Harm to human body by smoking – danger of smoking<br />When cigarette smoke is inhaled, thousands of chemicals get into yo...
Mr kd
Mr kd
Mr kd
Mr kd
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Mr kd

187

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
187
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Mr kd

  1. 1. Harm to human body by smoking – danger of smoking<br />When cigarette smoke is inhaled, thousands of chemicals get into your bloodstream and travel throughout your body. These chemicals cause damages to different parts of the body. <br />Eyes: Chemicals in tobacco cause damage to the macula (the most sensitive part of the retina, the back of the eye). <br />Tiny blood vessels can burst through the macula, leading to irreversible damage. According to the recent research, there is a strong association between smoking and a number of common eye diseases, including Graves' ophthalmopathy, age- related macular degeneration, glaucoma and cataract. Smoking causes morphological and functional changes to the lens and retina due to its atherosclerotic and thrombotic effects on the ocular capillaries. Also, it enhances the generation of free radicals and decreases the levels of antioxidants in the blood circulation, aqueous homour and ocular tissue. Eventually, continuous smoking may perpetuate further damage and lead to permanent blindness. <br />Mouth, throat and oesophagus: Smoking is a risk factor for all cancers associated with the larynx, oral cavity and oesophagus. Over 90% of the patients with oral cancer (includes cancers of the lip, tongue, mouth and throat) are smoker, and the risk for these cancers increases with the number of cigarettes smoked. Heavy smokers have laryngeal cancer mortality risks 20 to 30 times greater than non-smokers. The combined effect of tobacco and alcoholic drink imposes a much higher risk of oral and pharyngeal cancers by 35-fold.<br />Heart and circulation: Two immediate HYPERLINK " http://mens-health.health-cares.net/smoking-harms.php" " undefined" effects of smoking<br />on heart and circulation are (1) an increase in your heartbeat rate, (2) a sharp rise in blood pressure. These responses are caused by nicotine which acts on the nervous system, causing the heart rate to rise and blood vessels to constrict. This narrowing of the blood vessels causes the blood pressure rise and strain is put on the heart. The carbon monoxide in cigarettes depletes the oxygen carrying capacity of a smoker's blood. This means that the heart has to pump harder to get enough oxygen to the rest of the body. Smoking can also affect the blood in the long term: increase in the blood cholesterol and fibrinogen levels. Both these factors mean blood will clot more easily and this will increase the risk of having a heart attack, caused by a blood clot forming in the heart. The heart and circulation attacks caused by smoking include : Coronary heart disease (CHD), Aneurysm, Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), stroke etc. <br />Lungs: The tar content of cigarette smoke damages the cells in the airways of the lung, making the cilia unable to sweep away the harmful substances. Eventually this damage can produce cells that grow in an uncontrolled way leading to cancer of the lung or larynx. Moreover, harmful substances from the smoke are detected by the protective cells of the body and these cells move to the lung and try to defend it, but are destroyed by the cigarette smoke. The dead cells release substances that damage the structure of the lung, which leads to chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Tobacco accounts for more than 80% of the lung cancer cases. The observed relationship between tobacco smoking and the incidence of lung cancers appears to depend on factors such as: i) the daily dose of tobacco; ii) the duration of regular smoking and iii) the form in which tobacco is smoked (cigarettes, cigars, pipes). <br />Brain: HYPERLINK " http://mens-health.health-cares.net/smoking-harms.php" " undefined" Cigarette smoking<br />has been linked to the buildup of fatty substances in the carotid artery, the main neck artery supplying blood to the brain. Blockage of this artery may cut off the blood supply to the brain cells, which results in stroke (cerebral thrombosis). Also, nicotine raises blood pressure; carbon monoxide reduces the amount of oxygen your blood can carry to the brain; and cigarette smoke makes the blood thicker and more likely to clot. Smokers are more likely to develop stroke than non-smokers, with the overall relative risk of stroke in smokers being about 1.5times that of non-smokers.<br />Digestive system: Smoking has been shown to have harmful effects on all parts of the digestive system, contributing to such common disorders as heartburn and peptic ulcers. It also increases the risk of Crohn's disease and possibly gallstones. Risk of stomach cancer caused by smoking increases with duration of smoking and the number of cigarettes smoked. <br />Liver and pancreas: Nearly 50% of the bladder and kidney cancer in men are caused by smoking, with lower contribution for women. Cigarette smoke can interact with chemical (especially aromatic amines) in the work place to produce bladder and HYPERLINK " http://mens-health.health-cares.net/smoking-harms.php" " undefined" kidney cancer<br />. Also, approximately 30% of all deaths from pancreatic cancer are attributable to cigarette smoking.<br />Skin and hair: Just 10 minutes of cigarette smoking decreases the body's and skin's oxygen supply for almost an hour. Smoking robs the skin of collagen which keeps the skin elastic. Smokers get more and deeper wrinkles all over their faces because nicotine constricts the tiny capillaries that nourish the skin. Smokers in their 40s often have as many facial wrinkles as non-smokers in their 60s. Smoking interferes with the healing process, it takes longer to heal and there is more scarring. Smokers are also prone to premature thinning and graying of the hair. Men who smoke are twice as likely to become bald as are men who do not smoke, and premature graying is 3 to 6 times more common in smokers.