Beyond ePortfolio - Identity construction in a digitally extended world

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Presentation on ePortfolio and identity construction at AAEEBL conference, Boston, 20-22 July 2010

Presentation on ePortfolio and identity construction at AAEEBL conference, Boston, 20-22 July 2010

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  • Future: Employability
  • Future: Employability
  • Future: Employability
  • Future: Employability
  • Future: Employability
  • Future: Employability



  • The balance of power between organisations and individuals has been slowly shifting towards the middle since the Renaissance. The Internet and notably Web 2.0 kicked this historic evolution into a hyperbolic ‘revolution’. However, the observation is that ICT systems in general are not keeping up. After 30 odd years of corporate-centric software infrastructure, personal data and processes are still owned and managed by corporate or government organisations and the individual still is the new emperor without clothes.

  • The balance of power between organisations and individuals has been slowly shifting towards the middle since the Renaissance. The Internet and notably Web 2.0 kicked this historic evolution into a hyperbolic ‘revolution’. However, the observation is that ICT systems in general are not keeping up. After 30 odd years of corporate-centric software infrastructure, personal data and processes are still owned and managed by corporate or government organisations and the individual still is the new emperor without clothes.
    Leçon d'anatomie de Willem van der Meer, par Jansz van Mierevelt (1617).







  • TS Elliot: Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?
  • and we pay the consequences
  • and we pay the consequences
  • and we pay the consequences
  • and we pay the consequences







  • Simple mechanisms can provide trust and security...










