Linares chptr. 3 yellow book
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  • 1. Chapter 3 “Improving Student Learning WhenBudgets Are Tight”
  • 2. Can you feel the fiscal squeeze? How can school improve during the fiscal squeeze? Research Best-practice-based strategies Reallocation of existing resourcesTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 3. Redesign + Improve How can schoolimprove during thefiscal squeeze? Research +Redesign=Improvement Best-practice-basedstrategies Reallocation ofexisting resourcesTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight 2 automobilemanufacturingcompanies wentbankrupt and whatdid they do? They had toredesign andimprove the cars inorder to compete inthe marketplace.
  • 4. Redesign + Improve Oscar Goldman: SteveAustin, astronaut: a manbarely aliveGentlemen we canrebuild himWe have the technologyWe have the capabilityto make the worlds firstbionic manSteve Austin will be thatmanBetter than he wasbeforeBetter, Stronger, FasterTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are TightFiscal squeeze- barelykeeping afloatStakeholders-we can rebuilditWe have the resourcesWe have the capabilityto make the worlds besteducational institutionCCSD will be that institutionBetter than it was beforeBetter, Wiser, for the GreaterGood
  • 5. Would money help ? “Studies have found that even when resources increasesubstantially, schools frequently do not use the newdollars to strategically improve performance (p. 46).”Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 6. Understanding and Resist the CostIncrease Pressures on Schools Studies show that thefollowing positivelyimpact studentachievement: Smaller Classes for K-3(15 students per class)positively impactsstudent achievement inthe short and long haul.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 7. Understanding and Resist the CostIncrease Pressures on Schools Studies show that thefollowing positivelyimpact studentachievement: More electives (art,music, health, physicaleducation, career andtechnical education,advanced Worldlanguage)Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 8. Understanding and Resist the CostIncrease Pressures on Schools Studies show that thefollowing positivelyimpact studentachievement: Automatic pay increasedoes not have apositive impact onsystem performance andcosts more yearly bykeeping up with theannual increase.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 9. Understanding and Resist the CostIncrease Pressures on Schools Studies show that thefollowing positivelyimpact studentachievement: Growing costs forpension and healthbenefits has a hugeimpact on the year’sbudget especially withrising health costs.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 10. Increased costs and flat performance In summary, schools are bombarded by the intensepressures of: Smaller class sizes More electives Automatic pay increases Health and pension benefits*With all of these increase costs, none have significant positiveimpacts on student learning.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 11. Increased costs and flat performance“No wonder spending perpupil has risen dramaticallyin the past three decadeswhile performance has beenflat or only modestlyincreasing (p.50).”Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 12. How do we move forward? Clear goals must be established Implementation of a Plan of Action Clear understanding of the basics neededfor the Plan of Action Strategic budgeting Principles to guide budget decisionsTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 13. 1. Analyze currentperformance situation2. Set High Goals3. Change Curriculum andDefine EffectiveInstructional Practices4. Core v. Elective Strategy5. Data Driven Instruction6. Create CollaborativeGroupsWhere to begin….. Plan of Action7. Invest in ongoing,comprehensive, andintensive PD.8. Use RTI effectively to raisestudent standards.9. Distribute leadership10. Create a professionalculture11. Use an effective observationand evaluation model12. Embrace a culture ofaccountabiltyAdapted from slide #9 of Ben Sosebee
  • 14. The haves and have nots 3 categories of schools: 1- Those that have more funds than what thePlan of Action requires These schools need to use resources to attaincore student assessment goalsTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 15. The haves and have nots 3 categories of schools: 2- Those that are facing budget cuts Need to determine what cuts will have the leastimpact on student performanceTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 16. The haves and have nots 3 categories ofschools: 3- Those withresourcessignificantly lessthan the Plan ofAction Fund as much aspossible for the Plan ofAction using 6 macro-strategiesTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight 1-reallocate staff based onChptr. 1 2-be flexible with class size 3-implement collaborativetime with teachers 4-make Tier 1 effective withthe core program 5-provide extra helpstrategies 6-reduction in instructinalprograms
  • 17. In sum… The Plan of Action with its formulas andconfigurations provides a guide to help estimatenecessary funding for the haves and have nots.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 18. Compare/Contrast-Table 3.1 & 3.2Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 19. More Detail on Strategic Budgeting Raising class sizes Elective v. core classes Time for collaboration Costs of professional development Provide individual & small group tutoring Rethink every use of staff in schoolTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 20. More Detail on Strategic Budgeting Raising class sizes Regular class sizes of 15 students K-3 & Class sizes of 25students 4-12Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 21. More Detail on Strategic Budgeting Elective v. core classes Roza (2010) found that expenditures of elective classesfar exceed the expenditures of core classes ex. $36,000 per pupil for chearleading ex. $20,000 per pupil for jewelry making ex. $5,ooo to $7,000 per pupil for algebra and biology What does this mean? Major misallocation of funds and notaligned with the core goals of the education system *the elective funds takes into consideration of teacher:pupilTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 22. More Detail on Strategic Budgeting Finding collaborative time Districts need to train principals on how to organize theschool day to help facilitate collaboration. Making wise use of time while collaborating will entailtraining.Targeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 23. More Detail on Strategic Budgeting Extra help programs for struggling students Teacher/tutor for Tier 2 intervention Suggested formula: 1 teacher/tutor for every 200 at-riskstudents Staff for extended-day academic help Staff for summer school Rethink every use of staff in schoolTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight
  • 24. Resources Google Images Slide #9 from Ben’s presentation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7zNY0I5JNI http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071054/quotesTargeting Resources to Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight