function: Religious Buildings Chief Architect: Dott. Architetto Carlo Fantacci Via Trentino Alto Adige, 9 Loc. Fosci – 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – +30 0577 933029 Client: Arcidiocesi di Siena Colle V.E. Montalcino Piazza Duomo 5 - SIENA Design data: 1998-99 Completino data: 2000-2001 Consecration: 2002 Project Team (Collaborators) : Structures Dott. Ing Giovanni Corti Poggibonsi Geology Dott. Geologo Stefano Nastasi Poggibonsi Electrical installation P.I. Mauro Venturini Poggibonsi Warming installation P.I. Daniele Fondati Poggibonsi Holy fittings and Sculpture Renato Corsi Siena Artistic glass Prof. Otello Chiti Siena Cooperator Don Emanuele Iozzi Poggibonsi Area: Via Alessandro Volta, 55 53036 – Poggibonsi – SIENA – ITALY – Report: The church of Saint Spirit, thought as a measured organism, becomes, in its turn, unit of measure and governing unit of the same block. The entrance is placed in the corner of the building, and emphasizes the passage from the material world to the spiritual world. Such passage is moreover evidenced in the changing of the shape: the shape, externally square, is transformed in octagon, becoming then circle, as the form of the Divine perfection, in the centre of the building. The Church besides the centrality, proposes to its inside, the idea of the distance, therefore one of the generating topics of the plan is constituted by the guideline of the building from west to est, obtained through the real and symbolic passage of the square in an octagon, direction that cuts and guides the building in the same time, and that proposes the topic of the distance towards the light. The flooring made of travertine and the cement of the pillars, with their aspect nearly brutal, represent the bond that man has with the earth, and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements would symbolize the desire to turn to one more spiritual life. The white walls, permeate of light the entire building through two orders of inner windows. The diffused and shining light, is almost able to shatter the structures making them disappear in their physical consistency. The ceiling, carried out with wood bars, let the crossshaped light penetrate inside, remembering one great grill, symbol of the contrast between the captive being of the matter and desire to rise ourselves towards God. The bell tower, is a light architectonic element, representing the essence of a shape. General data Volum of elevated floors Mc. 8300 Volum of interred floors Mc. 4200 Total surface of elevated floors Mq. 1538 Total surface of interred floors Mq. 1256 External privated surface Mq. 540 External public surface Mq. 1570 Spaces in details Mq.520 Church, Chapell, Sacristy Mq.110 Parochial offices, secretary, archive, hall, toilets, cloister Mq.512 Catechism rooms, offices , store rooms, toilets Mq.170 Conference room, hall, toilets. Mq.226 Priests apartment, hall, toilets Mq.1256 Store rooms (underground) Arch. C. Fantacci The Church of Saint Spirit “ Therefore the church must not be a dominant element in the urban contest, but at the contrary it must show simplicity and strictness , and at the same time has to create a relation with the environment , to symbolize the aggregation capacity in the community: it must contain at the same time the simplicity of the interior religious act and the expressive richness that each representative building has in a community” ( Cardinale Lercaro 1965 ) This has been in short words the main line of the whole project. Using a concept of A. Siza , we could say that the language is not invented , but it transforms itself to be adapted to the reality and make it formal; that ‘s why the church needs to be in a dynamic relationship with the outside, and needs to be integrated in the urban environment towards the “ plasticity” of its elements and the use of similar materials of the closer buildings . At the same time the church is well focused in the city district, through the pureness of the shapes and as an architectural “break” made of open spaces (cloister, stairs, gardens, courtyards), underlining the public function of the religious building. The Saint Spirit’s Church, with its simple but at the same time articulated shape, wants to be in harmony with the urban environment; it has been thought as a measured element, but it becomes itself measure of the area, giving an identity to the place thanks to specific architectural references as the tower bell , focus of the area, and symbol of the believers call. If on the outside part the building is in strong relation with the environment and develops a centripetal strength as place of meditation and prayer , on the internal part the contrast is given by an intense and intimate atmosphere . If we would compare the material faith way of the believer walking into the church , to the spiritual trip he makes to join God , we could feel in the bell tower the symbol of the internal tension that guides to the spirituality , in the stairs the first act for the elevation of the spirit, and in the nearing to the gate , placed on the corner, the convinced choice of walking in a way that materially introduces into the church and spiritually carries to the communion with God. The contact point between inside and outside, i. e. exteriority and interiority , between material and spiritual world , happens through the corner gate, which is an important feature of the façade (shell shape, symbol of the pilgrim), introducing in a new dimension. This passage is particularly underlined by the shape modification between the internal and external building : the squared shape perceived from outside, symbolizing the world, transforms itself in octagon (symbol of the eight points of the Christian believe and symbol of the first day after the seventh), and being at the centre of the building becomes circle, the shape of God’s perfection. Nevertheless , even if the centrality is one of the main topic of the building, as a place of aggregation ( human solidarity) and openings ( of the own spirituality to God), the church proposes on the inside ,at the same time , the idea of the transition , symbol of the continuous research of God; it must be presented as a synthesis between axial dimension and centrality , as dynamic balance between these two basic topics, proposing the relationship of the individual with the collectivity and with God. The linearity proposed in the Church , that, as shown, starts from outside with the direction given by the bell tower, is underlined by the longitudinal axis which connects the gate to the presbytery. In this sense the light plays a basic role ; from the outside to the inside we see the passage from a bright to a darker light, that intensifies on the upper part, through small wall cuts, since joining the wooden lamellar ceiling; the ceiling lets penetrate a cross-shaped light, through a huge grill, symbol of the contrasts between the captive being of the matter and the desire to rise ourselves towards God, towards the light that , in a cross shape , shows itself in its whole splendor. The solution to this contrast is given by the light points coming from the skylights placed on east and lighting the altar in the presbytery. This light point ,symbolically placed at the end of the way access-altar , becomes symbol of hope, and solution for the human problems through a trip of faith . This is the reason why one of the theme of the project is given by the direction east-west of the building, obtained thanks to the real and at the same time symbolic passage from the square to the octagon and proposing the theme of the trip towards the light. The choice of this direction is due to specific evangelic references : Heaven is at East (Gen 2,8), from East comes the day light and Christ is real Light (Gv. 1,4-5,9) , the sun rises at East and Christ is the Sun of Justice (Ml. 3,20); moreover the light point on the apse represents the continuation of the spiritual way further the building, in direction of the light. About the choice of materials : outside it has been used the same materials of the closer buildings, but in the inside the use of different materials sharpens the tension towards the upper part. The flooring made of raw travertine (not polished) and the cement pillars, with their nearly brutal aspect, represent the bond that the man has with the earth , and therefore with the matter. However the vertical development of such elements symbolizes the wish to turn to a more spiritual life . The remaining walls are finished with white plaster, to give much more bright light to the building and shatter the structure making it disappear in its physical consistency. Also the internal dimensions of the church have been carefully analyzed : a human dimension, as starting point of the spiritual way and a divine dimension , arrival point. This is showed by two types of openings: the “human dimensioned” windows at the bottom brighten the perimeter of the building and indicate the way the man has to follow to understand his “material “being, while the upper windows hole the walls and make the matter empty. Inside, there is also a minor order, formed by the cement pillars, as tall as the pathway , and a major order, represented by the central raising , corresponding to the circle of the planning through which the light penetrates (vertical way towards God). The central part of the building therefore represents the spiritual raising and is in balance with the presbytery arrival point of the symbolic way: centrality and axial dimension in this case enter one the other and create in the church an intense , rich, total space but still in movement, symbol of the continuous “becoming” and therefore rebirth, of the believer’s faith act. The bell tower, which because of the shape , position and material has been much criticized , is deliberately a light architectonical element , representing the real essence of the shape, the essence of the tower itself, the synthesis of an element that was present in the past; and in the background the sky fills the space coming out among those pure lines. Almost a tridimensional color by number. On the nuanced sky the tower is designed with essential and pure lines. The lightness of the tower bell increases the importance of the church corpus, the box-shape evokes a ladder towards the sky. The lines give the shape and the idea , the sky gives the corpus. The Saint Spirit’s Church is also more; it is place of aggregation and relationship point, thanks to a multi-functional room , rooms for the religious classes, cloister, courtyard, priests apartments, space for voluntary associations, warehouse, all contained in 3000 square meters on an underground, ground and first floor.
  • 30 HOUSE-R HOUSE-R This is a renovation of an over 40 year-old small house in Tokyo. The compaction with thousands of small wooden houses is typical scenery of downtown Tokyo. But, most of the houses there, like the house in this project, are not concerned about their long existence, and just waiting to be collapsed as the waste of material. The challenge of the project is to revitalize this 50 square meter-small worn-out housing, to fit into contemporary lifestyle for its sustain. Background The site is on an area of density, near from a train station. Because this area was developed in a time of pre-motorization, most of the streets, there, are too narrow to allow a car-access. The 2.4 meters wide street, in front of this house, is not the exception of them. Houses along the street stand quite close each other, such as less than 300 millimeters in a distance from neighbor’s wall. The stresses for the people living in this area are the lack of distance from others and the lack of sunlight in the cause of its physical compaction. Scheme This project was aimed to fit this small housing into the contemporary lifestyle with the incorporation of the following three issues. 1. The sunlight supply. 2. The cognitive expansion. 3. The spatial complexity. As the house stands too close to the edge of the street and the street is too narrow to be free from pedestrians’ eyes, it was difficult for the light supply to keep a window open on its side. Opening on each of the other three sides also does not work well because of the sunlight block by the neighbor walls. In this house, sunlight showers from the sky. It falls down to the ground of interior with filtered by a roof of corrugated FRP, a cloth of glass fiber, and a slab of FRP honeycomb core. For the cognitive expansion, space of the house is treated in the sequence of the street as well as a representation of it. The interior is sprit by a wall stood along a longitude direction of the house, and folded to the upward. So that the folded narrow and long space with the several distances between floors and ceilings continues from the street of a pedestrian height to the street above, to recognize it in the relation to the street environment with the proper distance from neighbors. Instead of the monotony of a resting place, the spatial complexity is the demand for contemporary lifestyle. It is not achieved by material variation but by the condition of the sunlight. The skylight, as a nature, is much more wild and delicate. It changes continuously and dramatically by seasonal and daily weather condition, and by leaning of the sun. The skylight across the folded space creates changing spatial condition. It induces various appearances to the interior with the material reflection. The spatial complexity, then, emerges by the mergence with the falling sunlight and the sequential space. project name: HOUSE-R function: Residential building architect/ office name: Keizo Ikemura / UA client: Anonymity preference design date: February 1st,2008 completion date: December 1st, 2008 area: Site area: 40.80 square meters Building area: 28.56 square meters Total floor area: 53.59 square meters reference: “SHINKENCHIKU JUTAKUTOKUSHU 279,” p56-61 SHINKENCHIKU-SHA 2009 Printed in Japan.
  • 30 HOUSE-R HOUSE-R This is a renovation of an over 40 year-old small house in Tokyo. The compaction with thousands of small wooden houses is typical scenery of downtown Tokyo. But, most of the houses there, like the house in this project, are not concerned about their long existence, and just waiting to be collapsed as the waste of material. The challenge of the project is to revitalize this 50 square meter-small worn-out housing, to fit into contemporary lifestyle for its sustain. Background The site is on an area of density, near from a train station. Because this area was developed in a time of pre-motorization, most of the streets, there, are too narrow to allow a car-access. The 2.4 meters wide street, in front of this house, is not the exception of them. Houses along the street stand quite close each other, such as less than 300 millimeters in a distance from neighbor’s wall. The stresses for the people living in this area are the lack of distance from others and the lack of sunlight in the cause of its physical compaction. Scheme This project was aimed to fit this small housing into the contemporary lifestyle with the incorporation of the following three issues. 1. The sunlight supply. 2. The cognitive expansion. 3. The spatial complexity. As the house stands too close to the edge of the street and the street is too narrow to be free from pedestrians’ eyes, it was difficult for the light supply to keep a window open on its side. Opening on each of the other three sides also does not work well because of the sunlight block by the neighbor walls. In this house, sunlight showers from the sky. It falls down to the ground of interior with filtered by a roof of corrugated FRP, a cloth of glass fiber, and a slab of FRP honeycomb core. For the cognitive expansion, space of the house is treated in the sequence of the street as well as a representation of it. The interior is sprit by a wall stood along a longitude direction of the house, and folded to the upward. So that the folded narrow and long space with the several distances between floors and ceilings continues from the street of a pedestrian height to the street above, to recognize it in the relation to the street environment with the proper distance from neighbors. Instead of the monotony of a resting place, the spatial complexity is the demand for contemporary lifestyle. It is not achieved by material variation but by the condition of the sunlight. The skylight, as a nature, is much more wild and delicate. It changes continuously and dramatically by seasonal and daily weather condition, and by leaning of the sun. The skylight across the folded space creates changing spatial condition. It induces various appearances to the interior with the material reflection. The spatial complexity, then, emerges by the mergence with the falling sunlight and the sequential space. project name: HOUSE-R function: Residential building architect/ office name: Keizo Ikemura / UA client: Anonymity preference design date: February 1st,2008 completion date: December 1st, 2008 area: Site area: 40.80 square meters Building area: 28.56 square meters Total floor area: 53.59 square meters reference: “SHINKENCHIKU JUTAKUTOKUSHU 279,” p56-61 SHINKENCHIKU-SHA 2009 Printed in Japan.
  • 30 HOUSE-R HOUSE-R This is a renovation of an over 40 year-old small house in Tokyo. The compaction with thousands of small wooden houses is typical scenery of downtown Tokyo. But, most of the houses there, like the house in this project, are not concerned about their long existence, and just waiting to be collapsed as the waste of material. The challenge of the project is to revitalize this 50 square meter-small worn-out housing, to fit into contemporary lifestyle for its sustain. Background The site is on an area of density, near from a train station. Because this area was developed in a time of pre-motorization, most of the streets, there, are too narrow to allow a car-access. The 2.4 meters wide street, in front of this house, is not the exception of them. Houses along the street stand quite close each other, such as less than 300 millimeters in a distance from neighbor’s wall. The stresses for the people living in this area are the lack of distance from others and the lack of sunlight in the cause of its physical compaction. Scheme This project was aimed to fit this small housing into the contemporary lifestyle with the incorporation of the following three issues. 1. The sunlight supply. 2. The cognitive expansion. 3. The spatial complexity. As the house stands too close to the edge of the street and the street is too narrow to be free from pedestrians’ eyes, it was difficult for the light supply to keep a window open on its side. Opening on each of the other three sides also does not work well because of the sunlight block by the neighbor walls. In this house, sunlight showers from the sky. It falls down to the ground of interior with filtered by a roof of corrugated FRP, a cloth of glass fiber, and a slab of FRP honeycomb core. For the cognitive expansion, space of the house is treated in the sequence of the street as well as a representation of it. The interior is sprit by a wall stood along a longitude direction of the house, and folded to the upward. So that the folded narrow and long space with the several distances between floors and ceilings continues from the street of a pedestrian height to the street above, to recognize it in the relation to the street environment with the proper distance from neighbors. Instead of the monotony of a resting place, the spatial complexity is the demand for contemporary lifestyle. It is not achieved by material variation but by the condition of the sunlight. The skylight, as a nature, is much more wild and delicate. It changes continuously and dramatically by seasonal and daily weather condition, and by leaning of the sun. The skylight across the folded space creates changing spatial condition. It induces various appearances to the interior with the material reflection. The spatial complexity, then, emerges by the mergence with the falling sunlight and the sequential space. project name: HOUSE-R function: Residential building architect/ office name: Keizo Ikemura / UA client: Anonymity preference design date: February 1st,2008 completion date: December 1st, 2008 area: Site area: 40.80 square meters Building area: 28.56 square meters Total floor area: 53.59 square meters reference: “SHINKENCHIKU JUTAKUTOKUSHU 279,” p56-61 SHINKENCHIKU-SHA 2009 Printed in Japan.
  • 31 MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili MAF Museum of Femminine Arts Vallo della Lucania (Salerno) The Museum of Femminine Arts is a museum based on a collection of hand-crafted objects, artistic, industrial and communicative bond to the feminine world of the past three centuries. It’s the museum of a personal taste, tied to a peculiar and personal set of interests. Its charm lies both in the gathered objects within and in its nature of amazing cultural probing through the layers of material history, from a very specific and never before explored point of view. It’s a museum of items that, in the past, were all gathered under the definition of minor arts, feminine arts or decorative arts. The items that the visitor will be presented with are shown in their mutual relationships and in the full representation of their use, either symbolical, economical and cultural. The MAF is aware of the traditional categories of cultural organisation, but speaks to the general public through the emotions mediated by the objects. The interactive devices allow to fully enjoy the precious items and the rare books of the collection. They lead the visitor from its industrial and post-industrial world to a world of the past, in which the relationship between industrial production and craftwork is inverted. The ancient building that holds the MAF was modified and unified in its interior spaces, while being transformed to the outside in a façade that narrates the past and communicates with the city and the passers-by. Its communicative function is carried out by the use of colour, that characterizes the different curatorial choices made for each floor of the exhibition. The color is therefore used to divide the museum space by subject, but also as a magical mechanism to transform the building into a huge urban “lamp”: a marker and a new symbol for the city landscape of the city of Vallo della Lucania. 0 Memory PANTONE 2612C The theme of memory is here rendered in its different forms: old photographs of townspeople and voices telling their stories; bits of Cilento’s traditional music; sounds of musical instruments; the noise of the loom at work, of the spinning winder- 1 Language code PANTONE 327C This section is about the language codes theme or, rather, of the single linguistic elements: the visual lexicon of ornamental motifs, of repetitive patterns (letters, animals, heraldic emblems, stitches). 2 Pattern PANTONE 631C Pattern and weaving are presented here, a syntax that organizes the components of the lexicon. Different kinds of laces are shown, each one characterized by peculiar and ever changing symmetrical systems, rotated and apparently free. Seeming coincidences that hide regularity at a higher level. 3 Craftwork PANTONE 368C This is where the the work of man comes into play, the local and global trades, the centuries-old activity that extends codes, arranges new plots, works with materials, passes from rough to finished, transforms work into value, money into goods. The hand of man is the tool that gives shape to matter. 4 Materials PANTONE 349C This floor is packed with materials waiting to be discovered! Wool, silk, cotton, linen, duck, raw, refined, crafted and dyed. Materials to touch, manipulate, craft, to understand them, in the workshops close to the exhibition space In questo piano ci sono dei materiali da scoprire! La lana, la seta, il cotone, il lino, la canapa, al naturale, raffinati, lavorati e tinti. Materiali da toccare, da manipolare, da lavorare, per capirli, nei laboratori artigianali attigui allo spazio espositivo. MAF Credits Curatorial Project: Id-Lab con Nunzia di Giacomo Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Exhibition Project: Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Construction Management: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio) Construction: Geoappalti Srl Furniture: in cooperation with IKEA.
  • 31 MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili MAF Museum of Femminine Arts Vallo della Lucania (Salerno) The Museum of Femminine Arts is a museum based on a collection of hand-crafted objects, artistic, industrial and communicative bond to the feminine world of the past three centuries. It’s the museum of a personal taste, tied to a peculiar and personal set of interests. Its charm lies both in the gathered objects within and in its nature of amazing cultural probing through the layers of material history, from a very specific and never before explored point of view. It’s a museum of items that, in the past, were all gathered under the definition of minor arts, feminine arts or decorative arts. The items that the visitor will be presented with are shown in their mutual relationships and in the full representation of their use, either symbolical, economical and cultural. The MAF is aware of the traditional categories of cultural organisation, but speaks to the general public through the emotions mediated by the objects. The interactive devices allow to fully enjoy the precious items and the rare books of the collection. They lead the visitor from its industrial and post-industrial world to a world of the past, in which the relationship between industrial production and craftwork is inverted. The ancient building that holds the MAF was modified and unified in its interior spaces, while being transformed to the outside in a façade that narrates the past and communicates with the city and the passers-by. Its communicative function is carried out by the use of colour, that characterizes the different curatorial choices made for each floor of the exhibition. The color is therefore used to divide the museum space by subject, but also as a magical mechanism to transform the building into a huge urban “lamp”: a marker and a new symbol for the city landscape of the city of Vallo della Lucania. 0 Memory PANTONE 2612C The theme of memory is here rendered in its different forms: old photographs of townspeople and voices telling their stories; bits of Cilento’s traditional music; sounds of musical instruments; the noise of the loom at work, of the spinning winder- 1 Language code PANTONE 327C This section is about the language codes theme or, rather, of the single linguistic elements: the visual lexicon of ornamental motifs, of repetitive patterns (letters, animals, heraldic emblems, stitches). 2 Pattern PANTONE 631C Pattern and weaving are presented here, a syntax that organizes the components of the lexicon. Different kinds of laces are shown, each one characterized by peculiar and ever changing symmetrical systems, rotated and apparently free. Seeming coincidences that hide regularity at a higher level. 3 Craftwork PANTONE 368C This is where the the work of man comes into play, the local and global trades, the centuries-old activity that extends codes, arranges new plots, works with materials, passes from rough to finished, transforms work into value, money into goods. The hand of man is the tool that gives shape to matter. 4 Materials PANTONE 349C This floor is packed with materials waiting to be discovered! Wool, silk, cotton, linen, duck, raw, refined, crafted and dyed. Materials to touch, manipulate, craft, to understand them, in the workshops close to the exhibition space In questo piano ci sono dei materiali da scoprire! La lana, la seta, il cotone, il lino, la canapa, al naturale, raffinati, lavorati e tinti. Materiali da toccare, da manipolare, da lavorare, per capirli, nei laboratori artigianali attigui allo spazio espositivo. MAF Credits Curatorial Project: Id-Lab con Nunzia di Giacomo Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Exhibition Project: Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Construction Management: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio) Construction: Geoappalti Srl Furniture: in cooperation with IKEA.
  • 31 MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili MAF Museum of Femminine Arts Vallo della Lucania (Salerno) The Museum of Femminine Arts is a museum based on a collection of hand-crafted objects, artistic, industrial and communicative bond to the feminine world of the past three centuries. It’s the museum of a personal taste, tied to a peculiar and personal set of interests. Its charm lies both in the gathered objects within and in its nature of amazing cultural probing through the layers of material history, from a very specific and never before explored point of view. It’s a museum of items that, in the past, were all gathered under the definition of minor arts, feminine arts or decorative arts. The items that the visitor will be presented with are shown in their mutual relationships and in the full representation of their use, either symbolical, economical and cultural. The MAF is aware of the traditional categories of cultural organisation, but speaks to the general public through the emotions mediated by the objects. The interactive devices allow to fully enjoy the precious items and the rare books of the collection. They lead the visitor from its industrial and post-industrial world to a world of the past, in which the relationship between industrial production and craftwork is inverted. The ancient building that holds the MAF was modified and unified in its interior spaces, while being transformed to the outside in a façade that narrates the past and communicates with the city and the passers-by. Its communicative function is carried out by the use of colour, that characterizes the different curatorial choices made for each floor of the exhibition. The color is therefore used to divide the museum space by subject, but also as a magical mechanism to transform the building into a huge urban “lamp”: a marker and a new symbol for the city landscape of the city of Vallo della Lucania. 0 Memory PANTONE 2612C The theme of memory is here rendered in its different forms: old photographs of townspeople and voices telling their stories; bits of Cilento’s traditional music; sounds of musical instruments; the noise of the loom at work, of the spinning winder- 1 Language code PANTONE 327C This section is about the language codes theme or, rather, of the single linguistic elements: the visual lexicon of ornamental motifs, of repetitive patterns (letters, animals, heraldic emblems, stitches). 2 Pattern PANTONE 631C Pattern and weaving are presented here, a syntax that organizes the components of the lexicon. Different kinds of laces are shown, each one characterized by peculiar and ever changing symmetrical systems, rotated and apparently free. Seeming coincidences that hide regularity at a higher level. 3 Craftwork PANTONE 368C This is where the the work of man comes into play, the local and global trades, the centuries-old activity that extends codes, arranges new plots, works with materials, passes from rough to finished, transforms work into value, money into goods. The hand of man is the tool that gives shape to matter. 4 Materials PANTONE 349C This floor is packed with materials waiting to be discovered! Wool, silk, cotton, linen, duck, raw, refined, crafted and dyed. Materials to touch, manipulate, craft, to understand them, in the workshops close to the exhibition space In questo piano ci sono dei materiali da scoprire! La lana, la seta, il cotone, il lino, la canapa, al naturale, raffinati, lavorati e tinti. Materiali da toccare, da manipolare, da lavorare, per capirli, nei laboratori artigianali attigui allo spazio espositivo. MAF Credits Curatorial Project: Id-Lab con Nunzia di Giacomo Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Architectural Project: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio), Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Exhibition Project: Ghigos Ideas (Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete, Francesco Tosi), Id-Lab (Line Ulrika Christiansen, Federico Esposito, Stefano Mirti) Construction Management: ARC studio (Gerardo del Gaudio) Construction: Geoappalti Srl Furniture: in cooperation with IKEA.
  • 32 X House X HOUSE TUMBACO VALLEY, QUITO, ECUADOR arquitectura x ADRIAN MORENO AND MARIA SAMANIEGO 1 Not having a site when we started design on our house, we set out an elemental scheme that could work both in Quito and the valleys east of the city; this meant distilling our experience into an abstracted form, inspired in the work of Donald Judd, that could be placed in any of the sites we would be likely to find: an open ended box, whose spatial limits would be the eastern and western ranges of the Andes. 2 As we had no actual place, we looked to the spaces we felt our own, and found the patio as the essential place maker throughout our architectural history. 3 On the other hand was our fascination for the prototypical glass house and its possibilities in our year round temperate climate. 4 While the patio creates a sense of place it has to be enclosed in order to work, so the mountains can’t become the spatial limit. The glass house is perfect for that unlimited sense of space; the addition of a patio to the glass house gave us the chance to adapt to the different site possibilities. 5 We separated the private and public spaces defining a patio, the service spaces and circulation could be added as a plug-in as needed depending on site conditions, further defining the patio. 6 Finally this diagram could be fitted into the open ended box according to specific site conditions that would define orientation, size and proportion. Construction and choice of materials were parallel considerations to the design concepts, and were decided on similar premises: a building system that could be modulated and would allow decision making based on varying budget and site conditions. A light steel structure on a concrete plinth supports the rusted steel and plywood open ended box. Circulation, service spaces, and the elements that make the house function are inserted in white and enclosed in polycarbonate for protection from the stronger western sun. All services run concentrated parallel to circulation, rain water is kept separate from drainage, it is surface collected, and flows down the rusted ends of the box into the ground.
  • 32 X House X HOUSE TUMBACO VALLEY, QUITO, ECUADOR arquitectura x ADRIAN MORENO AND MARIA SAMANIEGO 1 Not having a site when we started design on our house, we set out an elemental scheme that could work both in Quito and the valleys east of the city; this meant distilling our experience into an abstracted form, inspired in the work of Donald Judd, that could be placed in any of the sites we would be likely to find: an open ended box, whose spatial limits would be the eastern and western ranges of the Andes. 2 As we had no actual place, we looked to the spaces we felt our own, and found the patio as the essential place maker throughout our architectural history. 3 On the other hand was our fascination for the prototypical glass house and its possibilities in our year round temperate climate. 4 While the patio creates a sense of place it has to be enclosed in order to work, so the mountains can’t become the spatial limit. The glass house is perfect for that unlimited sense of space; the addition of a patio to the glass house gave us the chance to adapt to the different site possibilities. 5 We separated the private and public spaces defining a patio, the service spaces and circulation could be added as a plug-in as needed depending on site conditions, further defining the patio. 6 Finally this diagram could be fitted into the open ended box according to specific site conditions that would define orientation, size and proportion. Construction and choice of materials were parallel considerations to the design concepts, and were decided on similar premises: a building system that could be modulated and would allow decision making based on varying budget and site conditions. A light steel structure on a concrete plinth supports the rusted steel and plywood open ended box. Circulation, service spaces, and the elements that make the house function are inserted in white and enclosed in polycarbonate for protection from the stronger western sun. All services run concentrated parallel to circulation, rain water is kept separate from drainage, it is surface collected, and flows down the rusted ends of the box into the ground.
  • 32 X House X HOUSE TUMBACO VALLEY, QUITO, ECUADOR arquitectura x ADRIAN MORENO AND MARIA SAMANIEGO 1 Not having a site when we started design on our house, we set out an elemental scheme that could work both in Quito and the valleys east of the city; this meant distilling our experience into an abstracted form, inspired in the work of Donald Judd, that could be placed in any of the sites we would be likely to find: an open ended box, whose spatial limits would be the eastern and western ranges of the Andes. 2 As we had no actual place, we looked to the spaces we felt our own, and found the patio as the essential place maker throughout our architectural history. 3 On the other hand was our fascination for the prototypical glass house and its possibilities in our year round temperate climate. 4 While the patio creates a sense of place it has to be enclosed in order to work, so the mountains can’t become the spatial limit. The glass house is perfect for that unlimited sense of space; the addition of a patio to the glass house gave us the chance to adapt to the different site possibilities. 5 We separated the private and public spaces defining a patio, the service spaces and circulation could be added as a plug-in as needed depending on site conditions, further defining the patio. 6 Finally this diagram could be fitted into the open ended box according to specific site conditions that would define orientation, size and proportion. Construction and choice of materials were parallel considerations to the design concepts, and were decided on similar premises: a building system that could be modulated and would allow decision making based on varying budget and site conditions. A light steel structure on a concrete plinth supports the rusted steel and plywood open ended box. Circulation, service spaces, and the elements that make the house function are inserted in white and enclosed in polycarbonate for protection from the stronger western sun. All services run concentrated parallel to circulation, rain water is kept separate from drainage, it is surface collected, and flows down the rusted ends of the box into the ground.
