Business Etiquette in IndiaIndia is a country composed of a multitude of religious cultures coexisting side by side. Thedo...
your host at the end of the meal.            Dont make these mistakes:            1. Putting your hands on your hips is ru...
6. Edit the letter for spelling, grammar, style, tone, and content.                                                     7....
your companys phone; Make sure its done WELLIn a business call, ALWAYS:* Stop whatever else you are doing.* Be upbeat.* Sp...
Print this article1. Shaking Hands      o   Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should...
Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7Y...
1. Shaking Hands         o   Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should             be...
Business Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor                                                     Culture ...
she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the              absence of a handshake, put t...
Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected w...
Time Keeping          o   Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make              ti...
Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected w...
Time Keeping           o   Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make               ...
Sending Emails1. Make sure your e-mail includes a courteous greeting and closing. Helps to make your e-    mail not seem d...
22. Stay away from fancy-schmancy fonts -- only the standard fonts are on all computers.23. Use emoticons sparingly to ens...
46. When forwarding email, if you cannot take the time to type a personal comment to the    person you are forwarding to--...
for CYA or to subtlety tattle can backfire and have your viewed as petty or insecure.66. When replying to an email with mu...
reply was inadvertently deleted or sent to your Trash or Junk folder.   89. With emotionally charged emails, wait until th...
6. Always use a pleasant, congenial and friendly tone.7. Never interrupt the person while he/she is talking to you.8. Neve...
If a tip does not apply to you or your business, I commend you. If even one does, I encourageyou to begin immediately to e...
3. Business Language is often English; be patient when it is not a person’s everyday   language. Do not speak too fast or ...
b. Lunch meetings can last up to 2 hours. They are used to entertain clients or establish          contacts. Be cautious w...
E. Disability EtiquetteThe Americans with Disabilities Act requires employees to make appropriate accommodationsfor disabl...
8. Holidays that are celebrated will vary from country to country; some places close for   vacation time (referred to as “...
Current issues of periodicals or business publications are also an excellent resource. Some ofthe following periodicals ha...
c. Making introductions can be intimidating. Introduce yourself by standing up, smiling,        moving toward the person, ...
C. Business Dining and Entertaining Etiquette   1. Meal Functions can take place at any time during the day.       f.   Br...
d. Inappropriate gifts include questionable items for children (safety, ethics) and          personal items (cologne, perf...
5. Attention to Time takes on new meaning in different cultures; be understanding of   cultural differences so as not to o...
Quible, Zane K. Administrative Office Management – An Introduction. Prentice-Hall, Inc.      Tilton, R., J. Jackson, and S...
Business Etiquette - Presentation Transcript1. Business Etiquette eNotesMba The Best References for MBA2. The Agenda Caree...
introduction.• Immediately introduce that new person to someone else you know.• Jot down theperson’s name17. Exchanging Bu...
abbreviations and emoticons.• Don’t reply to spam• Do not forward chain letters• Do not useemail to discuss confidential i...
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Business etiquette in india

  1. 1. Business Etiquette in IndiaIndia is a country composed of a multitude of religious cultures coexisting side by side. Thedominant religion is Hinduism, but significant numbers of Muslims, Buddhists, Sikhs, Jains, Jews, and Christians also live in India. Onto this religious diversity is grafted a layer of British formality and good manners resulting across the country in a population that is aspolite as it is distinctive. you can expect a great deal of discussion the pleasure most Indians take in bargaining and you have the markings for some long business meetings. Meeting and GreetingIn general, Indians are formal upon first meeting. Elders are respected and differed to manysituations, business ones included. Caste rankings still play a role with a wide variety ofsocial and business interactions, although theyre not as pervasive as they previously were.You may see an Indian bow slightly to another - that is either a show of respect for age or ashow of respect for age or a show of respect for someone higher in rank. Names and TitlesUse last names upon meeting someone for the first time and mention any higher academic orother titles. Business AttireIndia is hot and the clothing is casual. Suits are rarely seen, although a light jacket with ashirt and pants is standard outfit for businessmen. Women wear slacks and a jacket or longdresses. Dining and EntertainingBusiness lunches are common in India, and its perfectly appropriate to discuss business atlunch. Dinners at Indian homes are bounteous and delicious. Its rude to show up on time butyou shouldnt be more than half an hour late either. When you eat, do so without using yourleft hand. As in Muslim countries the left hand is symbolically unclean. And dont thank
  2. 2. your host at the end of the meal. Dont make these mistakes: 1. Putting your hands on your hips is rude. 2. Touching someone with your foot is rude, as is pointing with your foot. Business Cards Business cards are presented without a great deal of ceremony. But present your card with your right hand.E-mail EtiquetteHere are some realistic mistakes that people make when using e-mail:1. Forgetting the rules of spelling and grammar. Perhaps of the sheer volume of e-mails we send, they tend to bevery informal medium. Informally, however does not mean sloppiness.2. Omitting a greeting and/or closing.3. Using ALL CAPITALS. For one, capitals are harder to read than regular text. In addition, addition many peopletheir usage as the equivalent of yelling.4. Sending a message to too many people. Does everyone on your project team need to see the details of settingup a conference room for next Thursday?5. Also double-check the list of recipients for your e-mail-specially if it says something potentially negative. Business Letters When composing business letters Keep the following in mind: 1. Use high-quality paper with at least 25% cotton rag content. 2. Never send a letter written in anger unless youve waited 24 hours to review it. 3. Plan your correspondence before writing it-know what you want to say and in what order you want to say it. 4. Compose your correspondence after planning it - use direct, active language, vary your sentence structure, adopt a moderate, friendly, tone, and give clear directions. 5. Revise the letter after it has been written to take account of any new information.
