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How to Efficiently Build Your Brand - 5 Ways to Grow BIG, While Spending Small

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Tammy Katz, CEO of Katz Marketing Solutions presents How to Efficiently Build Your Brand at the International Fancy Food Show

Tammy Katz, CEO of Katz Marketing Solutions presents How to Efficiently Build Your Brand at the International Fancy Food Show

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  • Good Afternoon! Today we are going to talk about How to Efficiently Build Your Brand and the 5 Ways you can accelerate your brand’s growth rate, while staying within your budget. Here’s the core idea:. No matter where your brand is in its evolution…. building to $1MM Growing from $1-$10MM Ramping up from $10-$50MM… Or ramping up to megabrand status The strategies and activities that make brands thrive vs. what causes them to stumble, decline, or waste money, are the same! Today, I want to share with you the 5 Best Practices you can – and should use – to efficiently grow your brand.
  • I want you to walk out of here with some very specific, practical tools to leverage the momentum your brand already has…. And unleash your brand’s growth potential. To do that, we will review the Five Brand building best practices. For each best practices, I’ll: define it, so we’re all working with the same framework And give you 4-7 specific Do’s and Don’t’s” that I urge you take home and use. To further illustrate these pointers, we will review several case studies that I’ve handpicked, not only because they are great brands with great performance, but also because they are such pure, illustrative examples of brands who doing these best practices exceptionally well.
  • … So that you can understand and really internalize these pointers on how to grow your brand even more efficiently. But before we go any further, I’d like some feedback from you so I can accomplish your goals for this session. Please take out a business card and write down: “What is your biggest marketing challenge?” I want to address as many as I can within the session; or follow-up with you individually after the session.
  • We will also have some work sessions so you can have a chance to apply these skills, get some feedback, and importantly, get a chance to share and learn from some of the other terrific people in the room – your industry peers. I want you to walk out of here with a tangible plan and strategies to efficiently build your brand. I’ll ask you to really work in this workshop. Don’t worry – it’s painless, creative, and fun. All you need to do is follow along and we’ll build your workbook together. We’ll complete it here – my goal is that each develops a specific Brand Development Action Plans that you can take home and put to good, profitable use. So let’s get started…… does everyone have their workbook? Please turn to page 2…..
  • First, I’d like you to get in the right frame of mind. You know that last hectic day before you came to the show and were putting out fires?? Please take a break from that day to day scrambling….. and think…. Really think….. On the left side, do a summary of what you project your 2007 results to be. On the metrics that most matter to you – sales, profitability, distribution, project accomplishments…. Then on the right side, think about what you DREAM the end of 2009 will look like. I don’t mean anything safe like your long-term budget or production forecasts. Please really think about and visualize your ambitious goals here. Write down your ‘dream outcomes’ for ’09. Great. Now keep this ideal ’09 in mind we discuss these best practices.
  • Now I want us all to be thinking about effective marketing is and isn’t. It’s not – or shouldn’t be – a big, fat expense center – or something that you think of as expensive or something you can’t yet afford. It’s also not just cosmetic outcomes like fonts, colors, packaging, and selling material. Efficient marketing is very different. Efficient marketing is being absolutely riveted on a desired outcome FIRST, and then figuring out how to make the most of any and all Dollars you choose to invest in achieving that outcome. Think Before You Spend!!!
  • Now let’s review the 5 Best Practices. We will go through each of these in more detail. These are the 5 Best Practices that will review – each with more specific how to’s: 1. Winning product development and differentiation strategies 2. Effective Brand Positioning 3. Deliberate Distribution Strategies 4. Consumer Intimacy 5. Guerilla Marketing
  • Now assess yourself and your organization on these best practices. You will need to apply all of them to achieve your ’09 Dream. This exercise helps you identify which of these best practices you will most want to focus on. In the first column, please assess how important you think it is for your organization to excel in this best practice……. In the second column, please assess how good your company currently is at this best practice. In the third column, use the “Importance” score from the 1 st column. Now subtract the “Our Skills” score from the second column. This gives you the “Need Gap” score…. A very simple way to identify which best practice areas may be your near-term priority. Just to be clear, you should use all five of these best practices to optimize your brand. However, this is a tool for you to think about in which areas you may want to prioritize your efforts to improve AND leverage the areas (with the smaller need gap scores) where you are particularly strong.
  • Going into specific things you can go do – consider how these apply to you. Think Stop. Start. Continue…. For the Do’s – consider which of these are things you need to Start doing. For the Don’ts – in most cases, save yourself the money and time and Stop!! And if you are already doing any of these – terrific! – continue doing them.
  • In Marketing, we usually start with Brand Positioning. But the product – and in fact a superior and different product – is so vital for Specialty Foods, that in your business it’s the First Best Practice….
  • You need to build a product that is truly superior and different.
  • Feedback loops.like Customer Service, Web, Salesforce Consumer Panels Incorporate and anticipate consumer trends: e.g. convenience, health conscious, value seeking, global palates, demographic shifts Trend performance – band awareness, consumer satisfaction; Movement per store ($ per point of dist)
  • Okay, so let’s back up with definitions. What is positioning anyway? -the way we want customers to perceive, think and feel about our brand versus competitive entries 1 ; - (think Nike). They are now a brand that is in a category by itself versus competition… they sell ‘self-actualization,’ make you feel just a little bit more world class by buying something with their brand and live in an entirely different intellectual position, than, let’s say Puma or Adidas. -the brand’s perception in the prospect’s mind that takes into consideration not only its own strength and weaknesses, but those of its competitors as well 1 (like Pepsi is refreshment for the young at heart… not old and staid… for example, in its positioning versus Coke) The distinct intellectual location of your brand (when done right as distinct, undisputable place your brand lives in your customer’s mind) – (like Rolex watches, or the VW Beetle) The best way you can think of successful positioning is when you consider a brand as ‘the best’, ‘the only’ or ‘cannot be substituted.’
