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  • 1. 25.1 Properties of Stars
  • 2. Vocabulary
  • 3. Constellation
    An apparent group of stars originally named for mythical characters.
    The sky is divided into 88 constellations.
  • 4. Binary star
    One of two stars revolving around a common center of mass under their mutual gravitational attraction.
  • 5. Light-year
    The distance light travels in a year, about 9.5 trillion kilometers.
  • 6. Apparent Magnitude
    The brightness of a star when viewed from Earth.
  • 7. Absolute Magnitude
    The apparent brightness of a star if it were viewed from a distance of 32.6 light-years.
  • 8. Main-sequence star
    A star that falls into the main sequence category on the H-R diagram.
  • 9. Red Giant
    A large, cool star of high luminosity.
  • 10. Supergiant
    A very large, very bright red giant star.
  • 11. Cepheid Variable
    A star whose brightness varies periodically because it expands and contrasts.
  • 12. Nova
    A star that explosively increases in brightness.
  • 13. Nebulae
    A cloud of gas and/or dust in space.
  • 14. Key Concepts
  • 15. Color is a clue to a star’s temperature.
  • 16. Binary stars are used to determine the star property most difficult to calculate- its mass.
  • 17. The nearest stars have the largest parallax angles, while those of distant stars are too small to measure.
  • 18. Three factors control the apparent brightness of a star as seen from Earth: how big it is, how hot it is, and how far away it is.
  • 19. A Hertzsprung Russell diagram shows the relationship between the absolute magnitude and temperature of stars.

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