Heavy equipments in construction

1,231 views
999 views

Published on

Safety construction

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,231
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
84
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Heavy equipments in construction

  1. 1. The Operation of Heavy Equipment in the Presence of Personnel On the Ground 01/24/14 1
  2. 2. 01/24/14 2
  3. 3. Foreword Many types of Mobile Construction Equipment are available for use by contractors doing a wide variety of work. Many, if not all these machines, have to operate within a close proximity to persons on foot. They all however, present similar types of known hazards. This training session is devoted to attempt to identify, and hopefully better educate those who must work around or operate these types of equipment, since they all possess the capability to cause serous injury or death. 01/24/14 3
  4. 4. These Include but Are Not Limited To: Front-end loaders; Rubber-tired and tracked Crawler tractors/bulldozers, skid steer bobcats Wheel tractor-scrapers, elevating scrapers, tandem powered scrapers Rubber-tired backhoes and tracked hydraulic excavators On and off-road haulage vehicles Asphalt Pavers and associated support equipment - pavement rollers Vibratory rollers and compactors Motor graders, grade tractors, industrial tractors Concrete mixers and pump trucks Special use construction equipment: grinding, Pulverizing, milling, water trucks, etc 01/24/14 4
  5. 5. PERSONS PUT AT RISK BY WORKING AROUND, OR BEING NEAR, HEAVY EQUIPMENT WHILE IT IS OPERATING. DIRECT PARTICIPANTS: (Need to be on site on regular basis) Signal Persons, Observers, Flaggers, Grade Checkers, Dump Persons. Equipment Operators, Teamsters. Laborers, Iron Workers and Carpenters. Foremen, Supervisors, and other related contractor staff. Surveyors, Rodmen, Layout Crews. Mechanics and oilers. Any Other Crafts and/or Trades working on the Project, or Passing through the work areas. 01/24/14 5
  6. 6. PERSONS PUT AT RISK BY WORKING AROUND, OR BEING NEAR, HEAVY EQUIPMENT WHILE IT IS OPERATING. PARTICIPANTS WHO NEED TO BE ON SITE: (On a Periodic Basis) Delivery Trucks, Service Providers, (of any kind) - Unescorted on the site. Concrete Mixers, Pump Trucks. Contracted Services; Crane Rental, Concrete Saw Cutting, Port-to-let Service Persons, etc. Union/Labor Officials. Roach Coach Drivers. Trash Removal Vehicles.. Architects and Engineers, Inspectors, Client’s Staff/Owner’s Reps./Guests/VIPs. Engineering Service Providers: Concrete Testing, Compaction Testing, Air Monitoring, etc. City, County, State and Federal Officials: (Of all types). Vendor Sales Personnel or Product Installation Specialist(s). Other Utility Service Providers & Locators: Phone, Gas. Electric, Water, Sewer, Cable, etc. Transportation Industry; Trucking, Buses, Taxicabs, Rail, Ships, Aircraft. 01/24/14 6
  7. 7. PERSONS PUT AT RISK BY WORKING AROUND, OR BEING NEAR, HEAVY EQUIPMENT WHILE IT IS OPERATING. NON-PARTICIPANTS, NO DIRECT NEED TO BE ON SITE: Pedestrians, Spectators, On-lookers, Sidewalk Superintendents and the Just Plain Curious! Children (of all ages). Job Seekers, (all types). Joggers, Bicycle Riders, Skate Boarders, All Terrain Vehicles, Power Walkers. Environmentalists independently reviewing compliance with Laws/Restrictions.. Scavengers, Wood collectors, Junk Collectors, Dumpster Divers. Lawyers, Investigators, Thieves, Burglars and Law Breakers. The Media: (Depending on circumstances). 01/24/14 7
  8. 8. CONCERNS FOR SAFETY PROBLEM: YOU HAVE A CONGESTED CONSTRUCTION SITE WITH PERSONNEL ON FOOT, AND MOBILE MACHINES WORKING IN THE SAME AREA, AT THE SAME TIME! 01/24/14 8
  9. 9. Vision Statement TO PROVIDE A SAFE WORKPLACE, FREE FROM ALL RECOGNIZED HAZARDS... 01/24/14 9