  3. 3. 6. Edit the letter for spelling, grammar, style, tone, and content. 7. Edit again.MemorandaMemos are written communications within companies or within units within companies. Memos typically makeannouncements, discuss procedures, report on company activities, and disseminate employee information.Theyre informal and public. If you have something confidential to communicate, dont do it in a memo.All memos are structured similarly. They have:1. An addressee - flush left, in capital letters, near the top of the page2. The sender - flush left, in caps, immediately below the addressee3. Date - Flush Left, in caps, immediately below the sender4. Subject - Flush left, in caps, immediately below the dateTelephone MannersNow for some basic telephone manners:* First of all, prepare for the phone call before you make it.* Have a good idea of what you are going to talk about.* Make notes if necessary.When you call someone, introduce yourself RIGHT AWAYFirst, you should say a greeting.Second, identify yourself and your affiliation.Third, ask for the person to whom you would like to speak.Exercise patience on the phone and let other people finish their sentence.Speak clearly so you are not misunderstood.NEVER eat, drink, or chew gum while on the phone doing business.The first contact a potential client and/or customer typically has with your company is when someone answers
  4. 4. your companys phone; Make sure its done WELLIn a business call, ALWAYS:* Stop whatever else you are doing.* Be upbeat.* Speak clearly into the receiver.Business Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected when conducting business. If youignore these rules, you could offend your Indian counterparts, preventing important businessdeals from being signed. Business in India is generally more informal compared to other areas inAsia, such as China and Japan. However, simple actions, such as using your left hand, can beseen as highly offensive.Other People Are Reading India Business Practice & Business Etiquette Tips Business Meeting Etiquette in India
  5. 5. Print this article1. Shaking Hands o Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should be short and light, not firm. However, you should only shake a womans hand if she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the absence of a handshake, put the palms of both hands together under the chin and lean forward slightly in a bow while saying "namaste." Time Keeping o Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make time keeping difficult. To avoid getting frustrated make sure you leave a lot of time in your schedule for a meeting or appointment and try and fix meetings with a margin such as 11 a.m. to noon instead of just 11. Many times, government officials will deliberately keep you waiting in order to show their priority. o Sponsored Links  Powerpoint Presentations Find Your Friend on Facebook. Sign Up Now! www.Facebook.com Meetings o It is polite to begin meetings with small talk before discussing business matters. Hosts generally offer their visitors drinks (typically tea) and snack food such as cookies or crackers during the meeting, and it is polite and a sign of respect to accept this offer regardless of whether you are hungry or not. However, be sure to leave something on the plate. If it is empty, Indians take it as a sign you want more, and the plate will be refilled. Do not eat with your left hand. Indians look at this as your toilet hand and consider it unclean. Business Cards o Unlike in China or Japan, the system of giving and receiving business cards in India is very informal. Business cards are normally written in English, and it is not expected for them to be translated into local languages. You do not have to admire the card, but can put it straight in your pocket. Once again, though, do not use your left hand.
  6. 6. Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7YrsABusiness Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected when conducting business. If youignore these rules, you could offend your Indian counterparts, preventing important businessdeals from being signed. Business in India is generally more informal compared to other areas inAsia, such as China and Japan. However, simple actions, such as using your left hand, can beseen as highly offensive.Other People Are Reading India Business Practice & Business Etiquette Tips Business Meeting Etiquette in India Print this article
  7. 7. 1. Shaking Hands o Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should be short and light, not firm. However, you should only shake a womans hand if she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the absence of a handshake, put the palms of both hands together under the chin and lean forward slightly in a bow while saying "namaste." Time Keeping o Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make time keeping difficult. To avoid getting frustrated make sure you leave a lot of time in your schedule for a meeting or appointment and try and fix meetings with a margin such as 11 a.m. to noon instead of just 11. Many times, government officials will deliberately keep you waiting in order to show their priority. o Sponsored Links  Powerpoint Presentations Find Your Friend on Facebook. Sign Up Now! www.Facebook.com Meetings o It is polite to begin meetings with small talk before discussing business matters. Hosts generally offer their visitors drinks (typically tea) and snack food such as cookies or crackers during the meeting, and it is polite and a sign of respect to accept this offer regardless of whether you are hungry or not. However, be sure to leave something on the plate. If it is empty, Indians take it as a sign you want more, and the plate will be refilled. Do not eat with your left hand. Indians look at this as your toilet hand and consider it unclean. Business Cards o Unlike in China or Japan, the system of giving and receiving business cards in India is very informal. Business cards are normally written in English, and it is not expected for them to be translated into local languages. You do not have to admire the card, but can put it straight in your pocket. Once again, though, do not use your left hand.Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7YrsA
  8. 8. Business Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected when conducting business. If youignore these rules, you could offend your Indian counterparts, preventing important businessdeals from being signed. Business in India is generally more informal compared to other areas inAsia, such as China and Japan. However, simple actions, such as using your left hand, can beseen as highly offensive.Other People Are Reading India Business Practice & Business Etiquette Tips Business Meeting Etiquette in India Print this article 1. Shaking Hands o Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should be short and light, not firm. However, you should only shake a womans hand if
  9. 9. she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the absence of a handshake, put the palms of both hands together under the chin and lean forward slightly in a bow while saying "namaste." Time Keeping o Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make time keeping difficult. To avoid getting frustrated make sure you leave a lot of time in your schedule for a meeting or appointment and try and fix meetings with a margin such as 11 a.m. to noon instead of just 11. Many times, government officials will deliberately keep you waiting in order to show their priority. o Sponsored Links  Powerpoint Presentations Find Your Friend on Facebook. Sign Up Now! www.Facebook.com Meetings o It is polite to begin meetings with small talk before discussing business matters. Hosts generally offer their visitors drinks (typically tea) and snack food such as cookies or crackers during the meeting, and it is polite and a sign of respect to accept this offer regardless of whether you are hungry or not. However, be sure to leave something on the plate. If it is empty, Indians take it as a sign you want more, and the plate will be refilled. Do not eat with your left hand. Indians look at this as your toilet hand and consider it unclean. Business Cards o Unlike in China or Japan, the system of giving and receiving business cards in India is very informal. Business cards are normally written in English, and it is not expected for them to be translated into local languages. You do not have to admire the card, but can put it straight in your pocket. Once again, though, do not use your left hand.Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7YrsABusiness Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor
  10. 10. Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected when conducting business. If youignore these rules, you could offend your Indian counterparts, preventing important businessdeals from being signed. Business in India is generally more informal compared to other areas inAsia, such as China and Japan. However, simple actions, such as using your left hand, can beseen as highly offensive.Other People Are Reading India Business Practice & Business Etiquette Tips Business Meeting Etiquette in India Print this article 1. Shaking Hands o Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should be short and light, not firm. However, you should only shake a womans hand if she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the absence of a handshake, put the palms of both hands together under the chin and lean forward slightly in a bow while saying "namaste."
  11. 11. Time Keeping o Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make time keeping difficult. To avoid getting frustrated make sure you leave a lot of time in your schedule for a meeting or appointment and try and fix meetings with a margin such as 11 a.m. to noon instead of just 11. Many times, government officials will deliberately keep you waiting in order to show their priority. o Sponsored Links  Powerpoint Presentations Find Your Friend on Facebook. Sign Up Now! www.Facebook.com Meetings o It is polite to begin meetings with small talk before discussing business matters. Hosts generally offer their visitors drinks (typically tea) and snack food such as cookies or crackers during the meeting, and it is polite and a sign of respect to accept this offer regardless of whether you are hungry or not. However, be sure to leave something on the plate. If it is empty, Indians take it as a sign you want more, and the plate will be refilled. Do not eat with your left hand. Indians look at this as your toilet hand and consider it unclean. Business Cards o Unlike in China or Japan, the system of giving and receiving business cards in India is very informal. Business cards are normally written in English, and it is not expected for them to be translated into local languages. You do not have to admire the card, but can put it straight in your pocket. Once again, though, do not use your left hand.Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7YrsABusiness Etiquette in IndiaBy RachelBennett, eHow Contributor
  12. 12. Culture needs to be respected whenconducting business in India.India has strong cultural norms that need to be respected when conducting business. If youignore these rules, you could offend your Indian counterparts, preventing important businessdeals from being signed. Business in India is generally more informal compared to other areas inAsia, such as China and Japan. However, simple actions, such as using your left hand, can beseen as highly offensive.Other People Are Reading India Business Practice & Business Etiquette Tips Business Meeting Etiquette in India Print this article 1. Shaking Hands o Handshakes should be given between men at the start of a meeting. These should be short and light, not firm. However, you should only shake a womans hand if she offers it herself; otherwise, it is seen as predatory and offensive. In the absence of a handshake, put the palms of both hands together under the chin and lean forward slightly in a bow while saying "namaste."