  • Okay, so let’s back up with definitions. What is positioning anyway? -the way we want customers to perceive, think and feel about our brand versus competitive entries 1 ; - (think Nike). They are now a brand that is in a category by itself versus competition… they sell ‘self-actualization,’ make you feel just a little bit more world class by buying something with their brand and live in an entirely different intellectual position, than, let’s say Puma or Adidas. -the brand’s perception in the prospect’s mind that takes into consideration not only its own strength and weaknesses, but those of its competitors as well 1 (like Pepsi is refreshment for the young at heart… not old and staid… for example, in its positioning versus Coke) The distinct intellectual location of your brand (when done right as distinct, undisputable place your brand lives in your customer’s mind) – (like Rolex watches, or the VW Beetle) The best way you can think of successful positioning is when you consider a brand as ‘the best’, ‘the only’ or ‘cannot be substituted.’
  • So, the key words are: “How we want our customers to perceive us” Disney’s positioning is magical experiences and McDonalds is all about fun….
  • For example: ….distancing yourself versus competition……… Pepsi, in its relentless strategy of REFRESHMENT FOR YOUNGER PEOPLE, thus redefine Coca-Cola as the brand for old people… not exactly an aspirational image. Hallmark elevates itself within the greeting card market by creating a brand that is about ‘When you care to send the very best,” - - not only defining their superiority, but by definition, degrading their competition and questioning YOU for choosing anyone else.
  • And is distinct – an image and continuously filling a set of expectations that are VERY DISTINCT from competition Like Volvo which means Safety Or Mercedes – luxury and precise engineering:
  • Developing a strategic Brand Positioning is one of the best things you can do for your brand. And the beauty of it – you can do it at any time. A year before you are launching a new idea or several years in market, when you want to improve your performance. It is a great tool to build your competitive advantage. When you clearly define who you are and why you are superior it’s also a great method to reposition or deposition your competition.
  • For example. Coke was “the first” and is the “real thing”… so Pepsi used that against them with their positioning as “Refreshment for the Young at Heart” thereby making Coke the brand for old people.
  • The 2nd key benefit is enhanced profitability. Good positioning makes your business more profitable in two major ways: first, by giving you reason, in consumer’s minds, to command a premium price for your product… which gives you higher gross margins. And second, by continuing to reinforce one central strategy and leveraging earlier investments… therefore actually making it less expensive to support your business…. As opposed to continuously and expensively having to build an unknown brand….. Which takes us to the fourth benefit: branding gives your consistency and synergy of your business efforts. For example, EVERYTHING Nike does is about building its brand as the ultimate choice for performance and letting you be the best your can be. You can see how it pervades their strategy for product development, innovation, advertising creative, channels of distribution, promotions. But how do you get there? Remarkably, the strategies across virtually every industry are the same!
  • For example, when Grey Poupon defined itself as gourmet Dijon mustard in the 80’s it made French’s yellow mustard bland and downscale by comparison. Similarly, consider how Starbucks is “the” definition of the true, quality coffee experience, again redefining market leaders like Maxwell House and Folger’s low quality and tasteless, by comparison.
  • Which takes us to the 3rd benefit: Building a strategic brand positioning makes you much more efficient. It’s a great tool to clearly define what your brand is – and is not – which drives consistency and synergy in your planning, be much more precise about where you choose to take your brand, and be focused by defining what you are building your brand to be, But how do you get there? Remarkably, the strategies across virtually every industry are the same!
  • Think about how precisely engineered Nike’s your perception of them as helping you “be the best you can be”… all their external communication, product development, and almost every function uses that as its business principal…. So they are competing in a completely different arena than slugging it out with competition on product features, who has a new product or service, or who changed their prices.
  • Closer to home, Whole Foods clearly defines themselves as the best retailer of natural and organic foods, which drives everything from store appearance, customer service, product mix, and ingredient dec requirements.
  • Here’s as I mentioned before, the single most important tool you can have compete more effective. A power Positioning. I refer to Positioning as the strategic Blueprint, because, just like a house, it is the detailed and essential outline of how you will construct your brand. Can you imagine hiring a contractor and handing them a sizable check to just build you a nice house? No of course not. So similarly, this blueprint enables you to construct a new, or evolve an existing brand to meet your distinct specifications. And since your branding efforts are ongoing, the good news is that it is never too late to develop one of these. You are going to build yours in a few minutes. Your brand positioning statement has 6 important pieces. 1. Your target (demographic, attitudinal, and current usage) Brand Frame of reference (who you compete for share of wallet) adult health care facilities OR housing?? Benefit (only one that does this??) Because (reasons why/support) Brand character (if a person – describe in traits; ideally a person) Mother Theresa? Martha Stewart?
