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This double page spread on Kurt Cobain from the punk rock band ‘Nirvana’ represents the band, in my opinion, perfectly. As...
The main image of this article is the same picture of Oli Sykes from the band 'Bring Me The Horizon' as used on the front ...
The background of this article is the same as the modernistic background used on the front cover. Keeping to a house style...
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Double Page Spread

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Transcript of "Double Page Spread"

  1. 2. This double page spread on Kurt Cobain from the punk rock band ‘Nirvana’ represents the band, in my opinion, perfectly. As most people know, Kurt Cobain killed himself in 1994 due to the stress of celebrity life. By using a black and white image of Cobain breaking-down in a corner, this struggle is represented setting the theme of the article. As well as representing Cobain’s down-side, an image of him upside-down playing guitar at a gig represents his crazy punk rock attitude. Before the main article text there is a short taster in a larger font to set the theme of the article. Readers flicking through the magazine will read this short text and if it appeals to them they will read on. The article is written in columns to make it easier to read. The first letter of the article is much larger and much bolder than the rest of the text, it is used as a presentational device to indent the article. The text used is the same sans serif font as used throughout the rest of the magazine, keeping to a house theme that readers associate with the magazine. On the right hand side of the page, three of the main questions the article is aimed at are identified (much like how a pull quote would be used). A reader flicking through the magazine is likely to see the larger, bolder text and read it, luring them into the article. The three picture inserts on the centre of the right hand page relate to aspects of the article. The title of the article is written unevenly, and isn't completely on the page. This fits the them of 'NME's' rebellious style, and also the style of This is put at the end of the text to act as a lure; it will appeal to readers who read this article and enjoyed it as they will want to read more article of a similar context. the article.
  2. 3. The main image of this article is the same picture of Oli Sykes from the band 'Bring Me The Horizon' as used on the front cover. This tells the reader that this is the main article. The image itself could be interpreted as ironic; Oli Sykes is from a death-metal band and therefore you would not associate him with being an angel. The halo above his head (associated with good/angels) conflicts with the tattoo of a skull (associated with evil/death) and emphasises his rocker attitude ironically because there's nothing innocent about him. The black theme of the page represents the bands dark, death-metal music. The large pull quote on the left hand page lures the reader into the article and helps to set a theme. The distorted, sans serif font used for the pull quote and the article title is the same as the font used for the cover lines on the front cover. This keeps up a consistent house style that the audience becomes familiar with and relates the magazine with. The distorted text also represents the gritty metal music the band produce. Before the main body of text there is a bolder and larger section of text summing up what the article is about. If a reader is flicking through the magazine, this short piece of text will stand out from the smaller text and act as a lure. The image of Sykes in the corner of the right hand side looks like it has been cut and paste onto the page, giving a sloppy rebellious appearance. This connotes Oli's wild rebellious side. It also distracts from the seriousness of the main image, giving the article more of a light hearted theme. The first letter of the main body of text is much larger and bolder, and acts as an indent for the main article. The text font and size for the main body of text is the same as used throughout the rest of the magazine, keeping a consistent house style the audience can relate to the magazine.
  3. 4. The background of this article is the same as the modernistic background used on the front cover. Keeping to a house style recognised by an audience. By using this modernistic approach, the band (paramore) look like a new band, which will appeal to an audience wanting to know the latest and most fashionable bands. The top left hand corner reads “New to Q”. This allows a reader who is flicking through the magazine to easily see what the article is about. It is written in the same serif font as the logo of the magazine and is in the same red box, seen on the front cover. Further creating a consistent house style. The picture of the band all pulling faces suggests to the reader the band is fun, and that their music is likewise. This will appeal to readers looking to read about new fun bands. The colours of the bands clothes also help to project the bands 'fun' attitude. Before the main article text there is a slightly larger sentence which reads: “Wholesome pop-punks with special dietary needs”. This is used to lure a reader in who may just be flicking through the magazine; it tells the reader quickly and easily who and what the article is about. The first letter of the main article is large and bold, and acts as an indent. The main article is written in columns to make it easier to read. The title of the article is a serif font, fitting 'Q's' fashionable house style.
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