  13. 13. Time Keeping o Punctuality is not a priority in Indian culture, and traffic problems often make time keeping difficult. To avoid getting frustrated make sure you leave a lot of time in your schedule for a meeting or appointment and try and fix meetings with a margin such as 11 a.m. to noon instead of just 11. Many times, government officials will deliberately keep you waiting in order to show their priority. o Sponsored Links  Powerpoint Presentations Find Your Friend on Facebook. Sign Up Now! www.Facebook.com Meetings o It is polite to begin meetings with small talk before discussing business matters. Hosts generally offer their visitors drinks (typically tea) and snack food such as cookies or crackers during the meeting, and it is polite and a sign of respect to accept this offer regardless of whether you are hungry or not. However, be sure to leave something on the plate. If it is empty, Indians take it as a sign you want more, and the plate will be refilled. Do not eat with your left hand. Indians look at this as your toilet hand and consider it unclean. Business Cards o Unlike in China or Japan, the system of giving and receiving business cards in India is very informal. Business cards are normally written in English, and it is not expected for them to be translated into local languages. You do not have to admire the card, but can put it straight in your pocket. Once again, though, do not use your left hand.Read more: Business Etiquette in India |eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/about_6588381_business-etiquette-india.html#ixzz2APl7YrsA 101 Email Etiquette TipsIt is important that whether for business or personal use that you follow the basics of emailetiquette. This document covers for you the top tips for email etiquette that everyone needs to beaware of and follow. By doing so you will be a joy to communicate with while being perceivedas a caring and intelligent human being.
  14. 14. Sending Emails1. Make sure your e-mail includes a courteous greeting and closing. Helps to make your e- mail not seem demanding or terse.2. Address your contact with the appropriate level of formality and make sure you spelled their name correctly.3. Spell check - emails with typos are simply not taken as seriously.4. Read your email out loud to ensure the tone is that which you desire. Try to avoid relying on formatting for emphasis; rather choose the words that reflect your meaning instead. A few additions of the words "please" and "thank you" go a long way!5. Be sure you are including all relevant details or information necessary to understand your request or point of view. Generalities can many times causing confusion and unnecessary back and forths.6. Are you using proper sentence structure? First word capitalized with appropriate punctuation? Multiple instances of !!!or ???are perceived as rude or condescending.7. If your email is emotionally charged, walk away from the computer and wait to reply. Review the Senders email again so that you are sure you are not reading anything into the email that simply isnt there.8. If sending attachments, did you ask first when would be the best time to send? Did you check file size to make sure you dont fill the other sides inbox causing all subsequent e- mail to bounce?9. Refrain from using the Reply to All feature to give your opinion to those who may not be interested. In most cases replying to the Sender alone is your best course of action.10. Make one last check that the address or addresses in the To: field are those you wish to send your reply to.11. Be sure your name is reflected properly in the From: field. Jane A. Doe (not jane, jane doe or JANE DOE).12. Type in complete sentences. To type random phrases or cryptic thoughts does not lend to clear communication.13. Never assume the intent of an email. If you are not sure -- ask so as to avoid unnecessary misunderstandings.14. Just because someone doesnt ask for a response doesnt mean you ignore them. Always acknowledge emails from those you know in a timely manner.15. Be sure the Subject: field accurately reflects the content of your email.16. Dont hesitate to say thank you, how are you, or appreciate your help!17. Keep emails brief and to the point. Save long conversations for the old fashioned telephone.18. Always end your emails with "Thank you," "Sincerely," "Take it easy," "Best regards" - something! Formatting Emails19. Do not type in all caps. Thats yelling or reflects shouting emphasis.20. If you bold your type, know you are bolding your statement and it will be taken that way by the other side - X10!21. Do not use patterned backgrounds. Makes your email harder to read.
  15. 15. 22. Stay away from fancy-schmancy fonts -- only the standard fonts are on all computers.23. Use emoticons sparingly to ensure your tone and intent are clear.24. Typing your emails in all small case gives the perception of lack of education or laziness.25. Refrain from using multiple font colors in one email. It makes your email harder to view and can add to your intent being misinterpreted.26. Use formatting sparingly. Instead try to rely on choosing the most accurate words possible to reflect your tone and avoid misunderstandings in the process. Email Attachments27. When sending large attachments, always "zip" or compress them before sending.28. Never send large attachments without notice! Always ask what would be the best time to send them first.29. Learn how to resample or resize graphics to about 600 pixels in width before attaching them to an email. This will greatly reduce download time.30. Never open an attachment from someone you dont know.31. Be sure your virus, adware and spyware programs are up to date and include scanning of your emails and attachments both incoming and outgoing.32. It is better to spread multiple attachments over several emails rather than attaching them all to one email to avoid clogging the pipeline.33. Make sure the other side has the same software as you before sending attachments or they may not be able to open your attachment. Use PDF when possible. To, From, CC, BCc, RR, Subject:34. Only use Cc: when it is important for those you Cc: to know about the contents of the email. Overuse can cause your emails to be ignored.35. Dont use Return Receipt (RR) on every single email. Doing so is viewed as intrusive, annoying and can be declined by the other side anyway.36. Include addresses in the To: field for those who you would like a response from.37. Include addresses in the Cc: field for those who you are just FYIing.38. Make sure your name is displayed properly in the From: field.39. Remove addresses from the To:, CC; and BCc: field that dont need to see your reply.40. Always include a brief Subject. No subject can get your email flagged as spam.41. Think about your motives when adding addresses to To:, CC:, BCc. Use your discretion.42. Never expose your friends or contacts email address to strangers by listing them all in the To: field. Use BCc:!43. Make sure when using BCc: that your intentions are proper. To send BCc:copies to others as a way of talking behind someones back is inconsiderate. Email Forwarding44. Dont forward emails that say to do so--no matter how noble the cause may be. Most are hoaxes or hooey and may not be appreciated by those you send to.45. If someone asks you to refrain from forwarding emails they have that right and you shouldnt get mad or take it personally.
