Data Centre Surgery – Secrets for a Long & Healthy Life<br />
Driving Efficiency through Virtual Reality<br />Stuart Hall<br />
Other Industries<br />
Manufacturing<br />http://www.design-engine.com/competition/graphics/!Kablooe-l.jpg<br />http://test.performancees.com/gea...
Bio-Medical Industry<br />Interactive Models are used extensively in the Medical Industry… <br /><ul><li>Research & Develo...
Training & Education
Medical Device Design
Animation
Illustration
Reduction of Risk…</li></ul>SimBaby™<br />Courtesy of 3DScience.com. <br />
Aerospace Industry<br />Courtesy of http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bleep/pics.html. <br />
3D Design<br />
Multi Disciplinary Coordination<br />
Planning<br />
Analysis<br />
Pipe Analysis<br />DATA CENTRE EUROPE – APRIL 2009<br />
Power Systems Analysis<br /><ul><li>Load Flows
Short Circuit Calculations
Fault Flows
Protection Co-ordination, actual trip time based in the fault flow
Transient Stability</li></li></ul><li>Thermal Analysis<br />DATA CENTRE EUROPE – APRIL 2009<br />
Thermal Transient Analysis<br />
Simulation into Operation<br />
Full System Simulation<br />System Performance Prediction<br /><ul><li>CAPEX & OPEX
PUE
Capacity Planning
Failure Analysis
Emissions
Energy Consumption
Whole Facility or Breakdown </li></li></ul><li>Performance Simulation<br />
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Arup Driving Data Centre Efficiency Through Virtual Reality (Web Version)

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Virtual Reality is used extensively in Data Centre design, but why not during operation? A presentation providing food for thought on this fascinating topic.

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  • To begin we will take a look at other industries that use Virtual Reality in the their work, and see how it compares to the Data Centre industry.
  • Complex 3D models are used within the manufacturing industry produced with software tools such as PTC’sProEngineer or DassaultSystemes’ Catia. These tools enable complex multi-component products to be designed, prototyped and documented. Today most people will carry devices designed in this way on their person.
  • The biomedical industry uses modelling for many purposes including training, and education…The images show:SimBaby, a tool that allows medical staff to practice their emergency skills without risk to a real child.3D Science computer model that provides details anatomical information of the human body for a variety of engineering applications, e.g. prosthetic and apparatus design.
  • Or within the Aerospace industry where pilots in simulators are able to experience emergency situations without risk to their passengers. Something I expect many of us have taken for granted on our journey’s here for this conference.In summary Virtual Reality, 3D Modelling and Simulation are valuable, integral parts of many industries.
  • Now lets turn to the Data Centre industry and see how we use the Virtual World to our advantage.
  • Like the examples shown previously Data Centres are complex entities. 3D design tools make it possible to coordinate the many Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing services.
  • 3D Visualisation &amp; Renderings are powerful throughout the design process. The example shows visualisations used in the planning application for a data centre in the UK. The visualisations were key to gaining permission for this project to advance, convincing the authorities that its presence would not detriment the picturesque rural landscape.
  • The integration of some Physics into the models allows solutions to be engineered to meet design specification.
  • In this example a pipe analysis has been carried out to ensure that appropriate joints and fixings are selected to allow the pipes freedom to move during operation.
  • Electrical Power systems are modelled to predict load-flow, single point failure and transient analysis etc.
  • The equations of motion allow the temperatures and airflows in a Data Centre to be predicted. This allows a cooling system design to be demonstrated to be effective prior to installation.
  • Transient simulations allow the temperatures within the data centre whitespace to be predicted in the event of a power failure, or a transition to generator supply. Useful for ensuring that UPS systems are appropriately defined.
  • Like the aircraft simulator, the analysis tools can also be used to ‘Simulate’ how a data centre will behave in various what-if scenarios without risk to operation.Efficiency, Fault Tolerance, De-risk etc.
  • The thermal analysis show previously can be used for simulation too:Will hotspots occur if the data centre is loaded partially, or if a CRAC unit fails or is switched off for maintenance?How does the layout of equipment influence the temperatures within the space?What if a containment system is fitted?
  • In this real life example hotspots were predicted if a planned equipment installation were to go ahead without additional cooling.Simulations allowed the quantity and position of auxiliary CRAC units to be determined prior to installation. Their implementation prevented overheating in the real facility. The problem was averted.
  • The efficiency of Data Centre’s varies with external ambient, and percentage utilisation. A simulation with Romonet’s DCSim software predicts the DCiE surface plot. This Data Centre shown is particularly efficient at part load.
  • The integration of asset data, with 3D models allows assets to be identified, and visualised in a realistically, whilst providing up-to-date data for any future simulations should they be required.
  • The integration of building documentation means that operation&amp; maintenance manuals are kept up-to-date and are easily found simply by clicking on the devices in a 3D world.
  • The integration of BMS / sensordata, server utilisation data, allows real-time analytics to take place, displayed conveniently in the 3D modelling environment. The picture shows a BMS front end designed for a client to show and log power usage data, and calculate instantaneous PUE.
  • Currently many of the technologies seen are independent, requiring their own modelling and data. Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology offers a means to integrate the different models together, allowing data to be shared where possible.
  • Example: Artra
  • There are some common standards emerging. Some tools are already compatible, others are likely to come on-board.
  • Currently many of the technologies seen are independent, requiring their own modelling and data. Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology offers a means to integrate the different models together, allowing data to be shared where possible.
  • As in the industries we looked at in the beginning we see that the benefits of Virtual Reality to the Data Centre are numerous too. Useful in design, but useful too during the operation of a data centre too.
  • Examples for payback: Allow for a phased installation to take place, allowing plant to be installed ‘just in time’ as it is needed. Reduce the liklihood of human error (as we have seen this is a major cause of downtime). Improve utilisation of assets and release spare capacity.- A small increase in efficiency can easily pay for BIM technology in its first year.
  • Arup Driving Data Centre Efficiency Through Virtual Reality (Web Version)