  • For example :
  • The first part, is your Target. To whom are you selling or trying to appeal? Typically, people think only about their demographic target, let’s say Baby Boomers or Female Head of Household 25-54. Great. Good start. How about if we are more specific than like 30 million peope??? . A better target definition you should use is: 1) demographic – and within your demographic target, thinking long and hard about your PRINCIPAL target, and this is particularly important to you… whether your PRIMARY target is the Purchaser or the User. Typically if you have to choose, pick the Purchaser. 2) The user profile – not just who they are, but what their usage profile is…. Let’s say… Foodies who use (our category) more than twice a month and prefer premium brands ….. And the third element, their Need Mindset – what are the issues involved with their need…. Let’s say ‘want to make high quality meals, but are time poor, and are not sure how to use (our category)
  • For most of you, your target is probably somewhat clear, but I would challenge you to think about how you might make it even more precise…. Some of the best ways you can better define your target are: Consumer research – talking to your current, former, or potential customers Customer points of contact – ask those people who have the most frequent customer interaction, lets say admitting staff, nursing, doctors, accounting…. Customer analysis – do an analysis of your current customer base and where it is disproportionately concentrated. I’ll share another secret here… rather than agonize about the limitless potential you haven’t yet captured, one of the best ways you can grow is by replicating what you already do well Industry research – See where direct and indirect competition in your market get their customers, using the work that someone else has already prepared….. The obvious source would be analyzing your local competitor or perhaps someone you admire outside of your geography…. This includes prepublished syndicated research studies, AARP, publicly held health care companies, other categories seniors consume, like senior travel and magazines. Another tool can be looking at targeting information for other like things that your market consumes – like senior magazines and other media, trade associations (like AARP) Category unmet needs – and this one is one of your best tools, because it’s also a great place to possibly uncover a proprietary strategy. During your research, if your consumers can tell you they have an unmet need, or in your analysis of the competitive landscape you see that “no one is providing this” AND you see it is an need that your customers have…. You have uncovered a potential winning benefit It works much like the need gap exercise we did a little earlier.
  • The 2 nd key item is your brand name. For many of you this may be a given. But maybe it isn’t quite that simple. What is your brand name in consumer’s mind? There’s a very good reason that Federal Express rebranded itself to FedEx… that’s what they were to consumers, so they leveraged that perception. Another common issue is if you have a brand or sub-brand that is part of a parent company…. We could probably spend a day on this… but in general, again, to strengthen your positioning in consumers’ minds, use the brand name that already has the highest level of consumer recognition… and if your customers tell you that the hospital or other secondary company’s association is positive, use that too, but in a secondary, recommending mode. Lastly, if you have are amid a branding evolution question… when in doubt use the one that has the best and most consistent imagery….
  • The third item is your Category Frame of Reference. It is the market in which you compete for share of wallet…. And it typically is broader than your direct competitors. So for most of you, think about the array of other options that your consumers have for where they will spend “your” money…. For most of you, that is the larger definition of your category, not just the specialty subsegment. That’s what consumers compare you against and also consume. This is the CONSUMER frame of reference. If you are more narrowly defining your segment to the TRADE to show how well you perform in your subsegement, that’s great. Keep doing it. But for positioning, you need to view the competition as your consumer does.
  • The most critical item on your positioning is your benefit. What your looking for, like the Best Practices we’ve covered today, is the opportunity to distinguish yourself is “ The one that is____” , or “The only ones___” or the “Ones that mean____” and do it on a benefit that truly matters and motivates your consumer. Real or perceived as proprietary Primary advantageous outcome Advantageous to the target Functional or emotional First, you objectively assess your organization, ideally using consumer research if you have it. To identify a real benefit: like Superior Taste, or the only ones with XXXXX) or a perceived benefit (the most intense, the authentic French recipe). Another source of your best benefit is your PRIMARY advantageous outcome. It is a common tendency to want to tout all your benefits, but the most impactful approach for distinct positioning in selecting the MOST IMPORTANT benefit and developing synergy around that. You also need to focus on outcomes, rather than means…. Organic basil is not a benefit – great taste is! This is a very common challenge. We spend so much time building our businesses that we get a little too close to it and start talking about our new ingredients, new package, our new recipe because that’s how we see it. But again, challenge yourself to see and articulate these benefits in the consumers mind…. Those are nice features, but as a consumer the benefit to me is “taste or making an unbelievable meal.” There are two kinds of benefits, functional (lets say Best Flavor) or emotional (Show I’m a loving Mom; or Self-esteem)…. Particularly in your industry, it’s the emotional benefits that are the most compelling and motivating, and I challenge you to really use these.
  • This quest for a proprietary benefit is critical and challenging, so here are some good sources: Consumer research Quantitative and qualitative Probe for ultimate benefit Competitive analysis - see what your competitors offer and offer something distinct or better Emotional or intellectual resonance In your consumer research, you should do quantitative (mail or email surveys in large (100+) sizes) so you know what the majority is telling you AND qualitative (typically smaller, focus groups) where your consumers, in their own language, tell you what benefits really matter to them The other way you find these nuggets, or “key consumer insight” is by probing on the ultimate benefit…. So for example they’ll say “I want a place with attentive staff” or “well-trained aides” … your researcher should keep probing and probing… “why is that important…” or “what does that do for you…” and you will uncover richer, more compelling motivations like “my peace of mind,” “confidence,” “freedom from guilt” and truly persuasive motivations that truly sway the head or heart.
  • For support, you add the features that support your claim…. Features that support benefit Proprietary or superior features Product- or people-based And they need to be so linear, that they make sense, when linked to your benefit with the word because….. Now here’s the place where you can use some internal features, like doctor to patient ratio, new facilities and equipment…..
  • Brand character (if a person – describe in traits; ideally a person) - Like Mother Teresa or a Warm, nurturing and very competent Mom
  • The places you can find this are in: consumer research And having an internal ideation session (provocative question: if we were a well-known person, who would we be? Or if we were a car who would we be). This exercise might make people uncomfortable or pull people out of their comfort zone, but again, it’s a very powerful way to help carve out that distinct positioning of your organization and help guide some very important issues and nuances, like corporate values for personnel training or the proper (or improper) tone for your external communications.
  • One company that has done a fantastic job with positioning is Metromint. The product is distinct, the brand promise is clear – and what I like about this one is the positioning is so clear that you grasp the idea from the package alone – even before you read it!