  • For the 7th ePortfolio conference, and in order to give directions to our work towards our 2010 goal (ePortfolio for all), EIfEL has decided to address a number of challenges to the ePortfolio community and beyond —many of the problems the ePortfolio community faces today will not be resolved if they are not addressed beyond the ePortfolio silo. The goal of these challenges is to move beyond the current state of ePortfolio development, in particular in the field of interoperability as interoperability is not just a technical issue, but a means to enable new practices and the emergence of truly lifelong and life wide ePortfolios.
    Our main objective is to create the conditions for the emergence of MultiPortfolio organisations (one organisation can interact with many different ePort- folio platforms) and MultiOrganisation ePortfolios (have one ePortfolio to interact with many different institutions with their own platform).
    1. Universal ePortfolio Repository —a unified view of all my assets
    Context: Today, the digital assets used to create an ePortfolio can be hosted in many different sys- tems managed by many different organisations.
    Issue: How can we provide a unified view of all the assets belonging to one person, so she/he can seamlessly create ePortfolios without having to navigate through multiple sites? How can I reunite my digital identity?
    Direction: Identity and access management (IAM) technologies, such as federation of identities and services need to be fully explored by the ePortfolio community.
    NB: a universal repository is not equivalent to a unique repository; it can be universal while being distributed over a number of loosely connected and heterogeneous systems.
    2. Universal Competency Identifiers —share competency definitions across systems
    Context: A number of ePortfolio platforms, and other applications in the field of education, em- ployment, accreditation and human resource use competency frameworks. Today, the dominant de- livery format of competency frameworks is a PDF file, forcing each system to import or recreate them from scratch.
    Issue: How can we share competency definitions across systems and applications? How can we elicit emerging competencies through interactive technologies?
    Direction: The creation of a competency wiki pro- viding shared, distributed, multilingual URIs (Unique Resource Identifiers) to competency defi- nitions. The solution to unique resource identifiers for competency definition has already been dis- cussed by Simon Grant (Representing frameworks of skill and competence for interoperability). We
    have the technology required, what is missing is the political impetus and commitment.
    3. ePortfolio social —share assets, knowledge and processes across communities
    Context: The idea of using social computing for ePortfolios is growing and a number of platforms have integrated such features. Nevertheless, the current implementation of social networking tech- nology is mainly limited to connecting individuals as silos of information.
    Issue: Let’s imagine a group of 100 people belong- ing to the same community (company, school, etc.) among which 10 are writing their own CV. Can we design a technology that will make it possible that at the end of the process, each of the 100 people will have (part of) their own CV written? How can we automatically generate and updated ePortfolios and CVs through social interaction?
    Direction: Imagine that each time a person writes an elementary entry into their CV describing a pro- fessional experience, they have to name the peo- ple that shared the same experience; then for each person named, the entry is added to their ‘CV’, with the ability to edit it and share it back with the original author or create their own edited version of the entry. This way, each CV would be thread weaving a collective story. For the reader, being able to judge how an individual CV is connected to other stories, could even be an indicator of trust- worthiness. The same reasoning could of course apply to ePortfolios.
    4. ePortfolio semantic editors —make sense of what I write, connect, etc.
    Context: In 2003, during the first international ePortfolio conference in Poitiers, Christopher Tan presented Knowledge Community, a platform scaf- folding learners reflection through semantic anno- tation, i.e. identifying key words and labelling them with semantic value, e.g. evidence, theory, exam- ple, etc. Since then, not a single editor of ePortfolio tools has included any form of semantic annota- tion.
    Issue: We need ePortfolio editors that scaffold re- flective thinking, not just enrich text with bolds, italics and ‘pink on purple’ effects. We needproper, simple semantic editors, as semantic anno- tation is a way to structure reflection, connect ideas, facts and people.
    Direction: RDFa editors provide the blueprint for ePortfolio editors that fully support the compo- nents of a reflective process. At minima, be able to tag parts of texts/images, not just the whole document.
    5. ePortfolio Readers —read any ePortfolio through consistent and multiple views
    Context: There are a number of ePortfolio plat- forms, each one with their own user interfaces and some people create ePortfolios without using any dedicated ePortfolio platform (e.g. content man- agement system). And people want to be free to express their identity without being kept in the straightjacket of predefined templates.
    Issue: How can we leave total freedom to ePortfo- lio author’s creativity, while providing readers with their own view through a consistent navigational interface, e.g. evidence on the left, competency framework on the right, etc.?
    Direction: We might have to define different read- ers, depending on the process being involved, so the same ePortfolio could have different views generated by different tools. Such tools could be used by ePortfolio authors as tools to verify that their ePortfolio is properly structured and contains all the relevant semantic information.
    6. Open & Trusted Service Architecture
    Context: Today each ePortfolio platform provides a limited number of services and adding new serv- ices require the development of idiosyncratic plug- ins, when this possibility is offered.
