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GOLD
 
Gold Rush The Australian gold rush started in 1851  New South Wales Six months later, gold was found in Victoria
Edward Hargraves Other great discoveries
Earlier: <ul><li>1814 - Some  CONVICTS  who were employed cutting a road to  Bathurst were rumoured  to have found a quant...
 
Find Gold <ul><li>http://www.sbs.com.au/gold/# </li></ul>
1851
 
<ul><li>Ophir was home to more than 1000 prospectors just four months after Hargraves discovery. Gold fever gripped the na...
 
The rush to the rest of Australia <ul><li>Following the gold rushes of NSW and Victoria, deposits were uncovered throughou...
Arrival of the first Gold Escort
A nation transformed <ul><li>In 1852 alone,  370,000 immigrants  arrived in Australia and the economy of the nation boomed...
 
How to handle? <ul><li>First License </li></ul><ul><li>The first license was  issued in Victoria on September the 21st, 18...
 
The First Commissioner Hardy collecting licences and diggers evading
Commissioner Land <ul><li>He named the place 'Ophir', reported his discovery to the authorities, and was appointed a 'Comm...
Police Guard
Prospector
Diggers <ul><li>T he lives of those who worked the goldfields –  </li></ul><ul><li>Where </li></ul><ul><li>How </li></ul><...
 
 
 
 
 
 
About the work
 
 
 
 
 
Fights
the poetry of Henry Lawson to see how inextricably linked our history and mythology can be <ul><li>The night too quickly p...
Success
1872 Biggest Nuggat ever
Failure
Luck vs Unlucky
Multiculturalism on the goldfields <ul><li>Chinese gold digger starting for work, circa 1860s. </li></ul><ul><li>Australia...
<ul><li>Nonetheless, more than 400 troops and police were sent from Melbourne to crush what remained of the &quot;rebellio...
 
A fictional portrayal entitled  The Taking of the Children  on the recently installed   (1999) Great Australian Clock,  Qu...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apology text Vide o :   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3TZOGpG6cM
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Gold rush stolengeneration_rita_ivett

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  • The camaraderie and &apos; mateship &apos; that developed between diggers on the goldfields is still integral to how we - and others - perceive ourselves as Australians. The diggers&apos; defiance and open disdain of authority during this time is still a dominant theme in any discussion of our history and national identity. Indeed, mateship and defiance of authority have been central to the way our history has been told. Look at Australia&apos;s World War I &apos;diggers&apos; (named after their goldfield predecessors) at Gallipoli and how they have been portrayed: mates in the trenches with a healthy disrespect for their &apos;English superiors&apos;. Even today, nothing evokes more widespread national pride than groups of irreverent Aussie &apos;blokes&apos; beating the English at cricket, or any other sport for that matter! It is this early flowering of a national identity that makes any study of the gold rush days so intriguing. It is also true to say that the idealisation of goldfield life excludes or overlooks the squalor, greed, crime, self-interest and racism that were part and parcel of the times.
  • Transcript of "Gold rush stolengeneration_rita_ivett"