<br />Bone and muscle: Smoking delays the healing of fractures, and in some smokers bone healing is indefinitely delayed. Nicotine restricts blood flow to all tissue, especially in the newly forming tissues that are involved in the bone repair. Moreover, tobacco smoke chemicals are poisons that also inhibit the development of new tissue cells. The tissue of smokers does not get an adequate blood supply to promote healing, thus smokers are at a much higher risk of developing osteoporosis. Male smokers are also affected because smoking negatively affects the production of bone cells. Women with a smoking history have significantly lower bone density and are much more likely to suffer fractures. Furthermore, their earlier menopause add to the risk of osteoporosis. Studies show that women who use tobacco have a 50% higher risk of osteoporosis than nonsmokers. Smokers also have poorer muscle strength, agility and balance.<br />Daylength<br />Plants don't have any wild parties to mark the winter solstice but they do respond to the length of daylight. The response of plants to the relative length of day and night is called photoperiodism. Plants actually " measure" the duration of darkness rather than of light. Plant response to day light length is caused by changes in a pigment called phytochrome. Phytochrome is a light-sensitive, blue-green pigment. It occurs in plant tissues in minute quantities--about one part in 10 million. The pigment acts as an enzyme in other words, it activates certain processes without itself being used up. During daylight, phytochrome is converted to an active form, and in darkness it is converted to an inactive form. If the active form of phytochrome gets to a specific level for that plant, the enzyme can start changes in the plant. CITATION Mas99 l 1033 (Mason, 1999)<br />Photoperiodism influences many activities in plants including growth, seed germination, flowering, fruit development and the onset of winter dormancy. Some plants need a specific period of daylight in order to flower. Some plants require short days/long nights to flower. Some of our holiday plants such as poinsettias and kalanchoe require a short day/long night to bloom. In plants referred to as short day, their flower bud formation begins when daylight is relatively short about 10 to 12 hours and flowering is suppressed if daylight is longer. Greenhouse growers manipulate light to get the plants to bloom at the prescribed time. <br />Long day/short night plants initiate flower bud formation once they are exposed to relatively long days and short nights, about fourteen hours or more and won't flower if daylight length is shorter. Some of our common vegetables are long day plants such as beet, radish, lettuce, spinach and potatoes. Bulbing in onions is initiated under long days. The amount of daylight required depends on the variety. Some plants don't care about day length to flower and are called day neutral plants. Of course all this plant response may change depending on temperature, humidity and maturity of the plants. <br />The Fight or Flight Response <br />Instinct Rules<br />All animals have a built in survival instinct that has helped ensure that the fittest survive to propagate the species. The slowest wildebeest in the herd is the one that becomes supper for the lions! This instinct is alive and well, and functioning in each and everyone of us.. and our companies. In order to mobilise our bodies to meet the perceived threat, we prepare for either fight or flight (which we choose depends on our natures and our circumstances). Our body begins to close down all extraneous functions, blood is pumped to the main muscles and away from the skin (we go pale) sugar is metabolised by the adrenalin, pupils dilate, digestion stops, skin sweats, breathing becomes shallow … In this state we are only fit for survival. We can’t listen, we can’t be creative we are a victim of this mechanism. CITATION Coo10 l 1033 (Cooke, 2010)<br />Many years ago, when our ancestors lived in caves, their continued existence was utterly dependent on how well they read and responded to danger. Those methods for recognition and response to threat were literally hot-wired into their systems. They have been passed down through generation after generation and underpin the reactions to danger we experience today. The fight or flight response is automatic and by-passes the rational or conscious mind. We do NOT consciously choose to feel threatened or suffer anxiety. It is an instinctive response, happening unconsciously, of its own accord. CITATION Sus06 l 1033 (Dugdale, 2006)<br />Chemical Alert<br />When the response is stimulated at a physiological level, a part of the brain called the hypothalamus sets off a series of actions preparing the body for either battle (facing the danger) or running (escaping the threat).<br />Chemicals such as adrenalin, noradrenalin and cortisol are released into the bloodstream and complex patterns of nerve cell firing occur. The body is put on a state of high alert. The breathing and heart rate quickens. Our muscles are tightened. We become hyper-vigilant and sensitive and our body’s entire focus becomes repelling the threat.<br />Bodily functions deemed non-essential are slowed down as the energy keeping them in optimum functioning condition is temporarily refocused elsewhere. Because you don’t usually stop to either make a speech or grab something to eat while fighting or running for your life, the systems governing digestion or voice are affected. The degree to which we feel challenged directly corresponds to the loss of functioning we experience. The symptoms range from mild to severe accordingly.( http://www.write-out-loud.com/fightorflightresponse.html)<br />References<br /> CITATION Mas99 l 1033 m Mas99(Mason, 1999; Mason, 1999)<br /> CITATION Sus06 l 1033 (Dugdale, 2006)<br /> CITATION Coo10 l 1033 (Cooke, 2010)<br />

×