  16. 16. 46. When forwarding email, if you cannot take the time to type a personal comment to the person you are forwarding to--then dont bother.47. Dont forward anything without editing out all the forwarding >>>>, other email addresses, headers and commentary from all the other forwarders.48. If you must forward to more than one person, put your email address in the TO: field and all the others you are sending to in the BCc: field to protect their email address from being published to those they do not know. This is a serious privacy issue!49. Be careful when forwarding email on political or controversial issues. The recipient may not appreciate your POV. Email and Perception, Privacy, Copyright50. Choose your email address wisely. It will determine, in part, how you are perceived.51. Try not to make assumptions when it comes to email. Always ask for clarification before you react.52. Posting or forwarding of private email is copyright infringement -- not to mention downright rude. You need permission from the author first!53. Even though it isnt right; emails are forwarded to others. Keep this in mind when typing about emotional or controversial topics.54. When there is a misunderstanding by email, dont hesitate to pick up the old fashioned telephone to work things out!55. Know that how you type, and the efforts you make or dont make will indicate what is important to you and if you are an educated courteous person.56. If you forward an email that turns out to be a hoax, have the maturity to send an apology follow up email to those you sent the misinformation to.57. When filling out a contact form on a Web site, do so carefully and with clarity so your request is taken seriously.58. If a friend puts your e-mail address in the To: field with others you do not know, ask them to no longer expose your address to strangers without your permission. Business Email59. Think of your business email as though it was on your business letterhead and youll never go wrong!60. If you cannot respond to an email promptly, at the very least email back confirming your receipt and when the sender can expect your response.61. Emailing site owners about your product or service through the site form is still spam. Ask them if they want more info first!62. When replying to emails always respond promptly and edit out unnecessary information from the post you are responding to.63. Formality is in place as a courtesy and reflects respect. Assume the highest level of formality with new email contacts until the relationship dictates otherwise. Refrain from getting too informal too soon in your email communications.64. Never send anyone an email they need to unsubscribe from when they didnt subscribe in the first place!65. Be very careful how you use Reply to All and Cc: in a business environment. Doing so
  17. 17. for CYA or to subtlety tattle can backfire and have your viewed as petty or insecure.66. When replying to an email with multiple recipients noted in the To: or Cc: fields, remove the addresses of those who your reply does not apply to.67. Never send business attachments outside of business hours and confirm that the format in which you can send can be opened by the other side. IM, Blackberry68. With IM and Chat, try not to be overly cryptic or your meaning can be misread.69. Use Instant Messaging (IM) for casual topics or informational briefs. IM is not the place for serious topics or confrontational issues.70. Start by always asking if the person you are IMing is available and if it is a good time to chat. Refrain from IMing during meetings or when your attention is required.71. Practice communicating briefly and succinctly.72. Use IM for casual topics or informational briefs. Serious topics are not for IM.73. IMing is not an excuse to forget your grade school education.74. If you are not a smooth multi-tasker, do not continue multiple IM sessions and leave folks hanging while you communicate with others.75. Learn how to use the features of your IM program. Specifically your "busy" and "away" message features.76. Never IM under an alias to take a peek at friends or associates activities.77. Take into consideration who you are communicating with to determine the acronyms and emoticons that should be used - if at all. Email and Blogs, Forums, Message Boards78. Keep in mind when in newsgroups or message boards that you are in a global arena. Read the charters and rules - before you post.79. When discussions get out of control; dont stoop to name-calling or profanities. You are better than that!80. Keep your signature file to no more than 4-5 lines.81. Keep commercialism to no more than a link at the end of your comment or contribution.82. Stay on topic and discuss issues only relative to the thread/topic in question.83. If new to the message board, "lurk" for awhile to get a feel for the community and personalities of the regulars before you post.84. Never give out personal information or specifics to your location on message boards.85. Keep in mind there will always be differences of opinion. Try to remain objective and not personalize issues.86. Dont fall for trolls. Trolls are folks who will post rude comments just to get a rise out of everyone.87. Be sure to down edit, or remove any part of the post you are replying to that is no longer necessary to the ongoing conversation. Email Considerations...88. Before getting upset because you perceive someone didnt respond, check to see if their
  18. 18. reply was inadvertently deleted or sent to your Trash or Junk folder. 89. With emotionally charged emails, wait until the next morning to see if you feel the same before clicking Send. 90. Feel free to modify the Subject: field to more accurately reflect a conversations direction. 91. When it comes to your email communications, know who you can trust; trust only those you know. 92. Take the time to review each email before clicking Send to ensure your message is clear and you are relaying the tone that you desire. 93. Never use an old email to hit reply and start typing about an entirely new topic. 94. Regardless of how noble a forwarded email may be, dont just forward without investigating its authenticity @ Snopes.com. 95. Always add the email addresses of Web sites and new contacts immediately to your approved senders or address book so they get through Spam filters. 96. Before completing a Web sites Contact form; make an effort to review the site to be sure the information you seek is not already available. 97. Take a quick look at the e-mails in your Trash before you delete them just in case a good e-mail landed there by mistake. 98. If any email states to forward to all your friends, or just 5 people -- do everyone a favor and just hit delete! 99. Dont mass e-mail people who didnt ask to be on your personal "mailing list". 100. Double check that your adware, spyware and virus programs are set to automatically update at least once each week so the software knows what to protect you from. 101. And finally... Type unto others as you would have them type unto you!20 Business Telephone Etiquette Tipsby Avis WardSome very useful tips for telephone customer service..20 Telephone Etiquette Tips for Customer Service1. Make sure you speak clearly and are smiling as you answer the phone; also identify yourself.2. Before placing a caller on hold, ask their permission first and thank them.3. It is better to return a call than to keep someone on hold too long. If the phone rings back toyou, youve kept them on hold too long.4. Do not forget to return the call as you promised.5. Do not permit the phone to ring into the office more than three times.
  19. 19. 6. Always use a pleasant, congenial and friendly tone.7. Never interrupt the person while he/she is talking to you.8. Never engage in an argument with a caller.9. Do not handle an unhappy callers concern openly at the checkin/checkout desk.10. Do not make it a habit of receiving personal calls at work.11. Do not answer the phone if you are eating or chewing gum.12. Do not give the impression that you are rushed. It is better to return the call when you cangive the person the time they need to handle the reason for their call.13. Learn how to handle several callers simultaneously with ease and grace.14. Return calls promptly that have been left on voice mail and ansafones.15. Always get the best number (and an alternate) and the best time to have a call returned to thecaller, especially if a manager or another team member must return the call.16. Do not ever leave a message with someone else or on an ansafone or voice mail regardingdetails of a delinquent account. Instead, leave a message asking the person to call the"Accounting Department."17. Always make collection calls in private and away from the patient flow or public areas.18. If possible, provide a telephone for patients/customers/clients to use. An area providingprivacy is preferred.19. Do not call a patient, customer or clients home before 8:00AM or after 9:00PM, unlesstheyve given you permission to do so.20. When hanging up the phone, make sure the caller or person called hangs up first if the phoneis slammed on the receiver. Otherwise, always hang up the phone, gently.I recommend a remote, handless headset for the business staff. They are wonderful. This willsolve hanging up as you push release on the headset to hang up the phone. Also, it does not tieyour staff to their desk. The team member checking on insurance really appreciates this device.(The phone can also be answered if away from your desk.)Contact me if youd like to know the make and model of the remote, handless headsetrecommended. I am not asserting this list answers (no pun intended) all of the issues surroundingexcellent telephone skills but its a very good start.
