Ip addressing

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A well detailed powerpoint presentation that covers most of the basic concepts of Ip Addressing

A well detailed powerpoint presentation that covers most of the basic concepts of Ip Addressing

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  • 1. IP Addressing/Subnetting Simplified Brian Sterck May 6, 2005
  • 2. Class A Subnetting Options
  • 3. Class B Subnetting Options
  • 4. Class C Subnetting Options
  • 5. Brain Benders
  • 6. More Tools…
  • 7. Practical Example
  • 8. Do we have enough addresses?
    • How many addresses have been allocated?
    • How many are needed?
  • 9. Address Allocation
    • Total Address Needed:
    • LANs = 14+10+19+23+6+17+14 = 103
    • WANs = 4+4+4+4+4+4 = 24
    • Total = 103 + 24 = 127
  • 10. Understanding IP Requirements
    • Subnetworks on the LAN/WAN need to be issued using perfect powers of 2
    • 2 2 = 4
    • 2 3 = 8
    • 2 4 = 16
    • 2 5 = 32
    • 2 6 = 64
    • 2 7 = 128
  • 11. Scaling Subnets
    • With a requirement of 23 nodes…
    • The next perfect power of 2 that meets this need = 32
    • 2 5 = 32 5 host bits needed
    • Last Octet is then represented as:
      • A.B.C. NNN HHHHH N=Network H=Host
      • 11111111.11111111.11111111. 111 00000
  • 12. Subnetting Examples
    • SubnetMask SubnetMask # Hosts
    • 255.255.255.0 /24 256 (254)
    • 255.255.255.128 /25 128 (126)
    • 255.255.255.192 /26 64 (62)
    • 255.255.255.224 /27 32 (30)
    • 255.255.255.240 /28 16 (14)
    • 255.255.255.248 /29 8 (6)
    • 255.255.255.252 /30 4 (2)
  • 13. Practical Example
  • 14. Address Allocation
    • Total Addresses Needed:
    • LANs = 16+16+32+32+8+32+16 = 152
    • = /28 + /28 + /27 + /27 + /29 + /27 + /28 = 152
    • WANs = 4+4+4+4+4+4 = 24
    • = /30 + /30 + /30 + /30 + /30 + /30 = 24
    • Total = 103 + 52 = 157
  • 15. Reference Points
    • Use numbers, symbols, letters to represent each LAN / WAN link
    • Use some consistent method for assignment
      • Size of Subnetwork
      • Location
      • Zone or Distribution Point
  • 16. Assign Reference Points
  • 17. Subnetting Options
  • 18. Subnetting Options (cont.)
  • 19. VLSM and Routing Protocols
    • Does your routing protocol support varying the length of the subnet mask from one interface to another?
    • Can you re-subnet a subnet differently from one interface to another and still advertise that subnetwork via RIPv1, RIPv2, OSPF, EIGRP, ISIS, BGP?
  • 20. Routing Protocols
    • Supporting VLSM
      • RIP version 2
      • EIGRP
      • OSPF
      • ISIS
    • Not Supporting VLSM
      • IGRP
      • RIP version 1
  • 21. Which Routing Protocols will advertise all Networks correctly?
  • 22. Non-VLSM capable Routing Protocols will work just fine!
  • 23.  
  • 24. Problem!
    • The 192.168.20.0 /24 network gives us:
      • 1 Network
      • 254 Nodes Available for Assignment
    • 13 Subnetworks Required
    • Network Demands range from 4 – 32 nodes per LAN / WAN segment
  • 25. Start Subnetting
  • 26. Subnetting
  • 27. Subnetting
  • 28. Box Diagram Alternate
  • 29. Address Range
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  • 51. Future Expansion Danger
    • Note the three locations with the and
    • If we need to add a network printer or visitor with laptop, the IP addressing scheme will have to be modified.
    • This results in downtime and careful migration planning
    • There must be a better way!
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  • 63. Questions ?