  • I refer to Positioning as the strategic Blueprint, because, just like a house, it is the detailed and essential outline of how you will construct your brand. Can you imagine hiring a contractor and handing them a sizable check to just build you a nice house? No of course not. So similarly, this blueprint enables you to construct a new, or evolve an existing brand to meet your distinct specifications. And since your branding efforts are ongoing, the good news is that it is never too late to develop one of these. Your brand positioning statement has 6 important pieces. 1. Your target (demographic, attitudinal, and current usage) Brand Frame of reference (who you compete for share of wallet) adult health care facilities OR housing?? Benefit (only one that does this??) Because (reasons why/support) Brand character (if a person – describe in traits; ideally a person) Harrison Ford vs. Steve Segall
  • I refer to Positioning as the strategic Blueprint, because, just like a house, it is the detailed and essential outline of how you will construct your brand. Can you imagine hiring a contractor and handing them a sizable check to just build you a nice house? No of course not. So similarly, this blueprint enables you to construct a new, or evolve an existing brand to meet your distinct specifications. And since your branding efforts are ongoing, the good news is that it is never too late to develop one of these. Your brand positioning statement has 6 important pieces. 1. Your target (demographic, attitudinal, and current usage) Brand Frame of reference (who you compete for share of wallet) adult health care facilities OR housing?? Benefit (only one that does this??) Because (reasons why/support) Brand character (if a person – describe in traits; ideally a person) Harrison Ford vs. Steve Segall
  • Here’s as I mentioned before, the single most important tool you can have compete more effective. A power Positioning. I refer to Positioning as the strategic Blueprint, because, just like a house, it is the detailed and essential outline of how you will construct your brand. Can you imagine hiring a contractor and handing them a sizable check to just build you a nice house? No of course not. So similarly, this blueprint enables you to construct a new, or evolve an existing brand to meet your distinct specifications. And since your branding efforts are ongoing, the good news is that it is never too late to develop one of these. PASS OUT THE FORMS! Your brand positioning statement has 6 important pieces. 1. Your target (demographic, attitudinal, and current usage) Brand Frame of reference (who you compete for share of wallet) adult health care facilities OR housing?? Benefit (only one that does this??) Because (reasons why/support) Brand character (if a person – describe in traits; ideally a person) Harrison Ford vs. Steve Segall
  • Courage to Say “No” Inconsistent with brand strategy Cannot execute well Drains company focus

How to Efficiently Build Your Brand - 5 Ways to Grow BIG, While Spending Small How to Efficiently Build Your Brand - 5 Ways to Grow BIG, While Spending Small Presentation Transcript

  • How to Efficiently Build Your Brand 5 Ways to Grow BIG , While Spending Small
  • Session Goals
    • Help You Unleash your Brand’s Potential
    • Review 5 Brand Building Best Practices
      • Definitions and How To’s
      • Case Studies and Inspiration…
  • Great Brands – Best Practices
  • Session Goals
    • Help You Unleash your Brand’s Potential
    • Review 5 Brand Building Best Practices
      • Definitions and How To’s
      • Case Studies and Inspiration
      • Work Sessions
    • Brand Development Action Plans
  • 2009 Goals
    • 2009 “Dream”
    • 1.___________________________________________________________________
    • 2.___________________________________________________________________
    • 3.___________________________________________________________________
    • 4.___________________________________________________________________
    • 2007 Projection
    • 1.___________________________________________________________________
    • 2.___________________________________________________________________
    • 3.___________________________________________________________________
    • 4.___________________________________________________________________
  • Making More… with Less X X
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • Assessment 5. Guerilla Marketing 4. Consumer Intimacy 3. Deliberate Distribution Strategies 2. Effective Brand Positioning 1. Winning product development and differentiation strategies Need Gap (Importance – Skills) Our Skills (1-10) 10 is great Importance (1-10) 10 is critical Best Practice
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • 5 Best Practices Start. Stop. Continue….
  • Winning Product Development and Differentiation Strategies
    • Build true superiority and differentiation
      • - Relevance!
    • Clarify the Concept…
    • … . Deliver with a Killer Product
    • ‘ Obsess’ about delighting the consumer
    • Educate the trade and consumer
    • Use a disciplined Product Development Process
    • Leverage being small and nimble
  • Build true superiority and differentiation
    • Measurable win vs. competition on key attributes (ie taste, flavor, purchase interest)
    • Confirm real or perceived difference
    • Challenge/extend all concepts
    • Don’t “Gold Plate”: Ensure difference is consumer relevant
    • Track and maintain competitive superiority – performance vs. relevant competition
  • Clarify the Concept…
    • Consumer understands
      • what it is
      • why they need it
      • how to ‘use’ it
    ???!
  • Clarify the Concept…
    • Product, packaging, distribution, in-store placement, and P.O.S.
    • 5 words or less challenge!
    • Confirm consumer appeal
  • .. Deliver with a Killer Product
    • “ Delicious!!” according to the Company’s lone silver palate not
    • consumers’
    • Less than 50% definitely or probably would buy
    • Shallow repeat ‘because’….(and other fairy tales)
    • ‘ We’re our own category’
    • Superior to competition on key category attributes (e.g. taste and flavor)
    • + 60% definitely or probably would buy
    • +50% repeat rate
    • Above average purchase cycle (# units per year)
    Killer Products are: And are not:
  • Obsess about Delighting the Consumer Two Company Cultures:
  • Obsess about Delighting the Consumer
    • Identify, structure, and use consumer and trade feedback loops to improve
    • Know Thy Target; Know Thy Target’s Unmet Needs
      • Maintain deep consumer expertise
      • Focus on Usage, not just Units
    • Monitor, incorporate and anticipate consumer trends
    • Measure trend performance with consumer
  • Educate and Elevate
    • Teach the trade and consumer about your product superiority
    • Simple, consistent message in their language
    • Identify and leverage communication touch points
    • Romance and passion
  • Use a Disciplined Product Development Process
    • Set goals and P&L hurdles upfront
    • Evaluate alternatives!