  20. 20. If a tip does not apply to you or your business, I commend you. If even one does, I encourageyou to begin immediately to eliminate it.About the AuthorAvis Ward is a Consultant to dental healthcare professionals in Practice Managementspecializing in Case Acceptance and Marketing. More information can be found here:http://aviswardconsulting.com. Chapter 12: Business Etiquette OverviewMastering business etiquette is critical for success in today’s work environment. This chaptercovers a variety of aspects of business etiquette that are important in multiple work situations.Many of the items may seem to be common courtesy and politeness, but that just means thatyou are practicing good etiquette already. Lecture NotesA. Conducting BusinessA professional image begins with professionalism, which includes the way one dresses anddeals with others. 1. Business Attire is the way you dress for business. Some companies have specific policies, while others are more general. a. Personal appearance should be neat, clean, and professional. b. Conservative business attire means the men wear suits and ties and women wear suits or dresses. c. Casual business attire does not mean jeans and sneakers; it may include slacks and a sweater or other type of top. d. Use of jewelry may interfere with your appearance on the job if it is obtrusive in any way, but wearing conservative jewelry will meet approval. 2. Introductions and Greetings are important to make people feel comfortable in your organization. a. Making introductions can be intimidating. Introduce yourself by standing up, smiling, moving toward the person, and extending your right hand for a handshake. A couple of tips include: a lesser-ranked individual should introduce a higher-ranked person; use courtesy titles in introductions; ask politely how to pronounce difficult names. b. A greeting often includes a handshake; it is an acceptable physical greeting and should be firm, but not overpowering. Look at the name tag as you shake hands.
  21. 21. 3. Business Language is often English; be patient when it is not a person’s everyday language. Do not speak too fast or loudly, and avoid slang or jargon. 4. Business Networking requires that you circulate among people and introduce yourself. It is an opportunity to learn about each person you meet; you may make some long-lasting business relationships. 5. Business Cards provide contact information about you. They should be attached to reports/documents or gifts sent to a business associate. a. Present business cards at the end of a conversation or introduction; be courteous and tactful. Review the tips listed on p. 396 of the text. b. When receiving a business card, look at it and then the person to make a connection between the name and face later.B. Workplace Etiquette 1. Greeting Co-workers in passing is courteous; it is rude not to greet others when you enter an office. It is important to use acceptable terms and speak in terms acceptable to the company culture. 2. Sharing Recognition with others on a team project is important; you shouldn’t ever take credit for work done by others. 3. Respecting Personal Space a. As a guest, respect the other person’s privacy. As you enter the office, don’t take over their desk area with your belongings. To respect the other person’s time, make an appointment and be punctual. b. As a host, greet the visitor and make him or her feel welcome. If you are busy when the visitor arrives, have someone else escort the person to the meeting place. Escort a visitor out of the office when the meeting is over. c. As a co-worker, show respect and courtesy, use “please” and “thank you.” Respect the effort and concentration of others; do not interrupt them or enter an office with the door closed. Keep your work area neat. 4. Communication Etiquette is important because of the enormous amount of each work day that is spent communicating (verbally or in writing). a. Telephone etiquette should demonstrate courtesy; it is obvious to the person on the other end of the phone. Review the tips presented on p. 399 of the text. b. Electronic communication should be used effectively; modes of communication include cellular phones, e-mail, and fax. Specific tips for each type can be found in the text on pp. 400-402. c. Business meetings allow you to make a positive impression; watch what is said and the nonverbal communication as well. Review the tips offered on p. 403 of the text.C. Business Dining and Entertaining Etiquette 1. Meal Functions can take place at any time during the day. a. Breakfast is for urgent meetings, reviewing an event, or convenience of the participants; it usually lasts between 45 minutes and 1 hour.
  22. 22. b. Lunch meetings can last up to 2 hours. They are used to entertain clients or establish contacts. Be cautious with alcohol; some companies forbid consumption during work hours. Usually, the meeting begins once an appetizer is served. c. Afternoon tea is a new “power” meal used to get better acquainted with someone. It can be considered a healthy alternative to cocktail hour. d. Business dinners develop and solidify existing relationships. Allow 2 hours for the meeting, which may begin before the second drink arrives. Dinner should not be the first meeting with a client, unless he or she is from out of town. e. Business brunch might be for out-of-town contacts. 2. Paying the Bill should be the responsibility of the organization that benefits from the business association – if you invite the client, you pay. a. Arranging payment with the manager ahead of time assures that a bill is not brought to the table. b. Extending an invitation means that you should pay; emphasize the company is paying if it appears awkward (a female hosting a male client). c. Receiving an invitation to a private club is a sign that you shouldn’t pay; reciprocate with an invitation at a later time. 3. Tipping Practices are based on good service. a. An acceptable gratuity for good service in the U.S. is about a 15% tip. b. Added service charge may be required for larger groups at some restaurants. 4. Dining Etiquette says that you should arrive promptly at the invited time; a few minutes late is acceptable if there is a cocktail period. a. Place settings are complete; work toward the plate with the silverware. It might be helpful to draw a diagram of a place setting or bring in utensils to demonstrate. b. Eating the meal should begin when two people to your left and right have been served. Pass to the right, offer items to your immediate left. Some foods are “finger foods.” Review the list on p. 406, understand that the list may vary depending on culture. The best rule of thumb is to follow the example set by the host.D. Giving and Receiving GiftsThis is an important part of doing business within the U.S. and internationally. It is veryimportant that you research what is acceptable in other cultures before offering gifts. 1. Giving Gifts is considered a thoughtful gesture. a. Appropriate gifts include holidays, after a transaction has taken place, visiting an associate’s home, lunch or dinner out. Present them at appropriate times. Gifts are usually opened immediately and shown to those that are there. b. Inappropriate gifts include questionable items for children (safety, ethics) and personal items (cologne, perfume, lingerie). 2. Receiving Gifts should be done gracefully. Be sure to acknowledge gifts you receive with a thank-you note.