    Issue: How can we provide ePortfolio owners with an unlimited number of services without forcing service providers to develop multiple plug-ins for multiple applications? How can we trust the usage made by services of our personal data?
    Direction: This is connected to the idea of Univer- sal Repository, exploited and enriched by service providers. Schools, universities, employers, pro- fessional bodies etc. need to provide conversa- tional systems through trusted web services —a technology currently under development by differ- ent initiatives, such as TAS3.
    7. ePortfolio based performance support system —make the ePortfolio part of my work
    Context: One of the current problems with ePort- folio adoption at the workplace is the fact that ePortfolios can be seen as something either nice to have or adding to the regular work. Moreover, the
    current level of integration of ePortfolios with other information systems is still low.
    Issue: How can we make ePortfolio construction part of everyday activities? How can we demon- strate ePortfolio benefits through business bene- fits?
    Direction: Use ePortfolio technology and methods to develop next generation electronic performance support systems, integrate reflection as part of routine work processes, so the ePortfolio is built through naturally occurring business activities.
    8. ePortfolio discovery mechanism —find people, competencies, resources
    Context: While there are a number of methods for learning resources discovery (c.f. the learning re- sources exchange (LRE) repository of European Schoolnet) there are not yet universal mechanism to discover ePortfolios on the Internet, each indi- vidual relying on ad-hoc services.
    Issue: How can we easily find an ePortfolio or a resource contained in an ePortfolio?
    Direction: OAI-PMH (Open Archives Initiative's Protocol for Metadata Harvesting) is a possible method to create large indexes of ePortfolios per organisation, sector or even territory. Other meth- ods could be the publication of ePortfolios in trusted parties' indexes.
    9. URIs as tags
    Context: Tag is a popular form to connect things together. within an ePortfolio. Unfortunately the meaning of tags is context dependent, and differ- ent tags can share the same meaning.
    Issue: How can we create tags that are not con- text dependent?
    Direction: make tags RDF triplets: name (what is displayed as ‘tag’); URI to definition (an hidden hypertext link); link type (is, is part of, etc.). NB: this is an extension of challenge #2. Two tags are close if they share the same URI and identical if they are identical triplets.
    10.Universal Metadata
    Context: ePortfolio construction is about connect- ing data together. Metadata are not just ‘com- ments’ about data, but links between all the data sharing the same metadata. If data are assimilated to neurones, metadata can be seen as the syn- apses connecting neurones together..
    Issue: How can we enrich distributed data with ‘personal/social metadata repositories
    Direction: keep metadata repositories apart from data, on the model of social bookmarking.
  • For the 7th ePortfolio conference, and in order to give directions to our work towards our 2010 goal (ePortfolio for all), EIfEL has decided to address a number of challenges to the ePortfolio community and beyond —many of the problems the ePortfolio community faces today will not be resolved if they are not addressed beyond the ePortfolio silo. The goal of these challenges is to move beyond the current state of ePortfolio development, in particular in the field of interoperability as interoperability is not just a technical issue, but a means to enable new practices and the emergence of truly lifelong and life wide ePortfolios.
    Our main objective is to create the conditions for the emergence of MultiPortfolio organisations (one organisation can interact with many different ePort- folio platforms) and MultiOrganisation ePortfolios (have one ePortfolio to interact with many different institutions with their own platform).
    1. Universal ePortfolio Repository —a unified view of all my assets
    Context: Today, the digital assets used to create an ePortfolio can be hosted in many different sys- tems managed by many different organisations.
    Issue: How can we provide a unified view of all the assets belonging to one person, so she/he can seamlessly create ePortfolios without having to navigate through multiple sites? How can I reunite my digital identity?
    Direction: Identity and access management (IAM) technologies, such as federation of identities and services need to be fully explored by the ePortfolio community.
    NB: a universal repository is not equivalent to a unique repository; it can be universal while being distributed over a number of loosely connected and heterogeneous systems.
    2. Universal Competency Identifiers —share competency definitions across systems
    Context: A number of ePortfolio platforms, and other applications in the field of education, em- ployment, accreditation and human resource use competency frameworks. Today, the dominant de- livery format of competency frameworks is a PDF file, forcing each system to import or recreate them from scratch.
    Issue: How can we share competency definitions across systems and applications? How can we elicit emerging competencies through interactive technologies?
    Direction: The creation of a competency wiki pro- viding shared, distributed, multilingual URIs (Unique Resource Identifiers) to competency defi- nitions. The solution to unique resource identifiers for competency definition has already been dis- cussed by Simon Grant (Representing frameworks of skill and competence for interoperability). We
    have the technology required, what is missing is the political impetus and commitment.
    3. ePortfolio social —share assets, knowledge and processes across communities
    Context: The idea of using social computing for ePortfolios is growing and a number of platforms have integrated such features. Nevertheless, the current implementation of social networking tech- nology is mainly limited to connecting individuals as silos of information.