    • Determine Project Leader and Management Sponsor
    • Constant collaboration… especially Marketing & R&D
    • Don’t proceed until you can delight consumers – internally or with external resources
    Launch Testing and Validation Development Viability Assessment Ideation
  • Disciplined Product Development Process Outcomes Key Issues Phase
    • Performance tracking data
    • Plan refinements
    • - Refined business model
    • Go to market decisions
    • Launch strategy
    • Viable concept
    • Viable product
    • Product/
    • concept fit
    • Ability to efficiently produce
    • Go/No Go/ Rework
    • Alternative Ideas
    • Prioritized potential ideas
    • Cross-functional coordination
    • Excellent execution
    • “ Over-com-munication”
    • Is there sufficient consumer appeal?
    • Is there sufficient market potential?
    • Are assumptions valid?
    • Is the concept viable and optimal?
    • What will the product be?
    • - Can ‘we’ execute it well?
    • What’s the market potential?
    • Is it lucrative? (Year 1 and Year 3 P&L)
    What’s possible? Is it on strategy? Does the consumer want it? Launch Testing and Validation Development Viability Assessment Ideation
  • Leverage being Small and Nimble
    • Speed to market
    • Trade and consumer intimacy
    • Own your niche
    • Go where mega brands can’t
  • Case Study: Vosges Haut-Chocolat
    • Luxury haut-chocolats with exotic worldly flavor influence
    • Highest quality global seasonings
    • ‘ Chocolate visionary’
    • Concepts: Each product tells a story about a culture and distinct personality; reinforced at POS
      • Products with a soul
    • Concept delivery: each batch QC’d by CEO
  • Case Study: Vosges Haut-Chocolat
    • Ongoing product improvement
    • Results:
      • Started in 1998
      • 2007 Sales projected at $15MM; +67% vs. last year
  • Case Study: Mighty Leaf Tea Company
    • Concept: make premium global tea in America portable
    • Developed proprietary Mighty Leaf Tea Pouches TM : silken pouches that deliver superior, whole leaf tea
    • Multi-sensory experience
    • Continuous innovation: biodegradable tea pouch in ‘06
  • Case Study: Mighty Leaf Tea Company
    • Packaging to educate and assist consumers
      • Color coded to communicate energy level (caffeine) and daypart
      • Steeping instructions on each tea bag ‘which makes or breaks a tea experience’
    • Results:
      • Founded in ‘95
      • Inc. 500 in ’05, ’06: +400% 3-year growth rate
      • ’ 06 Sales: $13.5MM
  • Winning Product Development and Differentiation Strategies
    • Build true superiority and differentiation
      • - Relevance!
    • Clarify the Concept…
    • … . Deliver with a Killer Product
    • ‘ Obsess’ about delighting the consumer
    • Educate the trade and consumer
    • Use a disciplined Product Development Process
    • Leverage being small and nimble
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • What is Positioning?
    • Positioning - noun, verb
    • the way we want customers to perceive, think and feel about our brand versus competitive entries 1 ;
    • the brand’s perception in the prospect’s mind that takes into consideration not only its own strength and weaknesses, but those of its competitors as well 1
    1 Trout & Ries
  • What is Positioning?
    • Positioning -
    • The distinct intellectual location of your brand
  • Positioning - examples “ How we want our customers perceive us….”
  • Positioning - examples “… versus competition….”
  • Positioning - examples … and is distinct…
  • Benefits of Strategic Positioning
    • Tool to build competitive advantage
      • Ability to reposition competition
  •  
  • Benefits of Strategic Positioning
    • Tool to build competitive advantage
      • Ability to reposition competition
    • Enhanced profitability
    Perceived Superiority vs. Competition Pricing
  • Benefits of Strategic Positioning
  • Benefits of Strategic Positioning
    • Tool to build competitive advantage
      • Ability to reposition competition
    • Enhanced profitability
    • Efficiency
      • Consistency and synergy of business efforts
      • Precision
      • Focus
  • Best Practices
  • Best Practices
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)____
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3)_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint Example: Orville Redenbacher’s Popcorn (at launch)
    • To people who love popcorn, make it at home, and are frustrated about uneven results
    • Orville Redenbacher’s is the brand of popping corn
    • That makes the best popcorn
    • Because a) it uses the best hybrid popcorn kernel b) it pops up lighter and fluffier than ordinary popcorn c) it leaves fewer unpopped kernels and d) it was developed by a devoted popcorn farmer
    • The brand character is likeable, folksy, straightforward and honest.
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Demographic target
    • Purchaser or user?
    • Usage profile
    • Need mindset
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • SOURCES:
    • Consumer research
    • Customer points of contact
    • Customer analysis
    • Industry research
    • Category unmet needs
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Brand in consumer’s mind
    • Highest awareness brand name
    • Best brand name imagery
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Industry or category
    • Array of substitute items
    • Competition for dollars spent
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_______________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Real or perceived as proprietary
    • Primary advantageous outcome
    • Advantageous to the target
    • Functional or emotional
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • SOURCES:
    • Consumer feedback
      • Probe for ultimate benefit
    • Competitive analysis
    • Emotional or intellectual resonance
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Features that support benefit
    • Proprietary or superior features
    • Product- or people-based
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    • Brand described as a celebrity or distinct person
  • Positioning – the Strategic Blueprint
    • To __________ (Target)________________________________.