  23. 23. E. Disability EtiquetteThe Americans with Disabilities Act requires employees to make appropriate accommodationsfor disabled personnel, but there are other issues that fellow employees should be aware of. 1. Practical Tips for Working with Disabled relate to showing respect and behaving in a natural way. Some tips include (others are on p. 409): Wait for acceptance when offering assistance Speak directly to the person, not to an assistant Offer to shake hands, identify yourself when you meet someone Treat adults as adults Don’t interfere with a wheel chair or guide dog Speak and listen carefully 2. Etiquette for the Disabled can make it easier to accommodate individual differences. a. Wheelchair etiquette includes viewing the wheelchair as an extension of the person using it; respect their personal space. Additional tips are found on pp. 409-410 of the text. b. Visual impairment etiquette varies depending on the impairment. That can range from partial sight to complete blindness. Offer assistance if you think it might be helpful to the person. Additional tips are found on p. 410 of the text. c. Hearing loss etiquette should be practiced regularly; hearing loss is very common today. Be observant and accommodate as necessary. Additional tips are found on pp. 410-411 of the text. d. Developmental disability etiquette requires patience and understanding in the work place; the same standards should be set for everyone. Additional tips are found on p. 411 of the text.F. International EtiquetteWith the extent of global business, it is important to be aware of international etiquette beforeembarking on such a situation. Research may be required to be sure everyone is behaving in away that doesn’t offend anyone. 1. Eliminate Stereotypes, they are generalizations that may not be true. Research cultures to learn about them before the meeting. 2. Greeting Business Associates with an acceptable gesture is important; research will help you make a good choice between a handshake, bow, or eye contact. 3. Building Relationships before conducting business is especially important when working with associates from outside the U.S. 4. Language may be a barrier, but it can be overcome by paying special attention to the words that are used. Also, watch use of nonverbal cues and gestures. 5. Attention to Time takes on new meaning in different cultures; be understanding of cultural differences so as not to offend anyone. 6. Personal Space varies from culture to culture; touch is also viewed differently. Be careful to respect everyone’s personal space. 7. Working Schedules and break times will vary. The number of hours worked in a day and the start/end times will depend on the culture.
  24. 24. 8. Holidays that are celebrated will vary from country to country; some places close for vacation time (referred to as “holiday”). 9. Food Customs vary in a lot of ways. Main meal time varies and foods of choice will vary. a. Differences in foods will change from country to country (or region to region). It is very important to choose food items that everyone will enjoy. b. Rules of etiquette should be considered when you are served unfamiliar foods. Don’t ask about a food, taste it Politely refuse what you don’t want Don’t offend the host c. Religious beliefs may impact foods that are acceptable; be aware and avoid food that would offend them.Emphasize that the key to proper etiquette when working with people from other countries isresearch. With the vast amount of information available on the Internet, that shouldn’t be toodifficult. A little bit of work prior to a meeting can make the difference in the outcome for yourorganization. Additional Resources for StudentsRecommended readings (no texts should be more than two years old): Boone, Louis E. and David L. Kurtz. Contemporary Business Communication. Prentice- Hall, Inc. Bovee, Courtland L. and John V. Thill. Business Communication Today. McGraw-Hill, Inc. Calkins-Fulton, Patsy J. and Joanna D. Hanks. Office Technology and Procedures. South-Western Publishing Co. Certo, Samuel. Supervision Concepts and Skill Building. Irwin/McGraw Hill. Himstreet, William C. and Wayne M. Baty. Business Communication. Kent Publishing Co. Keeling, B. Lewis and Norman F. Kallaus. Administrative Office Management. South- Western Publishing Co. Lesikar, Raymond V. Basic Business Communication. Ober, Scott. Contemporary Business Communication. Oliverio and Pasewark. The Office: Procedures and Technology. South-Western Publishing Co. Quible, Zane K. Administrative Office Management – An Introduction. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Tilton, R., J. Jackson, and S. Rigby. The Electronic Office: Procedures and Administration. South-Western Publishing Co. Wolf, P. and S. Kuiper. Effective Communication in Business.
  25. 25. Current issues of periodicals or business publications are also an excellent resource. Some ofthe following periodicals have an accompanying Web site. Current Periodical Web AddressGregg Reference ManualIAAP Complete Office http://www.iaap-hq.org/products/handbook.htmHandbookModern Office TechnologyOfficePro http://www.iaap-hq.org/officepro/toc.htmThe Office http://www.executiveplanet.comWeb sites for international http://www.geocities.cominformation http://www.odci.gov/cia// http://www.webofculture.com Chapter 12: Business Etiquette OverviewMastering business etiquette is critical for success in today’s work environment. This chaptercovers a variety of aspects of business etiquette that are important in multiple work situations.Many of the items may seem to be common courtesy and politeness, but that just means thatyou are practicing good etiquette already. Lecture NotesA. Conducting BusinessA professional image begins with professionalism, which includes the way one dresses anddeals with others. 1. Business Attire is the way you dress for business. Some companies have specific policies, while others are more general. e. Personal appearance should be neat, clean, and professional. f. Conservative business attire means the men wear suits and ties and women wear suits or dresses. g. Casual business attire does not mean jeans and sneakers; it may include slacks and a sweater or other type of top. h. Use of jewelry may interfere with your appearance on the job if it is obtrusive in any way, but wearing conservative jewelry will meet approval. 2. Introductions and Greetings are important to make people feel comfortable in your organization.
  26. 26. c. Making introductions can be intimidating. Introduce yourself by standing up, smiling, moving toward the person, and extending your right hand for a handshake. A couple of tips include: a lesser-ranked individual should introduce a higher-ranked person; use courtesy titles in introductions; ask politely how to pronounce difficult names. d. A greeting often includes a handshake; it is an acceptable physical greeting and should be firm, but not overpowering. Look at the name tag as you shake hands. 3. Business Language is often English; be patient when it is not a person’s everyday language. Do not speak too fast or loudly, and avoid slang or jargon. 4. Business Networking requires that you circulate among people and introduce yourself. It is an opportunity to learn about each person you meet; you may make some long-lasting business relationships. 5. Business Cards provide contact information about you. They should be attached to reports/documents or gifts sent to a business associate. c. Present business cards at the end of a conversation or introduction; be courteous and tactful. Review the tips listed on p. 396 of the text. d. When receiving a business card, look at it and then the person to make a connection between the name and face later.B. Workplace Etiquette 1. Greeting Co-workers in passing is courteous; it is rude not to greet others when you enter an office. It is important to use acceptable terms and speak in terms acceptable to the company culture. 2. Sharing Recognition with others on a team project is important; you shouldn’t ever take credit for work done by others. 3. Respecting Personal Space d. As a guest, respect the other person’s privacy. As you enter the office, don’t take over their desk area with your belongings. To respect the other person’s time, make an appointment and be punctual. e. As a host, greet the visitor and make him or her feel welcome. If you are busy when the visitor arrives, have someone else escort the person to the meeting place. Escort a visitor out of the office when the meeting is over. f. As a co-worker, show respect and courtesy, use “please” and “thank you.” Respect the effort and concentration of others; do not interrupt them or enter an office with the door closed. Keep your work area neat. 4. Communication Etiquette is important because of the enormous amount of each work day that is spent communicating (verbally or in writing). d. Telephone etiquette should demonstrate courtesy; it is obvious to the person on the other end of the phone. Review the tips presented on p. 399 of the text. e. Electronic communication should be used effectively; modes of communication include cellular phones, e-mail, and fax. Specific tips for each type can be found in the text on pp. 400-402. f. Business meetings allow you to make a positive impression; watch what is said and the nonverbal communication as well. Review the tips offered on p. 403 of the text.