  • 33 Saint Gobain Contest Office Building Collaboration with Ivan Kudryavcev, Parkhat Abdullaev watch animated presentation on youtube: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =T21w54aBtNY
  • 33 Saint Gobain Contest Office Building Collaboration with Ivan Kudryavcev, Parkhat Abdullaev watch animated presentation on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T21w54aBtNY
  • 33 Saint Gobain Contest Office Building Collaboration with Ivan Kudryavcev, Parkhat Abdullaev watch animated presentation on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T21w54aBtNY
  • 34 Childhood Evocative Mantle PROJECT NAME: CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE FUNCTION: RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS FOR OLDER ADULT. UNIVERSITY: UNIVERSITY OF CONCEPCION, CHILE PROJECT TEAM: PATRICIO MORA ARAYA AND DANIELA GARCIA LETELIER (Students of Architecture 4th year 2008) DESIGN DATE: SEPTEMBER 2008 COMPLETION DATE: DECEMBER 2008 AREA: 3650 SQM RELATED LINKS : http://www.chilearq.com/obra/patricimora/1665/ CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE is a project that aims to propose a new habitability model able to give an answer to the current life-styles of the older adult. The proposal arises as a qualitative solution for the inhabiting of the older adult that, along with the creation of a set of houses, seeks the endowment of an inhabitable environment, constituting a combo that places itself spatially, formally and functionally under a mantle, which allows having solutions under different circumstances to the main aspects of the life of a current older adult: dwelling-house, garden-nursery, neighborhood-common green areas. The project places itself in the city of Concepción, Bío-Bío region, Chile; a city with mild-rainy climate and with an eight-month precipitations period yearly. This situation makes it difficult to enjoy outdoor recreation and has an impact on the complete social development of the older adult, where recreation plays a fundamental role for keeping their mental health. The project Manto Evocador de la Infancia propitiates meetings for people 365 days per year; this condition is complemented with sustainability variables in space design and creation, which is the case of the handling of the greenhouse effect produced under the mantle. This allows controlling the temperature difference of the interior space between 5 and 10°C in comparison with the exterior, which affects by being warmer during the winter and cooler during the summer due to the solar protection that the enveloping surface of deciduous generates over the mantle. The main variables considered in the design of this project are: Social - financial. The project is a model that integrates a flower growing system that aims to reinsert the older adult productively. The challenge is to achieve social management to avoid segregation and to strengthen self-confidence by giving them a tool that makes them feel useful again to society. From this point arises “Huerta de Los Ancianos de Tucapel Bajo”, transforming this center in a social referent to the city which, in practice, would allow generating extra incomes for this age group that demands a strong financial support due to medical expenses made through this period of life, among other reasons. Functional. The concept of combo corresponds to a mini-city in which three big areas are distinguished among which the common spaces and flowery nursery stand out. These areas not only give economic support, but also a welcoming and pleasant environment for its residents. The central volume of the combo corresponds to the common center for senior citizens, in charge of satisfying the recreational and union needs of the elderly, which also has spaces for flowery workshops where they can create their own products to be sold later in the flower shop of the combo. On the right area (north) is placed the guided village for senior citizens, which has 24 dwelling-modules conforming a common yard between them. Towards the left side of the club (south) is placed the collective residence for senior citizens, which has 30-double bedrooms conforming one module and that in the center contains common spaces as dining rooms, visiting rooms, living rooms, etc. Sustainability. The mantle covers 100% of the combo, making it like the function of a greenhouse that obtains heat energy from the environment, reducing heating costs for the enclosed areas (during the winter) and propitiating the controlled temperature through the deciduous enveloping surface that the mantle has (during the summer), which gives abundant shadow and creates a microclimate favorable to the senior citizens. Ventilation inside the mantle is worked through air-crossed systems with mechanical regulation, set with north-south direction due to the predominant winds in Concepción. It complements with direct extraction chimneys for the wet areas of the houses, which crosses through the mantle allowing the release of contaminated air out of it. Lineup of the houses is continuous in order to generate a faster transfer of heat between mass in contact and the rainwater is collected within the mantle perimeter, which becomes the watering fount for plants, and is also sent to gray waters chambers that distribute them through the residential combo for its usage in toilets of the three areas of the project. Spatial. One of the main characteristics of the elderly is seeing and feeling like a child once again. This involution is produced in many aspects of their lives making the simplest things to stimulate them, somehow constituting a rebirth, a discovering or rediscovering of the world. Physical conditions change, their body posture shrinks making their sight angle to point downwards, approximating to a child’s height. From this point emerges the intention of relating this childhood evocative process with what is special about a garden, seeing it as the place that naturally, as an inherent issue to the childhood, reminds us of our happy moments of games, friends and freedom. Considering the effect of emotional resonance for the senior citizen that produces an open space surrounded by nature is why the mantle that allows evoking colors, textures and odors pertaining to flowers and plants is proposed, creating an interior space full of life and harmony, where what is inert is expelled and joy is welcomed, promoting collective participation and projecting a green image in constant change to the saturated gray city. Patricio Mora Araya Daniela García Letelier Students of Architecture 4th year Architecture Faculty of Architecture, Urbanism and Geography Universidad de Concepción Chile
  • 34 Childhood Evocative Mantle PROJECT NAME: CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE FUNCTION: RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS FOR OLDER ADULT. UNIVERSITY: UNIVERSITY OF CONCEPCION, CHILE PROJECT TEAM: PATRICIO MORA ARAYA AND DANIELA GARCIA LETELIER (Students of Architecture 4th year 2008) DESIGN DATE: SEPTEMBER 2008 COMPLETION DATE: DECEMBER 2008 AREA: 3650 SQM RELATED LINKS : http://www.chilearq.com/obra/patricimora/1665/ CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE is a project that aims to propose a new habitability model able to give an answer to the current life-styles of the older adult. The proposal arises as a qualitative solution for the inhabiting of the older adult that, along with the creation of a set of houses, seeks the endowment of an inhabitable environment, constituting a combo that places itself spatially, formally and functionally under a mantle, which allows having solutions under different circumstances to the main aspects of the life of a current older adult: dwelling-house, garden-nursery, neighborhood-common green areas. The project places itself in the city of Concepción, Bío-Bío region, Chile; a city with mild-rainy climate and with an eight-month precipitations period yearly. This situation makes it difficult to enjoy outdoor recreation and has an impact on the complete social development of the older adult, where recreation plays a fundamental role for keeping their mental health. The project Manto Evocador de la Infancia propitiates meetings for people 365 days per year; this condition is complemented with sustainability variables in space design and creation, which is the case of the handling of the greenhouse effect produced under the mantle. This allows controlling the temperature difference of the interior space between 5 and 10°C in comparison with the exterior, which affects by being warmer during the winter and cooler during the summer due to the solar protection that the enveloping surface of deciduous generates over the mantle. The main variables considered in the design of this project are: Social - financial. The project is a model that integrates a flower growing system that aims to reinsert the older adult productively. The challenge is to achieve social management to avoid segregation and to strengthen self-confidence by giving them a tool that makes them feel useful again to society. From this point arises “Huerta de Los Ancianos de Tucapel Bajo”, transforming this center in a social referent to the city which, in practice, would allow generating extra incomes for this age group that demands a strong financial support due to medical expenses made through this period of life, among other reasons. Functional. The concept of combo corresponds to a mini-city in which three big areas are distinguished among which the common spaces and flowery nursery stand out. These areas not only give economic support, but also a welcoming and pleasant environment for its residents. The central volume of the combo corresponds to the common center for senior citizens, in charge of satisfying the recreational and union needs of the elderly, which also has spaces for flowery workshops where they can create their own products to be sold later in the flower shop of the combo. On the right area (north) is placed the guided village for senior citizens, which has 24 dwelling-modules conforming a common yard between them. Towards the left side of the club (south) is placed the collective residence for senior citizens, which has 30-double bedrooms conforming one module and that in the center contains common spaces as dining rooms, visiting rooms, living rooms, etc. Sustainability. The mantle covers 100% of the combo, making it like the function of a greenhouse that obtains heat energy from the environment, reducing heating costs for the enclosed areas (during the winter) and propitiating the controlled temperature through the deciduous enveloping surface that the mantle has (during the summer), which gives abundant shadow and creates a microclimate favorable to the senior citizens. Ventilation inside the mantle is worked through air-crossed systems with mechanical regulation, set with north-south direction due to the predominant winds in Concepción. It complements with direct extraction chimneys for the wet areas of the houses, which crosses through the mantle allowing the release of contaminated air out of it. Lineup of the houses is continuous in order to generate a faster transfer of heat between mass in contact and the rainwater is collected within the mantle perimeter, which becomes the watering fount for plants, and is also sent to gray waters chambers that distribute them through the residential combo for its usage in toilets of the three areas of the project. Spatial. One of the main characteristics of the elderly is seeing and feeling like a child once again. This involution is produced in many aspects of their lives making the simplest things to stimulate them, somehow constituting a rebirth, a discovering or rediscovering of the world. Physical conditions change, their body posture shrinks making their sight angle to point downwards, approximating to a child’s height. From this point emerges the intention of relating this childhood evocative process with what is special about a garden, seeing it as the place that naturally, as an inherent issue to the childhood, reminds us of our happy moments of games, friends and freedom. Considering the effect of emotional resonance for the senior citizen that produces an open space surrounded by nature is why the mantle that allows evoking colors, textures and odors pertaining to flowers and plants is proposed, creating an interior space full of life and harmony, where what is inert is expelled and joy is welcomed, promoting collective participation and projecting a green image in constant change to the saturated gray city. Patricio Mora Araya Daniela García Letelier Students of Architecture 4th year Architecture Faculty of Architecture, Urbanism and Geography Universidad de Concepción Chile
  • 34 Childhood Evocative Mantle PROJECT NAME: CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE FUNCTION: RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS FOR OLDER ADULT. UNIVERSITY: UNIVERSITY OF CONCEPCION, CHILE PROJECT TEAM: PATRICIO MORA ARAYA AND DANIELA GARCIA LETELIER (Students of Architecture 4th year 2008) DESIGN DATE: SEPTEMBER 2008 COMPLETION DATE: DECEMBER 2008 AREA: 3650 SQM RELATED LINKS : http://www.chilearq.com/obra/patricimora/1665/ CHILDHOOD EVOCATIVE MANTLE is a project that aims to propose a new habitability model able to give an answer to the current life-styles of the older adult. The proposal arises as a qualitative solution for the inhabiting of the older adult that, along with the creation of a set of houses, seeks the endowment of an inhabitable environment, constituting a combo that places itself spatially, formally and functionally under a mantle, which allows having solutions under different circumstances to the main aspects of the life of a current older adult: dwelling-house, garden-nursery, neighborhood-common green areas. The project places itself in the city of Concepción, Bío-Bío region, Chile; a city with mild-rainy climate and with an eight-month precipitations period yearly. This situation makes it difficult to enjoy outdoor recreation and has an impact on the complete social development of the older adult, where recreation plays a fundamental role for keeping their mental health. The project Manto Evocador de la Infancia propitiates meetings for people 365 days per year; this condition is complemented with sustainability variables in space design and creation, which is the case of the handling of the greenhouse effect produced under the mantle. This allows controlling the temperature difference of the interior space between 5 and 10°C in comparison with the exterior, which affects by being warmer during the winter and cooler during the summer due to the solar protection that the enveloping surface of deciduous generates over the mantle. The main variables considered in the design of this project are: Social - financial. The project is a model that integrates a flower growing system that aims to reinsert the older adult productively. The challenge is to achieve social management to avoid segregation and to strengthen self-confidence by giving them a tool that makes them feel useful again to society. From this point arises “Huerta de Los Ancianos de Tucapel Bajo”, transforming this center in a social referent to the city which, in practice, would allow generating extra incomes for this age group that demands a strong financial support due to medical expenses made through this period of life, among other reasons. Functional. The concept of combo corresponds to a mini-city in which three big areas are distinguished among which the common spaces and flowery nursery stand out. These areas not only give economic support, but also a welcoming and pleasant environment for its residents. The central volume of the combo corresponds to the common center for senior citizens, in charge of satisfying the recreational and union needs of the elderly, which also has spaces for flowery workshops where they can create their own products to be sold later in the flower shop of the combo. On the right area (north) is placed the guided village for senior citizens, which has 24 dwelling-modules conforming a common yard between them. Towards the left side of the club (south) is placed the collective residence for senior citizens, which has 30-double bedrooms conforming one module and that in the center contains common spaces as dining rooms, visiting rooms, living rooms, etc. Sustainability. The mantle covers 100% of the combo, making it like the function of a greenhouse that obtains heat energy from the environment, reducing heating costs for the enclosed areas (during the winter) and propitiating the controlled temperature through the deciduous enveloping surface that the mantle has (during the summer), which gives abundant shadow and creates a microclimate favorable to the senior citizens. Ventilation inside the mantle is worked through air-crossed systems with mechanical regulation, set with north-south direction due to the predominant winds in Concepción. It complements with direct extraction chimneys for the wet areas of the houses, which crosses through the mantle allowing the release of contaminated air out of it. Lineup of the houses is continuous in order to generate a faster transfer of heat between mass in contact and the rainwater is collected within the mantle perimeter, which becomes the watering fount for plants, and is also sent to gray waters chambers that distribute them through the residential combo for its usage in toilets of the three areas of the project. Spatial. One of the main characteristics of the elderly is seeing and feeling like a child once again. This involution is produced in many aspects of their lives making the simplest things to stimulate them, somehow constituting a rebirth, a discovering or rediscovering of the world. Physical conditions change, their body posture shrinks making their sight angle to point downwards, approximating to a child’s height. From this point emerges the intention of relating this childhood evocative process with what is special about a garden, seeing it as the place that naturally, as an inherent issue to the childhood, reminds us of our happy moments of games, friends and freedom. Considering the effect of emotional resonance for the senior citizen that produces an open space surrounded by nature is why the mantle that allows evoking colors, textures and odors pertaining to flowers and plants is proposed, creating an interior space full of life and harmony, where what is inert is expelled and joy is welcomed, promoting collective participation and projecting a green image in constant change to the saturated gray city. Patricio Mora Araya Daniela García Letelier Students of Architecture 4th year Architecture Faculty of Architecture, Urbanism and Geography Universidad de Concepción Chile
  • 35 Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless RE: CONSTRUCT. FOLDED BAMBOO + PAPER HOUSE Temporary shelters for earthquake’s homeless Ming Tang, LEED AP Tang & Yang Architects. LLC [email_address] After a magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck central China last May, killing 69,000 people, injuring hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless, the government is planning an extensive reconstruction project that includes building more than 1.5 million temporary homes, which are expected to last two or three years. Hundreds of Chinese factories that make tents and temporary buildings are maximizing their production for the sake of the earthquake survivors, many of whom lost everything. The central feature of our project is the development of a temporary shelter for the homeless people, a kinetic structure that exhibits characteristics of umbrella and folded fans, with the potential of arranging themselves into various contexts and dwelling requirements. We named it as Bamboo + paper House, a self reconstructive structure for instant installations, which, according to the changing internal requirements and site topography, can produce potentially infinite scenarios. 1. Bamboo house As the fastest growing plant, Bamboo reaches full height in one growth spurt of about two months. When bamboo is harvested, the root system is unharmed and healthy, ready to produce more shoots, just like a grass lawn. Thick bamboo poles are 2-3 times stronger than comparable size of wood timber. Bamboo can be harvested in 7 years versus 10-50 years for softwoods and hardwoods, yielding up to 20 times more than wood. It produces greater biomass and 30% more oxygen than a hardwood forest on the same area, while improving watersheds, preventing erosion, restoring soil, providing sweet edible shoots and removing toxins from contaminated soil. Rather than using the industry mass production to generate uniform dwellings, the Folded Bamboo House uses a simple kinetic structure made by bamboo, a kind of bottom-up assembling of complex adaptive systems that self-regulate, in opposition to top-down overarching principles. The straight bamboo poles are used to create ruled surfaceshelicoid, hyperbolic paraholoid and hyperboloid of revolution. The result of Folded Bamboo House is a reflection of the logic of fold versus unfolds, self-construction versus de-construction, permanent structure versus mobility. The characteristic of the Folded Bamboo House heavily relies on the umbrella structure’s open angle and the spatial relations of each rib. The Folded House is transported to site and modified by the social, economic and culture requirements of the user. With this user customized system, the house can react to external stimuli and be transformed with a short time responding to the light, wind or temperature change. 2. Folded Paper house With over 50% of the average landfill mass comprised of paper, and with the growing need to decrease landfill input for economic reasons, the ability to turn this paper into usable, stable, strong building products is a great advantage. Paper is recycled content (post-consumer and pre-consumer). Use of savaged paper reduced the environmental impacts and energy cost of producing new construction products and material. There impacts are significant since buildings account for a large portion of our natural resources consumption, including 40% raw stone, gravel and sand, and 25% of virgin wood. The composed of paper fibers, water, and cement can be used for a variety of construction applications. After draining the majority of the water, the slurry can be molded into tubes to be used as a construction material. The light weight paper house can be pre-assembled in the factory, folded into a small package, loaded into a truck for transportation. By changing the angle of kinetic structure, a folded paper house can deform into unlimited forms. Thus, these process-driven methods produce the living units, community center, restaurant, and multiple use shops. Beyond these functions, spatiotemoporal organization also produces dynamic building profile, various compositions to represent diverse culture experiences and historical references.
  • 35 Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless RE: CONSTRUCT. FOLDED BAMBOO + PAPER HOUSE Temporary shelters for earthquake’s homeless Ming Tang, LEED AP Tang & Yang Architects. LLC [email_address] After a magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck central China last May, killing 69,000 people, injuring hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless, the government is planning an extensive reconstruction project that includes building more than 1.5 million temporary homes, which are expected to last two or three years. Hundreds of Chinese factories that make tents and temporary buildings are maximizing their production for the sake of the earthquake survivors, many of whom lost everything. The central feature of our project is the development of a temporary shelter for the homeless people, a kinetic structure that exhibits characteristics of umbrella and folded fans, with the potential of arranging themselves into various contexts and dwelling requirements. We named it as Bamboo + paper House, a self reconstructive structure for instant installations, which, according to the changing internal requirements and site topography, can produce potentially infinite scenarios. 1. Bamboo house As the fastest growing plant, Bamboo reaches full height in one growth spurt of about two months. When bamboo is harvested, the root system is unharmed and healthy, ready to produce more shoots, just like a grass lawn. Thick bamboo poles are 2-3 times stronger than comparable size of wood timber. Bamboo can be harvested in 7 years versus 10-50 years for softwoods and hardwoods, yielding up to 20 times more than wood. It produces greater biomass and 30% more oxygen than a hardwood forest on the same area, while improving watersheds, preventing erosion, restoring soil, providing sweet edible shoots and removing toxins from contaminated soil. Rather than using the industry mass production to generate uniform dwellings, the Folded Bamboo House uses a simple kinetic structure made by bamboo, a kind of bottom-up assembling of complex adaptive systems that self-regulate, in opposition to top-down overarching principles. The straight bamboo poles are used to create ruled surfaceshelicoid, hyperbolic paraholoid and hyperboloid of revolution. The result of Folded Bamboo House is a reflection of the logic of fold versus unfolds, self-construction versus de-construction, permanent structure versus mobility. The characteristic of the Folded Bamboo House heavily relies on the umbrella structure’s open angle and the spatial relations of each rib. The Folded House is transported to site and modified by the social, economic and culture requirements of the user. With this user customized system, the house can react to external stimuli and be transformed with a short time responding to the light, wind or temperature change. 2. Folded Paper house With over 50% of the average landfill mass comprised of paper, and with the growing need to decrease landfill input for economic reasons, the ability to turn this paper into usable, stable, strong building products is a great advantage. Paper is recycled content (post-consumer and pre-consumer). Use of savaged paper reduced the environmental impacts and energy cost of producing new construction products and material. There impacts are significant since buildings account for a large portion of our natural resources consumption, including 40% raw stone, gravel and sand, and 25% of virgin wood. The composed of paper fibers, water, and cement can be used for a variety of construction applications. After draining the majority of the water, the slurry can be molded into tubes to be used as a construction material. The light weight paper house can be pre-assembled in the factory, folded into a small package, loaded into a truck for transportation. By changing the angle of kinetic structure, a folded paper house can deform into unlimited forms. Thus, these process-driven methods produce the living units, community center, restaurant, and multiple use shops. Beyond these functions, spatiotemoporal organization also produces dynamic building profile, various compositions to represent diverse culture experiences and historical references.
  • 35 Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless RE: CONSTRUCT. FOLDED BAMBOO + PAPER HOUSE Temporary shelters for earthquake’s homeless Ming Tang, LEED AP Tang & Yang Architects. LLC [email_address] After a magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck central China last May, killing 69,000 people, injuring hundreds of thousands and leaving millions homeless, the government is planning an extensive reconstruction project that includes building more than 1.5 million temporary homes, which are expected to last two or three years. Hundreds of Chinese factories that make tents and temporary buildings are maximizing their production for the sake of the earthquake survivors, many of whom lost everything. The central feature of our project is the development of a temporary shelter for the homeless people, a kinetic structure that exhibits characteristics of umbrella and folded fans, with the potential of arranging themselves into various contexts and dwelling requirements. We named it as Bamboo + paper House, a self reconstructive structure for instant installations, which, according to the changing internal requirements and site topography, can produce potentially infinite scenarios. 1. Bamboo house As the fastest growing plant, Bamboo reaches full height in one growth spurt of about two months. When bamboo is harvested, the root system is unharmed and healthy, ready to produce more shoots, just like a grass lawn. Thick bamboo poles are 2-3 times stronger than comparable size of wood timber. Bamboo can be harvested in 7 years versus 10-50 years for softwoods and hardwoods, yielding up to 20 times more than wood. It produces greater biomass and 30% more oxygen than a hardwood forest on the same area, while improving watersheds, preventing erosion, restoring soil, providing sweet edible shoots and removing toxins from contaminated soil. Rather than using the industry mass production to generate uniform dwellings, the Folded Bamboo House uses a simple kinetic structure made by bamboo, a kind of bottom-up assembling of complex adaptive systems that self-regulate, in opposition to top-down overarching principles. The straight bamboo poles are used to create ruled surfaceshelicoid, hyperbolic paraholoid and hyperboloid of revolution. The result of Folded Bamboo House is a reflection of the logic of fold versus unfolds, self-construction versus de-construction, permanent structure versus mobility. The characteristic of the Folded Bamboo House heavily relies on the umbrella structure’s open angle and the spatial relations of each rib. The Folded House is transported to site and modified by the social, economic and culture requirements of the user. With this user customized system, the house can react to external stimuli and be transformed with a short time responding to the light, wind or temperature change. 2. Folded Paper house With over 50% of the average landfill mass comprised of paper, and with the growing need to decrease landfill input for economic reasons, the ability to turn this paper into usable, stable, strong building products is a great advantage. Paper is recycled content (post-consumer and pre-consumer). Use of savaged paper reduced the environmental impacts and energy cost of producing new construction products and material. There impacts are significant since buildings account for a large portion of our natural resources consumption, including 40% raw stone, gravel and sand, and 25% of virgin wood. The composed of paper fibers, water, and cement can be used for a variety of construction applications. After draining the majority of the water, the slurry can be molded into tubes to be used as a construction material. The light weight paper house can be pre-assembled in the factory, folded into a small package, loaded into a truck for transportation. By changing the angle of kinetic structure, a folded paper house can deform into unlimited forms. Thus, these process-driven methods produce the living units, community center, restaurant, and multiple use shops. Beyond these functions, spatiotemoporal organization also produces dynamic building profile, various compositions to represent diverse culture experiences and historical references.
  • 36 Helical Stair Gallery Project name: Helical Stair Gallery Function: Temporary Art Gallery Chief Architect: Kyuseon Hong Design Date: 2009.02 Helical Stair Gallery Helical stair, which have been invented by anonymous architect and used over hundreds years to create elegant spatial experiences, could be mentioned as one of the most beautiful self-supporting structure systems. This project is inspired by those structural merits of spiral stair in terms of construction efficiency by modularity with beautiful spatial quality we can obtain from. Moreover, the ultimate goal of this proposal is to extend its role from the spatial component to space itself. The structural center of traditional spiral stair is located in the center of rotational axis of structure; however, the unique characteristic of this proposal is started from the offset of 2 different center points of components’ stacking to create variations and make it as one complete structure with spatial quality not as a device for vertical transportation. In terms of assembling process, more than the half of whole components are simply repeating without dimension changes as several prototypes and the others are changed from those prototypes with several dimensional changes. As a spatial experience, dominant occupiable floor keep continuing to the rooftop surface without any spatial disconnections with spiral stair steps, so occupants can have experiences inside & outside of structure simultaneously and have views over Basingstoke Canal
  • 36 Helical Stair Gallery Project name: Helical Stair Gallery Function: Temporary Art Gallery Chief Architect: Kyuseon Hong Design Date: 2009.02 Helical Stair Gallery Helical stair, which have been invented by anonymous architect and used over hundreds years to create elegant spatial experiences, could be mentioned as one of the most beautiful self-supporting structure systems. This project is inspired by those structural merits of spiral stair in terms of construction efficiency by modularity with beautiful spatial quality we can obtain from. Moreover, the ultimate goal of this proposal is to extend its role from the spatial component to space itself. The structural center of traditional spiral stair is located in the center of rotational axis of structure; however, the unique characteristic of this proposal is started from the offset of 2 different center points of components’ stacking to create variations and make it as one complete structure with spatial quality not as a device for vertical transportation. In terms of assembling process, more than the half of whole components are simply repeating without dimension changes as several prototypes and the others are changed from those prototypes with several dimensional changes. As a spatial experience, dominant occupiable floor keep continuing to the rooftop surface without any spatial disconnections with spiral stair steps, so occupants can have experiences inside & outside of structure simultaneously and have views over Basingstoke Canal
  • 36 Helical Stair Gallery Project name: Helical Stair Gallery Function: Temporary Art Gallery Chief Architect: Kyuseon Hong Design Date: 2009.02 Helical Stair Gallery Helical stair, which have been invented by anonymous architect and used over hundreds years to create elegant spatial experiences, could be mentioned as one of the most beautiful self-supporting structure systems. This project is inspired by those structural merits of spiral stair in terms of construction efficiency by modularity with beautiful spatial quality we can obtain from. Moreover, the ultimate goal of this proposal is to extend its role from the spatial component to space itself. The structural center of traditional spiral stair is located in the center of rotational axis of structure; however, the unique characteristic of this proposal is started from the offset of 2 different center points of components’ stacking to create variations and make it as one complete structure with spatial quality not as a device for vertical transportation. In terms of assembling process, more than the half of whole components are simply repeating without dimension changes as several prototypes and the others are changed from those prototypes with several dimensional changes. As a spatial experience, dominant occupiable floor keep continuing to the rooftop surface without any spatial disconnections with spiral stair steps, so occupants can have experiences inside & outside of structure simultaneously and have views over Basingstoke Canal
  • 37 Universal Public Library - For Disabled `Using daylight as a play` is this project`s goal. Recognizing light by using architecture as a media and enjoying this space is the project`s goal. Light is always even to everything. It is even to plants, animals, and to humans. That is why this library is designed for blind people as well as normal people, to be able to enjoy the play of light through architecture. The spaces that are arranged in a straight line can be defined as one way spaces. One way spaces have more advantages than spaces that are formed like a network for blind people, That is why this library has a public space which has a certain vector. The stack rooms are arranged along the vector direction. The one way spaces are stacked vertically also, and are connected with a ramp, so that horizontal movement can occur at the same time with vertical movement.
  • 37 Universal Public Library - For Disabled `Using daylight as a play` is this project`s goal. Recognizing light by using architecture as a media and enjoying this space is the project`s goal. Light is always even to everything. It is even to plants, animals, and to humans. That is why this library is designed for blind people as well as normal people, to be able to enjoy the play of light through architecture. The spaces that are arranged in a straight line can be defined as one way spaces. One way spaces have more advantages than spaces that are formed like a network for blind people, That is why this library has a public space which has a certain vector. The stack rooms are arranged along the vector direction. The one way spaces are stacked vertically also, and are connected with a ramp, so that horizontal movement can occur at the same time with vertical movement.
  • 37 Universal Public Library - For Disabled `Using daylight as a play` is this project`s goal. Recognizing light by using architecture as a media and enjoying this space is the project`s goal. Light is always even to everything. It is even to plants, animals, and to humans. That is why this library is designed for blind people as well as normal people, to be able to enjoy the play of light through architecture. The spaces that are arranged in a straight line can be defined as one way spaces. One way spaces have more advantages than spaces that are formed like a network for blind people, That is why this library has a public space which has a certain vector. The stack rooms are arranged along the vector direction. The one way spaces are stacked vertically also, and are connected with a ramp, so that horizontal movement can occur at the same time with vertical movement.
  • 38 Sarmiento Square DESCRIPTIVE MEMORY GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS The project is part of a strategy to intervene and recover public space, in the historical district of San Fernando City. The meaning of this intervention is associated with the social role of public space within the city scheme. This is a civilian space, binding and a generator of social and partaking coexistence. The public space offers a possibility to experience some sense of collective identity, which is shared by the different constituents of society. Plaza Sarmiento is located on the corner of Tres de Febrero and Nueve de Julio streets and amidst the city scheme, where two of its limits are streets and the other two are neighboring properties. The features are those of a “dry” park, where a children’s playground prevails. The project’s goal is to fully engage in all the needs and situations existing on the site.. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS URBAN LIMITS The care of public space in the city, sometimes creates a need –in neighbors and city authorities- to limit its use at night. The project focuses on managing those limits in the most sensitive way possible. That is to say, taking into consideration the needs imposed by city life, but with no disregard for city space quality. The project does not consider railings as a “necessary distress” but includes them in the design idea of the park, ridding them of any negative connotation: The railings are set up with a diagonal design which defines the two main sectors of the park: one which will always be open to the city (urban sector) and the other which closes at night (playground sector). This way, during the day as well as at night, railings become one more element of the park’s equipment. The enclosure is made by modules formed of a fixed panel, a mobile/sliding panel, a green flower-bed, a tree and a bench which, as a composite, make a rest area and define the city landscape. The dividing walls are used as part of the landscape. By means of grade slopes on the floor (playground and green terrace) and the planned vines, the present “back walls” have a new meaning and become green surfaces that jazz the park up.