    • (Brand name) is the brand of (category frame of reference)________
    • That (Benefit)_________________________________________
    • Because (Reason(s) Why) 1)_____________________________, 2)_______ _________________3_______________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
    SOURCES: Internal ideation Consumer research
  • Metromint Brand Positioning
    • To people, primarily women, 25-45, who buy natural and specialty foods , and are heath-conscious, Metromint is brand of mintwater that gives you a unique cooling sensation because 1) it is made with pure water and real mint; 2) has a surprisingly vibrant taste . 
    • The brand character is healthy, sleek, active, cool, and unique.
    •  
  • Case Study: Metromint
    • Distinct, simple concept: Mintwater that is uniquely refreshing
      • Clearly communicated in product and packaging
    • Polarizing initial concept responses – confirmed distinctiveness
    • Targeted launch to natural and specialty food retail channels
    • Launched at 2004 NASFT; rapid
    • authorization, expansion at Whole Foods
    • Results:
    • 2006 Sales: +400% vs. YA
    • 2007 Sales: +300% vs. YA
    • Fastest growing Natural & Natural Flavored Water (SPINS)
  • Lesser Evil Brand Positioning
    • To Baby Boomers, who want to snack healthier, without sacrificing taste, Lesser Evil is the brand of snacks, that is indulgent and healthier because
    • 1) it tastes great, and 2) is made with the highest quality, natural (when possible) ingredients . 
    • The brand character is fun, honest, nostalgic, contemporary, and honest.
    •  
  • Case Study: Lesser Evil Snacks
    • Positioning central to the business strategy
    • Clearly positioned as an indulgent, healthier snack
    • Capitalized on category need gap: healthier snacks that do not sacrifice taste
  • Case Study: Lesser Evil Snacks
    • Positioning central to the business strategy
    • Clearly positioned as an Indulgent, healthier snack
    • Capitalized on category need gap: healthier snacks that did not sacrifice taste
    • Snacking without the guilt
    • Strategically ‘depositioning’ category leader
    • and other healthy snacks
    • Results:
      • #1 movement in SPINS 18 months
    • after launch (in ’04)
      • 2007 Sales Projecting at +100% vs. YA
  • Case Study: Stirrings
    • Capitalized on consumer unmet need for high quality mixers, compliment to high quality spirits
    • Benefits:
      • Physical: fantastic, restaurant- quality mixed drink at home
      • Emotional: makes you a great ‘effortless’ entertainer
  • Case Study: Stirrings
    • To discriminating ‘foodies’, primarily women purchasers, 27-35 , who like to entertain and create a great impression, Stirrings is the brand of mixers that makes you a great entertainer because 1) you can easily make restaurant-quality cocktails 2) it is of comparable quality to your high quality liquor ; 3) it is made with real fruit juice, triple filtered water and cane sugar.
    • The brand character is sophisticated, innovative,  
    • and engaging .
  • Case Study: Stirrings
    • Results:
    • - Launched in 2000
    • - 2006 Sales: +60% vs. YA
    • - Attracted ‘arm’s length investment partnership’ with Diageo in ‘07
    • - 2007 Sales: approaching $30 MM
  • ___________ Brand Positioning
    • To (Target)____________________ ________________________________ .
    • (Brand name) __________________________________ is the brand of (Category Frame of reference) ________________________________ t hat (Benefit) ________________________________________________
    • because (Reason(s) Why) 1)__________________________________, 2)_______ _________________3)_________________________.
    •  
    • The brand character is ___________________________________.
    •  
  • How to Build and Leverage your Brand Positioning
    • Prepare and analyze
    • Recruit core team
    • Collaborate and create
    • Communicate and proselytize
    • Integrate into all key plans: annual, strategic, cross-functional
    • Monitor, track, and refine
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • Deliberate Distribution Strategies Definition: The plan to launch and expand your brand in channels that maximize your brand’s profit potential.
  • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Be Consistent with Brand Strategy
    • Keep Channel/per store profitability focus
    • Build Base Distribution Performance
    • Nail Your Movement Story
    • Explore Strategic Visibility
    • Pursue Partners and Alliances
    • Tell consumers where to buy you
  • Be Consistent with Brand Strategy
    • Enhance or Detract?
      • Does your target shop (consume) there?
      • Is that placement consistent with brand image?
      • Will your brand perform well there vs. competition?
      • Do you have sufficient channel/account power?
      • Can you execute well in this channel?
    • “The medium is the message”
    • Maintain courage to say “No”
  • Keep Channel/per door profitability focus
    • Comparative P & Ls
      • Evaluate actual gross margins (sales – allowances – COGS)
      • Channel specific costs to serve: S, F, A&P, and G&A
      • Test vs. ongoing
    • ‘ Good’ vs. ‘Bad’ Channels
    • “ Go Where the Money Is… Go There Often”
      • Willie Sutton, Bank Robber
  • Build Base Distribution Performance
    • ‘Perfect the Model’ from your Core… and replicate profit/store best practices
    • - strongest stores
    • - strongest markets
    • - strongest channels
    • - strongest sku’s
    • Monitor consumer demand,
    • net of distribution gains!
  • Nail and Tell your Movement Story
    • Show Trade Sales and Profit Impact
      • Incremental Profit Trumps
      • ‘Profit Calculator’
        • Sales
        • Gross margins
        • Turns
        • GMROI
  • Explore Strategic Visibility
    • Brand credibility and prestige
        • Upscale retailers, gift stores, caterers, upscale restaurants and other fashion mavens
    • Brand awareness and trial
        • Foodservice, events, mass channels, quality sampling
  • Pursue Partners and Alliances
    • Complimentary brands and businesses
    • Be creative!
      • Who else is targeting my consumer?