  27. 27. C. Business Dining and Entertaining Etiquette 1. Meal Functions can take place at any time during the day. f. Breakfast is for urgent meetings, reviewing an event, or convenience of the participants; it usually lasts between 45 minutes and 1 hour. g. Lunch meetings can last up to 2 hours. They are used to entertain clients or establish contacts. Be cautious with alcohol; some companies forbid consumption during work hours. Usually, the meeting begins once an appetizer is served. h. Afternoon tea is a new “power” meal used to get better acquainted with someone. It can be considered a healthy alternative to cocktail hour. i. Business dinners develop and solidify existing relationships. Allow 2 hours for the meeting, which may begin before the second drink arrives. Dinner should not be the first meeting with a client, unless he or she is from out of town. j. Business brunch might be for out-of-town contacts. 2. Paying the Bill should be the responsibility of the organization that benefits from the business association – if you invite the client, you pay. d. Arranging payment with the manager ahead of time assures that a bill is not brought to the table. e. Extending an invitation means that you should pay; emphasize the company is paying if it appears awkward (a female hosting a male client). f. Receiving an invitation to a private club is a sign that you shouldn’t pay; reciprocate with an invitation at a later time. 3. Tipping Practices are based on good service. c. An acceptable gratuity for good service in the U.S. is about a 15% tip. d. Added service charge may be required for larger groups at some restaurants. 4. Dining Etiquette says that you should arrive promptly at the invited time; a few minutes late is acceptable if there is a cocktail period. c. Place settings are complete; work toward the plate with the silverware. It might be helpful to draw a diagram of a place setting or bring in utensils to demonstrate. d. Eating the meal should begin when two people to your left and right have been served. Pass to the right, offer items to your immediate left. Some foods are “finger foods.” Review the list on p. 406, understand that the list may vary depending on culture. The best rule of thumb is to follow the example set by the host.D. Giving and Receiving GiftsThis is an important part of doing business within the U.S. and internationally. It is veryimportant that you research what is acceptable in other cultures before offering gifts. 1. Giving Gifts is considered a thoughtful gesture. c. Appropriate gifts include holidays, after a transaction has taken place, visiting an associate’s home, lunch or dinner out. Present them at appropriate times. Gifts are usually opened immediately and shown to those that are there.
  28. 28. d. Inappropriate gifts include questionable items for children (safety, ethics) and personal items (cologne, perfume, lingerie). 2. Receiving Gifts should be done gracefully. Be sure to acknowledge gifts you receive with a thank-you note.E. Disability EtiquetteThe Americans with Disabilities Act requires employees to make appropriate accommodationsfor disabled personnel, but there are other issues that fellow employees should be aware of. 1. Practical Tips for Working with Disabled relate to showing respect and behaving in a natural way. Some tips include (others are on p. 409): Wait for acceptance when offering assistance Speak directly to the person, not to an assistant Offer to shake hands, identify yourself when you meet someone Treat adults as adults Don’t interfere with a wheel chair or guide dog Speak and listen carefully 2. Etiquette for the Disabled can make it easier to accommodate individual differences. e. Wheelchair etiquette includes viewing the wheelchair as an extension of the person using it; respect their personal space. Additional tips are found on pp. 409-410 of the text. f. Visual impairment etiquette varies depending on the impairment. That can range from partial sight to complete blindness. Offer assistance if you think it might be helpful to the person. Additional tips are found on p. 410 of the text. g. Hearing loss etiquette should be practiced regularly; hearing loss is very common today. Be observant and accommodate as necessary. Additional tips are found on pp. 410-411 of the text. h. Developmental disability etiquette requires patience and understanding in the work place; the same standards should be set for everyone. Additional tips are found on p. 411 of the text.F. International EtiquetteWith the extent of global business, it is important to be aware of international etiquette beforeembarking on such a situation. Research may be required to be sure everyone is behaving in away that doesn’t offend anyone. 1. Eliminate Stereotypes, they are generalizations that may not be true. Research cultures to learn about them before the meeting. 2. Greeting Business Associates with an acceptable gesture is important; research will help you make a good choice between a handshake, bow, or eye contact. 3. Building Relationships before conducting business is especially important when working with associates from outside the U.S. 4. Language may be a barrier, but it can be overcome by paying special attention to the words that are used. Also, watch use of nonverbal cues and gestures.
  29. 29. 5. Attention to Time takes on new meaning in different cultures; be understanding of cultural differences so as not to offend anyone. 6. Personal Space varies from culture to culture; touch is also viewed differently. Be careful to respect everyone’s personal space. 7. Working Schedules and break times will vary. The number of hours worked in a day and the start/end times will depend on the culture. 8. Holidays that are celebrated will vary from country to country; some places close for vacation time (referred to as “holiday”). 9. Food Customs vary in a lot of ways. Main meal time varies and foods of choice will vary. d. Differences in foods will change from country to country (or region to region). It is very important to choose food items that everyone will enjoy. e. Rules of etiquette should be considered when you are served unfamiliar foods. Don’t ask about a food, taste it Politely refuse what you don’t want Don’t offend the host f. Religious beliefs may impact foods that are acceptable; be aware and avoid food that would offend them.Emphasize that the key to proper etiquette when working with people from other countries isresearch. With the vast amount of information available on the Internet, that shouldn’t be toodifficult. A little bit of work prior to a meeting can make the difference in the outcome for yourorganization. Additional Resources for StudentsRecommended readings (no texts should be more than two years old): Boone, Louis E. and David L. Kurtz. Contemporary Business Communication. Prentice- Hall, Inc. Bovee, Courtland L. and John V. Thill. Business Communication Today. McGraw-Hill, Inc. Calkins-Fulton, Patsy J. and Joanna D. Hanks. Office Technology and Procedures. South-Western Publishing Co. Certo, Samuel. Supervision Concepts and Skill Building. Irwin/McGraw Hill. Himstreet, William C. and Wayne M. Baty. Business Communication. Kent Publishing Co. Keeling, B. Lewis and Norman F. Kallaus. Administrative Office Management. South- Western Publishing Co. Lesikar, Raymond V. Basic Business Communication. Ober, Scott. Contemporary Business Communication. Oliverio and Pasewark. The Office: Procedures and Technology. South-Western Publishing Co.