  • 38 Sarmiento Square DESCRIPTIVE MEMORY GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS The project is part of a strategy to intervene and recover public space, in the historical district of San Fernando City. The meaning of this intervention is associated with the social role of public space within the city scheme. This is a civilian space, binding and a generator of social and partaking coexistence. The public space offers a possibility to experience some sense of collective identity, which is shared by the different constituents of society. Plaza Sarmiento is located on the corner of Tres de Febrero and Nueve de Julio streets and amidst the city scheme, where two of its limits are streets and the other two are neighboring properties. The features are those of a “dry” park, where a children’s playground prevails. The project’s goal is to fully engage in all the needs and situations existing on the site.. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS URBAN LIMITS The care of public space in the city, sometimes creates a need –in neighbors and city authorities- to limit its use at night. The project focuses on managing those limits in the most sensitive way possible. That is to say, taking into consideration the needs imposed by city life, but with no disregard for city space quality. The project does not consider railings as a “necessary distress” but includes them in the design idea of the park, ridding them of any negative connotation: The railings are set up with a diagonal design which defines the two main sectors of the park: one which will always be open to the city (urban sector) and the other which closes at night (playground sector). This way, during the day as well as at night, railings become one more element of the park’s equipment. The enclosure is made by modules formed of a fixed panel, a mobile/sliding panel, a green flower-bed, a tree and a bench which, as a composite, make a rest area and define the city landscape. The dividing walls are used as part of the landscape. By means of grade slopes on the floor (playground and green terrace) and the planned vines, the present “back walls” have a new meaning and become green surfaces that jazz the park up.
  • 38 Sarmiento Square DESCRIPTIVE MEMORY GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS The project is part of a strategy to intervene and recover public space, in the historical district of San Fernando City. The meaning of this intervention is associated with the social role of public space within the city scheme. This is a civilian space, binding and a generator of social and partaking coexistence. The public space offers a possibility to experience some sense of collective identity, which is shared by the different constituents of society. Plaza Sarmiento is located on the corner of Tres de Febrero and Nueve de Julio streets and amidst the city scheme, where two of its limits are streets and the other two are neighboring properties. The features are those of a “dry” park, where a children’s playground prevails. The project’s goal is to fully engage in all the needs and situations existing on the site.. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS URBAN LIMITS The care of public space in the city, sometimes creates a need –in neighbors and city authorities- to limit its use at night. The project focuses on managing those limits in the most sensitive way possible. That is to say, taking into consideration the needs imposed by city life, but with no disregard for city space quality. The project does not consider railings as a “necessary distress” but includes them in the design idea of the park, ridding them of any negative connotation: The railings are set up with a diagonal design which defines the two main sectors of the park: one which will always be open to the city (urban sector) and the other which closes at night (playground sector). This way, during the day as well as at night, railings become one more element of the park’s equipment. The enclosure is made by modules formed of a fixed panel, a mobile/sliding panel, a green flower-bed, a tree and a bench which, as a composite, make a rest area and define the city landscape. The dividing walls are used as part of the landscape. By means of grade slopes on the floor (playground and green terrace) and the planned vines, the present “back walls” have a new meaning and become green surfaces that jazz the park up.
  • 39 Ngari School Project Name: Ngari School Stage 1 Function: School Classroom building Chief Architect/ Office Name: Emergency Architects / Emergency Architects Australia Project team: Guy Luscombe (Team Leader) Nicolas Ewald David Rapaport Barry Gibbon Rod Simpson Joe Loh Sandra Behrendt Robbie Dodds Erin Foley Fatima Touati David Kaunitz Davidson Livah (Local builder) Michael Vavu (Local builder) Client: Solomon Islands Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development (MEHRD) / EU Stabex - Design and Construction Phases Unicef Recovery Action and Rehabilation Project (RARP) with New Caledonia Agence Developpement Francais – Stage 1 Construction Phase Consultancy / Collaboration Partners: Engineering Advice - Partner Housing: Rod Johnston Stephen Maher Simon Matthews Rodney Pratt Design Date: August 2008 Completion Date: December 2008 Area: 129.6 sqm Related Links: www.emergencyarchitects.org.au http:// www.emergencyarchitects.org.au On April 2nd 2007, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunami hit the Western Province of the already impoverished Solomon Islands devastating villages and destroying hundreds of houses and schools. The Ngari School building was designed and built as a prototype to aid rebuilding efforts. This modest two classroom block was the first school building to be built as part of the Unicef led response program. Emergency Architects was originally approached by the European Union and the Solomon Islands Government to provide simple, appropriate, sustainable designs for the 130 schools affected by the disaster. The brief was to produce a suite of building designs that could be used for the various functions of a school in remote regions of the Solomon Islands, places that can sometimes only be accessed by boat or foot. The buildings had to be easy to construct using local labour and materials and had to be earthquake resistant, naturally lit and well ventilated. The building is made entirely of timbers cut on site and the windows are made locally from hand woven fibre. A truly collaborative project, workshops and community consultation were held to enable participation and comment by user groups with the design being completed on a pro bono basis by architects and engineers in Australia and the Solomons through Emergency Architects. Once on site local labour was used to engage the community, provide training and build capacity and it was constructed to program in 10 weeks for $35,000AUD ($270/sqm), an amazing feat in that environment! Subsequent refinements to the design have made further savings so that future buildings will be even cheaper. Architects are often criticised for being exclusive, over budget and taking too long so it was uplifting to see that a simple building, designed for its purpose, could not only meet its programmatic requirements (and a dire need!) but could also be cheaper than some of the less appropriate alternatives proposed for the reconstruction efforts.
  • 39 Ngari School Project Name: Ngari School Stage 1 Function: School Classroom building Chief Architect/ Office Name: Emergency Architects / Emergency Architects Australia Project team: Guy Luscombe (Team Leader) Nicolas Ewald David Rapaport Barry Gibbon Rod Simpson Joe Loh Sandra Behrendt Robbie Dodds Erin Foley Fatima Touati David Kaunitz Davidson Livah (Local builder) Michael Vavu (Local builder) Client: Solomon Islands Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development (MEHRD) / EU Stabex - Design and Construction Phases Unicef Recovery Action and Rehabilation Project (RARP) with New Caledonia Agence Developpement Francais – Stage 1 Construction Phase Consultancy / Collaboration Partners: Engineering Advice - Partner Housing: Rod Johnston Stephen Maher Simon Matthews Rodney Pratt Design Date: August 2008 Completion Date: December 2008 Area: 129.6 sqm Related Links: www.emergencyarchitects.org.au http://www.emergencyarchitects.org.au On April 2nd 2007, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunami hit the Western Province of the already impoverished Solomon Islands devastating villages and destroying hundreds of houses and schools. The Ngari School building was designed and built as a prototype to aid rebuilding efforts. This modest two classroom block was the first school building to be built as part of the Unicef led response program. Emergency Architects was originally approached by the European Union and the Solomon Islands Government to provide simple, appropriate, sustainable designs for the 130 schools affected by the disaster. The brief was to produce a suite of building designs that could be used for the various functions of a school in remote regions of the Solomon Islands, places that can sometimes only be accessed by boat or foot. The buildings had to be easy to construct using local labour and materials and had to be earthquake resistant, naturally lit and well ventilated. The building is made entirely of timbers cut on site and the windows are made locally from hand woven fibre. A truly collaborative project, workshops and community consultation were held to enable participation and comment by user groups with the design being completed on a pro bono basis by architects and engineers in Australia and the Solomons through Emergency Architects. Once on site local labour was used to engage the community, provide training and build capacity and it was constructed to program in 10 weeks for $35,000AUD ($270/sqm), an amazing feat in that environment! Subsequent refinements to the design have made further savings so that future buildings will be even cheaper. Architects are often criticised for being exclusive, over budget and taking too long so it was uplifting to see that a simple building, designed for its purpose, could not only meet its programmatic requirements (and a dire need!) but could also be cheaper than some of the less appropriate alternatives proposed for the reconstruction efforts.
  • 39 Ngari School Project Name: Ngari School Stage 1 Function: School Classroom building Chief Architect/ Office Name: Emergency Architects / Emergency Architects Australia Project team: Guy Luscombe (Team Leader) Nicolas Ewald David Rapaport Barry Gibbon Rod Simpson Joe Loh Sandra Behrendt Robbie Dodds Erin Foley Fatima Touati David Kaunitz Davidson Livah (Local builder) Michael Vavu (Local builder) Client: Solomon Islands Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development (MEHRD) / EU Stabex - Design and Construction Phases Unicef Recovery Action and Rehabilation Project (RARP) with New Caledonia Agence Developpement Francais – Stage 1 Construction Phase Consultancy / Collaboration Partners: Engineering Advice - Partner Housing: Rod Johnston Stephen Maher Simon Matthews Rodney Pratt Design Date: August 2008 Completion Date: December 2008 Area: 129.6 sqm Related Links: www.emergencyarchitects.org.au http://www.emergencyarchitects.org.au On April 2nd 2007, an 8.1 magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunami hit the Western Province of the already impoverished Solomon Islands devastating villages and destroying hundreds of houses and schools. The Ngari School building was designed and built as a prototype to aid rebuilding efforts. This modest two classroom block was the first school building to be built as part of the Unicef led response program. Emergency Architects was originally approached by the European Union and the Solomon Islands Government to provide simple, appropriate, sustainable designs for the 130 schools affected by the disaster. The brief was to produce a suite of building designs that could be used for the various functions of a school in remote regions of the Solomon Islands, places that can sometimes only be accessed by boat or foot. The buildings had to be easy to construct using local labour and materials and had to be earthquake resistant, naturally lit and well ventilated. The building is made entirely of timbers cut on site and the windows are made locally from hand woven fibre. A truly collaborative project, workshops and community consultation were held to enable participation and comment by user groups with the design being completed on a pro bono basis by architects and engineers in Australia and the Solomons through Emergency Architects. Once on site local labour was used to engage the community, provide training and build capacity and it was constructed to program in 10 weeks for $35,000AUD ($270/sqm), an amazing feat in that environment! Subsequent refinements to the design have made further savings so that future buildings will be even cheaper. Architects are often criticised for being exclusive, over budget and taking too long so it was uplifting to see that a simple building, designed for its purpose, could not only meet its programmatic requirements (and a dire need!) but could also be cheaper than some of the less appropriate alternatives proposed for the reconstruction efforts.
  • 40 Buqalla Pools & Hotel Pools and Hotel on the natural spot. Meeting place between man and nature. Design and building directed by architect.
  • 40 Buqalla Pools & Hotel Pools and Hotel on the natural spot. Meeting place between man and nature. Design and building directed by architect.
  • 40 Buqalla Pools & Hotel Pools and Hotel on the natural spot. Meeting place between man and nature. Design and building directed by architect.
  • 41 Spriral House Pigniu This Week-End-House in Panix, Pigniu in the Swiss alpine region Surselva is at 4300 feet altitude. It`s spaces are connected in a spiral movment, divided by different levels of the rising spiral. The outside wall is wrapped around twice, like a continuous skin - changing from concrete to wooden shingles.
  • 41 Spriral House Pigniu This Week-End-House in Panix, Pigniu in the Swiss alpine region Surselva is at 4300 feet altitude. It`s spaces are connected in a spiral movment, divided by different levels of the rising spiral. The outside wall is wrapped around twice, like a continuous skin - changing from concrete to wooden shingles.
  • 41 Spriral House Pigniu This Week-End-House in Panix, Pigniu in the Swiss alpine region Surselva is at 4300 feet altitude. It`s spaces are connected in a spiral movment, divided by different levels of the rising spiral. The outside wall is wrapped around twice, like a continuous skin - changing from concrete to wooden shingles.
  • 42 National Wildflower Centre The National Wildflower Centre as a Symbol of Nature and Mathematics The basic geometry and spatial logic of the proposed building is inspired by a simple Mathematical principle found in Nature: the Fibonacci spiral. The building consists of two variations of the Fibonacci spiral. The inner spiral houses public programs such as a conference room, classrooms, and a community room, all encased in a glass skin and covered by a pebble roof. The outer spiral contains operational programs including seed processing rooms and pot plant storage space. The continuous spiral configuration optimizes the functions of National Wildflower Centre complex by promoting integration between the existing brick buildings and the 150-meter long visiting center; providing users with a continuous work flow and enriching visitors` outdoor/indoor experience as they stroll the pebbled roof ramp. The adjacency of the operational spiral and the public spiral also reinforces the educational functions of the complex. Gardeners and visitors will observe one another as they travel the parallel paths along the thickened wall system. Sustainable skin system The outer spiral features a sustainable wildflower screen. The screen is a self-standing structure comprised of an array of small-scale tetra shaped pot holding hoops. The double-skinned screen enhances the buildings energy-saving performance through features such as seasonal daylight control by varying pot arrangement, water irrigation systems, and living machines. The entire operational area becomes a greenhouse enclosed in a glass skin and PV panels. The screen also acts as a vertical display adding an organic texture to the building by arranging seasonal wildflowers along the exterior skin. The future of the National Wildflower Centre Complex Located at the gateway to Liverpool, the National Wildflower Centre complex is expected to go through further developments of its surroundings. Proposed developments include a retrofit of the parkland to incorporate a geo-thermal system to enhance the centre`s climate control as well as a renovation of the existing outdoor garden to feature the same basic geometric rules of the new addition. Such developments will help further establish the National Wildflower Centre`s role as a cradle for natural preservation and public education.
  • 42 National Wildflower Centre The National Wildflower Centre as a Symbol of Nature and Mathematics The basic geometry and spatial logic of the proposed building is inspired by a simple Mathematical principle found in Nature: the Fibonacci spiral. The building consists of two variations of the Fibonacci spiral. The inner spiral houses public programs such as a conference room, classrooms, and a community room, all encased in a glass skin and covered by a pebble roof. The outer spiral contains operational programs including seed processing rooms and pot plant storage space. The continuous spiral configuration optimizes the functions of National Wildflower Centre complex by promoting integration between the existing brick buildings and the 150-meter long visiting center; providing users with a continuous work flow and enriching visitors` outdoor/indoor experience as they stroll the pebbled roof ramp. The adjacency of the operational spiral and the public spiral also reinforces the educational functions of the complex. Gardeners and visitors will observe one another as they travel the parallel paths along the thickened wall system. Sustainable skin system The outer spiral features a sustainable wildflower screen. The screen is a self-standing structure comprised of an array of small-scale tetra shaped pot holding hoops. The double-skinned screen enhances the buildings energy-saving performance through features such as seasonal daylight control by varying pot arrangement, water irrigation systems, and living machines. The entire operational area becomes a greenhouse enclosed in a glass skin and PV panels. The screen also acts as a vertical display adding an organic texture to the building by arranging seasonal wildflowers along the exterior skin. The future of the National Wildflower Centre Complex Located at the gateway to Liverpool, the National Wildflower Centre complex is expected to go through further developments of its surroundings. Proposed developments include a retrofit of the parkland to incorporate a geo-thermal system to enhance the centre`s climate control as well as a renovation of the existing outdoor garden to feature the same basic geometric rules of the new addition. Such developments will help further establish the National Wildflower Centre`s role as a cradle for natural preservation and public education.
  • 42 National Wildflower Centre The National Wildflower Centre as a Symbol of Nature and Mathematics The basic geometry and spatial logic of the proposed building is inspired by a simple Mathematical principle found in Nature: the Fibonacci spiral. The building consists of two variations of the Fibonacci spiral. The inner spiral houses public programs such as a conference room, classrooms, and a community room, all encased in a glass skin and covered by a pebble roof. The outer spiral contains operational programs including seed processing rooms and pot plant storage space. The continuous spiral configuration optimizes the functions of National Wildflower Centre complex by promoting integration between the existing brick buildings and the 150-meter long visiting center; providing users with a continuous work flow and enriching visitors` outdoor/indoor experience as they stroll the pebbled roof ramp. The adjacency of the operational spiral and the public spiral also reinforces the educational functions of the complex. Gardeners and visitors will observe one another as they travel the parallel paths along the thickened wall system. Sustainable skin system The outer spiral features a sustainable wildflower screen. The screen is a self-standing structure comprised of an array of small-scale tetra shaped pot holding hoops. The double-skinned screen enhances the buildings energy-saving performance through features such as seasonal daylight control by varying pot arrangement, water irrigation systems, and living machines. The entire operational area becomes a greenhouse enclosed in a glass skin and PV panels. The screen also acts as a vertical display adding an organic texture to the building by arranging seasonal wildflowers along the exterior skin. The future of the National Wildflower Centre Complex Located at the gateway to Liverpool, the National Wildflower Centre complex is expected to go through further developments of its surroundings. Proposed developments include a retrofit of the parkland to incorporate a geo-thermal system to enhance the centre`s climate control as well as a renovation of the existing outdoor garden to feature the same basic geometric rules of the new addition. Such developments will help further establish the National Wildflower Centre`s role as a cradle for natural preservation and public education.
  • 43 Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital A canteen building for a charitable hospital at Bangalore. Idea was to open the canteen to the green surroundings. Also to keep the costs down. Exiting trees were saved and courtyards introduced. By doing this we got natural light and ventilation throughout the day.This has helped them to avoid using Lights and Fans,which has inturn helped them save evergy and costs. The most important thing is that the doctors love the place ,because it gives them a serene break amongst the greenery from their hectic schedule of saving lives.....
  • 43 Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital A canteen building for a charitable hospital at Bangalore. Idea was to open the canteen to the green surroundings. Also to keep the costs down. Exiting trees were saved and courtyards introduced. By doing this we got natural light and ventilation throughout the day.This has helped them to avoid using Lights and Fans,which has inturn helped them save evergy and costs. The most important thing is that the doctors love the place ,because it gives them a serene break amongst the greenery from their hectic schedule of saving lives.....
  • 43 Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital A canteen building for a charitable hospital at Bangalore. Idea was to open the canteen to the green surroundings. Also to keep the costs down. Exiting trees were saved and courtyards introduced. By doing this we got natural light and ventilation throughout the day.This has helped them to avoid using Lights and Fans,which has inturn helped them save evergy and costs. The most important thing is that the doctors love the place ,because it gives them a serene break amongst the greenery from their hectic schedule of saving lives.....
  • 44 Instant House PROJECT DATA project name: Instant House function: Temporary modular houses hosting the young visitors during the EXPO 2015 location: Parco delle Cave - Milan (Italy) office name: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design project leader: Gianluca Aresta project team: Gianluca Aresta (architect); Gianpiero Conserva (architect); Paolo Tarì (designer). client: Federlegno-Arredo srl design date: november 2008 area: living/sleeping module 8,94 sqm service module 10,64 sqm 2 people box: 19,58 sqm 4 people box: 28,52 sqm 6 people box: 37,46 sqm 8 people box: 46,40 sqm related links: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it DESCRIPTIVE REPORT The famous analyst James Hillman (1926 - 1989) in his "The politics of beauty" wondered how a neglected design, cheap colours, senseless sounds, structures and spaces could cost in terms of physical comfort and psychological balance. According to such reflection we wanted investigate how to find the right balance between the need to provide an accommodation, which is temporary -"instant"– and therefore answering to requirements of low spatial impact, and the need for settlement characterized by biunique capacity, both suitable for the nature of man that in the sense of optimal enjoyment linked to all the sensory aspects. Through the location of the project within the park we want create the potential relationship between man and nature within the city. In this case we chose the urban Parco delle Cave, strategically favorable not only for its landscape quality, but also because it is easily reachable thanks to the networks of connection of the city, among which some are included in the city planning program of Milan (for example, the Via dell’Acqua). One of the most influential appliances deriving from the relationship with the nature within the project is that of the modular aggregation. Specifically it has only one living module, containing two beds and a dining area, that can join with other units in order to reach the capacity of eight people, a toilet and kitchen module, which at the beginning and at the end of the aggregation changes into bathroom space with a technical room, assuming in the composition the function of opening and closing the aggregative system. So the system adapts itself to the natural shape of the place, of which we try to respect the environment through the mimesis deriving from the use of wood and green roof. The aspects of sustainability are closely linked to these two materials: it is enough to think of the low visual and natural impact of the use of wood, especially if it comes from reforested reserves, according to FSC certifications, it is enough to think of the aspect of low energy consumption deriving from the insulation offered by the green roof, on the one hand, and the strategic section of the longitudinally inclined roof, which hinders the summer rays inclined at about 60° and admits the solar rays inclined at about 30°, which heat the environment through the solar greenhouse created. But the planning result meets also the needs linked to the human sensory perception. Indeed we can remake how the longitudinal direction of the staves damps the perception of reduced spaces and how the gradual chromatic lightness relieves the sense of oppression caused by restricted spaces and infuses a pleasant sense of warmth. Finally, the attention paid to the availability by the disabled within each module is no less important: it is possible thanks to apposite external ramps, in case of need. DATI DI PROGETTO nome del progetto: Instant House destinazione d’uso: Cellule abitative di accoglienza per i giovani ospiti dell'EXPO 2015 ubicazione: Parco delle Cave - Milano (Italia) nome dello studio: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design capogruppo del progetto: Gianluca Aresta progettisti: Gianluca Aresta (architeto); Gianpiero Conserva (architetto); Paolo Tarì (designer). committente: Federlegno-Arredo srl data di progetto: novembre 2008 superficie: modulo living 8,94 m² module servizi 10,64 m² unità per 2 persone: 19,58 m² unità per 4 persone: 28,52 m² unità per 6 persone: 37,46 m² unità per 8 persone: 46,40 m² link correlati: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it RELAZIONE DESCRITTIVA Il famoso psicologo analista James Hillman (1926 - 1989) nel suo “La politica della bellezza” si chiedeva quanto potessero costare in termini di benessere fisico e di equilibrio psicologico un design trascurato, coloranti da quattro soldi, suoni, strutture e spazi privi di senso. Sulla scia di una tale riflessione si è voluto indagare sul modo in cui trovare il giusto equilibrio tra la necessità di dare alloggio temporaneo -“instant”- e quindi rispondente a requisiti di basso impatto spaziale, e la necessità di insediamento dalla biunivoca potenzialità, sia nella direzione della natura che dell'uomo, nel senso di fruizione ottimale legata a tutti gli aspetti sensoriali. Attraverso l'ubicazione del progetto all'interno del parco si vuole creare il più potenziale rapporto tra uomo e natura all'interno della città. Nel caso in questione si è scelto il Parco urbano delle Cave, strategicamente favorevole non solo per le sue qualità paesaggistiche,ma anche in quanto risulta essere interessato dalle reti di collegamento della città, anche in programma (si pensi alla via dell'acqua). Una delle più influenti applicazioni derivanti dal rapporto con la natura all'interno del progetto è quella dell'aggregabilità modulare. Nello specifico si conta un solo modulo living, disposto di due letti e spazio pranzo che può aggregarsi ad altre unità per arrivare fino alla capienza di otto persone; di un modulo servizi contenente bagno e cucina che a sua volta all'inizio e alla fine dell' aggregazione varia in spazio bagno più locale tecnico, assumendo la funzione compositiva di apertura e chiusura del sistema aggregativo. Il sistema si integra così con la naturale conformazione del posto, del quale si cerca di rasentare una forma di rispetto con la mimesis derivante dall'utilizzo del legno e del tetto verde. Strettamente legati a questi due materiali sono gli aspetti della ecocompatibilità: si pensi al basso impatto sia visivo che naturale dell'uso del legno, a maggior ragione se questo deriva da riserve riforestabili, in base alle certificazioni FSC; all'aspetto del basso consumo energetico derivante dall'isolamento offerto dal tetto verde, da un lato, e dalla strategica sezione dal tetto inclinato in senso longitudinale, che deriva dall'intenzione di ostacolare i raggi estivi inclinati di circa 60° e accogliere quelli solari che, inclinati di circa 30°, riscaldano l'ambiente attraverso la serra solare creata. Ma il risultato progettuale risponde anche ad esigenze legate alla percezione sensoriale umana. Infatti si può notare come l'orientamento delle doghe in senso longitudinale smorzi la percezione di spazi ridotti e la graduale chiarezza cromatica dei legni alleggerisca il senso di oppressività derivante da spazi angusti, oltre che infondere un piacevole senso di calore. Infine, non di secondaria importanza è l'attenzione data alla fruibilità da parte dei disabili all'interno di ogni modulo, resa possibile dall'esterno attraverso apposite rampe all'occorrenza.
  • 44 Instant House PROJECT DATA project name: Instant House function: Temporary modular houses hosting the young visitors during the EXPO 2015 location: Parco delle Cave - Milan (Italy) office name: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design project leader: Gianluca Aresta project team: Gianluca Aresta (architect); Gianpiero Conserva (architect); Paolo Tarì (designer). client: Federlegno-Arredo srl design date: november 2008 area: living/sleeping module 8,94 sqm service module 10,64 sqm 2 people box: 19,58 sqm 4 people box: 28,52 sqm 6 people box: 37,46 sqm 8 people box: 46,40 sqm related links: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it DESCRIPTIVE REPORT The famous analyst James Hillman (1926 - 1989) in his "The politics of beauty" wondered how a neglected design, cheap colours, senseless sounds, structures and spaces could cost in terms of physical comfort and psychological balance. According to such reflection we wanted investigate how to find the right balance between the need to provide an accommodation, which is temporary -"instant"– and therefore answering to requirements of low spatial impact, and the need for settlement characterized by biunique capacity, both suitable for the nature of man that in the sense of optimal enjoyment linked to all the sensory aspects. Through the location of the project within the park we want create the potential relationship between man and nature within the city. In this case we chose the urban Parco delle Cave, strategically favorable not only for its landscape quality, but also because it is easily reachable thanks to the networks of connection of the city, among which some are included in the city planning program of Milan (for example, the Via dell’Acqua). One of the most influential appliances deriving from the relationship with the nature within the project is that of the modular aggregation. Specifically it has only one living module, containing two beds and a dining area, that can join with other units in order to reach the capacity of eight people, a toilet and kitchen module, which at the beginning and at the end of the aggregation changes into bathroom space with a technical room, assuming in the composition the function of opening and closing the aggregative system. So the system adapts itself to the natural shape of the place, of which we try to respect the environment through the mimesis deriving from the use of wood and green roof. The aspects of sustainability are closely linked to these two materials: it is enough to think of the low visual and natural impact of the use of wood, especially if it comes from reforested reserves, according to FSC certifications, it is enough to think of the aspect of low energy consumption deriving from the insulation offered by the green roof, on the one hand, and the strategic section of the longitudinally inclined roof, which hinders the summer rays inclined at about 60° and admits the solar rays inclined at about 30°, which heat the environment through the solar greenhouse created. But the planning result meets also the needs linked to the human sensory perception. Indeed we can remake how the longitudinal direction of the staves damps the perception of reduced spaces and how the gradual chromatic lightness relieves the sense of oppression caused by restricted spaces and infuses a pleasant sense of warmth. Finally, the attention paid to the availability by the disabled within each module is no less important: it is possible thanks to apposite external ramps, in case of need. DATI DI PROGETTO nome del progetto: Instant House destinazione d’uso: Cellule abitative di accoglienza per i giovani ospiti dell'EXPO 2015 ubicazione: Parco delle Cave - Milano (Italia) nome dello studio: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design capogruppo del progetto: Gianluca Aresta progettisti: Gianluca Aresta (architeto); Gianpiero Conserva (architetto); Paolo Tarì (designer). committente: Federlegno-Arredo srl data di progetto: novembre 2008 superficie: modulo living 8,94 m² module servizi 10,64 m² unità per 2 persone: 19,58 m² unità per 4 persone: 28,52 m² unità per 6 persone: 37,46 m² unità per 8 persone: 46,40 m² link correlati: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it RELAZIONE DESCRITTIVA Il famoso psicologo analista James Hillman (1926 - 1989) nel suo “La politica della bellezza” si chiedeva quanto potessero costare in termini di benessere fisico e di equilibrio psicologico un design trascurato, coloranti da quattro soldi, suoni, strutture e spazi privi di senso. Sulla scia di una tale riflessione si è voluto indagare sul modo in cui trovare il giusto equilibrio tra la necessità di dare alloggio temporaneo -“instant”- e quindi rispondente a requisiti di basso impatto spaziale, e la necessità di insediamento dalla biunivoca potenzialità, sia nella direzione della natura che dell'uomo, nel senso di fruizione ottimale legata a tutti gli aspetti sensoriali. Attraverso l'ubicazione del progetto all'interno del parco si vuole creare il più potenziale rapporto tra uomo e natura all'interno della città. Nel caso in questione si è scelto il Parco urbano delle Cave, strategicamente favorevole non solo per le sue qualità paesaggistiche,ma anche in quanto risulta essere interessato dalle reti di collegamento della città, anche in programma (si pensi alla via dell'acqua). Una delle più influenti applicazioni derivanti dal rapporto con la natura all'interno del progetto è quella dell'aggregabilità modulare. Nello specifico si conta un solo modulo living, disposto di due letti e spazio pranzo che può aggregarsi ad altre unità per arrivare fino alla capienza di otto persone; di un modulo servizi contenente bagno e cucina che a sua volta all'inizio e alla fine dell' aggregazione varia in spazio bagno più locale tecnico, assumendo la funzione compositiva di apertura e chiusura del sistema aggregativo. Il sistema si integra così con la naturale conformazione del posto, del quale si cerca di rasentare una forma di rispetto con la mimesis derivante dall'utilizzo del legno e del tetto verde. Strettamente legati a questi due materiali sono gli aspetti della ecocompatibilità: si pensi al basso impatto sia visivo che naturale dell'uso del legno, a maggior ragione se questo deriva da riserve riforestabili, in base alle certificazioni FSC; all'aspetto del basso consumo energetico derivante dall'isolamento offerto dal tetto verde, da un lato, e dalla strategica sezione dal tetto inclinato in senso longitudinale, che deriva dall'intenzione di ostacolare i raggi estivi inclinati di circa 60° e accogliere quelli solari che, inclinati di circa 30°, riscaldano l'ambiente attraverso la serra solare creata. Ma il risultato progettuale risponde anche ad esigenze legate alla percezione sensoriale umana. Infatti si può notare come l'orientamento delle doghe in senso longitudinale smorzi la percezione di spazi ridotti e la graduale chiarezza cromatica dei legni alleggerisca il senso di oppressività derivante da spazi angusti, oltre che infondere un piacevole senso di calore. Infine, non di secondaria importanza è l'attenzione data alla fruibilità da parte dei disabili all'interno di ogni modulo, resa possibile dall'esterno attraverso apposite rampe all'occorrenza.