    1. 1. Data Centre Surgery – Secrets for a Long & Healthy Life<br />
    2. 2. Driving Efficiency through Virtual Reality<br />Stuart Hall<br />
    3. 3. Other Industries<br />
    4. 4. Manufacturing<br />http://www.design-engine.com/competition/graphics/!Kablooe-l.jpg<br />http://test.performancees.com/gearbox.jpg<br />
    5. 5. Bio-Medical Industry<br />Interactive Models are used extensively in the Medical Industry… <br /><ul><li>Research & Development
    6. 6. Training & Education
    7. 7. Medical Device Design
    8. 8. Animation
    9. 9. Illustration
    10. 10. Reduction of Risk…</li></ul>SimBaby™<br />Courtesy of 3DScience.com. <br />
    11. 11. Aerospace Industry<br />Courtesy of http://homepage.ntlworld.com/bleep/pics.html. <br />
    12. 12. 3D Design<br />
    13. 13. Multi Disciplinary Coordination<br />
    14. 14. Planning<br />
    15. 15. Analysis<br />
    16. 16. Pipe Analysis<br />DATA CENTRE EUROPE – APRIL 2009<br />
    17. 17. Power Systems Analysis<br /><ul><li>Load Flows
    18. 18. Short Circuit Calculations
    19. 19. Fault Flows
    20. 20. Protection Co-ordination, actual trip time based in the fault flow
    21. 21. Transient Stability</li></li></ul><li>Thermal Analysis<br />DATA CENTRE EUROPE – APRIL 2009<br />
    22. 22. Thermal Transient Analysis<br />
    23. 23. Simulation into Operation<br />
    24. 24. Full System Simulation<br />System Performance Prediction<br /><ul><li>CAPEX & OPEX
    25. 25. PUE
    26. 26. Capacity Planning
    27. 27. Failure Analysis
    28. 28. Emissions
    29. 29. Energy Consumption
    30. 30. Whole Facility or Breakdown </li></li></ul><li>Performance Simulation<br />
    31. 31. Upgrade Planning<br />
    32. 32. Efficiency (e.g. PUE / DCiE)<br />
    33. 33. Asset Management<br />
    34. 34. Integrated Documentation<br />
    35. 35. BMS & Sensor Reporting<br />Real-time monitoring & integrated metrics<br />
    36. 36. Data Integration<br />
    37. 37. Building Information Modelling (BIM) is the process of generating and managing building data during its life cycle. <br />Typically it uses three-dimensional, real-time, dynamic building modelling software to increase productivity in building design and construction. The process produces the Building Information Model (also abbreviated BIM), which encompasses building geometry, spatial relationships, geographic information, and quantities and properties of building components. <br />Building Information Modelling (BIM)<br />… a 3D model linked to a database of building information<br />
    38. 38. Integration<br /><ul><li>Database</li></ul>Structured Query Language (SQL)<br /><ul><li>Commonly used in the majority of relational DBs
    39. 39. Simple to export & combine data sets
    40. 40. Model Files</li></ul>Industry Foundation Class (IFC)<br /><ul><li>A common 3D model format
    41. 41. Compatible with the majority of BIM & Analysis tools</li></ul>ISO/PAS 16739<br />(international standard pending)<br />
    42. 42. Summary & Conclusions<br />
    43. 43. Benefits<br />KPI<br />Branch Power<br />Record<br />Benchmark<br />Cooling<br />Maintain<br />Cost<br />Power<br />Capacity<br />CO2<br />Efficiency<br />Account-abilility<br /> Document<br /> Single Data Set<br />Traceability<br />Pre-test<br />Operate<br />Energy Use<br />Running Cost<br />Utilisation<br />
    44. 44. Why is this Important?<br /><ul><li>Using Virtual Reality to Design, Analyse, Simulate & Operate:
    45. 45. Reduces over-engineering
    46. 46. Streamlines operation
    47. 47. Reduce costs
    48. 48. Reduces environmental impact
    49. 49. Increases Asset Utilisation
    50. 50. Improve control & maintainability
    51. 51. Reduces risk of human error
    52. 52. Reduces downtime </li></ul>SimBaby™<br />
    53. 53. “Once a new technology rolls over you. If you’re not part of the steam roller you’re part of the road.” <br />Stewart Brand<br />Conclusions<br />Virtual Reality offers a means to improve data centre design operation, performance and efficiency.<br />
    54. 54. Agenda<br />Tiers Before Bed Time<br />Project Delivery<br />Driving Efficiency through Virtual Reality<br />Questions & Discussion<br />
    55. 55. Data Centre Surgery – Secrets for a Long & Healthy Life<br />

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