  30. 30. Quible, Zane K. Administrative Office Management – An Introduction. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Tilton, R., J. Jackson, and S. Rigby. The Electronic Office: Procedures and Administration. South-Western Publishing Co. Wolf, P. and S. Kuiper. Effective Communication in Business.Current issues of periodicals or business publications are also an excellent resource. Some ofthe following periodicals have an accompanying Web site. Current Periodical Web AddressGregg Reference ManualIAAP Complete Office http://www.iaap-hq.org/products/handbook.htmHandbookModern Office TechnologyOfficePro http://www.iaap-hq.org/officepro/toc.htmThe Office http://www.executiveplanet.comWeb sites for international http://www.geocities.cominformation http://www.odci.gov/cia// http://www.webofculture.comPPT - Business EtiquetteBusiness etiquette is in essence about building relationships with people. In the business world, itis people that influence your success or failure. Etiquette, and in particular business etiquette, issimply a means of maximising your business potential.If you feel comfortable around someone and vice versa, better communication and mutual trustwill develop. This comfort zone is realised through presenting yourself effectively. Businessetiquette helps you achieve this, and eNotesMBA is here to help you develop proper BusinessEtiquette.PPT - Business EtiquetteDownloadView more PowerPoint eNotesMBA
  31. 31. Business Etiquette - Presentation Transcript1. Business Etiquette eNotesMba The Best References for MBA2. The Agenda Career Preparation Handshakes Meeting and greeting Etiquette InterviewingEtiquette Mobile/Telephone Etiquette Office Etiquette3. Career Preparation Why Prepare?It’s a jungle out there….. Competition is strong, and the waywe present ourselves is under closer examination more than ever before.4. Difference Between College and Business College Business• Individual • Teamwork• Tests •Relationships• Quantified • Subjective• Customer • Employee• Objective • Judgments• Written •Verbal• Senior • Trainee5. Types of Handshakes6. The Pull-In7. The Two-Handed Shake8. The Topper9. The Finger Squeeze10. The Bone Crusher11. The Palm Pinch12. The Limp Fish13. The Proper Handshake • Firm, but not bone-crushing • Lasts about 3 seconds • May be"pumped" once or twice from the elbow • Is released after the shake, even if the introductioncontinues • Includes good eye contact with the other person14. Introductions in Business I look upon every day to be lost, in which I do not make a newacquaintance~ Samuel Johnson• Introducing yourself• Introducing others• Responding tointroductions• What to do when you can’t remember names• Secret to remembering names15. Meeting and Greeting• Who introduces who? – Introduce the person with lesser authority tothe person with higher authority, regardless of gender – Highest person of rank is mentionedfirst. Remember: “Big, may I introduce Small.” – A younger person is always introduced to anolder person – It is helpful to include the persons title16. Tricks for remembering names• Repeat the person’s name a few times to yourself afteryou’re introduced.• Use the person’s name immediately in the conversation after an
  32. 32. introduction.• Immediately introduce that new person to someone else you know.• Jot down theperson’s name17. Exchanging Business Cards• Carrying your card and be a giver of cards• Distinguishedbusiness card with updated information.• Neat and clean card ready for distribution in a cardholder.• Presenting your card• Compliment while receiving a card• Set goals for distribution18. Art of grooming• Clothing and accessories suitable for different occasions-footwear ,makeup, hair care, skin care.• Colour palette• Personal hygiene• Dress for the occasion and thetime of the day• Finesse in grooming19. What should I wear? I Don’t Think So !!20. Clothing Tips for Men• Conservative 2-piece dark suit, navy blue or medium to dark gray.•Long sleeved blue or white shirt.• Tie complimenting in color or style• Socks one shade lighterthan trousers• Dark polished shoes and matching belt• Jewelry – No bracelets, earrings or largerings.21. Dress for Success22. Clothing Tips for Women• Cotton Saree/ Dark conservative suit.• White or light colored longsleeved blouse that is not low cut..• Black well polished shoes with 1 to 1½ inch heels.• Limitedconservative jewelry.• Hair neatly tied and off the face.• Simple business makeup.23. Dress for Success24. Body Language Do’s Don’ts Make frequent eye contact Slouch Smile Cross you arms Takenotes Smile Tap your feet Nod frequently Clear your throat Smile repeatedly Keep you hands outof your Bite your lips or nails pocket25. Office Etiquette• Be polite and courteous to colleagues.• Handle the furniture with care.•When offered tea and coffee thank the person and throw the disposable cups in the dustbin.•Take an appointment if you want to meet a senior.• Always allow your boss to complete hisconversation if he is over the phone• Always carry important papers in a folder.26. Don’ts• Don’t hang around the corridor• Don’t smoke in the office premises.• Don’t gossipand criticise people.• Don’t giggle or talk loudly• Don’t spread litter around.• Don’t barge into ameeting lunch or dinner if you are not invited.• Don’t use stationery for personal use27. Email Etiquette• Be concise and to the point• Use proper spelling, grammar and punctuation•Make it personal• Use templates for frequently used responses• Answer swiftly.• Do not attachunnecessary files• Use proper structure and layout.• Do not overuse the high priority option.28. …..Cont• Do not write in capital letter• Do not leave out the message thread.• Read andcompile before you send it.• Do not overuse reply to all• Proper use of Cc, BCC• Take care with
  33. 33. abbreviations and emoticons.• Don’t reply to spam• Do not forward chain letters• Do not useemail to discuss confidential information.29. Interviewing Etiquette30. The Perfect Candidate• A complete application• Personal appearance• Answering questionscompletely• Consistent work attendance• Positive attitude and behavior• Good interpersonalrelations• Completing tasks efficiently31. Pre-Interviewing Courtesies• Acknowledge your acceptance.• Do your homework on thecompany.• Prepare your questions.• Make sure you know how to get to the interview location•Coordinate your wardrobe and portfolio.• Look your best.• Be 10 minutes early.32. The Interview• The Application• The Greetings – the handshake, the names• The Chit –Chat• The Core – the interviewing questions• The Questions - Have your questions ready!• TheClose – What happens next?33. Post Interview• Ask for their Business Card.• Write down important discussion points.• Writea thank you letter.• Follow up with a phone call.34. Mobile etiquette• Use of silent/vibrate mode.• Do not use mobile while driving• Volume andpitch and tone while using• Avoid jazzy ring tones while at work.• Maintain privacy whiletalking• Switch off when asked for.• Avoid multitasking35. Dining with Style and Grace36. Knowing table etiquette will put you at ease.37. Your Basic Place Setting38. Where do I start?39. Good Luck!Any Questions?

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