  • 44 Instant House PROJECT DATA project name: Instant House function: Temporary modular houses hosting the young visitors during the EXPO 2015 location: Parco delle Cave - Milan (Italy) office name: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design project leader: Gianluca Aresta project team: Gianluca Aresta (architect); Gianpiero Conserva (architect); Paolo Tarì (designer). client: Federlegno-Arredo srl design date: november 2008 area: living/sleeping module 8,94 sqm service module 10,64 sqm 2 people box: 19,58 sqm 4 people box: 28,52 sqm 6 people box: 37,46 sqm 8 people box: 46,40 sqm related links: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it DESCRIPTIVE REPORT The famous analyst James Hillman (1926 - 1989) in his "The politics of beauty" wondered how a neglected design, cheap colours, senseless sounds, structures and spaces could cost in terms of physical comfort and psychological balance. According to such reflection we wanted investigate how to find the right balance between the need to provide an accommodation, which is temporary -"instant"– and therefore answering to requirements of low spatial impact, and the need for settlement characterized by biunique capacity, both suitable for the nature of man that in the sense of optimal enjoyment linked to all the sensory aspects. Through the location of the project within the park we want create the potential relationship between man and nature within the city. In this case we chose the urban Parco delle Cave, strategically favorable not only for its landscape quality, but also because it is easily reachable thanks to the networks of connection of the city, among which some are included in the city planning program of Milan (for example, the Via dell’Acqua). One of the most influential appliances deriving from the relationship with the nature within the project is that of the modular aggregation. Specifically it has only one living module, containing two beds and a dining area, that can join with other units in order to reach the capacity of eight people, a toilet and kitchen module, which at the beginning and at the end of the aggregation changes into bathroom space with a technical room, assuming in the composition the function of opening and closing the aggregative system. So the system adapts itself to the natural shape of the place, of which we try to respect the environment through the mimesis deriving from the use of wood and green roof. The aspects of sustainability are closely linked to these two materials: it is enough to think of the low visual and natural impact of the use of wood, especially if it comes from reforested reserves, according to FSC certifications, it is enough to think of the aspect of low energy consumption deriving from the insulation offered by the green roof, on the one hand, and the strategic section of the longitudinally inclined roof, which hinders the summer rays inclined at about 60° and admits the solar rays inclined at about 30°, which heat the environment through the solar greenhouse created. But the planning result meets also the needs linked to the human sensory perception. Indeed we can remake how the longitudinal direction of the staves damps the perception of reduced spaces and how the gradual chromatic lightness relieves the sense of oppression caused by restricted spaces and infuses a pleasant sense of warmth. Finally, the attention paid to the availability by the disabled within each module is no less important: it is possible thanks to apposite external ramps, in case of need. DATI DI PROGETTO nome del progetto: Instant House destinazione d’uso: Cellule abitative di accoglienza per i giovani ospiti dell'EXPO 2015 ubicazione: Parco delle Cave - Milano (Italia) nome dello studio: LAeD – Laboratorio di Architettura e Design capogruppo del progetto: Gianluca Aresta progettisti: Gianluca Aresta (architeto); Gianpiero Conserva (architetto); Paolo Tarì (designer). committente: Federlegno-Arredo srl data di progetto: novembre 2008 superficie: modulo living 8,94 m² module servizi 10,64 m² unità per 2 persone: 19,58 m² unità per 4 persone: 28,52 m² unità per 6 persone: 37,46 m² unità per 8 persone: 46,40 m² link correlati: http://www.archiportale.com/progetti/gianluca-aresta/milano/instant-house_15553.html mail: gianluca.aresta@alice.it RELAZIONE DESCRITTIVA Il famoso psicologo analista James Hillman (1926 - 1989) nel suo “La politica della bellezza” si chiedeva quanto potessero costare in termini di benessere fisico e di equilibrio psicologico un design trascurato, coloranti da quattro soldi, suoni, strutture e spazi privi di senso. Sulla scia di una tale riflessione si è voluto indagare sul modo in cui trovare il giusto equilibrio tra la necessità di dare alloggio temporaneo -“instant”- e quindi rispondente a requisiti di basso impatto spaziale, e la necessità di insediamento dalla biunivoca potenzialità, sia nella direzione della natura che dell'uomo, nel senso di fruizione ottimale legata a tutti gli aspetti sensoriali. Attraverso l'ubicazione del progetto all'interno del parco si vuole creare il più potenziale rapporto tra uomo e natura all'interno della città. Nel caso in questione si è scelto il Parco urbano delle Cave, strategicamente favorevole non solo per le sue qualità paesaggistiche,ma anche in quanto risulta essere interessato dalle reti di collegamento della città, anche in programma (si pensi alla via dell'acqua). Una delle più influenti applicazioni derivanti dal rapporto con la natura all'interno del progetto è quella dell'aggregabilità modulare. Nello specifico si conta un solo modulo living, disposto di due letti e spazio pranzo che può aggregarsi ad altre unità per arrivare fino alla capienza di otto persone; di un modulo servizi contenente bagno e cucina che a sua volta all'inizio e alla fine dell' aggregazione varia in spazio bagno più locale tecnico, assumendo la funzione compositiva di apertura e chiusura del sistema aggregativo. Il sistema si integra così con la naturale conformazione del posto, del quale si cerca di rasentare una forma di rispetto con la mimesis derivante dall'utilizzo del legno e del tetto verde. Strettamente legati a questi due materiali sono gli aspetti della ecocompatibilità: si pensi al basso impatto sia visivo che naturale dell'uso del legno, a maggior ragione se questo deriva da riserve riforestabili, in base alle certificazioni FSC; all'aspetto del basso consumo energetico derivante dall'isolamento offerto dal tetto verde, da un lato, e dalla strategica sezione dal tetto inclinato in senso longitudinale, che deriva dall'intenzione di ostacolare i raggi estivi inclinati di circa 60° e accogliere quelli solari che, inclinati di circa 30°, riscaldano l'ambiente attraverso la serra solare creata. Ma il risultato progettuale risponde anche ad esigenze legate alla percezione sensoriale umana. Infatti si può notare come l'orientamento delle doghe in senso longitudinale smorzi la percezione di spazi ridotti e la graduale chiarezza cromatica dei legni alleggerisca il senso di oppressività derivante da spazi angusti, oltre che infondere un piacevole senso di calore. Infine, non di secondaria importanza è l'attenzione data alla fruibilità da parte dei disabili all'interno di ogni modulo, resa possibile dall'esterno attraverso apposite rampe all'occorrenza.
  • 45 Modern Art Museum SUBJECT: The museum of Modern Art The museum is situated on the inclined relief under ground. Only light elements are lifted from the ground. There are escalators in the museum which help the one to move through the museum. Whole museum is a one system so the viewer can inspect the whole museum only going on the single route.
  • 45 Modern Art Museum SUBJECT: The museum of Modern Art The museum is situated on the inclined relief under ground. Only light elements are lifted from the ground. There are escalators in the museum which help the one to move through the museum. Whole museum is a one system so the viewer can inspect the whole museum only going on the single route.
  • 45 Modern Art Museum SUBJECT: The museum of Modern Art The museum is situated on the inclined relief under ground. Only light elements are lifted from the ground. There are escalators in the museum which help the one to move through the museum. Whole museum is a one system so the viewer can inspect the whole museum only going on the single route.
  • 46 Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center project name: Water -Touristic complex in Kaliningrad center function: Hotel and Residential buildings chief architect/office name: prof. Andrey B.Nekrasov, Alexander A.Tsibaikin project team: Evgeniya Yatsyuk client: Diploma project design date: 01/09/07 completion date: 01/06/08 area: Russia.Kaliningrad The main idea of the project is to create a development which is used to be in the central part, before war started using old red lines according with old drafts and documents related to period before war. A new view is going to be created using new technologies; new materials and using glass-let’s say a contemporary view on architecture before war period. In the north, site is bounded with general Karbushev embankment, from the west side with Oktiabriaskaia street, from the south Solnechnui boulevard, from the east general Pavlov street. New quarters will include small private hotel complexes, living area, spaces for artists. Cafés, restaurant, bars, souvenir shops, tourist centers, small museums, and galleries are going to locate on the ground floor. On the bank of the river Pregol will be situated fishing markets-places Kaliningrad used to be proud of. Infrastructure is going to be pleasant not only for people who live in Kaliningrad but also for tourists from abroad. Another pleasant thing of creating old development is to avert easy view to existing development of 1970, which are nowadays organizes surrounding area. Marina is planned on the site connected with a river Pregol and will be in a sense of transport a connection- in this way an opportunity would appear to use yachts and other water transport for communication. A hotel complex surrounds water space with open view on the cathedral and water. The hotel territory is represented with the 9 volumes, common space underground where restaurants are located and managerial rooms unite buildings. Pedestrian Boulevard visually connects cathedral on the Knaiphov island and Evangelicheskaia church on Lomse and divides both zones: hotel and living area. Living complex has inner courtyard for people living in this complex only. Access is limited because the courtyard is situated on -3. 000 mark, while pedestrian Boulevard runs on the 0. 000 mark though living and public spaces are in a different levels. The lowest part in the living complex comprises shops, library, sports area, small cinema. Underground level is planned as a parking space for all people living in the complex. On the 5-6 level 2 story apartments are located. Thus a result of all work was a creation a new image of a town which is used to be here not copying it but creating new one with a memory of the past.
  • 46 Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center project name: Water -Touristic complex in Kaliningrad center function: Hotel and Residential buildings chief architect/office name: prof. Andrey B.Nekrasov, Alexander A.Tsibaikin project team: Evgeniya Yatsyuk client: Diploma project design date: 01/09/07 completion date: 01/06/08 area: Russia.Kaliningrad The main idea of the project is to create a development which is used to be in the central part, before war started using old red lines according with old drafts and documents related to period before war. A new view is going to be created using new technologies; new materials and using glass-let’s say a contemporary view on architecture before war period. In the north, site is bounded with general Karbushev embankment, from the west side with Oktiabriaskaia street, from the south Solnechnui boulevard, from the east general Pavlov street. New quarters will include small private hotel complexes, living area, spaces for artists. Cafés, restaurant, bars, souvenir shops, tourist centers, small museums, and galleries are going to locate on the ground floor. On the bank of the river Pregol will be situated fishing markets-places Kaliningrad used to be proud of. Infrastructure is going to be pleasant not only for people who live in Kaliningrad but also for tourists from abroad. Another pleasant thing of creating old development is to avert easy view to existing development of 1970, which are nowadays organizes surrounding area. Marina is planned on the site connected with a river Pregol and will be in a sense of transport a connection- in this way an opportunity would appear to use yachts and other water transport for communication. A hotel complex surrounds water space with open view on the cathedral and water. The hotel territory is represented with the 9 volumes, common space underground where restaurants are located and managerial rooms unite buildings. Pedestrian Boulevard visually connects cathedral on the Knaiphov island and Evangelicheskaia church on Lomse and divides both zones: hotel and living area. Living complex has inner courtyard for people living in this complex only. Access is limited because the courtyard is situated on -3. 000 mark, while pedestrian Boulevard runs on the 0. 000 mark though living and public spaces are in a different levels. The lowest part in the living complex comprises shops, library, sports area, small cinema. Underground level is planned as a parking space for all people living in the complex. On the 5-6 level 2 story apartments are located. Thus a result of all work was a creation a new image of a town which is used to be here not copying it but creating new one with a memory of the past.
  • 46 Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center project name: Water -Touristic complex in Kaliningrad center function: Hotel and Residential buildings chief architect/office name: prof. Andrey B.Nekrasov, Alexander A.Tsibaikin project team: Evgeniya Yatsyuk client: Diploma project design date: 01/09/07 completion date: 01/06/08 area: Russia.Kaliningrad The main idea of the project is to create a development which is used to be in the central part, before war started using old red lines according with old drafts and documents related to period before war. A new view is going to be created using new technologies; new materials and using glass-let’s say a contemporary view on architecture before war period. In the north, site is bounded with general Karbushev embankment, from the west side with Oktiabriaskaia street, from the south Solnechnui boulevard, from the east general Pavlov street. New quarters will include small private hotel complexes, living area, spaces for artists. Cafés, restaurant, bars, souvenir shops, tourist centers, small museums, and galleries are going to locate on the ground floor. On the bank of the river Pregol will be situated fishing markets-places Kaliningrad used to be proud of. Infrastructure is going to be pleasant not only for people who live in Kaliningrad but also for tourists from abroad. Another pleasant thing of creating old development is to avert easy view to existing development of 1970, which are nowadays organizes surrounding area. Marina is planned on the site connected with a river Pregol and will be in a sense of transport a connection- in this way an opportunity would appear to use yachts and other water transport for communication. A hotel complex surrounds water space with open view on the cathedral and water. The hotel territory is represented with the 9 volumes, common space underground where restaurants are located and managerial rooms unite buildings. Pedestrian Boulevard visually connects cathedral on the Knaiphov island and Evangelicheskaia church on Lomse and divides both zones: hotel and living area. Living complex has inner courtyard for people living in this complex only. Access is limited because the courtyard is situated on -3. 000 mark, while pedestrian Boulevard runs on the 0. 000 mark though living and public spaces are in a different levels. The lowest part in the living complex comprises shops, library, sports area, small cinema. Underground level is planned as a parking space for all people living in the complex. On the 5-6 level 2 story apartments are located. Thus a result of all work was a creation a new image of a town which is used to be here not copying it but creating new one with a memory of the past.
  • 47 Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama H ouse Restoration Located in historic district of Bastakia, the house was owned by Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama who died in 1958. He was appointed as lawyer for commercial affairs in the mid of the twentieth century and was one of the students of the famous Emarati poet Mubarak bin Hamad Al Aqaili. The house is one of the most sophisticated buildings in the Bastakia quarter which considered to be the last coherent group of traditional buildings and windrower houses in the United Arab Emirates. Al Bastakia reflects the role of rich Persian merchant immigrants, who came to area in the beginning of the twentieth century, in developing an exotic architectural style presented in elaborate decoration and intensity of wind towers found in the traditional court houses along the creek. The wind towers became one of the symbols that characterized traditional architecture in the UAE. As such it represents one of the most important architectural, historical and cultural assets not only for Dubai but also for the rest of the United Arab Emirates. The house was built in 1931 around a courtyard with two storyes and a mezzanine in the northern and southern side and two wind towers which descend into living rooms of the first floor. The restoration work was implemented respecting the international ethics and standard of conservation using with local building techniques and traditional materials. Minimum interventions were applied in the design proposal to allow for proper use of the buildings. The project includes also some reconstruction activities for the southern edge of the building and careful restoration work for the other parts of the buildings. One important component of the project was to the re-installing of the beautiful geometric gypsum panels. The house designed both to accommodate extended family and to provide proper privacy for the women according to Moslem tradition. From outside the walls of the houses rise bare, rough, and massive and contrast sharply with the interior where arches and screens achieve an intricate pattern of light and shade. The most distinctive element is the many different types of screens whether a diagonal or louvered timber strips. They serves number of purposes, but all create a degree of privacy across the house between different family zones, breaking up shapes and movement into network of light and shade. The plaster and metal screens above the doors and windows of the ground floor ventilate the stores and winter rooms, allowing smoke and hot or stale air to escape from the latter. The merchant houses of the Bastakia are heavy masonry structure built on the beam and column principle. Three main materials are used through out bastakia: coral and shell stone which is the earliest material and generally appears on the oldest houses; sand lime block (tabuk), which was used concurrently with coral for many years and then took over the main material, the concrete block work and reinforce concrete which was adopted in the 1960`s and 70,s. A quick survey on used building materials in the area shows that about half of the houses were built out from lime block where the other half are divided equally between coral stone which used in this The house of Mohammed Sharif Al Olama represents one of the finest examples of windrower houses in United Arab Emirates. With its rich architectural elements details, the house is a testimony to the living traditions and architectural characteristics reflected in the unique proto type of traditional Emirati house and a record of collective memory and everyday live for the Emirati society in the middle of the twentieth century. The restoration of the House of Mohamed Sharif Sultan Al Olama` Project reflects a sensitive approach to rehabilitation for one of the best and few remaining houses in historic Bastakia in Dubai. The restoration principles employed may well serve as a guide for further projects concerned with conservation of cultural properties. Constructed in 1931, the house with its distinctive wind towers and beautiful gypsum decoration is considered to be one of the most sophisticated Garden House along the water front. Historically the district of Bastakia exhibits an important interchange and influences based on the Persian Enlightenment reflected in intense use of windrower (Barjil) in courtyard houses which was adapted to response to the harsh climate in the Gulf area.The house was restored in 2006 by Dubai Municipality to be used as the administrative offices for the Architectural Heritage Department. This building is also open for public and visitors who are interested in local architectural in the UAE house and concrete blocks.
  • 47 Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama H ouse Restoration Located in historic district of Bastakia, the house was owned by Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama who died in 1958. He was appointed as lawyer for commercial affairs in the mid of the twentieth century and was one of the students of the famous Emarati poet Mubarak bin Hamad Al Aqaili. The house is one of the most sophisticated buildings in the Bastakia quarter which considered to be the last coherent group of traditional buildings and windrower houses in the United Arab Emirates. Al Bastakia reflects the role of rich Persian merchant immigrants, who came to area in the beginning of the twentieth century, in developing an exotic architectural style presented in elaborate decoration and intensity of wind towers found in the traditional court houses along the creek. The wind towers became one of the symbols that characterized traditional architecture in the UAE. As such it represents one of the most important architectural, historical and cultural assets not only for Dubai but also for the rest of the United Arab Emirates. The house was built in 1931 around a courtyard with two storyes and a mezzanine in the northern and southern side and two wind towers which descend into living rooms of the first floor. The restoration work was implemented respecting the international ethics and standard of conservation using with local building techniques and traditional materials. Minimum interventions were applied in the design proposal to allow for proper use of the buildings. The project includes also some reconstruction activities for the southern edge of the building and careful restoration work for the other parts of the buildings. One important component of the project was to the re-installing of the beautiful geometric gypsum panels. The house designed both to accommodate extended family and to provide proper privacy for the women according to Moslem tradition. From outside the walls of the houses rise bare, rough, and massive and contrast sharply with the interior where arches and screens achieve an intricate pattern of light and shade. The most distinctive element is the many different types of screens whether a diagonal or louvered timber strips. They serves number of purposes, but all create a degree of privacy across the house between different family zones, breaking up shapes and movement into network of light and shade. The plaster and metal screens above the doors and windows of the ground floor ventilate the stores and winter rooms, allowing smoke and hot or stale air to escape from the latter. The merchant houses of the Bastakia are heavy masonry structure built on the beam and column principle. Three main materials are used through out bastakia: coral and shell stone which is the earliest material and generally appears on the oldest houses; sand lime block (tabuk), which was used concurrently with coral for many years and then took over the main material, the concrete block work and reinforce concrete which was adopted in the 1960`s and 70,s. A quick survey on used building materials in the area shows that about half of the houses were built out from lime block where the other half are divided equally between coral stone which used in this The house of Mohammed Sharif Al Olama represents one of the finest examples of windrower houses in United Arab Emirates. With its rich architectural elements details, the house is a testimony to the living traditions and architectural characteristics reflected in the unique proto type of traditional Emirati house and a record of collective memory and everyday live for the Emirati society in the middle of the twentieth century. The restoration of the House of Mohamed Sharif Sultan Al Olama` Project reflects a sensitive approach to rehabilitation for one of the best and few remaining houses in historic Bastakia in Dubai. The restoration principles employed may well serve as a guide for further projects concerned with conservation of cultural properties. Constructed in 1931, the house with its distinctive wind towers and beautiful gypsum decoration is considered to be one of the most sophisticated Garden House along the water front. Historically the district of Bastakia exhibits an important interchange and influences based on the Persian Enlightenment reflected in intense use of windrower (Barjil) in courtyard houses which was adapted to response to the harsh climate in the Gulf area.The house was restored in 2006 by Dubai Municipality to be used as the administrative offices for the Architectural Heritage Department. This building is also open for public and visitors who are interested in local architectural in the UAE house and concrete blocks.
  • 47 Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama H ouse Restoration Located in historic district of Bastakia, the house was owned by Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama who died in 1958. He was appointed as lawyer for commercial affairs in the mid of the twentieth century and was one of the students of the famous Emarati poet Mubarak bin Hamad Al Aqaili. The house is one of the most sophisticated buildings in the Bastakia quarter which considered to be the last coherent group of traditional buildings and windrower houses in the United Arab Emirates. Al Bastakia reflects the role of rich Persian merchant immigrants, who came to area in the beginning of the twentieth century, in developing an exotic architectural style presented in elaborate decoration and intensity of wind towers found in the traditional court houses along the creek. The wind towers became one of the symbols that characterized traditional architecture in the UAE. As such it represents one of the most important architectural, historical and cultural assets not only for Dubai but also for the rest of the United Arab Emirates. The house was built in 1931 around a courtyard with two storyes and a mezzanine in the northern and southern side and two wind towers which descend into living rooms of the first floor. The restoration work was implemented respecting the international ethics and standard of conservation using with local building techniques and traditional materials. Minimum interventions were applied in the design proposal to allow for proper use of the buildings. The project includes also some reconstruction activities for the southern edge of the building and careful restoration work for the other parts of the buildings. One important component of the project was to the re-installing of the beautiful geometric gypsum panels. The house designed both to accommodate extended family and to provide proper privacy for the women according to Moslem tradition. From outside the walls of the houses rise bare, rough, and massive and contrast sharply with the interior where arches and screens achieve an intricate pattern of light and shade. The most distinctive element is the many different types of screens whether a diagonal or louvered timber strips. They serves number of purposes, but all create a degree of privacy across the house between different family zones, breaking up shapes and movement into network of light and shade. The plaster and metal screens above the doors and windows of the ground floor ventilate the stores and winter rooms, allowing smoke and hot or stale air to escape from the latter. The merchant houses of the Bastakia are heavy masonry structure built on the beam and column principle. Three main materials are used through out bastakia: coral and shell stone which is the earliest material and generally appears on the oldest houses; sand lime block (tabuk), which was used concurrently with coral for many years and then took over the main material, the concrete block work and reinforce concrete which was adopted in the 1960`s and 70,s. A quick survey on used building materials in the area shows that about half of the houses were built out from lime block where the other half are divided equally between coral stone which used in this The house of Mohammed Sharif Al Olama represents one of the finest examples of windrower houses in United Arab Emirates. With its rich architectural elements details, the house is a testimony to the living traditions and architectural characteristics reflected in the unique proto type of traditional Emirati house and a record of collective memory and everyday live for the Emirati society in the middle of the twentieth century. The restoration of the House of Mohamed Sharif Sultan Al Olama` Project reflects a sensitive approach to rehabilitation for one of the best and few remaining houses in historic Bastakia in Dubai. The restoration principles employed may well serve as a guide for further projects concerned with conservation of cultural properties. Constructed in 1931, the house with its distinctive wind towers and beautiful gypsum decoration is considered to be one of the most sophisticated Garden House along the water front. Historically the district of Bastakia exhibits an important interchange and influences based on the Persian Enlightenment reflected in intense use of windrower (Barjil) in courtyard houses which was adapted to response to the harsh climate in the Gulf area.The house was restored in 2006 by Dubai Municipality to be used as the administrative offices for the Architectural Heritage Department. This building is also open for public and visitors who are interested in local architectural in the UAE house and concrete blocks.
  • 48 Temisctocles 12 Temistocles 12 is a building on a rectangular-shaped property, like many others in Polanco. However, the way in which it is set on the property is the result of a structural analysis which allowed us to avoid the use of intermediate columns, and gave us great freedom in the interior distribution. A cube providing lighting and ventilation in the center is also used for stairs that go up the five levels, and reach the eight apartments and pent-house on the top level. Four concrete walls go through the building; they become thinner toward the street, forming two volumes which make up the façade. All the apartments have an irregular terrace to the front, accentuating the verticality of the walls and the depth of the facade. A large tree, which covers the west facade, plus the wide range of apparent materials result in a building with character.
  • 48 Temisctocles 12 Temistocles 12 is a building on a rectangular-shaped property, like many others in Polanco. However, the way in which it is set on the property is the result of a structural analysis which allowed us to avoid the use of intermediate columns, and gave us great freedom in the interior distribution. A cube providing lighting and ventilation in the center is also used for stairs that go up the five levels, and reach the eight apartments and pent-house on the top level. Four concrete walls go through the building; they become thinner toward the street, forming two volumes which make up the façade. All the apartments have an irregular terrace to the front, accentuating the verticality of the walls and the depth of the facade. A large tree, which covers the west facade, plus the wide range of apparent materials result in a building with character.
  • 48 Temisctocles 12 Temistocles 12 is a building on a rectangular-shaped property, like many others in Polanco. However, the way in which it is set on the property is the result of a structural analysis which allowed us to avoid the use of intermediate columns, and gave us great freedom in the interior distribution. A cube providing lighting and ventilation in the center is also used for stairs that go up the five levels, and reach the eight apartments and pent-house on the top level. Four concrete walls go through the building; they become thinner toward the street, forming two volumes which make up the façade. All the apartments have an irregular terrace to the front, accentuating the verticality of the walls and the depth of the facade. A large tree, which covers the west facade, plus the wide range of apparent materials result in a building with character.
  • 49 Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Project: Daniel Moreno Flores Project name: creative offices: RECREATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN ARCHITECTURE Function: Office University: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador Faculty: Architecture, Design and Art City: Quito Ecuador Year: Final project 2006-2007 Professors: Arq. Alexis Mosquera - Arq. José María Sáez Location: Av. De la República, Pasaje Carrión y Alpallana Exterior dimensions: 2404 m2 Interior dimensions: 2062 m2 Surface terrain : 1649,7 m2 related links • Archiprix international. World´s best Graduation Project´s, Hunter Douglas Awards 2009. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.archiprix.org/2009/ • Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.baq-cae.ec/baq-cae/index.php • Universidad Católica del Ecuador, FADA. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.puce.edu.ec/arquitecturaweb/paginas/galeria/trabajos/danielmoreno/Framegen.htm • Revista virtual Trama (Ecuador). Access 22 june 2009 http://www.trama.com.ec/espanol/revistas/articuloCompleto.php?idRevista=30&numeroRevista=100&articuloId=346 • Revista Escala. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.revistaescala.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=162:bienal-de-quito&catid=65:actualidad&Itemid=101 • Pagina web Proyectando. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.proyectando.com.ar/noticias/nov08/2.htm references (if published before): • Libro de la XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito, Trama: 2008. Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador, Editorial Trama. Quito, Ecuador. Noviembre 2008. Páginas 112 y 114. • Archiprix, 2009. Los mejores proyectos de graduación del mundo. editorial 010, stichting Archiprix, Rotterdam página 41 • Revista Escala. 2009 revista de arquitectura, Bogota Winner of the Gold Metal Prize in the XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito 2008 with the work of End of Career of Architectural Design Verdict of the jury: ¨Project of contemporary attitude which explores multicolor, allowing a spatial offering and abstract of the urban surroundings, his profiles integrating them into the proposal. The jury especially valued the spaces with a strong playfull character. The project creates transparencies at different levels.¨ project text: This proposal involves the design of appropriate environments for work activities, so that they are performed within a recreational context, counting on the user's active participation. Play takes the human being further than the Iimits of ordinary experience. As such, play can enrich work in variety, mobility, and in adequate challenges, always within prepared environments to make it possible, thereby inviting one to participate. Whenever play is included in work, the individual achieves a self-fulfillment experience, well beyond the work accomplished. A location for the project was sought where activities would not normally have anything to do with play, and the challenge was to interrelate daily work tasks with play for users, so that they could experiment, innovate, discover, and be open to participating and provoking changes in their environment. One thing is transformed into another. In this way, the distance between the public and architecture is eliminated. The designed environments are stimulating and provide freedom of action. Moreover, multiple options are presented so that the user can select them. This allows activities developed there to favor a continuous feeling of challenge, novelty, and satisfaction. These are spaces that generate distinct pertinence. The architecture in this proposal, simple in form, will become complex with participation of the user. It uses mechanisms that are easily handled, and available to everyone. The architectural design is flexible, for it permits the user to make many movements, beginning with elements that are virtually fixed. The spaces and planes are adaptable to the needs of whoever uses them. The spaces suggest the activities, and do not tell one how they should be done. The architectural planes, with their movements and possibilities, allow for multiple alternatives for performance, with the presence of fixed blocks, moveable planes and modules that are completely portable.
  • 49 Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Project: Daniel Moreno Flores Project name: creative offices: RECREATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN ARCHITECTURE Function: Office University: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador Faculty: Architecture, Design and Art City: Quito Ecuador Year: Final project 2006-2007 Professors: Arq. Alexis Mosquera - Arq. José María Sáez Location: Av. De la República, Pasaje Carrión y Alpallana Exterior dimensions: 2404 m2 Interior dimensions: 2062 m2 Surface terrain : 1649,7 m2 related links • Archiprix international. World´s best Graduation Project´s, Hunter Douglas Awards 2009. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.archiprix.org/2009/ • Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.baq-cae.ec/baq-cae/index.php • Universidad Católica del Ecuador, FADA. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.puce.edu.ec/arquitecturaweb/paginas/galeria/trabajos/danielmoreno/Framegen.htm • Revista virtual Trama (Ecuador). Access 22 june 2009 http://www.trama.com.ec/espanol/revistas/articuloCompleto.php?idRevista=30&numeroRevista=100&articuloId=346 • Revista Escala. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.revistaescala.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=162:bienal-de-quito&catid=65:actualidad&Itemid=101 • Pagina web Proyectando. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.proyectando.com.ar/noticias/nov08/2.htm references (if published before): • Libro de la XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito, Trama: 2008. Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador, Editorial Trama. Quito, Ecuador. Noviembre 2008. Páginas 112 y 114. • Archiprix, 2009. Los mejores proyectos de graduación del mundo. editorial 010, stichting Archiprix, Rotterdam página 41 • Revista Escala. 2009 revista de arquitectura, Bogota Winner of the Gold Metal Prize in the XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito 2008 with the work of End of Career of Architectural Design Verdict of the jury: ¨Project of contemporary attitude which explores multicolor, allowing a spatial offering and abstract of the urban surroundings, his profiles integrating them into the proposal. The jury especially valued the spaces with a strong playfull character. The project creates transparencies at different levels.¨ project text: This proposal involves the design of appropriate environments for work activities, so that they are performed within a recreational context, counting on the user's active participation. Play takes the human being further than the Iimits of ordinary experience. As such, play can enrich work in variety, mobility, and in adequate challenges, always within prepared environments to make it possible, thereby inviting one to participate. Whenever play is included in work, the individual achieves a self-fulfillment experience, well beyond the work accomplished. A location for the project was sought where activities would not normally have anything to do with play, and the challenge was to interrelate daily work tasks with play for users, so that they could experiment, innovate, discover, and be open to participating and provoking changes in their environment. One thing is transformed into another. In this way, the distance between the public and architecture is eliminated. The designed environments are stimulating and provide freedom of action. Moreover, multiple options are presented so that the user can select them. This allows activities developed there to favor a continuous feeling of challenge, novelty, and satisfaction. These are spaces that generate distinct pertinence. The architecture in this proposal, simple in form, will become complex with participation of the user. It uses mechanisms that are easily handled, and available to everyone. The architectural design is flexible, for it permits the user to make many movements, beginning with elements that are virtually fixed. The spaces and planes are adaptable to the needs of whoever uses them. The spaces suggest the activities, and do not tell one how they should be done. The architectural planes, with their movements and possibilities, allow for multiple alternatives for performance, with the presence of fixed blocks, moveable planes and modules that are completely portable.
  • 49 Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Project: Daniel Moreno Flores Project name: creative offices: RECREATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN ARCHITECTURE Function: Office University: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador Faculty: Architecture, Design and Art City: Quito Ecuador Year: Final project 2006-2007 Professors: Arq. Alexis Mosquera - Arq. José María Sáez Location: Av. De la República, Pasaje Carrión y Alpallana Exterior dimensions: 2404 m2 Interior dimensions: 2062 m2 Surface terrain : 1649,7 m2 related links • Archiprix international. World´s best Graduation Project´s, Hunter Douglas Awards 2009. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.archiprix.org/2009/ • Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.baq-cae.ec/baq-cae/index.php • Universidad Católica del Ecuador, FADA. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.puce.edu.ec/arquitecturaweb/paginas/galeria/trabajos/danielmoreno/Framegen.htm • Revista virtual Trama (Ecuador). Access 22 june 2009 http://www.trama.com.ec/espanol/revistas/articuloCompleto.php?idRevista=30&numeroRevista=100&articuloId=346 • Revista Escala. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.revistaescala.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=162:bienal-de-quito&catid=65:actualidad&Itemid=101 • Pagina web Proyectando. Access 22 june 2009 http://www.proyectando.com.ar/noticias/nov08/2.htm references (if published before): • Libro de la XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito, Trama: 2008. Colegio de Arquitectos del Ecuador, Editorial Trama. Quito, Ecuador. Noviembre 2008. Páginas 112 y 114. • Archiprix, 2009. Los mejores proyectos de graduación del mundo. editorial 010, stichting Archiprix, Rotterdam página 41 • Revista Escala. 2009 revista de arquitectura, Bogota Winner of the Gold Metal Prize in the XVI Bienal Panamericana de Arquitectura de Quito 2008 with the work of End of Career of Architectural Design Verdict of the jury: ¨Project of contemporary attitude which explores multicolor, allowing a spatial offering and abstract of the urban surroundings, his profiles integrating them into the proposal. The jury especially valued the spaces with a strong playfull character. The project creates transparencies at different levels.¨ project text: This proposal involves the design of appropriate environments for work activities, so that they are performed within a recreational context, counting on the user's active participation. Play takes the human being further than the Iimits of ordinary experience. As such, play can enrich work in variety, mobility, and in adequate challenges, always within prepared environments to make it possible, thereby inviting one to participate. Whenever play is included in work, the individual achieves a self-fulfillment experience, well beyond the work accomplished. A location for the project was sought where activities would not normally have anything to do with play, and the challenge was to interrelate daily work tasks with play for users, so that they could experiment, innovate, discover, and be open to participating and provoking changes in their environment. One thing is transformed into another. In this way, the distance between the public and architecture is eliminated. The designed environments are stimulating and provide freedom of action. Moreover, multiple options are presented so that the user can select them. This allows activities developed there to favor a continuous feeling of challenge, novelty, and satisfaction. These are spaces that generate distinct pertinence. The architecture in this proposal, simple in form, will become complex with participation of the user. It uses mechanisms that are easily handled, and available to everyone. The architectural design is flexible, for it permits the user to make many movements, beginning with elements that are virtually fixed. The spaces and planes are adaptable to the needs of whoever uses them. The spaces suggest the activities, and do not tell one how they should be done. The architectural planes, with their movements and possibilities, allow for multiple alternatives for performance, with the presence of fixed blocks, moveable planes and modules that are completely portable.
  • 50 Symbiotic Housing Link Symbiotic Housing Link ; a project by Lennard Dominique Carlier Key issues for a symbiotic solution; • An increasing need to live and work in proximity. The growing dynamic labor market is driving the need for more dynamic (mobile) architecture • Cheaper, entry level housing is in need - many people are preparing for a life of renting – unable to afford or unwilling to resort to a life of overwhelming debt • Land is at a premium in the Central City – new philosophies are required to use under-utilised space in a sustainable and symbiotic way for the life of the city • Sustainable living through sustainable materials, technologies, plot sizes, and transportation is the only possible future • Cities are about people – and fostering neighbourhoods for everyone • Alternative forms of transport are becoming more popular – pedestrian numbers and cyclists are on the rise. Facilities to accommodate them will encourage more to join in • A cohesive pedestrian transport network would enable the city to survive with less oil and more life • An infra-structure that feeds energy into the city as both people and electrical energy harvested from the environment would benefit everyone Solution ;;; Symbiotic Housing • A sheltered pedestrian link and cycle-way from Ponsonby into Auckland Central Business District – roughly a 3km long journey. • The sheltered link provides a platform for mobile / transportable ‘plug-in’ housing units and associated services boxes • This link is just the start and others could be constructed anywhere with a wide footpath – and there are plenty of potential sites around Auckland once you start to look • The potential is for these platform / shelters being constructed around the City, then you can move your apartment closer to where you work or swap sites with someone • Private, semi-private, and public layers of space are created where they didn’t exist before thereby increasing the sense of community, life and safety. The the apartment units over look streets and Victoria Park, and could be in areas of the city fringe that are currently not frequented • Integration of urban and transportation requirements – traffic lights, street lights, bus stops, bicycle racks, and pedestrian bridges can all be built into the platform / shelter infra-structure • The Units could be stacked in two or three storey’s – and people could have more than one unit Sustainability ; • Energy harvesting technologies could be built into the super structure platform – and into the apartment units: each unit shares a ‘plug in’ services box containing provision for rain water and electrical storage, solar and wind energy harvesting; • Production of structure and buildings can be facilitated in factory conditions with high efficiencies in material utilization – minimizing waste • The two most important aspects in modular prefab design is the construction of the building in factory conditions and the ability to cart the building by truck onto site with minimal required construction • Made from a Fibre Reinforced Plastic structure – a new material technology used as structural material for replacement motorway bridges on the M5 in the UK. The advantages of FRP are numerous; lightweight / high strength, zero maintenance and long life Feasibility ; • There is potential to create a Building Code or Standards for this new housing typology – leading to a diverse range of mobile apartments • Finances for the superstructure could be generated through the ‘leasehold’ or rent of land where a mobile apartment is sited • Excess energy generated by the apartments and associated services boxes are sold back to the grid and credited to construction of the superstructure and infrastructure • Possible business models could use existing factory resources to create these prefabricated building products Living ; • The apartment unit is designed to be as open plan and therefore as flexible as possible. The interior is made up of three simple areas – sleep, bathe, live (open plan space that can be closed off via sliding panels) • The 10m x 3.2m units can be transported on the back of a truck - without pilot vehicles; multiple units can be moved at once • One side is typically exposed to a road. Noise generated by traffic is mitigated by high levels of acoustic reflection, insulation and absorption. Foundations are to be isolated from vibration • Pole foundations could lend themselves to the incorporation of harvesting heat from the ground • Longer lasting materials require fewer resources for replacement with reduced maintenance and repair costs
  • 50 Symbiotic Housing Link Symbiotic Housing Link ; a project by Lennard Dominique Carlier Key issues for a symbiotic solution; • An increasing need to live and work in proximity. The growing dynamic labor market is driving the need for more dynamic (mobile) architecture • Cheaper, entry level housing is in need - many people are preparing for a life of renting – unable to afford or unwilling to resort to a life of overwhelming debt • Land is at a premium in the Central City – new philosophies are required to use under-utilised space in a sustainable and symbiotic way for the life of the city • Sustainable living through sustainable materials, technologies, plot sizes, and transportation is the only possible future • Cities are about people – and fostering neighbourhoods for everyone • Alternative forms of transport are becoming more popular – pedestrian numbers and cyclists are on the rise. Facilities to accommodate them will encourage more to join in • A cohesive pedestrian transport network would enable the city to survive with less oil and more life • An infra-structure that feeds energy into the city as both people and electrical energy harvested from the environment would benefit everyone Solution ;;; Symbiotic Housing • A sheltered pedestrian link and cycle-way from Ponsonby into Auckland Central Business District – roughly a 3km long journey. • The sheltered link provides a platform for mobile / transportable ‘plug-in’ housing units and associated services boxes • This link is just the start and others could be constructed anywhere with a wide footpath – and there are plenty of potential sites around Auckland once you start to look • The potential is for these platform / shelters being constructed around the City, then you can move your apartment closer to where you work or swap sites with someone • Private, semi-private, and public layers of space are created where they didn’t exist before thereby increasing the sense of community, life and safety. The the apartment units over look streets and Victoria Park, and could be in areas of the city fringe that are currently not frequented • Integration of urban and transportation requirements – traffic lights, street lights, bus stops, bicycle racks, and pedestrian bridges can all be built into the platform / shelter infra-structure • The Units could be stacked in two or three storey’s – and people could have more than one unit Sustainability ; • Energy harvesting technologies could be built into the super structure platform – and into the apartment units: each unit shares a ‘plug in’ services box containing provision for rain water and electrical storage, solar and wind energy harvesting; • Production of structure and buildings can be facilitated in factory conditions with high efficiencies in material utilization – minimizing waste • The two most important aspects in modular prefab design is the construction of the building in factory conditions and the ability to cart the building by truck onto site with minimal required construction • Made from a Fibre Reinforced Plastic structure – a new material technology used as structural material for replacement motorway bridges on the M5 in the UK. The advantages of FRP are numerous; lightweight / high strength, zero maintenance and long life Feasibility ; • There is potential to create a Building Code or Standards for this new housing typology – leading to a diverse range of mobile apartments • Finances for the superstructure could be generated through the ‘leasehold’ or rent of land where a mobile apartment is sited • Excess energy generated by the apartments and associated services boxes are sold back to the grid and credited to construction of the superstructure and infrastructure • Possible business models could use existing factory resources to create these prefabricated building products Living ; • The apartment unit is designed to be as open plan and therefore as flexible as possible. The interior is made up of three simple areas – sleep, bathe, live (open plan space that can be closed off via sliding panels) • The 10m x 3.2m units can be transported on the back of a truck - without pilot vehicles; multiple units can be moved at once • One side is typically exposed to a road. Noise generated by traffic is mitigated by high levels of acoustic reflection, insulation and absorption. Foundations are to be isolated from vibration • Pole foundations could lend themselves to the incorporation of harvesting heat from the ground • Longer lasting materials require fewer resources for replacement with reduced maintenance and repair costs
  • 50 Symbiotic Housing Link Symbiotic Housing Link ; a project by Lennard Dominique Carlier Key issues for a symbiotic solution; • An increasing need to live and work in proximity. The growing dynamic labor market is driving the need for more dynamic (mobile) architecture • Cheaper, entry level housing is in need - many people are preparing for a life of renting – unable to afford or unwilling to resort to a life of overwhelming debt • Land is at a premium in the Central City – new philosophies are required to use under-utilised space in a sustainable and symbiotic way for the life of the city • Sustainable living through sustainable materials, technologies, plot sizes, and transportation is the only possible future • Cities are about people – and fostering neighbourhoods for everyone • Alternative forms of transport are becoming more popular – pedestrian numbers and cyclists are on the rise. Facilities to accommodate them will encourage more to join in • A cohesive pedestrian transport network would enable the city to survive with less oil and more life • An infra-structure that feeds energy into the city as both people and electrical energy harvested from the environment would benefit everyone Solution ;;; Symbiotic Housing • A sheltered pedestrian link and cycle-way from Ponsonby into Auckland Central Business District – roughly a 3km long journey. • The sheltered link provides a platform for mobile / transportable ‘plug-in’ housing units and associated services boxes • This link is just the start and others could be constructed anywhere with a wide footpath – and there are plenty of potential sites around Auckland once you start to look • The potential is for these platform / shelters being constructed around the City, then you can move your apartment closer to where you work or swap sites with someone • Private, semi-private, and public layers of space are created where they didn’t exist before thereby increasing the sense of community, life and safety. The the apartment units over look streets and Victoria Park, and could be in areas of the city fringe that are currently not frequented • Integration of urban and transportation requirements – traffic lights, street lights, bus stops, bicycle racks, and pedestrian bridges can all be built into the platform / shelter infra-structure • The Units could be stacked in two or three storey’s – and people could have more than one unit Sustainability ; • Energy harvesting technologies could be built into the super structure platform – and into the apartment units: each unit shares a ‘plug in’ services box containing provision for rain water and electrical storage, solar and wind energy harvesting; • Production of structure and buildings can be facilitated in factory conditions with high efficiencies in material utilization – minimizing waste • The two most important aspects in modular prefab design is the construction of the building in factory conditions and the ability to cart the building by truck onto site with minimal required construction • Made from a Fibre Reinforced Plastic structure – a new material technology used as structural material for replacement motorway bridges on the M5 in the UK. The advantages of FRP are numerous; lightweight / high strength, zero maintenance and long life Feasibility ; • There is potential to create a Building Code or Standards for this new housing typology – leading to a diverse range of mobile apartments • Finances for the superstructure could be generated through the ‘leasehold’ or rent of land where a mobile apartment is sited • Excess energy generated by the apartments and associated services boxes are sold back to the grid and credited to construction of the superstructure and infrastructure • Possible business models could use existing factory resources to create these prefabricated building products Living ; • The apartment unit is designed to be as open plan and therefore as flexible as possible. The interior is made up of three simple areas – sleep, bathe, live (open plan space that can be closed off via sliding panels) • The 10m x 3.2m units can be transported on the back of a truck - without pilot vehicles; multiple units can be moved at once • One side is typically exposed to a road. Noise generated by traffic is mitigated by high levels of acoustic reflection, insulation and absorption. Foundations are to be isolated from vibration • Pole foundations could lend themselves to the incorporation of harvesting heat from the ground • Longer lasting materials require fewer resources for replacement with reduced maintenance and repair costs
  • 51 Winner of the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition AIMA Studio {Architectural Image Aspect}, the Freelance group of young architects, was the winner of the award of “superior Design“ in the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition. Design by: Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi, Hedye Darman
  • 51 Winner of the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition AIMA Studio {Architectural Image Aspect}, the Freelance group of young architects, was the winner of the award of “superior Design“ in the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition. Design by: Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi, Hedye Darman
  • 52 Olympic House and Park in Nicosia OLYMPIC HOUSE AND PARK, Nicosia, Cyprus The offices of the Cyprus Olympic Committee and of all the National Athletic Federations. Chief architect / office name: Armon choros architektonikis Project team: Eleftheria Serghidou, Vasilis Pashiourtides Client: Cyprus Olympic Committee Structural engineering: Nicos Kalathas, George Demetriades Mech./Electr. Engineering: Giannos Zempylas, Kyriakos Ioannides Design date: 1999 Completion date: 2006 Area: 10,604 sq.m. The design for the Olympic House and Park sought to achieve an architectural composition that would give the fullest possible expression to the Olympic ideal. The following three fundamental considerations were addressed and in due course served to frame the proposal: • The global dimension inherent in the encouragement and inculcation of the Olympic spirit imbued as it is with ideals such as brotherhood, noble emulation and world peace. • The historical dimension of preserving and reviving a venerable institution of great antiquity. • The athletic dimension that pursues training of “body and spirit” in equal measure as an essential human activity. It was felt that the shifts from “individual to collective” and from “ancient to modern” could be achieved by means of architectural transitions deployed in space, and thus be translated, through mediating voids, into the layout of the building in plan, and its dialogue with the ground in section respectively. On master plan the concord of body and spirit was reflected en the concord of built and non-built, of edifice and park. With respect to the plan the quest for a layout that would express the global parameter led to the image of an ancient stadium. The building is developed perimetrically around a central void, which opens out to the town, calling upon the “external” to enter and allowing the “internal” to be viewed. In section, the transition from “ancient to modern” is realised through raising the building high and creating a ground-floor void, where the promenade takes on the significance of museum space for showcasing the ancient and modern history of the institution. At the master plan level, the building is not juxtaposed to the park, but neither is the reverse true. Initially the built penetrates the un-built part of the plot centrally letting the un-built surround it, while subsequently the un-built penetrates the build centrally and by piercing it, this is incorporated into it. This interpenetration and co-existence of built and un-built, of edifice and park, on an equal footing, expresses the need for material and spiritual to coexist: training for “body and spirit”. The central void, a large space for gatherings, is developed sequentially from the park through the shaded atrium to the entrance lobby and then through the multi-purpose hall once again towards the park. Circulation in the offices is carried out externally so that the spaces be aligned on either side of the atria, just like spectators and, also, of the events taking place within them.
  • 52 Olympic House and Park in Nicosia OLYMPIC HOUSE AND PARK, Nicosia, Cyprus The offices of the Cyprus Olympic Committee and of all the National Athletic Federations. Chief architect / office name: Armon choros architektonikis Project team: Eleftheria Serghidou, Vasilis Pashiourtides Client: Cyprus Olympic Committee Structural engineering: Nicos Kalathas, George Demetriades Mech./Electr. Engineering: Giannos Zempylas, Kyriakos Ioannides Design date: 1999 Completion date: 2006 Area: 10,604 sq.m. The design for the Olympic House and Park sought to achieve an architectural composition that would give the fullest possible expression to the Olympic ideal. The following three fundamental considerations were addressed and in due course served to frame the proposal: • The global dimension inherent in the encouragement and inculcation of the Olympic spirit imbued as it is with ideals such as brotherhood, noble emulation and world peace. • The historical dimension of preserving and reviving a venerable institution of great antiquity. • The athletic dimension that pursues training of “body and spirit” in equal measure as an essential human activity. It was felt that the shifts from “individual to collective” and from “ancient to modern” could be achieved by means of architectural transitions deployed in space, and thus be translated, through mediating voids, into the layout of the building in plan, and its dialogue with the ground in section respectively. On master plan the concord of body and spirit was reflected en the concord of built and non-built, of edifice and park. With respect to the plan the quest for a layout that would express the global parameter led to the image of an ancient stadium. The building is developed perimetrically around a central void, which opens out to the town, calling upon the “external” to enter and allowing the “internal” to be viewed. In section, the transition from “ancient to modern” is realised through raising the building high and creating a ground-floor void, where the promenade takes on the significance of museum space for showcasing the ancient and modern history of the institution. At the master plan level, the building is not juxtaposed to the park, but neither is the reverse true. Initially the built penetrates the un-built part of the plot centrally letting the un-built surround it, while subsequently the un-built penetrates the build centrally and by piercing it, this is incorporated into it. This interpenetration and co-existence of built and un-built, of edifice and park, on an equal footing, expresses the need for material and spiritual to coexist: training for “body and spirit”. The central void, a large space for gatherings, is developed sequentially from the park through the shaded atrium to the entrance lobby and then through the multi-purpose hall once again towards the park. Circulation in the offices is carried out externally so that the spaces be aligned on either side of the atria, just like spectators and, also, of the events taking place within them.
  • 52 Olympic House and Park in Nicosia OLYMPIC HOUSE AND PARK, Nicosia, Cyprus The offices of the Cyprus Olympic Committee and of all the National Athletic Federations. Chief architect / office name: Armon choros architektonikis Project team: Eleftheria Serghidou, Vasilis Pashiourtides Client: Cyprus Olympic Committee Structural engineering: Nicos Kalathas, George Demetriades Mech./Electr. Engineering: Giannos Zempylas, Kyriakos Ioannides Design date: 1999 Completion date: 2006 Area: 10,604 sq.m. The design for the Olympic House and Park sought to achieve an architectural composition that would give the fullest possible expression to the Olympic ideal. The following three fundamental considerations were addressed and in due course served to frame the proposal: • The global dimension inherent in the encouragement and inculcation of the Olympic spirit imbued as it is with ideals such as brotherhood, noble emulation and world peace. • The historical dimension of preserving and reviving a venerable institution of great antiquity. • The athletic dimension that pursues training of “body and spirit” in equal measure as an essential human activity. It was felt that the shifts from “individual to collective” and from “ancient to modern” could be achieved by means of architectural transitions deployed in space, and thus be translated, through mediating voids, into the layout of the building in plan, and its dialogue with the ground in section respectively. On master plan the concord of body and spirit was reflected en the concord of built and non-built, of edifice and park. With respect to the plan the quest for a layout that would express the global parameter led to the image of an ancient stadium. The building is developed perimetrically around a central void, which opens out to the town, calling upon the “external” to enter and allowing the “internal” to be viewed. In section, the transition from “ancient to modern” is realised through raising the building high and creating a ground-floor void, where the promenade takes on the significance of museum space for showcasing the ancient and modern history of the institution. At the master plan level, the building is not juxtaposed to the park, but neither is the reverse true. Initially the built penetrates the un-built part of the plot centrally letting the un-built surround it, while subsequently the un-built penetrates the build centrally and by piercing it, this is incorporated into it. This interpenetration and co-existence of built and un-built, of edifice and park, on an equal footing, expresses the need for material and spiritual to coexist: training for “body and spirit”. The central void, a large space for gatherings, is developed sequentially from the park through the shaded atrium to the entrance lobby and then through the multi-purpose hall once again towards the park. Circulation in the offices is carried out externally so that the spaces be aligned on either side of the atria, just like spectators and, also, of the events taking place within them.