    1. 1. GOLD
    2. 3. Gold Rush The Australian gold rush started in 1851 New South Wales Six months later, gold was found in Victoria
    3. 4. Edward Hargraves Other great discoveries
    4. 5. Earlier: <ul><li>1814 - Some CONVICTS who were employed cutting a road to Bathurst were rumoured to have found a quantity of gold. </li></ul><ul><li>1823, 15 February - The first verified discovery of gold …. Bathurst, New South Wales . </li></ul><ul><li>1825 - A CONVICT flogged in Sydney on suspicion of having stolen gold, which he stated he had discovered in the bush. </li></ul><ul><li>1829 - Mr Jackson Barwise claims he had his attention drawn to gold by a James Ryan. They wrapped the gold up and Mr Barwise took this back to Sydney where he was told to keep quiet or he would be locked up as being insane. This was supposed to be to stop the shepherds running away to find gold. </li></ul><ul><li>1839, April - in the Blue Mountains , New South Wales. </li></ul><ul><li>1844 - Mr T. capture a gang of bushrangers , reported that he had when about 20 miles S.S.W. from Melbourne seen a quartz reef with yellow metal in it, which he was afterwards convinced was gold. </li></ul><ul><li>1848 - Gold specimens found on the spurs of the Pyrenees Mountains , Victoria ; exhibited in the shop window of Mr. Robe, jeweller, Melbourne. </li></ul><ul><li>1848 - Gold found at Mitchells Creek near Wellington NSW on the Nanima squatting run, 1849, 31 January - Gold discovered at the Pyrenees, Port Phillip, by A SHEPHERD . </li></ul><ul><li>1849, January - Thomas Chapman discovered gold at Daisy Hill, Victoria and sold it to Mrs. Brentani, Collins Street, Melbourne, a nugget which weighed 16 ounces. Afraid of the Melbourne authorities, the discoverer bolted to Sydney in the 'Sea-horse'. </li></ul><ul><li>1849 - William Clarke, in Smythesdale, Victoria . </li></ul>
    5. 7. Find Gold <ul><li>http://www.sbs.com.au/gold/# </li></ul>
    6. 8. 1851
    7. 10. <ul><li>Ophir was home to more than 1000 prospectors just four months after Hargraves discovery. Gold fever gripped the nation and the colonial authorities responded by appointing 'Commissioners of Land' to regulate the diggings and collect licence fees for each 'claim'. </li></ul><ul><li>” A complete mental madness appears to have seized almost every member of the community. There has been a universal rush to the diggings. ” Bathurst Free Press </li></ul>
    8. 12. The rush to the rest of Australia <ul><li>Following the gold rushes of NSW and Victoria, deposits were uncovered throughout the land. Only South Australia failed to produce any gold deposits of significance. </li></ul><ul><li>The first discoveries in other States were made in Western Australia in the early 1850s (the rich Kalgoorlie and Coolgardie fields were not found until the 1890s); Queensland in 1853; the Northern Territory in 1865; and Tasmania, at Beaconsfield in 1877. </li></ul>
    9. 13. Arrival of the first Gold Escort
    10. 14. A nation transformed <ul><li>In 1852 alone, 370,000 immigrants arrived in Australia and the economy of the nation boomed. </li></ul><ul><li>The 'rush' was well and truly on. Victoria contributed more than one third of the world's gold output in the 1850s and </li></ul><ul><li>in just two years the State's population had grown from 77,000 to 540,000! </li></ul><ul><li>The number of new arrivals to Australia was greater than the number of convicts who had landed here in the previous seventy years . The total population trebled from 430,000 in 1851 to 1.7 million in 1871 . </li></ul><ul><li>The gold bullion that was shipped to London each year brought a huge flow of imports. The goldfield towns also sparked a huge boost in business investment and stimulated the market for local produce. The economy was expanding and thriving. </li></ul><ul><li>Because so many people were travelling to and from the goldfields, the 1850s also saw the construction of the first railway and the operation of the first telegraphs. </li></ul>
    11. 16. How to handle? <ul><li>First License </li></ul><ul><li>The first license was issued in Victoria on September the 21st, 1851. The number of gold licenses issued in N.S.W., was 12,186, of which 2,094 were issued at the Ophir; 8,637 at the Turon; 1,009 at the Meroo and Louisa Creek; 41 at the Abercrombie; and 405 at Araluen, up to October 31, 1851. </li></ul>
    12. 18. The First Commissioner Hardy collecting licences and diggers evading
    13. 19. Commissioner Land <ul><li>He named the place 'Ophir', reported his discovery to the authorities, and was appointed a 'Commissioner of Land'. He received a reward of £10,000, plus a life pension. </li></ul>
    14. 20. Police Guard
    15. 21. Prospector
    16. 22. Diggers <ul><li>T he lives of those who worked the goldfields – </li></ul><ul><li>Where </li></ul><ul><li>How </li></ul><ul><li>Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Mornings- Evenings </li></ul><ul><li>Other activities </li></ul>
    17. 29. About the work
    18. 35. Fights
    19. 36. the poetry of Henry Lawson to see how inextricably linked our history and mythology can be <ul><li>The night too quickly passes And we are growing old, So let us fill our glasses And toast the Days of Gold; When finds of wondrous treasure Set all the South ablaze, And you and I were faithful mates All through the roaring days. Henry Lawson, The Roaring Days , 1889 </li></ul>
    20. 37. Success
    21. 38. 1872 Biggest Nuggat ever
    22. 39. Failure
    23. 40. Luck vs Unlucky
    24. 41. Multiculturalism on the goldfields <ul><li>Chinese gold digger starting for work, circa 1860s. </li></ul><ul><li>Australia attracted adventurers from all around the world. The majority of these new arrivals were British but also included Americans, French, Italian, German, Polish and Hungarian exiles. The largest foreign contingent on the goldfields was the 40,000 Chinese who made their way to Australia. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1861, Chinese immigrants made up 3.3 percent of the Australian population, the greatest it has ever been. These Chinese were nearly all men (38,337 men and only eleven women !) and most were under contract to Chinese and foreign businessmen. In exchange for their passage money, they worked on the goldfields until their debt was paid off. Most then returned to China. Between 1852 and 1889, there were 40,721 arrivals and 36,049 departures. </li></ul><ul><li>Racism </li></ul><ul><li>There were campaigns to oust the Chinese from the goldfields. The motivation was based on racism and fear of competition for dwindling amounts of easily found gold as the Chinese were known as untiring workers. </li></ul>
    25. 42. <ul><li>Nonetheless, more than 400 troops and police were sent from Melbourne to crush what remained of the &quot;rebellion&quot;. They rushed the 120 or so miners still inside the stockade, killing more than 20 and trampling their Southern Cross flag into the dust. The rebel leaders were tried for treason but the juries in Melbourne refused to pass any guilty verdicts, and the authorities sensibly let the matter drop. A Royal Commission subsequently condemned the goldfield administration, and the miners' grievances were eventually remedied – including their demands for political representation: a year later, minus an arm lost at Eureka, Peter Lalor (illustrated) was duly elected to the Victorian parliament. </li></ul>
    26. 44. A fictional portrayal entitled The Taking of the Children on the recently installed (1999) Great Australian Clock, Queen Victoria Building, Sydney, by artist Chris Cook.
    27. 51. Apology text Vide o :   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3TZOGpG6cM
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