        • Who is already doing programs that we can join?
      • Who else is targeting my target accounts?
      • What other items are my consumer buying when they need my brand?
      • When is the consumer in the right frame of mind to buy my brand?
  • Tell Consumers Where to Buy You
    • All external communication
    • Website – store locator, internet sales
    • In-store location, when possible
    • All sampling
  • Case Study: Dancing Deer Bakery
    • Launched, then strategically
    • de-emphasized coffeehouses
    • Williams-Sonoma distribution: getting it right
    • Built strong Whole Foods regional performance, then expansion
    • No grocery or Big Box
    • Results: Launched in 1994, $10.5MM in 2007 (+35%)
  • Case Study – Sarabeth’s Kitchen
    • Began with fruits and jams
    • Opened Sarabeth’s Restaurant – Manhattan sensation
    • Awarded the concession at the Whitney Museum (NYC) – ‘91
    • Secured distribution at Williams- Sonoma, Balducci’s and Bloomingdale’s
  • Case Study – Sarabeth’s Kitchen
    • Drove additional specialty, retail doors
    • Built web presence and mail order data
    • base since ’95 – now 60M names
    • Results:
    • 2006 Sales: doubled vs. 2005
    • 2007 Sales: +50% vs. YA
  • Case Study: Crimson Cup
    • Started in ’91 as a supplier to provide people with the best coffee
    • Evolved to provide complete system for coffeehouse and coffee movement
    • Comprehensive per store consultative support
  • Case Study: Crimson Cup
    • Best practices and tools to maximize profit potential (e.g. location, product mix, pricing, merchandising, training)
      • Steps to optimize marketing potential
      • Localizable tools
    • Results:
      • Same-store sales: +11.4% vs. YA
      • (3- 10x competition)
      • 2007 Sales: $7MM (+25% vs. YA)
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • Consumer Intimacy
    • Know your primary target
    • Structure listening and responding
      • Maintain dialogue with heavy users
    • Get objective, measurable consumer feedback
    • Prioritize positioning, usage, new products
    • Establish an Expert with a ‘seat at the table’
    • Maintain as a process, not an event
  • Know your primary target
    • Demographics
    • Usage
    • Needs and beliefs
    • Heavy users, vs. other users
    • Who, what, when, where and why they consume you
    • Know the group ; know the person
  • Case Study: Honest Tea
      • CEO is, and knows, his target and their soul: ‘cultural creatives’; environmentally/socially conscious consumers
      • Addressed consumer unmet need: thirst quenching beverage that is not overly sweet/sugary or too bland
      • Deliver on brand promise:
      • authentic, honest, and healthier
      • Active dialogue with consumers;
      • cultural commitment
  • Case Study: Honest Tea
      • Consumer intimacy drives new products:
      • Target: ‘cultural creatives’; environmentally/socially conscious consumers
      • Addressed consumer unmet need: thirst quenching beverage that is not overly sweet/sugary; healthier
      • Confirmed with consumers
  • Case Study: Honest Tea
      • Results:
      • Founded in 1998; first account: Fresh Fields (WFM)
      • 2007 Sales projections: $25 MM; +50% vs. YA
      • 25% market share of ready-to-drink market; 90% ACV (SPINS)
  • Structure Listening and Responding
      • Maintain consumer feedback on your brand
      • Probe for and use trade and consumer feedback
      • Seek opportunities for feedback on key issues
      • “How are we doing?” “What can we do better?”
      • Leverage current assets!
  • Maintain dialogue with heavy users
    • Consumer database!
    • Consumer referrals
    • Website
    • Advisory council
  • Get Objective, Measurable Feedback
      • Key attributes
      • Measurable (e.g. 1-5 scale)
      • Vs. Competition
      • Likelihood of purchasing
      • Repeat to track progress
      • Prioritize positioning, usage, and new products - - only data you can and will act on!
  • Case Study: RiceSelect
    • Maintained and used a 600+ consumer database and
    • feedback loop since brand’s infancy
    • Capitalized on and drove consumers’ increasingly sophisticated rice palate
    • Enjoyed rapid brand growth via distribution and
    • approached a potential plateau
    • Commissioned a cornerstone Attitude & Usage
    • study to take $20+ million brand to next level
  • Case Study: RiceSelect
    • Capitalized on key learnings:
      • Redefined competition
      • Identified and targeted heavy users
      • Need to strengthen brand positioning
      • Clarified priority brand and product attributes
      • Pinpointed opportunity to increase repeat sales
    • Results: 2007 Sales: +15% versus YA
  • Establish an Expert with a ‘seat at the table’…
      • “What does the consumer want?”
      • “How will our consumers respond?”
    • … especially to support growth and strategic
    • initiatives
  • Maintain as a process, not an event
    • Ongoing consumer dialogue
    • Track key metrics and trend
    • Objective measurement of productivity
    • Culture of listeners….
  • SaltWorks’ Artisan Salt
    • Started as a hobby in ‘01, grown to +$10MM
    • Leader in sea salt; great salt credentials
      • Educate and elevate market via Salt Reference Guide
    • eCommerce based business attracts highly targeted consumers
      • Over 25M subscribers
      • Rich dialogue and responsiveness to consumer needs
      • Consumers provide global new product ideas
      • Leverage Search Engine Optimization
    • Artisan Salt: respond to consumer demand for healthier, gourmet salt
  • SaltWorks’ Artisan Salt
    • Retail brand launched in ’06
      • Consumer-based merchandising and product mix counsel
    • Results:
    • SaltWorks 2007 sales: + 100% vs. YA
    • Artisan Salt line: rapid acceptance at Whole Foods and Kroger
  • 5 Best Practices
    • Winning product development and differentiation strategies
    • Effective Brand Positioning
    • Deliberate Distribution Strategies
    • Consumer Intimacy
    • Guerilla Marketing
  • Guerilla Marketing
    • Definition:
      • unconventional marketing intended to get maximum results from minimal resources
  • Guerilla Marketing
    • Keep Marketing Programs On Strategy
    • or Cut
    • Diagnose Key Issue(s)…
    • … Use the Right Tools
    • Maximize each Investment
    • ‘Perfect the Recipe’:
    • - Expand your best model!