  • 53 Chicago City Library Chicago Library project name: “ 98” - the harold washington library center Chicago site: west congress parkway, chicago, illinois – us function: public library (virtual project) chief architect: dott. arch. michelangelo acciaro office name: michelangelo acciaro | architetti collaborator: nora lau, dipl. ing. Architektur promoter: icarch gallery, 709 washington street, evanston, chicago, illinois – us design date: december 2007 area: 59595.98 sq m related links: http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/projects/chicago.html http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/further_information/showcase.html references: http://icarch.net/ Oh my god! Chicago Library Something strange must have happened to the big public library building! Iʼve just got off the train, and Im not threatened by its imminent shadow as usual! How could that be? Where is the building? I really have to go to this library! - I need a book… one of these books which – maybe - could elevate the human mind. But where the devil …? No, thats impossible! Books have to be treated in a serious way! They have to be protected! And, on that score, the library building was just right: solid, similar to Dogbert Duckʼs money depository. Sitting on its slightly inclined pedestal it represented a menacing and almost inaccessible cultural autonomy. The solid sarcophagus-like wrapping seemed to be perfectly safe! … Or at least I thought so. Carefully Iʼm climbing down the stairs of the station. An enormous long fissure bursts the ground where once stood the library. Downwards I pick up some news fragments: “ During the night an ear-splitting noise … a heavy tremor … some seismic motion … perhaps a subterranean volcano … the library knocked over, turned upside down and rammed into the subsoil … maybe the heart took revenge on the spirit: as we know our sentimental organ is attracted by the center of the earth. A natural law! Maybe the library had only preferred to turn back to the basics after all this elevation of spirits and minds! …” In a first stadium the library seemed to have assumed a simply reversed position, but - walking on the ceilings – it could still be used as it was. Its roof decorations were planted deep into the ground, the structure appeared to be robust and well anchored. But then, with another jerk, the building subsided again and sunk into an alarming lopsided position. At that point, one thought the library was lost forever… Now a few people pause in front of the scene of the accident. Someone believes to see a stream of molten lava, inundating the holes in the ground with its red liquids, whereas more attentive observers catch sight of a strong source of light. So perhaps not everything has vanished? Indeed! Just a few moments later the library building turns out to be still intact, or at least partially, and all the books undamaged. “And even better”, some people are shouting themselves hoarse, “finally we have an archaeological find downtown Chicago!” The big crater of this night, now almost re-contracted, has left a landscape of big crystallized fragments forming an open city space. The field of tension finds its references in the vanishing points of the adjacent buildings and corners. Tense lines penetrate into the piazza. They form gaps and holes, paths and bridges which invite to enter the new library and see the rests of the old one. New stairways allow the descent to the core of the ground. The interior spaces are enormous, and the almost obtrusive geometries of the old library building, once enthroned above earth level, have become memory. They arenʼt threatening any more; piece by piece they can be visited and seen at close range, almost without distortion. The new reading spaces are suspended from the old libraryʼs surrounding walls. Well, the under-earth building is not quite suffused with daylight, but to preserve the books, they shouldnʼt be exposed to too much of it. However, the sun is penetrating into the most important reading areas; and cocoons and satellites, navigating underneath just like celestial bodies, form additional sources of light. Perhaps there is another explanation of the incident: the surrounding blocks - practical Americans - desired a neighbour that didnʼt suffer from obsessions: the carnivalcelebrating library with its feather-like head jewelry brought them at the end of their tether. If Sullivan couldnʼt construct any more, why should a building disfigure this place? Not bad! I have found the book I wanted, but I donʼt want to read it at home: today it isnʼt cold outside, and I will have a look for a place in the sun on the square, maybe along the water vein next to the big fissure, or beside the surface of water on West Congress Parkway. Coming back tomorrow, I might find everything as it had been before …
  • 53 Chicago City Library Chicago Library project name: “ 98” - the harold washington library center Chicago site: west congress parkway, chicago, illinois – us function: public library (virtual project) chief architect: dott. arch. michelangelo acciaro office name: michelangelo acciaro | architetti collaborator: nora lau, dipl. ing. Architektur promoter: icarch gallery, 709 washington street, evanston, chicago, illinois – us design date: december 2007 area: 59595.98 sq m related links: http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/projects/chicago.html http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/further_information/showcase.html references: http://icarch.net/ Oh my god! Chicago Library Something strange must have happened to the big public library building! Iʼve just got off the train, and Im not threatened by its imminent shadow as usual! How could that be? Where is the building? I really have to go to this library! - I need a book… one of these books which – maybe - could elevate the human mind. But where the devil …? No, thats impossible! Books have to be treated in a serious way! They have to be protected! And, on that score, the library building was just right: solid, similar to Dogbert Duckʼs money depository. Sitting on its slightly inclined pedestal it represented a menacing and almost inaccessible cultural autonomy. The solid sarcophagus-like wrapping seemed to be perfectly safe! … Or at least I thought so. Carefully Iʼm climbing down the stairs of the station. An enormous long fissure bursts the ground where once stood the library. Downwards I pick up some news fragments: “ During the night an ear-splitting noise … a heavy tremor … some seismic motion … perhaps a subterranean volcano … the library knocked over, turned upside down and rammed into the subsoil … maybe the heart took revenge on the spirit: as we know our sentimental organ is attracted by the center of the earth. A natural law! Maybe the library had only preferred to turn back to the basics after all this elevation of spirits and minds! …” In a first stadium the library seemed to have assumed a simply reversed position, but - walking on the ceilings – it could still be used as it was. Its roof decorations were planted deep into the ground, the structure appeared to be robust and well anchored. But then, with another jerk, the building subsided again and sunk into an alarming lopsided position. At that point, one thought the library was lost forever… Now a few people pause in front of the scene of the accident. Someone believes to see a stream of molten lava, inundating the holes in the ground with its red liquids, whereas more attentive observers catch sight of a strong source of light. So perhaps not everything has vanished? Indeed! Just a few moments later the library building turns out to be still intact, or at least partially, and all the books undamaged. “And even better”, some people are shouting themselves hoarse, “finally we have an archaeological find downtown Chicago!” The big crater of this night, now almost re-contracted, has left a landscape of big crystallized fragments forming an open city space. The field of tension finds its references in the vanishing points of the adjacent buildings and corners. Tense lines penetrate into the piazza. They form gaps and holes, paths and bridges which invite to enter the new library and see the rests of the old one. New stairways allow the descent to the core of the ground. The interior spaces are enormous, and the almost obtrusive geometries of the old library building, once enthroned above earth level, have become memory. They arenʼt threatening any more; piece by piece they can be visited and seen at close range, almost without distortion. The new reading spaces are suspended from the old libraryʼs surrounding walls. Well, the under-earth building is not quite suffused with daylight, but to preserve the books, they shouldnʼt be exposed to too much of it. However, the sun is penetrating into the most important reading areas; and cocoons and satellites, navigating underneath just like celestial bodies, form additional sources of light. Perhaps there is another explanation of the incident: the surrounding blocks - practical Americans - desired a neighbour that didnʼt suffer from obsessions: the carnivalcelebrating library with its feather-like head jewelry brought them at the end of their tether. If Sullivan couldnʼt construct any more, why should a building disfigure this place? Not bad! I have found the book I wanted, but I donʼt want to read it at home: today it isnʼt cold outside, and I will have a look for a place in the sun on the square, maybe along the water vein next to the big fissure, or beside the surface of water on West Congress Parkway. Coming back tomorrow, I might find everything as it had been before …
  • 53 Chicago City Library Chicago Library project name: “ 98” - the harold washington library center Chicago site: west congress parkway, chicago, illinois – us function: public library (virtual project) chief architect: dott. arch. michelangelo acciaro office name: michelangelo acciaro | architetti collaborator: nora lau, dipl. ing. Architektur promoter: icarch gallery, 709 washington street, evanston, chicago, illinois – us design date: december 2007 area: 59595.98 sq m related links: http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/projects/chicago.html http://www.michelangeloacciaro.com/sites/further_information/showcase.html references: http://icarch.net/ Oh my god! Chicago Library Something strange must have happened to the big public library building! Iʼve just got off the train, and Im not threatened by its imminent shadow as usual! How could that be? Where is the building? I really have to go to this library! - I need a book… one of these books which – maybe - could elevate the human mind. But where the devil …? No, thats impossible! Books have to be treated in a serious way! They have to be protected! And, on that score, the library building was just right: solid, similar to Dogbert Duckʼs money depository. Sitting on its slightly inclined pedestal it represented a menacing and almost inaccessible cultural autonomy. The solid sarcophagus-like wrapping seemed to be perfectly safe! … Or at least I thought so. Carefully Iʼm climbing down the stairs of the station. An enormous long fissure bursts the ground where once stood the library. Downwards I pick up some news fragments: “ During the night an ear-splitting noise … a heavy tremor … some seismic motion … perhaps a subterranean volcano … the library knocked over, turned upside down and rammed into the subsoil … maybe the heart took revenge on the spirit: as we know our sentimental organ is attracted by the center of the earth. A natural law! Maybe the library had only preferred to turn back to the basics after all this elevation of spirits and minds! …” In a first stadium the library seemed to have assumed a simply reversed position, but - walking on the ceilings – it could still be used as it was. Its roof decorations were planted deep into the ground, the structure appeared to be robust and well anchored. But then, with another jerk, the building subsided again and sunk into an alarming lopsided position. At that point, one thought the library was lost forever… Now a few people pause in front of the scene of the accident. Someone believes to see a stream of molten lava, inundating the holes in the ground with its red liquids, whereas more attentive observers catch sight of a strong source of light. So perhaps not everything has vanished? Indeed! Just a few moments later the library building turns out to be still intact, or at least partially, and all the books undamaged. “And even better”, some people are shouting themselves hoarse, “finally we have an archaeological find downtown Chicago!” The big crater of this night, now almost re-contracted, has left a landscape of big crystallized fragments forming an open city space. The field of tension finds its references in the vanishing points of the adjacent buildings and corners. Tense lines penetrate into the piazza. They form gaps and holes, paths and bridges which invite to enter the new library and see the rests of the old one. New stairways allow the descent to the core of the ground. The interior spaces are enormous, and the almost obtrusive geometries of the old library building, once enthroned above earth level, have become memory. They arenʼt threatening any more; piece by piece they can be visited and seen at close range, almost without distortion. The new reading spaces are suspended from the old libraryʼs surrounding walls. Well, the under-earth building is not quite suffused with daylight, but to preserve the books, they shouldnʼt be exposed to too much of it. However, the sun is penetrating into the most important reading areas; and cocoons and satellites, navigating underneath just like celestial bodies, form additional sources of light. Perhaps there is another explanation of the incident: the surrounding blocks - practical Americans - desired a neighbour that didnʼt suffer from obsessions: the carnivalcelebrating library with its feather-like head jewelry brought them at the end of their tether. If Sullivan couldnʼt construct any more, why should a building disfigure this place? Not bad! I have found the book I wanted, but I donʼt want to read it at home: today it isnʼt cold outside, and I will have a look for a place in the sun on the square, maybe along the water vein next to the big fissure, or beside the surface of water on West Congress Parkway. Coming back tomorrow, I might find everything as it had been before …
  • 54 House in Nova Lima - MG House in Nova Lima – MG Author of project: Ulisses Morato de Andrade Winning project of the 10th Architecture Award promoted by IAB-MG (Instituto dos Arquitetos do Brasil – Minas Gerais) 2008, single houses category. Descriptive Memorial A contemporaneous house built with traditional techniques. This construction occupies the top of a hillside and is projected over an immense valley framed with a chain of mountains, a predominant relief in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In the surroundings of Nova Lima – MG, where the construction was erected, a considerable part of the houses are influenced by the language of Portuguese colonial architecture and uses manual techniques of construction. The house was projected for a young executive with a bold entrepreneur profile. Our architectonic proposal created a contemporaneous language tuned to the owner’s profile and, at the same time, it incorporated the constructive techniques and materials available in the region. With this conceptual arrangement we were able to articulate constructive tradition to contemporaneous design and open space to a new approach of architectonic solution for local houses. The place chosen for the house was determined by the generous native landscape in the surroundings. In this context, space definition privileged the possibilities of relationship of house users with the exuberant natural landscape. As for the relation House x Nature, we decided for the contrast, i.e., the radicalization of a geometric and rational design in opposition to natural organic shapes. Therefore, the “natural order” and “cultural order” are mutually distinguished and valued. The house was built in a land with three distinct levels. This arrangement lead to a better use of declivity and, at the same time, great plasticity to architectonic elements. Pure volumes receive interference from inclined columns, from discontinuous covering planes and from the red wall that crosses the house. The reference to the Brazilian modernist architecture is maintained and nevertheless unconstructed and reorganized. TECHNICAL FILE Project name: House in Nova Lima - MG Function: Residential Chief architect / office name: Ulisses Morato / Morato Arquitetura Project team: Ulisses Morato Client: Evandro Pontes Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): Pedro Cardoso – Engineering Quatro Arquitetura e Design – Executive project and 3D Design date: May/2003 Completion date: December/2004 Area: 213 m2 Related links: Divulgation of works awarded on the 10th edition of the IAB-MG prize: http://ata10apremiacao2008.blogspot.com/ (optional) References (if published before): Article about the house in the magazine Arquitetura e Urbanismo (Architecture and Urbanism) - Edition 144 - 15/3/2006: http://www.revistaau.com.br/edicoes/144/artigo22113-1.asp?o=r Photos of the house: Daniel Mansur
  • 54 House in Nova Lima - MG House in Nova Lima – MG Author of project: Ulisses Morato de Andrade Winning project of the 10th Architecture Award promoted by IAB-MG (Instituto dos Arquitetos do Brasil – Minas Gerais) 2008, single houses category. Descriptive Memorial A contemporaneous house built with traditional techniques. This construction occupies the top of a hillside and is projected over an immense valley framed with a chain of mountains, a predominant relief in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In the surroundings of Nova Lima – MG, where the construction was erected, a considerable part of the houses are influenced by the language of Portuguese colonial architecture and uses manual techniques of construction. The house was projected for a young executive with a bold entrepreneur profile. Our architectonic proposal created a contemporaneous language tuned to the owner’s profile and, at the same time, it incorporated the constructive techniques and materials available in the region. With this conceptual arrangement we were able to articulate constructive tradition to contemporaneous design and open space to a new approach of architectonic solution for local houses. The place chosen for the house was determined by the generous native landscape in the surroundings. In this context, space definition privileged the possibilities of relationship of house users with the exuberant natural landscape. As for the relation House x Nature, we decided for the contrast, i.e., the radicalization of a geometric and rational design in opposition to natural organic shapes. Therefore, the “natural order” and “cultural order” are mutually distinguished and valued. The house was built in a land with three distinct levels. This arrangement lead to a better use of declivity and, at the same time, great plasticity to architectonic elements. Pure volumes receive interference from inclined columns, from discontinuous covering planes and from the red wall that crosses the house. The reference to the Brazilian modernist architecture is maintained and nevertheless unconstructed and reorganized. TECHNICAL FILE Project name: House in Nova Lima - MG Function: Residential Chief architect / office name: Ulisses Morato / Morato Arquitetura Project team: Ulisses Morato Client: Evandro Pontes Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): Pedro Cardoso – Engineering Quatro Arquitetura e Design – Executive project and 3D Design date: May/2003 Completion date: December/2004 Area: 213 m2 Related links: Divulgation of works awarded on the 10th edition of the IAB-MG prize: http://ata10apremiacao2008.blogspot.com/ (optional) References (if published before): Article about the house in the magazine Arquitetura e Urbanismo (Architecture and Urbanism) - Edition 144 - 15/3/2006: http://www.revistaau.com.br/edicoes/144/artigo22113-1.asp?o=r Photos of the house: Daniel Mansur
  • 54 House in Nova Lima - MG House in Nova Lima – MG Author of project: Ulisses Morato de Andrade Winning project of the 10th Architecture Award promoted by IAB-MG (Instituto dos Arquitetos do Brasil – Minas Gerais) 2008, single houses category. Descriptive Memorial A contemporaneous house built with traditional techniques. This construction occupies the top of a hillside and is projected over an immense valley framed with a chain of mountains, a predominant relief in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. In the surroundings of Nova Lima – MG, where the construction was erected, a considerable part of the houses are influenced by the language of Portuguese colonial architecture and uses manual techniques of construction. The house was projected for a young executive with a bold entrepreneur profile. Our architectonic proposal created a contemporaneous language tuned to the owner’s profile and, at the same time, it incorporated the constructive techniques and materials available in the region. With this conceptual arrangement we were able to articulate constructive tradition to contemporaneous design and open space to a new approach of architectonic solution for local houses. The place chosen for the house was determined by the generous native landscape in the surroundings. In this context, space definition privileged the possibilities of relationship of house users with the exuberant natural landscape. As for the relation House x Nature, we decided for the contrast, i.e., the radicalization of a geometric and rational design in opposition to natural organic shapes. Therefore, the “natural order” and “cultural order” are mutually distinguished and valued. The house was built in a land with three distinct levels. This arrangement lead to a better use of declivity and, at the same time, great plasticity to architectonic elements. Pure volumes receive interference from inclined columns, from discontinuous covering planes and from the red wall that crosses the house. The reference to the Brazilian modernist architecture is maintained and nevertheless unconstructed and reorganized. TECHNICAL FILE Project name: House in Nova Lima - MG Function: Residential Chief architect / office name: Ulisses Morato / Morato Arquitetura Project team: Ulisses Morato Client: Evandro Pontes Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): Pedro Cardoso – Engineering Quatro Arquitetura e Design – Executive project and 3D Design date: May/2003 Completion date: December/2004 Area: 213 m2 Related links: Divulgation of works awarded on the 10th edition of the IAB-MG prize: http://ata10apremiacao2008.blogspot.com/ (optional) References (if published before): Article about the house in the magazine Arquitetura e Urbanismo (Architecture and Urbanism) - Edition 144 - 15/3/2006: http://www.revistaau.com.br/edicoes/144/artigo22113-1.asp?o=r Photos of the house: Daniel Mansur
  • 55 Floating Space project name : Floating spaces function : House chief architect/ office name : M.L.Varudh Varavarn / Vin Varavarn Architect.,ltd project team : Mr.Jongsarit Jinachan, Mr. Akaphol Jarnpian client : Mr.Waranchai na songkla design date : July 2008 completion date : Jan 2010 area : 300 sq.m. Summary info This small project is a design of a new 300 sq.m house, situated within the same compound of an existing house. Our client requested for a new modern building of steel structure, but requires that it does not deface their existing 30 years old house. We proposed a semi-detached building which could be connected with the existing house. After a careful consideration, we decided that our new design should not resemble the existing building in order to give possibilities for new creative idea to develop, as requested by the client. As the new building will be situated at the back of the site behind the existing house, we, as an architect, would like to envision a new design that shines its life rather than becoming dormant at the back. Our conceptual approach is to utilize the existing drive-way as the main approach to the new building extension. At night, the light from the 3 meters span cantilevered room on the 2nd and 3rd floor would generate an effect of a bright floating space above ground. At the same time, the living room and the bedroom of this new extension would have an open view of the gardens; as well as full ventilation from the wind direction. Owing to the limitation of available space, a unique manipulation by means of juxtaposition of the structure will be the major focus for our design consideration
  • 55 Floating Space project name : Floating spaces function : House chief architect/ office name : M.L.Varudh Varavarn / Vin Varavarn Architect.,ltd project team : Mr.Jongsarit Jinachan, Mr. Akaphol Jarnpian client : Mr.Waranchai na songkla design date : July 2008 completion date : Jan 2010 area : 300 sq.m. Summary info This small project is a design of a new 300 sq.m house, situated within the same compound of an existing house. Our client requested for a new modern building of steel structure, but requires that it does not deface their existing 30 years old house. We proposed a semi-detached building which could be connected with the existing house. After a careful consideration, we decided that our new design should not resemble the existing building in order to give possibilities for new creative idea to develop, as requested by the client. As the new building will be situated at the back of the site behind the existing house, we, as an architect, would like to envision a new design that shines its life rather than becoming dormant at the back. Our conceptual approach is to utilize the existing drive-way as the main approach to the new building extension. At night, the light from the 3 meters span cantilevered room on the 2nd and 3rd floor would generate an effect of a bright floating space above ground. At the same time, the living room and the bedroom of this new extension would have an open view of the gardens; as well as full ventilation from the wind direction. Owing to the limitation of available space, a unique manipulation by means of juxtaposition of the structure will be the major focus for our design consideration
  • 55 Floating Space project name : Floating spaces function : House chief architect/ office name : M.L.Varudh Varavarn / Vin Varavarn Architect.,ltd project team : Mr.Jongsarit Jinachan, Mr. Akaphol Jarnpian client : Mr.Waranchai na songkla design date : July 2008 completion date : Jan 2010 area : 300 sq.m. Summary info This small project is a design of a new 300 sq.m house, situated within the same compound of an existing house. Our client requested for a new modern building of steel structure, but requires that it does not deface their existing 30 years old house. We proposed a semi-detached building which could be connected with the existing house. After a careful consideration, we decided that our new design should not resemble the existing building in order to give possibilities for new creative idea to develop, as requested by the client. As the new building will be situated at the back of the site behind the existing house, we, as an architect, would like to envision a new design that shines its life rather than becoming dormant at the back. Our conceptual approach is to utilize the existing drive-way as the main approach to the new building extension. At night, the light from the 3 meters span cantilevered room on the 2nd and 3rd floor would generate an effect of a bright floating space above ground. At the same time, the living room and the bedroom of this new extension would have an open view of the gardens; as well as full ventilation from the wind direction. Owing to the limitation of available space, a unique manipulation by means of juxtaposition of the structure will be the major focus for our design consideration
  • 56 CITY-PARK project name: CITY-PARK function: Residential buildings / Apartment buildings chief architect/office name: Meryem Ozturkoglu project team: Meryem Ozturkoglu client: Personal design consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): design date: 2009 completion date: 2009 area: NY, USA (optional) related links : www.yankodesign.com/2009/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world/ www.designloft.org/news/city-park-concept-big-j/ www.usatoday.com/topics/article/Kevin+Lynch/0fd93oz1ehc1e/1 www.square-mag.co.uk/tag/architecture-architecture/page/2 www.better-design-india.blogspot.com/2009_03_01_archive.html www.preik.no/09/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world-45445 www.infuture.ru/comment/1781/arch www.coolest-concepts.net/2009/03/04/cel-mai-mare-j-din-lume/ ...This leads to the definition of what might to be called imageability: that quality in a physical object which gives it a high probability of evoking a strong image in any given observer. It is that shape, color, or arrangement which facilitates the making of vividly identified, powerfully structured, highly useful mental images of the environment....” Image of the City, Kevin Lynch Skyscrapers, as one of the components the modernist living space, take role with the varying typology and increasing functions since the industrial revolution until now. Skyscrapers which firstly appeared as tall-prismatic buildings change the silhouette of the cities with their different shapes. CITY-PARK is designed as a system that is derived from the structure of New York City. The first conception of CITY-PARK is a union that involves both CITY and the PARK as a running diagram like NYC. Basic form of a tree is the main of the conception. With ever, increasing units and changing facilities CITY-PARK uprises on the riverside of Hudson River. CITY-PARK conception CITY-PARK tends not only rising as s skyscraper but also rising as an urban transformation. As engaging the two sides of Hudson River, the continuous pedestrian lane is formed between Hudson Park and Central Park. Thus, the open-space area which clustered separately along Hudson River has become a complete line. Also CITY-PARK turns into a dock which has a role as a social activity area. With ever, having interior gardens CITY-PARK becomes both multifunctional and sustainable structure.
  • 56 CITY-PARK project name: CITY-PARK function: Residential buildings / Apartment buildings chief architect/office name: Meryem Ozturkoglu project team: Meryem Ozturkoglu client: Personal design consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): design date: 2009 completion date: 2009 area: NY, USA (optional) related links : www.yankodesign.com/2009/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world/ www.designloft.org/news/city-park-concept-big-j/ www.usatoday.com/topics/article/Kevin+Lynch/0fd93oz1ehc1e/1 www.square-mag.co.uk/tag/architecture-architecture/page/2 www.better-design-india.blogspot.com/2009_03_01_archive.html www.preik.no/09/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world-45445 www.infuture.ru/comment/1781/arch www.coolest-concepts.net/2009/03/04/cel-mai-mare-j-din-lume/ ...This leads to the definition of what might to be called imageability: that quality in a physical object which gives it a high probability of evoking a strong image in any given observer. It is that shape, color, or arrangement which facilitates the making of vividly identified, powerfully structured, highly useful mental images of the environment....” Image of the City, Kevin Lynch Skyscrapers, as one of the components the modernist living space, take role with the varying typology and increasing functions since the industrial revolution until now. Skyscrapers which firstly appeared as tall-prismatic buildings change the silhouette of the cities with their different shapes. CITY-PARK is designed as a system that is derived from the structure of New York City. The first conception of CITY-PARK is a union that involves both CITY and the PARK as a running diagram like NYC. Basic form of a tree is the main of the conception. With ever, increasing units and changing facilities CITY-PARK uprises on the riverside of Hudson River. CITY-PARK conception CITY-PARK tends not only rising as s skyscraper but also rising as an urban transformation. As engaging the two sides of Hudson River, the continuous pedestrian lane is formed between Hudson Park and Central Park. Thus, the open-space area which clustered separately along Hudson River has become a complete line. Also CITY-PARK turns into a dock which has a role as a social activity area. With ever, having interior gardens CITY-PARK becomes both multifunctional and sustainable structure.
  • 56 CITY-PARK project name: CITY-PARK function: Residential buildings / Apartment buildings chief architect/office name: Meryem Ozturkoglu project team: Meryem Ozturkoglu client: Personal design consultancy/collaboration partners (if any): design date: 2009 completion date: 2009 area: NY, USA (optional) related links : www.yankodesign.com/2009/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world/ www.designloft.org/news/city-park-concept-big-j/ www.usatoday.com/topics/article/Kevin+Lynch/0fd93oz1ehc1e/1 www.square-mag.co.uk/tag/architecture-architecture/page/2 www.better-design-india.blogspot.com/2009_03_01_archive.html www.preik.no/09/03/04/the-biggest-j-in-the-world-45445 www.infuture.ru/comment/1781/arch www.coolest-concepts.net/2009/03/04/cel-mai-mare-j-din-lume/ ...This leads to the definition of what might to be called imageability: that quality in a physical object which gives it a high probability of evoking a strong image in any given observer. It is that shape, color, or arrangement which facilitates the making of vividly identified, powerfully structured, highly useful mental images of the environment....” Image of the City, Kevin Lynch Skyscrapers, as one of the components the modernist living space, take role with the varying typology and increasing functions since the industrial revolution until now. Skyscrapers which firstly appeared as tall-prismatic buildings change the silhouette of the cities with their different shapes. CITY-PARK is designed as a system that is derived from the structure of New York City. The first conception of CITY-PARK is a union that involves both CITY and the PARK as a running diagram like NYC. Basic form of a tree is the main of the conception. With ever, increasing units and changing facilities CITY-PARK uprises on the riverside of Hudson River. CITY-PARK conception CITY-PARK tends not only rising as s skyscraper but also rising as an urban transformation. As engaging the two sides of Hudson River, the continuous pedestrian lane is formed between Hudson Park and Central Park. Thus, the open-space area which clustered separately along Hudson River has become a complete line. Also CITY-PARK turns into a dock which has a role as a social activity area. With ever, having interior gardens CITY-PARK becomes both multifunctional and sustainable structure.
  • 57 Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl Absolute Architecture. "The slow but inexorable march of history reserves for architecture a sequence of alternate phases, each lasting about thirty years, at the start of which each generation takes up a critical attitude towards the previous one. Contemporary architectural culture is now in this transitional phase: today’s paradigms will gradually lose their importance, disappear or be replaced by what we today considerer as values opposed to the established values of these years. It is to be hoped that architecture will reacquire a radical formal identity. There is no doubt that this phase will peter out once its paradigms are exhausted, but during its development architecture will return to the centre of interest of the discipline. Architecture in the service of society and its policies will also affirm it’s absolute character as a material entity. The contemporary debate over themes such as urban analyses, strategies, diagrams, etc. Is a useful line research, but one that we consider secondary. Architecture is critical – in its intrinsic, formal nature – at a time when its reflects on and consciously revises its instruments and procedures: nothing can explain the nature and significance of architecture better than architecture itself. Architecture is ‘matter’ and architects have to work witch the vocabulary and syntax of matter. It is within these general considerations that we intend to construct the design work. The principal objective of the work will be the design and project of an architectural object not just relevant to the set topic but one that expresses the architect’s position towards the fundamental themes of the composition, design and construction of architecture. At best, the designs produced by our office should also formulate, in a clear and rigorous manner and trough the exclusive use of architectural language, new paradigms in which a radical renewal of the discipline can be glimpsed. This formulation will be achieved by devising a Manifesto: a new paradigm is impossible without a careful construction of the iconographic and representative apparatus of the project. The design will thus be understood as a fundamental instrument to express radically and polemically the deeper meaning of architectural practice." Text by Elia Zenghelis arch. City vs Sprawl - "Nuova città sulla centuria Romana" The central Veneto area, lying approximately between Padua, Treviso, Castelfranco and Mestre, has one of the most unusual settlement systems of northern Italy. This project starts from the view that the phenomena of urban sprawl should be stemmed, as the sprawl gives rise to a great number of problem, among which we might mention the excessive proliferation of infrastructures, with costs for the government that are unsustainable in the long run and break the delicate environmental balance of the system created by roman agriculture colonization. The new city is set in the area of Camposanpiero and adopts the principle of the Roman grid as a strategy for protecting the area while making it denser. The project’s objective is to propose a new from of urban living that brings together the advantages of community life with careful use and improvement of the existing environmental system, while rebuilding the almost completely obliterated relationship between the people and the farmed fields. The essential idea is to build at the edges of the Roman century, leaving the interior unaltered and maximizing the contrast between density and empty space. The presence of existing settlements, particularly along the east-west line along the centuries’ horizontal axes inspired taking the free sides of the centuries on the north-south line as the primary direction of new construction. The height of the buildings makes it possible to concentrate a large number of inhabitants along the succession of canals and boulevards and lets one orient oneself in the area. The proposed buildings are intended as standard examples. All of the choices are conditioned by two essential element of the proposal: to the north, there is the upper boundary of the Musone Vecchio river; and the south there is the lower boundary of Decumano which is urbanized by a system of squares and public spaces, which becomes the core of the city’s social life. Project by LOKOMOTIV.archs office (Anita Lara Bulloni - Alberto Julio Fresco architects) + Carola Daldoss arch.
  • 57 Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl Absolute Architecture. "The slow but inexorable march of history reserves for architecture a sequence of alternate phases, each lasting about thirty years, at the start of which each generation takes up a critical attitude towards the previous one. Contemporary architectural culture is now in this transitional phase: today’s paradigms will gradually lose their importance, disappear or be replaced by what we today considerer as values opposed to the established values of these years. It is to be hoped that architecture will reacquire a radical formal identity. There is no doubt that this phase will peter out once its paradigms are exhausted, but during its development architecture will return to the centre of interest of the discipline. Architecture in the service of society and its policies will also affirm it’s absolute character as a material entity. The contemporary debate over themes such as urban analyses, strategies, diagrams, etc. Is a useful line research, but one that we consider secondary. Architecture is critical – in its intrinsic, formal nature – at a time when its reflects on and consciously revises its instruments and procedures: nothing can explain the nature and significance of architecture better than architecture itself. Architecture is ‘matter’ and architects have to work witch the vocabulary and syntax of matter. It is within these general considerations that we intend to construct the design work. The principal objective of the work will be the design and project of an architectural object not just relevant to the set topic but one that expresses the architect’s position towards the fundamental themes of the composition, design and construction of architecture. At best, the designs produced by our office should also formulate, in a clear and rigorous manner and trough the exclusive use of architectural language, new paradigms in which a radical renewal of the discipline can be glimpsed. This formulation will be achieved by devising a Manifesto: a new paradigm is impossible without a careful construction of the iconographic and representative apparatus of the project. The design will thus be understood as a fundamental instrument to express radically and polemically the deeper meaning of architectural practice." Text by Elia Zenghelis arch. City vs Sprawl - "Nuova città sulla centuria Romana" The central Veneto area, lying approximately between Padua, Treviso, Castelfranco and Mestre, has one of the most unusual settlement systems of northern Italy. This project starts from the view that the phenomena of urban sprawl should be stemmed, as the sprawl gives rise to a great number of problem, among which we might mention the excessive proliferation of infrastructures, with costs for the government that are unsustainable in the long run and break the delicate environmental balance of the system created by roman agriculture colonization. The new city is set in the area of Camposanpiero and adopts the principle of the Roman grid as a strategy for protecting the area while making it denser. The project’s objective is to propose a new from of urban living that brings together the advantages of community life with careful use and improvement of the existing environmental system, while rebuilding the almost completely obliterated relationship between the people and the farmed fields. The essential idea is to build at the edges of the Roman century, leaving the interior unaltered and maximizing the contrast between density and empty space. The presence of existing settlements, particularly along the east-west line along the centuries’ horizontal axes inspired taking the free sides of the centuries on the north-south line as the primary direction of new construction. The height of the buildings makes it possible to concentrate a large number of inhabitants along the succession of canals and boulevards and lets one orient oneself in the area. The proposed buildings are intended as standard examples. All of the choices are conditioned by two essential element of the proposal: to the north, there is the upper boundary of the Musone Vecchio river; and the south there is the lower boundary of Decumano which is urbanized by a system of squares and public spaces, which becomes the core of the city’s social life. Project by LOKOMOTIV.archs office (Anita Lara Bulloni - Alberto Julio Fresco architects) + Carola Daldoss arch.
  • 57 Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl Absolute Architecture. "The slow but inexorable march of history reserves for architecture a sequence of alternate phases, each lasting about thirty years, at the start of which each generation takes up a critical attitude towards the previous one. Contemporary architectural culture is now in this transitional phase: today’s paradigms will gradually lose their importance, disappear or be replaced by what we today considerer as values opposed to the established values of these years. It is to be hoped that architecture will reacquire a radical formal identity. There is no doubt that this phase will peter out once its paradigms are exhausted, but during its development architecture will return to the centre of interest of the discipline. Architecture in the service of society and its policies will also affirm it’s absolute character as a material entity. The contemporary debate over themes such as urban analyses, strategies, diagrams, etc. Is a useful line research, but one that we consider secondary. Architecture is critical – in its intrinsic, formal nature – at a time when its reflects on and consciously revises its instruments and procedures: nothing can explain the nature and significance of architecture better than architecture itself. Architecture is ‘matter’ and architects have to work witch the vocabulary and syntax of matter. It is within these general considerations that we intend to construct the design work. The principal objective of the work will be the design and project of an architectural object not just relevant to the set topic but one that expresses the architect’s position towards the fundamental themes of the composition, design and construction of architecture. At best, the designs produced by our office should also formulate, in a clear and rigorous manner and trough the exclusive use of architectural language, new paradigms in which a radical renewal of the discipline can be glimpsed. This formulation will be achieved by devising a Manifesto: a new paradigm is impossible without a careful construction of the iconographic and representative apparatus of the project. The design will thus be understood as a fundamental instrument to express radically and polemically the deeper meaning of architectural practice." Text by Elia Zenghelis arch. City vs Sprawl - "Nuova città sulla centuria Romana" The central Veneto area, lying approximately between Padua, Treviso, Castelfranco and Mestre, has one of the most unusual settlement systems of northern Italy. This project starts from the view that the phenomena of urban sprawl should be stemmed, as the sprawl gives rise to a great number of problem, among which we might mention the excessive proliferation of infrastructures, with costs for the government that are unsustainable in the long run and break the delicate environmental balance of the system created by roman agriculture colonization. The new city is set in the area of Camposanpiero and adopts the principle of the Roman grid as a strategy for protecting the area while making it denser. The project’s objective is to propose a new from of urban living that brings together the advantages of community life with careful use and improvement of the existing environmental system, while rebuilding the almost completely obliterated relationship between the people and the farmed fields. The essential idea is to build at the edges of the Roman century, leaving the interior unaltered and maximizing the contrast between density and empty space. The presence of existing settlements, particularly along the east-west line along the centuries’ horizontal axes inspired taking the free sides of the centuries on the north-south line as the primary direction of new construction. The height of the buildings makes it possible to concentrate a large number of inhabitants along the succession of canals and boulevards and lets one orient oneself in the area. The proposed buildings are intended as standard examples. All of the choices are conditioned by two essential element of the proposal: to the north, there is the upper boundary of the Musone Vecchio river; and the south there is the lower boundary of Decumano which is urbanized by a system of squares and public spaces, which becomes the core of the city’s social life. Project by LOKOMOTIV.archs office (Anita Lara Bulloni - Alberto Julio Fresco architects) + Carola Daldoss arch.
  • 58 Public Library - Bucharest Project name: RM Library Function: library Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project - University of architecture and urbanism “Ion Mincu” Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - prof.dr. arh. Mircea Ochinciuc 1 prof.arh. Ana Maria Goilav 2 asist. arh. Mihai Dutescu 3 assist. arh. Adrian Moleavin Design date: 14.11.2007 Completion date: 20.12.2007 Area: 1200 m2 Site The library is situated on Regina Maria Avenue (which connects Unirii Plaza and the Rahova street), which has specific urban tissue for the central area of Bucharest, on a triangle shaped plot, having valuable neighborhoods like the Church of June 11th and the Romanian Patriarchate. Study target -Redefining the functional program of a library and its related activities in the context of a IT era scenario -Develop a valid architectural-spatial scenario, as rescue of a cultural program that tends to disappear from daily life -Integration of a contemporary intervention in a defined urban tissue The main features of the site: _combination of commerce and services with collective housing _ train type house – narrow and long yard areas that create intimate and discreet communication with the public space Discontinuous fronts, have the effect of obtaining an continuous transition between public and private space. This transition opens a new continuous perspective, like a drawing of overlapping layers which define the urban tissue. The aim of the new building is to correct the uncontrolled shape of the existing open space and to create a better-defined new one. The library project developed on the idea of morpho - ecologies design (zantedeschia aethiopica - calla flower growth), open public space which is gradually enveloped in an enclosed public space. This kind of increase can be observed in the case of the so-called train type house, which is something similar to bungalow house, that represent the main site typology. On both sides of this structure, both sides oriented towards streets, lye the volumes that contain the library, cafeteria and the book store. The north volume works as a buffer, that organizes a smooth connection between Regina Maria Avenue and the public square (open public space). The space created in-between these volumes is particularly important because it works as an urban square and in the same time as an open air library, which delivers the means of passive environmental modulation to the area. Below these, at level -1, the multimedia room, and administrative functions are developed. The growth of the library’s envelope is driven by computational processes that derive from specific articulation of the triangular elements in strong relation with structural analysis, spatial, functional, and environmental parameters, and last but not least to the human parameter. Project name: Recreation center Function: sport and spa Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project – Faculty of architecture Ljubljana Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - univ.dipl.inza.arh.M.Florijanci - assistant:univ.dipl.arch.Mitja Zorc Design date: 1.10.2008 Completion date: 1.05.2009 Area: 2658 m2 The project ideea is to analyse and integrate the Trenta main characteristics the: mountains, fog, vapour, smoke and the village. By using different elements and their compositions allow to archieve an adaptable system which maintain also its instant recognisability. As we already know until now architecture represent a game of shadows and light, game where we report permanent. Our perception was governed entirely by this relation. If we think what happens with an architecture enveloped by haze, we can say that all the perspectives that will result will be distorted like a spherical projection and the fluid boundaries of haze will be in a continuous feedback with the environment. What will happen with the visitor in this haze space? We all know that we find flavor in ambiguity of haze which is full of possibilities, and promises. Fog will condition a reality in continuing transformation and will always require a new reading. The project will be an interactiv system, which have almoust the same physically characteristics with haze space -imposibility of perceiveing space as a whole -wavey space, with no right angles, the range is connected by a clothoid (flat curve whose curvature is proportional to the length of each arc between center and point considered) symbol of passing into an unknown territory. -the impossibility to refer to the line of horizon -the interactiv system will be activated not only by the exact coordinates of the visitor at that time but also the history route. Moreover, the structure - curved surfaces connecting different elliptic sections - acts as path of deformation while it can change under the influence of wind, just as mist medium does. So, we can say that it is not relevant to speak in terms of architecture, about indoors/outdoors; it is rather a total space, a space - event, where the visitor should find the way by himself. The need to provide a community centre will usually be generated either by the need to update, modify or replace an existing faccility that has genuinely served a need, or to provide a totally new facility intended to encourage the re-establishment of a sense of community. For community centres to be viable, they must be seen to provide for and be welcoming to the community; they are often a key factor in an area regeneration strategy. We all know that a vally carved by glaciers, or glacial valley, are normally U-shaped. The valley becomes visible upon the recession of glacier that forms it. When the ice recedes or thaws, the valley remains, often littered with small boulders that were transported within the ice. Floor gradient does not affect the valley’s shape, it is the glacier’s size that does. Continuously flowing glaciers - especially in the ice age - an large sized glaciers carve wide, deep incised valleys. Examples of U-shaped valleys are found in every mountainous region that has experienced glaciation (is the process of glacier growth and establishment. Glacier is a large, slow-moving mass of ice, formed from compacted layers of snow, that slowly deforms and flows in response to gravity and high pressure. The processes and landforms caused by claciers and related to them are referred to as glacial) usually during the Pleistocene ice ages. Most present U-shaped valleys started as V-shaped before glaciation. The glaciers carved in out wider and deeper, simultaneously changing the shape. This proceeds through the glacial erosion processes of glaciation and abrasion, which results in large rocky material (glacial till) being carried in the glacier. A material called boulder clay is deposited on the floor of the valley. As the ice melts and retreats, the valley is left with very steep sides and wide, flat floor. A river or stream may remain in the valley. This replaces the original stream or river and is known as misfit stream because it is smaller than one would expect given the size of its valley. If we analyze the site more carefully, we will can see a dilemma that he presents. Dilemma lies in the fact that the valley as a space, is a space-oriented, usually transition space, journey space, and that the theme propose an idea of reviving a seat on the valley, which will have an role of polarization, that is to create something static in a space that “flows on a direction”, which is quite difficult, but this is the challenge of site. We can identify as dynamic element – the river – which includes a valley route- the road, tourist, haze, vapour and as static elements – the village houses, the inhabitants of village. The program that I propose as a solution for this site is an “Recreation Center” which will include two main aspects of the site: first aspect - dynamic aspect which represents part of the sport (sport it’s an action, represents motion, which in valley context is something plausible) – hiking, trekking, horse riding, free climbing, and sledding are closely linked to the ideea of function that causes attending and return, and the second aspect, static aspect – represented by therapy part – spa. The size and dunctions of program will be designed so that it can be maintained by the inhabitants of area. The program is devided in 2 main programs - first sport and second therapy-spa
  • 58 Public Library - Bucharest Project name: RM Library Function: library Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project - University of architecture and urbanism “Ion Mincu” Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - prof.dr. arh. Mircea Ochinciuc 1 prof.arh. Ana Maria Goilav 2 asist. arh. Mihai Dutescu 3 assist. arh. Adrian Moleavin Design date: 14.11.2007 Completion date: 20.12.2007 Area: 1200 m2 Site The library is situated on Regina Maria Avenue (which connects Unirii Plaza and the Rahova street), which has specific urban tissue for the central area of Bucharest, on a triangle shaped plot, having valuable neighborhoods like the Church of June 11th and the Romanian Patriarchate. Study target -Redefining the functional program of a library and its related activities in the context of a IT era scenario -Develop a valid architectural-spatial scenario, as rescue of a cultural program that tends to disappear from daily life -Integration of a contemporary intervention in a defined urban tissue The main features of the site: _combination of commerce and services with collective housing _ train type house – narrow and long yard areas that create intimate and discreet communication with the public space Discontinuous fronts, have the effect of obtaining an continuous transition between public and private space. This transition opens a new continuous perspective, like a drawing of overlapping layers which define the urban tissue. The aim of the new building is to correct the uncontrolled shape of the existing open space and to create a better-defined new one. The library project developed on the idea of morpho - ecologies design (zantedeschia aethiopica - calla flower growth), open public space which is gradually enveloped in an enclosed public space. This kind of increase can be observed in the case of the so-called train type house, which is something similar to bungalow house, that represent the main site typology. On both sides of this structure, both sides oriented towards streets, lye the volumes that contain the library, cafeteria and the book store. The north volume works as a buffer, that organizes a smooth connection between Regina Maria Avenue and the public square (open public space). The space created in-between these volumes is particularly important because it works as an urban square and in the same time as an open air library, which delivers the means of passive environmental modulation to the area. Below these, at level -1, the multimedia room, and administrative functions are developed. The growth of the library’s envelope is driven by computational processes that derive from specific articulation of the triangular elements in strong relation with structural analysis, spatial, functional, and environmental parameters, and last but not least to the human parameter. Project name: Recreation center Function: sport and spa Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project – Faculty of architecture Ljubljana Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - univ.dipl.inza.arh.M.Florijanci - assistant:univ.dipl.arch.Mitja Zorc Design date: 1.10.2008 Completion date: 1.05.2009 Area: 2658 m2 The project ideea is to analyse and integrate the Trenta main characteristics the: mountains, fog, vapour, smoke and the village. By using different elements and their compositions allow to archieve an adaptable system which maintain also its instant recognisability. As we already know until now architecture represent a game of shadows and light, game where we report permanent. Our perception was governed entirely by this relation. If we think what happens with an architecture enveloped by haze, we can say that all the perspectives that will result will be distorted like a spherical projection and the fluid boundaries of haze will be in a continuous feedback with the environment. What will happen with the visitor in this haze space? We all know that we find flavor in ambiguity of haze which is full of possibilities, and promises. Fog will condition a reality in continuing transformation and will always require a new reading. The project will be an interactiv system, which have almoust the same physically characteristics with haze space -imposibility of perceiveing space as a whole -wavey space, with no right angles, the range is connected by a clothoid (flat curve whose curvature is proportional to the length of each arc between center and point considered) symbol of passing into an unknown territory. -the impossibility to refer to the line of horizon -the interactiv system will be activated not only by the exact coordinates of the visitor at that time but also the history route. Moreover, the structure - curved surfaces connecting different elliptic sections - acts as path of deformation while it can change under the influence of wind, just as mist medium does. So, we can say that it is not relevant to speak in terms of architecture, about indoors/outdoors; it is rather a total space, a space - event, where the visitor should find the way by himself. The need to provide a community centre will usually be generated either by the need to update, modify or replace an existing faccility that has genuinely served a need, or to provide a totally new facility intended to encourage the re-establishment of a sense of community. For community centres to be viable, they must be seen to provide for and be welcoming to the community; they are often a key factor in an area regeneration strategy. We all know that a vally carved by glaciers, or glacial valley, are normally U-shaped. The valley becomes visible upon the recession of glacier that forms it. When the ice recedes or thaws, the valley remains, often littered with small boulders that were transported within the ice. Floor gradient does not affect the valley’s shape, it is the glacier’s size that does. Continuously flowing glaciers - especially in the ice age - an large sized glaciers carve wide, deep incised valleys. Examples of U-shaped valleys are found in every mountainous region that has experienced glaciation (is the process of glacier growth and establishment. Glacier is a large, slow-moving mass of ice, formed from compacted layers of snow, that slowly deforms and flows in response to gravity and high pressure. The processes and landforms caused by claciers and related to them are referred to as glacial) usually during the Pleistocene ice ages. Most present U-shaped valleys started as V-shaped before glaciation. The glaciers carved in out wider and deeper, simultaneously changing the shape. This proceeds through the glacial erosion processes of glaciation and abrasion, which results in large rocky material (glacial till) being carried in the glacier. A material called boulder clay is deposited on the floor of the valley. As the ice melts and retreats, the valley is left with very steep sides and wide, flat floor. A river or stream may remain in the valley. This replaces the original stream or river and is known as misfit stream because it is smaller than one would expect given the size of its valley. If we analyze the site more carefully, we will can see a dilemma that he presents. Dilemma lies in the fact that the valley as a space, is a space-oriented, usually transition space, journey space, and that the theme propose an idea of reviving a seat on the valley, which will have an role of polarization, that is to create something static in a space that “flows on a direction”, which is quite difficult, but this is the challenge of site. We can identify as dynamic element – the river – which includes a valley route- the road, tourist, haze, vapour and as static elements – the village houses, the inhabitants of village. The program that I propose as a solution for this site is an “Recreation Center” which will include two main aspects of the site: first aspect - dynamic aspect which represents part of the sport (sport it’s an action, represents motion, which in valley context is something plausible) – hiking, trekking, horse riding, free climbing, and sledding are closely linked to the ideea of function that causes attending and return, and the second aspect, static aspect – represented by therapy part – spa. The size and dunctions of program will be designed so that it can be maintained by the inhabitants of area. The program is devided in 2 main programs - first sport and second therapy-spa
  • 58 Public Library - Bucharest Project name: RM Library Function: library Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project - University of architecture and urbanism “Ion Mincu” Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - prof.dr. arh. Mircea Ochinciuc 1 prof.arh. Ana Maria Goilav 2 asist. arh. Mihai Dutescu 3 assist. arh. Adrian Moleavin Design date: 14.11.2007 Completion date: 20.12.2007 Area: 1200 m2 Site The library is situated on Regina Maria Avenue (which connects Unirii Plaza and the Rahova street), which has specific urban tissue for the central area of Bucharest, on a triangle shaped plot, having valuable neighborhoods like the Church of June 11th and the Romanian Patriarchate. Study target -Redefining the functional program of a library and its related activities in the context of a IT era scenario -Develop a valid architectural-spatial scenario, as rescue of a cultural program that tends to disappear from daily life -Integration of a contemporary intervention in a defined urban tissue The main features of the site: _combination of commerce and services with collective housing _ train type house – narrow and long yard areas that create intimate and discreet communication with the public space Discontinuous fronts, have the effect of obtaining an continuous transition between public and private space. This transition opens a new continuous perspective, like a drawing of overlapping layers which define the urban tissue. The aim of the new building is to correct the uncontrolled shape of the existing open space and to create a better-defined new one. The library project developed on the idea of morpho - ecologies design (zantedeschia aethiopica - calla flower growth), open public space which is gradually enveloped in an enclosed public space. This kind of increase can be observed in the case of the so-called train type house, which is something similar to bungalow house, that represent the main site typology. On both sides of this structure, both sides oriented towards streets, lye the volumes that contain the library, cafeteria and the book store. The north volume works as a buffer, that organizes a smooth connection between Regina Maria Avenue and the public square (open public space). The space created in-between these volumes is particularly important because it works as an urban square and in the same time as an open air library, which delivers the means of passive environmental modulation to the area. Below these, at level -1, the multimedia room, and administrative functions are developed. The growth of the library’s envelope is driven by computational processes that derive from specific articulation of the triangular elements in strong relation with structural analysis, spatial, functional, and environmental parameters, and last but not least to the human parameter. Project name: Recreation center Function: sport and spa Chief architect/office name: student architect – Bolojan Daniel Calin Project team: - Client: school project – Faculty of architecture Ljubljana Consultancy / collaboration partners (if any): - univ.dipl.inza.arh.M.Florijanci - assistant:univ.dipl.arch.Mitja Zorc Design date: 1.10.2008 Completion date: 1.05.2009 Area: 2658 m2 The project ideea is to analyse and integrate the Trenta main characteristics the: mountains, fog, vapour, smoke and the village. By using different elements and their compositions allow to archieve an adaptable system which maintain also its instant recognisability. As we already know until now architecture represent a game of shadows and light, game where we report permanent. Our perception was governed entirely by this relation. If we think what happens with an architecture enveloped by haze, we can say that all the perspectives that will result will be distorted like a spherical projection and the fluid boundaries of haze will be in a continuous feedback with the environment. What will happen with the visitor in this haze space? We all know that we find flavor in ambiguity of haze which is full of possibilities, and promises. Fog will condition a reality in continuing transformation and will always require a new reading. The project will be an interactiv system, which have almoust the same physically characteristics with haze space -imposibility of perceiveing space as a whole -wavey space, with no right angles, the range is connected by a clothoid (flat curve whose curvature is proportional to the length of each arc between center and point considered) symbol of passing into an unknown territory. -the impossibility to refer to the line of horizon -the interactiv system will be activated not only by the exact coordinates of the visitor at that time but also the history route. Moreover, the structure - curved surfaces connecting different elliptic sections - acts as path of deformation while it can change under the influence of wind, just as mist medium does. So, we can say that it is not relevant to speak in terms of architecture, about indoors/outdoors; it is rather a total space, a space - event, where the visitor should find the way by himself. The need to provide a community centre will usually be generated either by the need to update, modify or replace an existing faccility that has genuinely served a need, or to provide a totally new facility intended to encourage the re-establishment of a sense of community. For community centres to be viable, they must be seen to provide for and be welcoming to the community; they are often a key factor in an area regeneration strategy. We all know that a vally carved by glaciers, or glacial valley, are normally U-shaped. The valley becomes visible upon the recession of glacier that forms it. When the ice recedes or thaws, the valley remains, often littered with small boulders that were transported within the ice. Floor gradient does not affect the valley’s shape, it is the glacier’s size that does. Continuously flowing glaciers - especially in the ice age - an large sized glaciers carve wide, deep incised valleys. Examples of U-shaped valleys are found in every mountainous region that has experienced glaciation (is the process of glacier growth and establishment. Glacier is a large, slow-moving mass of ice, formed from compacted layers of snow, that slowly deforms and flows in response to gravity and high pressure. The processes and landforms caused by claciers and related to them are referred to as glacial) usually during the Pleistocene ice ages. Most present U-shaped valleys started as V-shaped before glaciation. The glaciers carved in out wider and deeper, simultaneously changing the shape. This proceeds through the glacial erosion processes of glaciation and abrasion, which results in large rocky material (glacial till) being carried in the glacier. A material called boulder clay is deposited on the floor of the valley. As the ice melts and retreats, the valley is left with very steep sides and wide, flat floor. A river or stream may remain in the valley. This replaces the original stream or river and is known as misfit stream because it is smaller than one would expect given the size of its valley. If we analyze the site more carefully, we will can see a dilemma that he presents. Dilemma lies in the fact that the valley as a space, is a space-oriented, usually transition space, journey space, and that the theme propose an idea of reviving a seat on the valley, which will have an role of polarization, that is to create something static in a space that “flows on a direction”, which is quite difficult, but this is the challenge of site. We can identify as dynamic element – the river – which includes a valley route- the road, tourist, haze, vapour and as static elements – the village houses, the inhabitants of village. The program that I propose as a solution for this site is an “Recreation Center” which will include two main aspects of the site: first aspect - dynamic aspect which represents part of the sport (sport it’s an action, represents motion, which in valley context is something plausible) – hiking, trekking, horse riding, free climbing, and sledding are closely linked to the ideea of function that causes attending and return, and the second aspect, static aspect – represented by therapy part – spa. The size and dunctions of program will be designed so that it can be maintained by the inhabitants of area. The program is devided in 2 main programs - first sport and second therapy-spa
  • 59 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center This glassed bridge with a parametric skin connects two halls inside the former Post Office Building, one of the most important heritage structures of Guatemala City, The project also transforms a former inaccesible light shaft into a scenario for various activities and performances. This structure was fabricated by young students of the Guatemala Workshop School sponsored by the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation and Guatemala City Hall.
  • 59 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center This glassed bridge with a parametric skin connects two halls inside the former Post Office Building, one of the most important heritage structures of Guatemala City, The project also transforms a former inaccesible light shaft into a scenario for various activities and performances. This structure was fabricated by young students of the Guatemala Workshop School sponsored by the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation and Guatemala City Hall.
  • 59 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center This glassed bridge with a parametric skin connects two halls inside the former Post Office Building, one of the most important heritage structures of Guatemala City, The project also transforms a former inaccesible light shaft into a scenario for various activities and performances. This structure was fabricated by young students of the Guatemala Workshop School sponsored by the Spanish Agency for International Cooperation and Guatemala City Hall.
  • 60 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center Name: HORTUS OFFICINALIS Competition: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control Complex International Competition Promoter: Construction and Planning Agency, Ministry of the Interior, R.O.C. Location: Taipei - Taiwan Year: 2008 Tipology: Medical Research Center Project: CONSOLE / OLIVA (Alessandro Console, Gina Oliva) Links: http://www.console-oliva.com/eng/hortusofficinalis.html The project starts from a global reflection about the role and the feature of a Center for Diseases Control (CDC) in the third millennium. The aim is re-thinking the idea of a Medical Research Center by overcoming its general and recognized image as an aseptic place and by conceiving it as generator of environmental and landscaping features. We link the idea of CDC to the idea of Hortus Officinalis, an ancient medical research place in which the activities are strictly related to the studies and the cultivation of healing herbs. In our interpretation, the CDC is a contemporary Hortus where the laboratories become the contemporary cultivations. As a consequence, the general plan of the project is based on the idea of hortus conclusus in which various buildings with different role, hight and dimension are placed in the intervention area in a way to generate a central wide green court. The court is a pedestrian area: it is separated from surrounding flows and it is placed at the lower level (0.00) than the public circulation one that coincides with the level (+ 7.00) of the scheduled central park of the Hsinchu Biomedical Science Area. The buildings that define the space of the inner court are divided in two groups: - The first group is composed by 3 blocks (7 meters high) spreading all over the intervention area in a way to create a wide countinous green basement. These 3 blocks have a double role: on the one hand they define and circumscribe the area of the court (where the circulation is reserved for CDC Staff); on the other hand, they creates an artificial ground that allows a path’s continuity between the level of the central park to the south and the level of the area northward; - the second group include 6 square-shaped blocks with different hight; these blocks are rested upon the artificial ground and characterize the contour line of the court. The allocation of functional spaces inside the two building groups is related to the feature and specific requirement of each space (Administration Center, Research&Diagnostic Center; public areas, staff areas, office areas etc.). For this reason, the collective and multifunctional activities (exhibition areas, conference rooms, auditorium, lobbies etc.) are allocated in the basement; whereas the research and working areas (laboratories and offices) are allocated in the square-shaped blocks. The two building groups are strictly related and create two different parts: - the wider part located to the south of the area that hosts the Research & Diagnostic Center; - the other one located to the north that hosts the Administration Center and creates a main front on the street. Starting from the idea of CDC as Hortus Officinalis, the general features of the project and the materials that characterized it follow and underline environmental and landscaping principles. As it happens in a Hortus, the natural element is predominant, but it is oriented by artificial rules. For this reason, the 3 main elements of the project are characterized in a different way: - The Basement (artificial ground) that defines the court has a green continuous roof (with tree-lined areas). There is also a distinction between the part of basement to the south (where there is the Research & Diagnostic Center) and the other one to the north (where there is the Administration Center). In the first, the roof of basement joins up with the streets through sloping green surfaces. In the second, there is a sequence of tiers that connect the street level to the green elevated plaza; - The Court is characterized by green areas and body of water areas. The other parts have a permeable paving to allow planting vegetation; - The Blocks are double-skin covered: a metallic grid covered by climber plants is overlapped to the external wall so that from the outside the blocks seem to be made of vegetation. Vegetation has also a bioclimatic role for controlling the quality and the level of temperature of internal spaces.
  • 60 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center Name: HORTUS OFFICINALIS Competition: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control Complex International Competition Promoter: Construction and Planning Agency, Ministry of the Interior, R.O.C. Location: Taipei - Taiwan Year: 2008 Tipology: Medical Research Center Project: CONSOLE / OLIVA (Alessandro Console, Gina Oliva) Links: http://www.console-oliva.com/eng/hortusofficinalis.html The project starts from a global reflection about the role and the feature of a Center for Diseases Control (CDC) in the third millennium. The aim is re-thinking the idea of a Medical Research Center by overcoming its general and recognized image as an aseptic place and by conceiving it as generator of environmental and landscaping features. We link the idea of CDC to the idea of Hortus Officinalis, an ancient medical research place in which the activities are strictly related to the studies and the cultivation of healing herbs. In our interpretation, the CDC is a contemporary Hortus where the laboratories become the contemporary cultivations. As a consequence, the general plan of the project is based on the idea of hortus conclusus in which various buildings with different role, hight and dimension are placed in the intervention area in a way to generate a central wide green court. The court is a pedestrian area: it is separated from surrounding flows and it is placed at the lower level (0.00) than the public circulation one that coincides with the level (+ 7.00) of the scheduled central park of the Hsinchu Biomedical Science Area. The buildings that define the space of the inner court are divided in two groups: - The first group is composed by 3 blocks (7 meters high) spreading all over the intervention area in a way to create a wide countinous green basement. These 3 blocks have a double role: on the one hand they define and circumscribe the area of the court (where the circulation is reserved for CDC Staff); on the other hand, they creates an artificial ground that allows a path’s continuity between the level of the central park to the south and the level of the area northward; - the second group include 6 square-shaped blocks with different hight; these blocks are rested upon the artificial ground and characterize the contour line of the court. The allocation of functional spaces inside the two building groups is related to the feature and specific requirement of each space (Administration Center, Research&Diagnostic Center; public areas, staff areas, office areas etc.). For this reason, the collective and multifunctional activities (exhibition areas, conference rooms, auditorium, lobbies etc.) are allocated in the basement; whereas the research and working areas (laboratories and offices) are allocated in the square-shaped blocks. The two building groups are strictly related and create two different parts: - the wider part located to the south of the area that hosts the Research & Diagnostic Center; - the other one located to the north that hosts the Administration Center and creates a main front on the street. Starting from the idea of CDC as Hortus Officinalis, the general features of the project and the materials that characterized it follow and underline environmental and landscaping principles. As it happens in a Hortus, the natural element is predominant, but it is oriented by artificial rules. For this reason, the 3 main elements of the project are characterized in a different way: - The Basement (artificial ground) that defines the court has a green continuous roof (with tree-lined areas). There is also a distinction between the part of basement to the south (where there is the Research & Diagnostic Center) and the other one to the north (where there is the Administration Center). In the first, the roof of basement joins up with the streets through sloping green surfaces. In the second, there is a sequence of tiers that connect the street level to the green elevated plaza; - The Court is characterized by green areas and body of water areas. The other parts have a permeable paving to allow planting vegetation; - The Blocks are double-skin covered: a metallic grid covered by climber plants is overlapped to the external wall so that from the outside the blocks seem to be made of vegetation. Vegetation has also a bioclimatic role for controlling the quality and the level of temperature of internal spaces.
  • 60 Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center Name: HORTUS OFFICINALIS Competition: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control Complex International Competition Promoter: Construction and Planning Agency, Ministry of the Interior, R.O.C. Location: Taipei - Taiwan Year: 2008 Tipology: Medical Research Center Project: CONSOLE / OLIVA (Alessandro Console, Gina Oliva) Links: http://www.console-oliva.com/eng/hortusofficinalis.html The project starts from a global reflection about the role and the feature of a Center for Diseases Control (CDC) in the third millennium. The aim is re-thinking the idea of a Medical Research Center by overcoming its general and recognized image as an aseptic place and by conceiving it as generator of environmental and landscaping features. We link the idea of CDC to the idea of Hortus Officinalis, an ancient medical research place in which the activities are strictly related to the studies and the cultivation of healing herbs. In our interpretation, the CDC is a contemporary Hortus where the laboratories become the contemporary cultivations. As a consequence, the general plan of the project is based on the idea of hortus conclusus in which various buildings with different role, hight and dimension are placed in the intervention area in a way to generate a central wide green court. The court is a pedestrian area: it is separated from surrounding flows and it is placed at the lower level (0.00) than the public circulation one that coincides with the level (+ 7.00) of the scheduled central park of the Hsinchu Biomedical Science Area. The buildings that define the space of the inner court are divided in two groups: - The first group is composed by 3 blocks (7 meters high) spreading all over the intervention area in a way to create a wide countinous green basement. These 3 blocks have a double role: on the one hand they define and circumscribe the area of the court (where the circulation is reserved for CDC Staff); on the other hand, they creates an artificial ground that allows a path’s continuity between the level of the central park to the south and the level of the area northward; - the second group include 6 square-shaped blocks with different hight; these blocks are rested upon the artificial ground and characterize the contour line of the court. The allocation of functional spaces inside the two building groups is related to the feature and specific requirement of each space (Administration Center, Research&Diagnostic Center; public areas, staff areas, office areas etc.). For this reason, the collective and multifunctional activities (exhibition areas, conference rooms, auditorium, lobbies etc.) are allocated in the basement; whereas the research and working areas (laboratories and offices) are allocated in the square-shaped blocks. The two building groups are strictly related and create two different parts: - the wider part located to the south of the area that hosts the Research & Diagnostic Center; - the other one located to the north that hosts the Administration Center and creates a main front on the street. Starting from the idea of CDC as Hortus Officinalis, the general features of the project and the materials that characterized it follow and underline environmental and landscaping principles. As it happens in a Hortus, the natural element is predominant, but it is oriented by artificial rules. For this reason, the 3 main elements of the project are characterized in a different way: - The Basement (artificial ground) that defines the court has a green continuous roof (with tree-lined areas). There is also a distinction between the part of basement to the south (where there is the Research & Diagnostic Center) and the other one to the north (where there is the Administration Center). In the first, the roof of basement joins up with the streets through sloping green surfaces. In the second, there is a sequence of tiers that connect the street level to the green elevated plaza; - The Court is characterized by green areas and body of water areas. The other parts have a permeable paving to allow planting vegetation; - The Blocks are double-skin covered: a metallic grid covered by climber plants is overlapped to the external wall so that from the outside the blocks seem to be made of vegetation. Vegetation has also a bioclimatic role for controlling the quality and the level of temperature of internal spaces.
  • 61 High School in Dano Project description Situated at the edge of a small town in Burkina Faso, the project comprises an L-shaped addition to an existing school complex. The design incorporates locally available materials and sustainable features that respond to the specific constraints of climate. This new building closes the southern angle of the compound and is oriented to reduce direct sunlight onto the walls, which are themselves protected from the sun by a wave –like canopy. The extension compromises three individual blocks housing classroom, offices and a computer room. An oval Amphitheatre, open to the exterior, serves as a sitting area during breaks. The ensemble is covered by a tilted, cantilevering roof structure whose undulating bays create a rhythm against the orthogonal enclosure below. Walls of locally available laterite (laminated with thin layers of cement to form 30 cm thick, load bearing partitions) sit on a granite stone bed. Regularly spaced, tall window shutters are painted in bright colours that vary with the activity inside. The roof consists of 3 m wide, modular elements assembled from 14 mm and 16 mm thick iron bars and welded together on site. Corrugated roofing fixed to the assemblage protects the interior from the elements. Within the classrooms, a wave–like suspended ceiling defined into 3 m bays recalls the exterior structure. Slits in the ceiling allow hot air to exhaust trough the roof, keeping the building naturally ventilated. Comprised of cement stones hanging on the construction of thin, flat rolled steel, the bottom side of the ceiling is painted in reflective white to distribute light within the classrooms. Throughout the construction process, local artisans were trained in new techniques, ensuring that building methods would stay within the community. For definition look at Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laterite
  • 61 High School in Dano Project description Situated at the edge of a small town in Burkina Faso, the project comprises an L-shaped addition to an existing school complex. The design incorporates locally available materials and sustainable features that respond to the specific constraints of climate. This new building closes the southern angle of the compound and is oriented to reduce direct sunlight onto the walls, which are themselves protected from the sun by a wave –like canopy. The extension compromises three individual blocks housing classroom, offices and a computer room. An oval Amphitheatre, open to the exterior, serves as a sitting area during breaks. The ensemble is covered by a tilted, cantilevering roof structure whose undulating bays create a rhythm against the orthogonal enclosure below. Walls of locally available laterite (laminated with thin layers of cement to form 30 cm thick, load bearing partitions) sit on a granite stone bed. Regularly spaced, tall window shutters are painted in bright colours that vary with the activity inside. The roof consists of 3 m wide, modular elements assembled from 14 mm and 16 mm thick iron bars and welded together on site. Corrugated roofing fixed to the assemblage protects the interior from the elements. Within the classrooms, a wave–like suspended ceiling defined into 3 m bays recalls the exterior structure. Slits in the ceiling allow hot air to exhaust trough the roof, keeping the building naturally ventilated. Comprised of cement stones hanging on the construction of thin, flat rolled steel, the bottom side of the ceiling is painted in reflective white to distribute light within the classrooms. Throughout the construction process, local artisans were trained in new techniques, ensuring that building methods would stay within the community. For definition look at Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laterite
  • 61 High School in Dano Project description Situated at the edge of a small town in Burkina Faso, the project comprises an L-shaped addition to an existing school complex. The design incorporates locally available materials and sustainable features that respond to the specific constraints of climate. This new building closes the southern angle of the compound and is oriented to reduce direct sunlight onto the walls, which are themselves protected from the sun by a wave –like canopy. The extension compromises three individual blocks housing classroom, offices and a computer room. An oval Amphitheatre, open to the exterior, serves as a sitting area during breaks. The ensemble is covered by a tilted, cantilevering roof structure whose undulating bays create a rhythm against the orthogonal enclosure below. Walls of locally available laterite (laminated with thin layers of cement to form 30 cm thick, load bearing partitions) sit on a granite stone bed. Regularly spaced, tall window shutters are painted in bright colours that vary with the activity inside. The roof consists of 3 m wide, modular elements assembled from 14 mm and 16 mm thick iron bars and welded together on site. Corrugated roofing fixed to the assemblage protects the interior from the elements. Within the classrooms, a wave–like suspended ceiling defined into 3 m bays recalls the exterior structure. Slits in the ceiling allow hot air to exhaust trough the roof, keeping the building naturally ventilated. Comprised of cement stones hanging on the construction of thin, flat rolled steel, the bottom side of the ceiling is painted in reflective white to distribute light within the classrooms. Throughout the construction process, local artisans were trained in new techniques, ensuring that building methods would stay within the community. For definition look at Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laterite
  • 62 Viviendas en Ángel 2 Under conditions of extreme poverty, malnutrition, insufficiency of the road net and markets, lack of potable water, sanitation and electricity are designed houses to give shelter to people that live with the danger of sliding and to plan a new expansion of the settlement. The village Ángel 2 is located in the north of Nicaragua, in an altitude of 900-1.000 m.a.s., the ground is characterized by large gradients and the temperature fluctuates between 20 and 27?C throughout all year. In order to locate the new settlement it was chosen the place with the smallest gradient, that is near the central point of the village that concentrates the public buildings. The theoretical plot for each house is of rural dimensions 20x50m., so to plant products for autoconsume. The human faeces are exploited through a fertilizer latrine and give natural fertilizer for the plants without cost. Moreover, the rainwater is collected in tanks and is used to water the plants. The formulation of the plots are totally adjusted in the geomorphology of the ground, while they give direction to the formulation of the public space. The relation between the houses are formed through the vicinity-core and the square-core enhancing the social relations. The squares are formed by plateaus that facilitate the gathering of the people and the children’s play. Through the design, the use of the car is restricted in case of emergency. About the residential unit the aim was to avoid the uniformity that rejects the uniqueness and the needs of each family and give only one part completed putting in the same time the basis for the future expansions. In that way a diversity of the plans and the facades is achieved, the design isn’t limited in only one typology and the uniqueness of each house is enhanced. One typology is analyzed as indicative with the stable part –common for all the houses- and the variable having the option to close with perforated elements or to open and convert the space to a gallery. Double roof is used for reasons of ventilation and storage. For the construction of the house is proposed a system that exploits the wastes, usually plastic bottles, that are “built” in a similar way with bricks. The method is simple and applicable by non-specialized users. For the impermanent elements are proposed local techniques and materials.
  • 62 Viviendas en Ángel 2 Under conditions of extreme poverty, malnutrition, insufficiency of the road net and markets, lack of potable water, sanitation and electricity are designed houses to give shelter to people that live with the danger of sliding and to plan a new expansion of the settlement. The village Ángel 2 is located in the north of Nicaragua, in an altitude of 900-1.000 m.a.s., the ground is characterized by large gradients and the temperature fluctuates between 20 and 27?C throughout all year. In order to locate the new settlement it was chosen the place with the smallest gradient, that is near the central point of the village that concentrates the public buildings. The theoretical plot for each house is of rural dimensions 20x50m., so to plant products for autoconsume. The human faeces are exploited through a fertilizer latrine and give natural fertilizer for the plants without cost. Moreover, the rainwater is collected in tanks and is used to water the plants. The formulation of the plots are totally adjusted in the geomorphology of the ground, while they give direction to the formulation of the public space. The relation between the houses are formed through the vicinity-core and the square-core enhancing the social relations. The squares are formed by plateaus that facilitate the gathering of the people and the children’s play. Through the design, the use of the car is restricted in case of emergency. About the residential unit the aim was to avoid the uniformity that rejects the uniqueness and the needs of each family and give only one part completed putting in the same time the basis for the future expansions. In that way a diversity of the plans and the facades is achieved, the design isn’t limited in only one typology and the uniqueness of each house is enhanced. One typology is analyzed as indicative with the stable part –common for all the houses- and the variable having the option to close with perforated elements or to open and convert the space to a gallery. Double roof is used for reasons of ventilation and storage. For the construction of the house is proposed a system that exploits the wastes, usually plastic bottles, that are “built” in a similar way with bricks. The method is simple and applicable by non-specialized users. For the impermanent elements are proposed local techniques and materials.
  • 62 Viviendas en Ángel 2 Under conditions of extreme poverty, malnutrition, insufficiency of the road net and markets, lack of potable water, sanitation and electricity are designed houses to give shelter to people that live with the danger of sliding and to plan a new expansion of the settlement. The village Ángel 2 is located in the north of Nicaragua, in an altitude of 900-1.000 m.a.s., the ground is characterized by large gradients and the temperature fluctuates between 20 and 27?C throughout all year. In order to locate the new settlement it was chosen the place with the smallest gradient, that is near the central point of the village that concentrates the public buildings. The theoretical plot for each house is of rural dimensions 20x50m., so to plant products for autoconsume. The human faeces are exploited through a fertilizer latrine and give natural fertilizer for the plants without cost. Moreover, the rainwater is collected in tanks and is used to water the plants. The formulation of the plots are totally adjusted in the geomorphology of the ground, while they give direction to the formulation of the public space. The relation between the houses are formed through the vicinity-core and the square-core enhancing the social relations. The squares are formed by plateaus that facilitate the gathering of the people and the children’s play. Through the design, the use of the car is restricted in case of emergency. About the residential unit the aim was to avoid the uniformity that rejects the uniqueness and the needs of each family and give only one part completed putting in the same time the basis for the future expansions. In that way a diversity of the plans and the facades is achieved, the design isn’t limited in only one typology and the uniqueness of each house is enhanced. One typology is analyzed as indicative with the stable part –common for all the houses- and the variable having the option to close with perforated elements or to open and convert the space to a gallery. Double roof is used for reasons of ventilation and storage. For the construction of the house is proposed a system that exploits the wastes, usually plastic bottles, that are “built” in a similar way with bricks. The method is simple and applicable by non-specialized users. For the impermanent elements are proposed local techniques and materials.
  • 63 Residential Building in Odessa project name: residential building in Odessa, Ukraine FUNCTION : RESIDENTIAL BUILDING OFFICE NAME: DROZDOV & PARTNERS PROJECT TEAM: OLEG DROZDOV, VYACHESLAV ZHEMIR, OLEG CHEBOTARYOV, SERGEY RUSANOV, ARTYOM ABROSIMOV, YURIY BENDASOV, OLEG STARODUBTSEV, VICTOR CHAVEZ CLIENT: BLACK SEA CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD DESIGN DATE: SPRING 2009 area: 13757.9 sq m LOCATION: 16TH FOUNTAIN STATION, ODESSA, UKRAINE The plot is located in the southern suburb of Odessa near the sea, in the picturesque green ravine on the site of the former transportation company. The area is remarkable for its diverse development with the scale ranging from 16-storeyed to 1-storeyed houses. The building with a shape of a horse-shoe has a semi-closed structure of variable height. The number of layers grows lower towards the sea and in the direction of the adjacent low-rise development, thereby creating sight-lines between the apartments and the sea and responding to the non-uniform surrounding. The volume of the building opens towards favourable south-eastern sun rays, making sure that the relatively small court-yard and all the living spaces of the building are insolated during the whole day. More than 30% of the apartments can boast of spacious terraces overlooking the sea, which raises their status to that of a single-family house. Other apartments also enjoy visual connection with the sea and with the court-yard. The latter is overlooked mainly from the living rooms: bedrooms, sitting rooms. The inner courtyard represents a recreational zone with a swimming pool, a summer bar, a playground. for children. The lower floors of the building house extra facilities, such as spa-salon, fitness club, restaurant, and shops, which can be accessed from the inside via a glazed gallery along the perimeter of the court-yard (for the residents of the building) and from the street outside (for other visitors). Two underground floors are allocated for parking. The building is designed with the view of maximum use of alternative sources of energy. The low level of underground waters enables effective use of geothermal energy for cooling and heating of the building. The rest of the required energy is produced by wind turbins and solar panels. The building sets a new quality standard for the whole coast of Odessa.
  • 63 Residential Building in Odessa Project Name: Residential Building İn Odessa, Ukraine Funct i on : Res i dent i al Bu i ld i ng Offıce Name: Drozdov & Partners Project Team: Oleg Drozdov, Vyacheslav Zhem i r, Oleg Chebotaryov, Sergey Rusanov, Artyom Abrosımov, Yurıy Bendasov, Oleg Starodubtsev, V i ctor Chavez Cl i ent: Black Sea Constructıon Company Ltd Des i gn Date: Spr i ng 2009 Area: 13757.9 Sq M Locat i on: 16th Founta i n Stat i on, Odessa, Ukra i ne The plot is located in the southern suburb of Odessa near the sea, in the picturesque green ravine on the site of the former transportation company. The area is remarkable for its diverse development with the scale ranging from 16-storeyed to 1-storeyed houses. The building with a shape of a horse-shoe has a semi-closed structure of variable height. The number of layers grows lower towards the sea and in the direction of the adjacent low-rise development, thereby creating sight-lines between the apartments and the sea and responding to the non-uniform surrounding. The volume of the building opens towards favourable south-eastern sun rays, making sure that the relatively small court-yard and all the living spaces of the building are insolated during the whole day. More than 30% of the apartments can boast of spacious terraces overlooking the sea, which raises their status to that of a single-family house. Other apartments also enjoy visual connection with the sea and with the court-yard. The latter is overlooked mainly from the living rooms: bedrooms, sitting rooms. The inner courtyard represents a recreational zone with a swimming pool, a summer bar, a playground. for children. The lower floors of the building house extra facilities, such as spa-salon, fitness club, restaurant, and shops, which can be accessed from the inside via a glazed gallery along the perimeter of the court-yard (for the residents of the building) and from the street outside (for other visitors). Two underground floors are allocated for parking. The building is designed with the view of maximum use of alternative sources of energy. The low level of underground waters enables effective use of geothermal energy for cooling and heating of the building. The rest of the required energy is produced by wind turbins and solar panels. The building sets a new quality standard for the whole coast of Odessa.
  • 63 Residential Building in Odessa project name: residential building in Odessa, Ukraine FUNCTION : RESIDENTIAL BUILDING OFFICE NAME: DROZDOV & PARTNERS PROJECT TEAM: OLEG DROZDOV, VYACHESLAV ZHEMIR, OLEG CHEBOTARYOV, SERGEY RUSANOV, ARTYOM ABROSIMOV, YURIY BENDASOV, OLEG STARODUBTSEV, VICTOR CHAVEZ CLIENT: BLACK SEA CONSTRUCTION COMPANY LTD DESIGN DATE: SPRING 2009 area: 13757.9 sq m LOCATION: 16TH FOUNTAIN STATION, ODESSA, UKRAINE The plot is located in the southern suburb of Odessa near the sea, in the picturesque green ravine on the site of the former transportation company. The area is remarkable for its diverse development with the scale ranging from 16-storeyed to 1-storeyed houses. The building with a shape of a horse-shoe has a semi-closed structure of variable height. The number of layers grows lower towards the sea and in the direction of the adjacent low-rise development, thereby creating sight-lines between the apartments and the sea and responding to the non-uniform surrounding. The volume of the building opens towards favourable south-eastern sun rays, making sure that the relatively small court-yard and all the living spaces of the building are insolated during the whole day. More than 30% of the apartments can boast of spacious terraces overlooking the sea, which raises their status to that of a single-family house. Other apartments also enjoy visual connection with the sea and with the court-yard. The latter is overlooked mainly from the living rooms: bedrooms, sitting rooms. The inner courtyard represents a recreational zone with a swimming pool, a summer bar, a playground. for children. The lower floors of the building house extra facilities, such as spa-salon, fitness club, restaurant, and shops, which can be accessed from the inside via a glazed gallery along the perimeter of the court-yard (for the residents of the building) and from the street outside (for other visitors). Two underground floors are allocated for parking. The building is designed with the view of maximum use of alternative sources of energy. The low level of underground waters enables effective use of geothermal energy for cooling and heating of the building. The rest of the required energy is produced by wind turbins and solar panels. The building sets a new quality standard for the whole coast of Odessa.
  • WA 4. Cycle Fullcourseware, June 2009

    1. 1. 20+10+X Architecture Awards 4th Cycle, June 2009 www.worldarchitecture.org
    2. 2. ● Selected by the votes of Honorary Members (20 projects) ● Cited by Honorary Members (+ 30 projects) The constituency of WA has decided to cite those projects that have received the admiration of many Honorary Members ● Selected through the rating of all visitors (10 projects) ● "Most thought-provoking +X" projects (3 projects) WINNERS / 4. Cycle www.worldarchitecture.org
    3. 3. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS 3LHD Architects | Memorial Bridge, Rijeka | Croatia
    4. 4. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org 3LHD Architects | Memorial Bridge, Rijeka | Croatia
    5. 5. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org 3LHD Architects | Memorial Bridge, Rijeka | Croatia
    6. 6. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Alain Sarfati | The Scarab of Roanne | France
    7. 7. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Alain Sarfati | The Scarab of Roanne | France
    8. 8. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Alain Sarfati | The Scarab of Roanne | France
    9. 9. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Architects Office S A A I | Icheon SKMS Institute | South Korea
    10. 10. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Architects Office S A A I | Icheon SKMS Institute | South Korea
    11. 11. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Architects Office S A A I | Icheon SKMS Institute | South Korea
    12. 12. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Marco Casagrande | Chen House | Taiwan
    13. 13. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Marco Casagrande | Chen House | Taiwan
    14. 14. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Marco Casagrande | Chen House | Taiwan
    15. 15. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor, NORVEG Coast Cultural Center, Norway
    16. 16. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor NORVEG Coast Cultural Center N orway
    17. 17. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor NORVEG Coast Cultural Center N orway
    18. 18. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Suprio Bhattacharjee `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal India
    19. 19. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Suprio Bhattacharjee `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal India
    20. 20. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Suprio Bhattacharjee `Reclaiming the City: Urban Nexus 2020`: The Andheri Intermodal India
    21. 21. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Romi Khosla Design Studios | M.F.Husain Art Gallery | India
    22. 22. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Romi Khosla Design Studios | M.F.Husain Art Gallery | India
    23. 23. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Romi Khosla Design Studios | M.F.Husain Art Gallery | India
    24. 24. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Can Kaya | Republic Square, Datca | Turkey
    25. 25. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Can Kaya | Republic Square, Datca | Turkey
    26. 26. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Can Kaya | Republic Square, Datca | Turkey
    27. 27. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Pino Marchese Renovation & Landscaping for Private House India
    28. 28. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Pino Marchese | Renovation & Landscaping for Private House | India
    29. 29. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Pino Marchese | Renovation & Landscaping for Private House | India
    30. 30. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Palace | Casitas | Spain
    31. 31. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Palace | Casitas | Spain
    32. 32. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Palace | Casitas | Spain
    33. 33. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Ellen Depoorter | Urban Plant | United States
    34. 34. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ellen Depoorter | Urban Plant | United States
    35. 35. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ellen Depoorter | Urban Plant | United States
    36. 36. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Brendan Meney, Ilpurla S ubstance M isuse R ehabilitation Centre , Australia
    37. 37. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Brendan Meney | Ilpurla Substance Misuse Rehabilitation Centre | A ustralia
    38. 38. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Brendan Meney | Ilpurla Substance Misuse Rehabilitation Centre | A ustralia
    39. 39. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Uthit Krueabuddee | Krung T ep P attana C ommunity | Thailand
    40. 40. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Uthit Krueabuddee | Krung Tep Pattana Community | Thailand
    41. 41. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Uthit Krueabuddee | Krung Tep Pattana Community | Thailand
    42. 42. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal | Malta
    43. 43. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal | Malta
    44. 44. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Architecture Project | Cruise Passenger Terminal | Malta
    45. 45. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Saken Narynov , Memorial to the Victims of Tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004, Norway
    46. 46. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Saken Narynov Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 Norway
    47. 47. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Saken Narynov Memorial to the victims of tsunami in South – Eastern Asia of 2004 Norway
    48. 48. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Joseph Cory , Farah Farah and Flavio Adriani , Contour Museum - Um el Phahem Art Museum, Israel
    49. 49. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Joseph Cory , Farah Farah and Flavio Adriani, Contour Museum - Um el Phahem Art Museum, Israel
    50. 50. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Joseph Cory , Farah Farah and Flavio Adriani, Contour Museum - Um el Phahem Art Museum, Israel
    51. 51. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Sheila Carney | Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston | United Kingdom
    52. 52. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Sheila Carney Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston United Kingdom
    53. 53. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Sheila Carney Radiopharmaceutical Production Unit – Preston United Kingdom
    54. 54. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Holzer Kobler Architekturen , Nebra, Germany
    55. 55. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Holzer Kobler Architekturen | Nebra | Germany
    56. 56. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Holzer Kobler Architekturen | Nebra | Germany
    57. 57. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Hyo Man Kim | Lim Geo Dang | South Korea
    58. 58. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Hyo Man Kim | Lim Geo Dang | South Korea
    59. 59. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Hyo Man Kim | Lim Geo Dang | South Korea
    60. 60. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Ryuichi Ashizawa , Setre Chapel, Japan
    61. 61. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ryuichi Ashizawa | Setre Chapel | Japan
    62. 62. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ryuichi Ashizawa | Setre Chapel | Japan
    63. 63. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Kazunori Fujimoto | House on Mt.Yataka | Japan
    64. 64. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Kazunori Fujimoto | House on Mt.Yataka | Japan
    65. 65. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Kazunori Fujimoto | House on Mt.Yataka | Japan
    66. 66. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS E&L Architects , Tulipan House, Poland
    67. 67. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org E&L Architects | Tulipan House | Polan d
    68. 68. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org E&L Architects | Tulipan House | Polan d
    69. 69. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Tetsuya Matsui Hoshikusa, Japan
    70. 70. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Tetsuya Matsui | Hoshikusa | Japan
    71. 71. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Tetsuya Matsui | Hoshikusa | Japan
    72. 72. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Roberto Ramirez | Centro Cultural CECIJEMA | Mexico
    73. 73. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Roberto Ramirez | Centro Cultural CECIJEMA | Mexico
    74. 74. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Roberto Ramirez | Centro Cultural CECIJEMA | Mexico
    75. 75. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Budi Pradono | Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant | Indonesia
    76. 76. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Budi Pradono | Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant | Indonesia
    77. 77. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Budi Pradono | Tetaring Kayu Manis Restaurant | Indonesia
    78. 78. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Pedro Barran Uruguay
    79. 79. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Pedro Barran Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Uruguay
    80. 80. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Pedro Barran Public Elementary School: Escuela de Tiempo Completo n.330 Gutierrez Ruiz Uruguay
    81. 81. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Yatin Pandya | Manavsadhna Activity Centre | India
    82. 82. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Yatin Pandya | Manavsadhna Activity Centre | India
    83. 83. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Yatin Pandya | Manavsadhna Activity Centre | India
    84. 84. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Elliot Justin Giovacchini | NUI Deli Corner Food Experience | United Kingdom
    85. 85. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Elliot Justin Giovacchini | NUI Deli Corner Food Experience | United Kingdom
    86. 86. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Elliot Justin Giovacchini | NUI Deli Corner Food Experience | United Kingdom
    87. 87. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Carlo Fantacci , The Church of Saint Spirit, Italy
    88. 88. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Carlo Fantacci | The Church of Saint Spirit | Italy
    89. 89. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Carlo Fantacci | The Church of Saint Spirit | Italy
    90. 90. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Keizo Ikemura , HOUSE-R, Japan
    91. 91. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Keizo Ikemura | HOUSE-R | Japan
    92. 92. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Keizo Ikemura | HOUSE-R | Japan
    93. 93. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS ARC Studio , Ghigos Ideas and Id – Lab MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili Italy
    94. 94. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org ARC Studio, Ghigos Ideas and Id – Lab MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili Italy
    95. 95. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org ARC Studio, Ghigos Ideas and Id – Lab MAF - Museo di Arti Femminili Italy
    96. 96. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Arquitectura x | X House | Ecuador
    97. 97. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Arquitectura x | X House | Ecuador
    98. 98. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Arquitectura x | X House | Ecuador
    99. 99. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Adil Azhiyev | Saint Gobain Contest Office Building | Kazakhstan
    100. 100. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Adil Azhiyev | Saint Gobain Contest Office Building | Kazakhstan
    101. 101. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Adil Azhiyev | Saint Gobain Contest Office Building | Kazakhstan
    102. 102. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Patricio Mora and Daniela Garcia Letelier | C hildhood Evocative Mantle | Chile
    103. 103. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Patricio Mora and Daniela Garcia Letelier | Childhood Evocative Mantle | Chile
    104. 104. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Patricio Mora and Daniela Garcia Letelier | Childhood Evocative Mantle | Chile
    105. 105. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless, China Ming Tang
    106. 106. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ming Tang | Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless | China
    107. 107. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ming Tang | Folded Bamboo + Paper House Temporary Shelters for Earthquake’s Homeless | China
    108. 108. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Kyuseon Hong , Helical Stair Gallery, United Kingdom
    109. 109. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Kyuseon Hong | Helical Stair Gallery | United Kingdom
    110. 110. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Kyuseon Hong | Helical Stair Gallery | United Kingdom
    111. 111. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Jungsoo Kim | Universal Public Library - For Disabled | United States
    112. 112. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Jungsoo Kim | Universal Public Library - For Disabled | United States
    113. 113. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Jungsoo Kim | Universal Public Library - For Disabled | United States
    114. 114. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Ignacio Montaldo | Sarmiento Square | Argentina
    115. 115. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ignacio Montaldo | Sarmiento Square | Argentina
    116. 116. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ignacio Montaldo | Sarmiento Square | Argentina
    117. 117. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Emergency Architects , Ngari School, Solomon Islands
    118. 118. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Emergency Architects | Ngari School | Solomon Islands
    119. 119. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Emergency Architects | Ngari School | Solomon Islands
    120. 120. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gezim Pacarizi | Buqalla Pools & Hotel | Kosovo
    121. 121. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gezim Pacarizi | Buqalla Pools & Hotel | Kosovo
    122. 122. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gezim Pacarizi | Buqalla Pools & Hotel | Kosovo
    123. 123. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand and Daniel Jauslin | Spriral House Pigniu | Switzerland
    124. 124. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand and Daniel Jauslin | Spriral House Pigniu | Switzerland
    125. 125. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Hans Drexler, Marc Guinand and Daniel Jauslin | Spriral House Pigniu | Switzerland
    126. 126. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Jeeyong Ann , National Wildflower Centre, United Kingdom
    127. 127. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Jeeyong Ann | National Wildflower Centre | United Kingdom
    128. 128. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Jeeyong Ann | National Wildflower Centre | United Kingdom
    129. 129. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Shailendra Arbole | Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital | India
    130. 130. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Shailendra Arbole | Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital | India
    131. 131. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Shailendra Arbole | Canteen Building for Baptist Hospital | India
    132. 132. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gianluca Aresta, Gianpiero Conserva and Paolo Tarì | Instant House | Italy
    133. 133. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gianluca Aresta, Gianpiero Conserva and Paolo Tarì | Instant House | Italy
    134. 134. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gianluca Aresta, Gianpiero Conserva and Paolo Tarì | Instant House | Italy
    135. 135. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Gela Chachua , Modern Art Museum, Georgia
    136. 136. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gela Chachua | Modern Art Museum | Georgia
    137. 137. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Gela Chachua | Modern Art Museum | Georgia
    138. 138. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Evgeniya Yatsyuk | Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center | Russia
    139. 139. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Evgeniya Yatsyuk | Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center | Russia
    140. 140. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Evgeniya Yatsyuk Water Touristic Complex in Kaliningrad Center Russia
    141. 141. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Eman Assi, Rashad Bukhash and Ahmad Mahmood, Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama H ouse Restoration , United Arab Emirates
    142. 142. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Eman Assi, Rashad Bukhash and Ahmad Mahmood Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama House Restoration United Arab Emirates
    143. 143. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Eman Assi, Rashad Bukhash and Ahmad Mahmood Mohammed Sharif Sultan Al Olama House Restoration United Arab Emirates
    144. 144. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Javier Sánchez , Temisctocles 12, Mexico
    145. 145. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Javier Sánchez | Temisctocles 12 | Mexico
    146. 146. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Javier Sánchez | Temisctocles 12 | Mexico
    147. 147. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Daniel Moreno Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Ecuador
    148. 148. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Daniel Moreno Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Ecuador
    149. 149. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Daniel Moreno Creative Offices: Recreational Environments in Architecture Ecuador
    150. 150. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org CITED BY THE VOTES OF HONORARY MEMBERS Lennard Carlier | Symbiotic Housing Link | New Zealand
    151. 151. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Lennard Carlier | Symbiotic Housing Link | New Zealand
    152. 152. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Lennard Carlier | Symbiotic Housing Link | New Zealand
    153. 153. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi Winner of the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition Iran
    154. 154. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi Winner of the 2nd Annual Persian School Architecture Design Competition I ran
    155. 155. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Armon Choros Architektonikis | Olympic House and Park in Nicosia | Cyprus
    156. 156. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Armon Choros Architektonikis | Olympic House and Park in Nicosia | Cyprus
    157. 157. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Armon Choros Architektonikis | Olympic House and Park in Nicosia | Cyprus
    158. 158. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Michelangelo Acciaro and Nora Lau Chicago City Library United States
    159. 159. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Michelangelo Acciaro and Nora Lau | Chicago City Library | United States
    160. 160. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Michelangelo Acciaro and Nora Lau | Chicago City Library | United States
    161. 161. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Ulisses Morato | House in Nova Lima - MG | Brazil
    162. 162. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ulisses Morato | House in Nova Lima - MG | Brazil
    163. 163. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Ulisses Morato | House in Nova Lima - MG | Brazil
    164. 164. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS M.L.Varudh Varavarn | Floating Space | Thailand
    165. 165. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org M.L.Varudh Varavarn | Floating Space | Thailand
    166. 166. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org M.L.Varudh Varavarn | Floating Space | Thailand
    167. 167. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Meryem Ozturkoglu | CITY-PARK | Turkey
    168. 168. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Meryem Ozturkoglu | CITY-PARK | Turkey
    169. 169. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Meryem Ozturkoglu | CITY-PARK | Turkey
    170. 170. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS LOKOMOTIV.archs Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl Italy
    171. 171. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org LOKOMOTIV.archs | Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl | Italy
    172. 172. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org LOKOMOTIV.archs | Absolute Architecture. City vs Sprawl | Italy
    173. 173. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Daniel Bolojan | Public Library - Bucharest | Romania
    174. 174. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Daniel Bolojan | Public Library - Bucharest | Romania
    175. 175. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Daniel Bolojan | Public Library - Bucharest | Romania
    176. 176. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Rafael Yee Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center Guatemala
    177. 177. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Rafael Yee | Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center | Guatemala
    178. 178. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Rafael Yee | Chandelier Bridge at Metropolitan Cultural Center | Guatemala
    179. 179. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org SELECTED THROUGH RATINGS Alessandro Console and Gina Oliva | Hortus Officinalis | Taiwan
    180. 180. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Alessandro Console and Gina Oliva | Hortus Officinalis | Taiwan
    181. 181. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Alessandro Console and Gina Oliva | Hortus Officinalis | Taiwan
    182. 182. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X" PROJECTS Francis Kéré | High School in Dano | Burkina Faso
    183. 183. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Francis Kéré | High School in Dano | Burkina Faso
    184. 184. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Francis Kéré | High School in Dano | Burkina Faso
    185. 185. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X" PROJECTS Marina Gousia | Viviendas en Ángel 2 | Nicaragua
    186. 186. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Marina Gousia | Viviendas en Ángel 2 | Nicaragua
    187. 187. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Marina Gousia | Viviendas en Ángel 2 | Nicaragua
    188. 188. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING +X PROJECTS Drozdov&Partners | Residential Building in Odessa | Ukraine
    189. 189. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Drozdov&Partners | Residential Building in Odessa | Ukraine
    190. 190. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org Drozdov&Partners | Residential Building in Odessa | Ukraine
    191. 191. www.worldarchitecture.org www.worldarchitecture.org June 2009 [email_address]
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