  10. 10. Goal and Objective PREVENT WORKPLACE ACCIDENTS! PREVENT PERSONAL INJURIES BETWEEN MOVING EQUIPMENT AND THOSE WORKERS WHO ARE ON FOOT. YOU MUST SEE AND BE SEEN!!! 01/24/14 10
  11. 11. Today’s Situation BEING STRUCK BY, OR CAUGHT INBETWEEN, ARE TWO OF THE LEADING CAUSE OF INJURIES AND FATALITIES ON CONSTRUCTION SITES! STRUCK BY (22%) 01/24/14 CAUGHT IN-BETWEEN (18%) 11
  12. 12. How Did We Get Here? A NATION-WIDE, PAST HISTORY OF PERSONS BEING STRUCK OR CRUSHED BY OPERATING OR MOVING EQUIPMENT. THE IMPRESSION THAT THE EQUIPMENT OPERATOR ALWAYS KNOWS WHERE THE GROUND PERSONNEL ARE LOCATED. 01/24/14 12
  13. 13. Available Solutions Management Commitment Employee Involvement Pre-construction Work-Site Analysis Hazard Prevention and Controls Equipment Maintenance Employee Awareness Training Periodically Review Procedures 01/24/14 13
  14. 14. Management Commitment Restrict entry onto site of non-essential personnel. Establish Controlled Entry Points to site. Coordinate Operations of Various Trades Working in the Same Areas. Provide Fundamental Site Rules and Training to all Persons at Risk. Adequate Lay-Down Areas Established. 01/24/14 14
  15. 15. Employee Involvement All employees who are at risk must receive basic indoctrination. Absolute need to address problem with employees on a regular basis. (Toolbox Safety Meetings). Employees must learn, follow, and obey established rules. Realize that they must see, and be seen. 01/24/14 15
  16. 16. Pre-Construction WorkSite Analysis Identify Potential Known Hazards. Job Conditions: Haul Roads, Access Points. Lay down/Storage Areas. Office, Tool, Storage and Change Trailers. Methods of Construction, (increases Risk?) Also Consider: Unwanted side effects of the Job Schedule. 01/24/14 16
  17. 17. HAZARD PREVENTION and CONTROLS Perimeter Fencing, Enclosures, signs. Spotters Provided for in-the-blind, backing machines and/or equipment. Poor Planing Forces Workers to Commit Unsafe Acts! (office trailers, change trailers, haul roads, parking areas). Be Alert; Stay Clear; Hear Warnings. Temporary Barricades around Hazards. 01/24/14 17
  18. 18. PROPER EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE Machine in Proper Working Order. Back-up Alarm, Horn, Lights, Mirrors. Cab Glass not Cracked or Broken. Machine Windows, Mirrors, kept Clean. Pre-Operational Inspection conducted by Operator. Prompt Repair of Any Noted Deficiencies! 01/24/14 18
  19. 19. EMPLOYEE AWARENESS TRAINING Does Your Job Require You To Approach Moving or Backing Machines? How does the Operator Know Where You Are? Do You Understand all Signs, Markers and Flags? KNOW WHAT THEY MEAN! You Must Always Be Alert to Changing Job Conditions and Your Particular Situation. 01/24/14 19
  20. 20. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITIES GENERAL GUIDELINES: Safety Features On Equipment, Know How They Operate, and Use Them Properly. Systematic Maintenance and Repair. Trained Operators. Trained Repair Personnel. Pre-Operational Inspection of Equipment. Review Manufacturer’s Operating Manual. 01/24/14 20
  21. 21. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITIES SPECIFIC: The Most Dangerous Movement is Backing! Know Where your Blind Spots Are. Look For People on Foot Around You. STOP! When Signaled; When Waived at Violently; Or If You Are In Doubt…. Maintain a Safe Operating Speed. 01/24/14 21
  22. 22. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITIES Keep Machine Under Control at all Times. Take Machine “Out of Service”, if it is Unsafe to Operate. Make Sure You Are Familiar with the Operating Characteristics of your Machine. Be On The Look-Out For Other Trades Working in the Same Area. 01/24/14 22
  23. 23. Where’s Waldo? 01/24/14 23
  24. 24. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITIES Be Aware of Other Machines Operating In the Area. Frequently check for the Location of other Machines. Keep Lights and Backup Alarm in Operating Condition. Allow NO ONE to Ride Outside the Cab for Any Reason! Clean Windows and Adjust Mirrors. 01/24/14 24
  25. 25. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILIES Always inform Appropriate Personnel of any Abnormal Conditions, Defects, or Changes made in Machine and/or Job Procedure or Conditions. Report Unsafe Workers to Supervision. Talk-up Safety with Those Who Work with You. Maintain “Constant Awareness”. 01/24/14 25
  26. 26. EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITIES Do Not Attempt Repairs or Maintenance that You Do Not Understand. Always Check the Mirror on the Blind Side, making Sure of Your Clearance. (Backing on the Blind Side should be Avoided if at all Possible). Learn and Follow Safe Work Practices! 01/24/14 26
  27. 27. MANUFACTURER’S RECOMENDATIONS CATERPILLAR STATES : Clear all Personnel from the Machine and the Area. The Operator Must be Satisfied that No One will be Endangered Before Moving the Machine. Look Behind Machine Before Backing. 01/24/14 27
  28. 28. MANUFACTURER’S RECOMENDATIONS Have a Signalman Present when Moving In or Out of a Building (or structure). Stop Machine Frequently at Night, Walk Around and Inspect Machine, Stay Alert. Clear All Obstacles from the Path of the Machine, Beware of Hazards such as Wires, Ditches, etc.. 01/24/14 28
  29. 29. OBSERVATIONS Small Machines have small blind spots, where large machines have large blind spots, both can cause serious injury or death! The taller and wider the machine, the bigger the blind spot area. All Involved must give Constant Attention to what they are Doing! 01/24/14 29
  30. 30. THE DANGER OF BEING STRUCK-BY ITEMS TO CONSIDER: Revolving Machines; Cranes & Backhoes. Struck By Attachments of Machines. Drawbar Related Accidents, Hooking and Unhooking. Articulated Machines - Pinch Points. Attaching Home Made Devices to a Machine, Not Approved by Mfg., (Hooks). 01/24/14 30
  31. 31. STANDING ON THE OPERATOR’S BLIND SIDE 01/24/14 31
  32. 32. THE DANGER OF BEING STRUCK-BY The Hazard of a Water Cooler Mounted on a piece of Equipment. Storing Crew Lunch Boxes on Equipment. Hand Tools Placed or Stored on Mobile Equipment Platforms or Decks. Environmental Design of the Machine; Noise Suppression-Vs-Hearing Protection. 01/24/14 32
  33. 33. IN DEFENSE OF THE EQUIPMENT OPERATOR Where Do All these People Come From? Machine Design; Not Much Thought given to Persons on Foot in the Working Area. Faster and Bigger Machines; Not as Forgiving as Older, Slower, Machines. Can’t See Everything that Goes on Around the Machine. Do Persons on Foot Realize the Danger? 01/24/14 33
  34. 34. IN DEFENSE OF THE EQUIPMENT OPERATOR The Operation of the Machine Requires Constant Attention. Who is Responsible for Whom? What about when I have to Work in Close Proximity to Persons on Foot. Persons or Vehicles that Approach the Equipment in My Blind Spots. Do People on Foot Look Out for Us? 01/24/14 34
  35. 35. Rubber-tired Backhoes Known Hazards Ground personnel caught in “pinch points” of machine or struck by moving machine attachments; buckets, backhoe boom, outriggers. Loose or missing pins and keepers in loader linkages, cracks in lift arms, bucket attachments and the condition of the bucket itself. 01/24/14 35
  36. 36. Rubber-tired Backhoes Traveling at excessive speeds, loss of control. Loose, sliding or bad ground conditions. Using machine as a crane or the bucket as an aerial work platform. Seat belt not worn by operator Transporting personnel in Bucket. 01/24/14 36
  37. 37. Rubber-tired Backhoes Overloading the capacity of the machine. Poorly-trained operator, [or] anyone on the crew is allowed to operate the machine. Abuse or Misuse of the equipment. Poor, or non-existing maintenance - [Wait till it breaks before problems are fixed]. 01/24/14 37

×