  • Keep Marketing Programs On Strategy or Cut The 5-15% Thief
    • Ensure 3-5 Marketing Strategies link to strategic and annual plan
    • Ensure Marketing Tactics support strategies or redirect the $$
  • Keep Marketing Programs On Strategy or Cut
  • Diagnose Key Issues…
    • Distribution
    • Awareness
    • Trial
    • Repeat
  • … and Use the Right Tools = /
  • Secure Distribution
    • Support the Sales Team:
    • Compelling ($$) sell-in materials
    • Train and equip
    • Prioritize channels
    • Trade advertising and communication
  • Building Awareness
    • Build and prioritize PUBLIC RELATIONS
    • Prioritize heavy user target
    • Target influencers, to drive word-of-mouth
    • High impact packaging, presentation and planogram
    • Think big: determine # aware’s to build marketing plan
  • Case Study: Brownie Points
    • Public Relations Drives Brand Awareness
    • Started business in ’96
    • Made their own “luck”: Customer thank you ‘evolves’
    • to 4 minute Today Show interview in 1998
      • - Willingness to share her story
      • - Make story newsworthy
      • - Seize the opportunity
      • - ‘Editors are looking for stories’
  • Case Study: Brownie Points
    • Subsequent features on CNBC, CNN, Entrepreneur,
    • The Food Network, and Rachel Ray
    • Leveraged PR credibility to land major accounts
    • Results:
    • Secured regional Kroger and Giant
    • Eagle distribution
    • 2007 Sales: +110% vs. ’06
  • Drive Trial
    • Sample, sample, sample
      • In-store
      • Out-of-store
    • Maximize efficiency:
      • $/sample
      • ROI
      • Consider partners
      • Make it an event!
    • Maximize effectiveness:
      • Tools to close the sale
      • Sample high opportunity targets
      • Sample with high aperture
      • Maximize trade participation
  • Case Study: Metromint
    • Sample, sample, sample
    • Founders initially
    • sampled in-store
    • Sample with big brand impact
    • Solicit sampling opportunities;
    • Make yourself ‘easy’ to sample
    • End-Run the ‘Big Event’
  • Drive Repeat and Loyalty
    • Improve product appeal
      • Vs. competition
    • Positioning, relevance
    • Pricing
    • In-, on-package, POS, and external communication to drive usage and use rate
      • Focus on Heavy Users
  • Case Study – Sarabeth’s Kitchen
    • Develop, Retain and Expand Brand Fans
    • Early in their development, hired small agency to develop print campaign
    • Developed web presence in the 90’s ‘on a shoestring’
    • Built and leveraged mailing list:
    • 60M names
    • Selected as Oprah’s Favorite in 2000; several Oprah TV mentions since
  • Case Study: Vino De Milo
    • Smart Strategic Basics
    • Distribution:
    • 2003 launch in gourmet food stores; expanded to Wild Oats and Whole Foods
    • Rep ride-withs to educate on product and merchandising
    • Awareness:
    • Blind Taste Test events and stories (wins) for local food editors
  • Case Study: Vino De Milo
    • Trial:
    • Make sampling events bigger: Founder presence, consumer sweepstakes, additional database names
    • Extensive in-store sampling; retailer support
    • Repeat:
    • New product news and specials to 3M database
    • Recipe suggestion POS
    • Results:
    • +100% yearly growth since ’03 launch
  • Maximize Each Investment
    • 1. What is the Program Objective?
    • What are the Options?
    • How can we be more efficient?
    • - Cost per X basis
    • How can we make this more effective?
    • What is the projected outcome?
    • Return on investment?
    • When will I measure and evaluate it to continue/expand?
    • 6. … and ‘Use what you buy!’
  • Case Study: Dancing Deer Creativity Maximizes Impact Creative Brand Awareness Electoral College Cookie Map at Faneuil Hall (’04 DNC Convention) Sampling Event as Mega-Event ‘ Break the Curse’ Cookie
  • ‘Perfect the Recipe’
    • Try multiple tactics, if manageable
    • Set measurable goals upfront
    • - Sales impact
    • - Cost (actual and ongoing)
    • - R.O.I
    • - Date to assess
    • Test, measure, repeat/refine
    • or redirect
    • Expand your best model!
  • Guerilla Marketing Worksheet
    • Key Opportunity (ies)______________________________________
    • Objective (goal):__________________________________________
    • Strategy (how): __________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    • Tactics (3 options/best option) (what):
    • 1.______________________________________________________________________________________ 2.______________________________________________________________________________________
    • 3.______________________________________________________________________________________
    • Budget: ________________________________________________
    • Projected Impact: ________________________________________
    • Ways to Further Leverage Program___________________________
    • _______________________________________________________
  • Brand Development Action Plan
    • Action Plan:
    • ___________________________________________________________
    • ___________________________________________________________
    • ___________________________________________________________
    • ___________________________________________________________
    • 5. ___________________________________________________________
    • Projected Impact Date
    • ___________________________________________ __________
    • ___________________________________________ __________
    • ___________________________________________ __________
    • ___________________________________________ __________
    • 5. ___________________________________________ __________
  • Questions and Answers
  • ‘Assignments’ 1. Market smart. 2. “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton