Forces Inside Earth 9.1
Fault <ul><li>A fault is where rocks bend and break and move along surfaces. </li></ul><ul><li>Rocks move in different dir...
Earthquakes <ul><li>An earthquake is the breaking of rock and produces vibrations. </li></ul><ul><li>this happens when roc...
Normal Faults <ul><li>A normal fault is when tension pulls rocks apart. </li></ul><ul><li>Rocks above the surface move dow...
Reverse Faults <ul><li>A reverse fault is when the rock above the surface are forced up and over the rock is below it. </l...
Strike-Slip Faults <ul><li>A strike-slip fault is when rocks on any side of the fault surface slide past each other. </li>...
Objectives
Explain how earthquakes result from the buildup of stress in the earth’s crust. <ul><li>There is a limit on how much the r...
Contrast normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults. <ul><li>At reverse faults, the rocks move up and over the other rock. At...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Faults and forces 9.1

354 views
274 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
354
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Faults and forces 9.1

  1. 1. Forces Inside Earth 9.1
  2. 2. Fault <ul><li>A fault is where rocks bend and break and move along surfaces. </li></ul><ul><li>Rocks move in different directions. </li></ul><ul><li>The forces inside the Earth put stress on rocks and cause these faults. </li></ul><ul><li>These rocks bend and break under a lot of pressure. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Earthquakes <ul><li>An earthquake is the breaking of rock and produces vibrations. </li></ul><ul><li>this happens when rocks reach their elastic limit and break. </li></ul><ul><li>Most destruction from earthquakes comes from the surface waves. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Normal Faults <ul><li>A normal fault is when tension pulls rocks apart. </li></ul><ul><li>Rocks above the surface move downward under the rock below it. </li></ul><ul><li>An example of a normal fault is the Sierra Nevadas. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Reverse Faults <ul><li>A reverse fault is when the rock above the surface are forced up and over the rock is below it. </li></ul><ul><li>When rocks break they sometimes continue to move along the surface. </li></ul><ul><li>An example of a reverse fault is the Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Strike-Slip Faults <ul><li>A strike-slip fault is when rocks on any side of the fault surface slide past each other. </li></ul><ul><li>They don’t move upward of downward. </li></ul><ul><li>The move past each with shear forces and is called a Transform fault. </li></ul><ul><li>An example is the San Andreas Fault. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Objectives
  8. 8. Explain how earthquakes result from the buildup of stress in the earth’s crust. <ul><li>There is a limit on how much the rocks from the Earth’s crust will bend and stretch. It goes through elastic or plastic deformation. Once the elastic limit is reached, the rocks break and the pressure that is caused form the break then moves along to the surface and forms earthquakes. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Contrast normal, reverse, and strike-slip faults. <ul><li>At reverse faults, the rocks move up and over the other rock. At a normal fault the rock moves below the upper rock and down into the Earth’s interior. Finally, at a strike-slip fault the rock slides past each other and does not move upward or downward. </li></ul>

×