    Issue: Let’s imagine a group of 100 people belong- ing to the same community (company, school, etc.) among which 10 are writing their own CV. Can we design a technology that will make it possible that at the end of the process, each of the 100 people will have (part of) their own CV written? How can we automatically generate and updated ePortfolios and CVs through social interaction?
    Direction: Imagine that each time a person writes an elementary entry into their CV describing a pro- fessional experience, they have to name the peo- ple that shared the same experience; then for each person named, the entry is added to their ‘CV’, with the ability to edit it and share it back with the original author or create their own edited version of the entry. This way, each CV would be thread weaving a collective story. For the reader, being able to judge how an individual CV is connected to other stories, could even be an indicator of trust- worthiness. The same reasoning could of course apply to ePortfolios.
    4. ePortfolio semantic editors —make sense of what I write, connect, etc.
    Context: In 2003, during the first international ePortfolio conference in Poitiers, Christopher Tan presented Knowledge Community, a platform scaf- folding learners reflection through semantic anno- tation, i.e. identifying key words and labelling them with semantic value, e.g. evidence, theory, exam- ple, etc. Since then, not a single editor of ePortfolio tools has included any form of semantic annota- tion.
    Issue: We need ePortfolio editors that scaffold re- flective thinking, not just enrich text with bolds, italics and ‘pink on purple’ effects. We needproper, simple semantic editors, as semantic anno- tation is a way to structure reflection, connect ideas, facts and people.
    Direction: RDFa editors provide the blueprint for ePortfolio editors that fully support the compo- nents of a reflective process. At minima, be able to tag parts of texts/images, not just the whole document.
    5. ePortfolio Readers —read any ePortfolio through consistent and multiple views
    Context: There are a number of ePortfolio plat- forms, each one with their own user interfaces and some people create ePortfolios without using any dedicated ePortfolio platform (e.g. content man- agement system). And people want to be free to express their identity without being kept in the straightjacket of predefined templates.
    Issue: How can we leave total freedom to ePortfo- lio author’s creativity, while providing readers with their own view through a consistent navigational interface, e.g. evidence on the left, competency framework on the right, etc.?
    Direction: We might have to define different read- ers, depending on the process being involved, so the same ePortfolio could have different views generated by different tools. Such tools could be used by ePortfolio authors as tools to verify that their ePortfolio is properly structured and contains all the relevant semantic information.
    6. Open & Trusted Service Architecture
    Context: Today each ePortfolio platform provides a limited number of services and adding new serv- ices require the development of idiosyncratic plug- ins, when this possibility is offered.
    Issue: How can we provide ePortfolio owners with an unlimited number of services without forcing service providers to develop multiple plug-ins for multiple applications? How can we trust the usage made by services of our personal data?
    Direction: This is connected to the idea of Univer- sal Repository, exploited and enriched by service providers. Schools, universities, employers, pro- fessional bodies etc. need to provide conversa- tional systems through trusted web services —a technology currently under development by differ- ent initiatives, such as TAS3.
    7. ePortfolio based performance support system —make the ePortfolio part of my work
    Context: One of the current problems with ePort- folio adoption at the workplace is the fact that ePortfolios can be seen as something either nice to have or adding to the regular work. Moreover, the
    current level of integration of ePortfolios with other information systems is still low.
    Issue: How can we make ePortfolio construction part of everyday activities? How can we demon- strate ePortfolio benefits through business bene- fits?
    Direction: Use ePortfolio technology and methods to develop next generation electronic performance support systems, integrate reflection as part of routine work processes, so the ePortfolio is built through naturally occurring business activities.
    8. ePortfolio discovery mechanism —find people, competencies, resources
    Context: While there are a number of methods for learning resources discovery (c.f. the learning re- sources exchange (LRE) repository of European Schoolnet) there are not yet universal mechanism to discover ePortfolios on the Internet, each indi- vidual relying on ad-hoc services.
    Issue: How can we easily find an ePortfolio or a resource contained in an ePortfolio?
    Direction: OAI-PMH (Open Archives Initiative's Protocol for Metadata Harvesting) is a possible method to create large indexes of ePortfolios per organisation, sector or even territory. Other meth- ods could be the publication of ePortfolios in trusted parties' indexes.
    9. URIs as tags
    Context: Tag is a popular form to connect things together. within an ePortfolio. Unfortunately the meaning of tags is context dependent, and differ- ent tags can share the same meaning.
    Issue: How can we create tags that are not con- text dependent?
    Direction: make tags RDF triplets: name (what is displayed as ‘tag’); URI to definition (an hidden hypertext link); link type (is, is part of, etc.). NB: this is an extension of challenge #2. Two tags are close if they share the same URI and identical if they are identical triplets.
    10.Universal Metadata
    Context: ePortfolio construction is about connect- ing data together. Metadata are not just ‘com- ments’ about data, but links between all the data sharing the same metadata. If data are assimilated to neurones, metadata can be seen as the syn- apses connecting neurones together..
    Issue: How can we enrich distributed data with ‘personal/social metadata repositories
    Direction: keep metadata repositories apart from data, on the model of social bookmarking.













  • in a trustworthy environment
















  • PDS OS
  • PDS OS
  • PDS OS
  • Subject is my proxy.
  • Subject is my proxy.

  • weaving personal stories













  • ...by who I want, independently from where my personal data is stored
    Federated searches

  • with who I want (services, individuals, groups)














  • Bentham’s panopticon (1995 [1787]), explored by Foucault (1983), who regarded it as a method of internalising social control. The asymmetry of power – the observer who can see everything yet is not himself seen – was considered by him to be the essence of power, resting on the differential possession of knowledge.

  • Profile based interaction... Identification to...
  • From CRM to VRM
    No need to register to specific services to make your personal data visible


  • Legal forms anticipated

  • a world where everyone has a PDS
  • Personal learning

  • Personal learning

  • Know the facts
    Collect data on healthcare, employment, competencies
    Know your policy and decision makers
  • make my bank statements searchable by other banking services




  • And we witness grass-root reactions: Diaspora.
  • And we witness grass-root reactions: Diaspora.
  • And political moves



Transcript

  • 1. Beyond ePortfolios identity construction in a digitally extended world
  • 2. ePortfolio
  • 3. Identity
  • 4. “The overwhelming feelings of crisis (in education), of ‘living at the crossroads’, …have little to do with the faults, errors or negligence of the professional pedagogues or the failures of educational theory, but quite a lot to do with the de-regulation and privatization of the identity-formation processes, the dispersal of authorities , the polyphony of value messages and the ensuring fragmentation of life… Beyond all this slicing and spicing, one can sense the crumbling of time. (Crisis) plays havoc with all the rules … the fragmentary life is lived in fragmentary time. Zygmunt Bauman, The Individualized Society, 2001
  • 5. “The overwhelming feelings of crisis (in education), of ‘living at the crossroads’, …have little to do with the faults, errors or negligence of the professional pedagogues or the failures of educational theory, but Fragmentation quite a lot to do with the de-regulation and privatization of the identity-formation processes, the dispersal of authorities , the polyphony of value messages and the ensuring fragmentation of life… Beyond all this slicing and spicing, one can sense the crumbling of time. (Crisis) plays havoc with all the rules … the fragmentary life is lived in fragmentary time. Zygmunt Bauman, The Individualized Society, 2001
  • 6. “[...] Most research on identity question the past or the present ( "Where are you from?" and "Who are you?"), while the concern with identity is actually mostly connected to the invention of self. Ordinary dreams prepare the future, including the immediate future. The self-concept is an instrument of action and change.”
  • 7. “[...] Most research on identity question the past or the present ( "Where are you from?" and "Who are you?"), while the concern with identity is actually mostly connected to the invention of self. Ordinary dreams prepare the future, including the immediate future. The self-concept is an instrument of action and change.”
  • 8. I D E N T I T Y PORTFOLIO
  • 9. I D E N T I T Y PORTFOLIO
  • 10. narration invention I D E N T I T Y PORTFOLIO Archives Projections Traces Plans Past Future Telling stories Dreaming
  • 11. External Past I Future Me Internal
  • 12. External Past I Me Future Internal
  • 13. narration action invention External Past I Me Future Internal reflection
  • 14. We External Past I Future Me Us Internal
  • 15. “Every relationship. . . implies a definition of self by others and other by self. . . A person's 'own' identity can never be completely abstracted from his identity-for-others. Ronald Laing, Self and Others, 1961
  • 16. “If I am I, simply because I am I, and thou art thou simply because thou art thou, then I am I and thou art thou. But if I am I because thou art thou, and thou art thou because I am I, then I am not I and thou art not thou.” Rabbi Mendel of Kotsk (quoted in Ethos and Identity, Epstein, 1978)
  • 17. Identity construction
  • 18. Individual Society
  • 19. Individual Society Government Organisations Businesses ...
  • 20. “Identity is a historical process which, after a transition phase where it was directed from above by the State, has fully emerged at the individual level from less than half a century as self-invention.”
  • 21. “Self identity is not a set of traits or observable characteristics. It is a person's own reflexive understanding of their biography. Self- identity has continuity, but that continuity is only a product of the person's reflexive beliefs about their own biography. It explains the past and is oriented towards anticipated future.
  • 22. Reputation Construction Construction Reflection Services Reflection Me Others Control Exploitation
  • 23. People Organisations Networks Competency Competency Status Reputation profile management Project Activities Contributions management Collaboration Assets / Capital Knowledge Knowledge Audience management Professional Learning Learning Transformation development organisation community Adapted from Fred Cavazza: http://www.fredcavazza.net/index.php?2006/10/22/1310-quest-ce-que-lindente-numerique
  • 24. What are the problems with identity technologies?
  • 25. Where is the identity we have lost in digital identity?
  • 26. 3 41,76 8,015Saturday , 24 Janu is the total aryng 09 nsitive An NHS t s containi 20 se- B ecTOdr 22 s ugust pe 0 n S rN r ofWrOesohas ust Aenvng vedpi: Thousands o numbe al rvi i critol 20o 7le across sout f names, ptorne atimnnrs, acided ho m nubebeo rs idef ails of aboe n onal the in s e-aft ce ddre in il a s h smaer a laptoses stored by pe Intesnin uthe0UaS.htsite Aberche r et jo atawe B 5, e . c t b-s00rpa ie M p with se curity bre en stolen asopgrt of a nts wersterolen. have be Trus5 wa ro M ra a on e .com st 00hteme. found to nnwgcUniversitonline fraud January 2 rsc s omplex y NHS p otection hav Si m l,aws. The e breached data patyenantec a securitcommpany, dis t medica y coputer, l e we ds breach over threcorekeo whicclosed the encrypte d, was st nn iafteri oneh had d t wh c reeearchers fouold n fao a offic s. h wore n e f its n e th r t m server computeot an unloc Ukraine held 1.6 million ked r in records stolen from Monster, a New York com pany.
  • 27. Identification to Identification of
  • 28. Identifier I d e n t i t y
  • 29. R el atio n sh ips Attributes
  • 30. Priva c y Intimacy
  • 31. Tr u s t Walls
  • 32. Closed society Open Society Architecture Integration Aggregation Systems Disconnected Networked Security Walls Trust Data Hiden Discoverable Identity External constraints Inner potential
  • 33. Identity systems do not use the properties of the network topography
  • 34. What are the problems with ePortfolios?
  • 35. Assessment Focus Learning
  • 36. Accountability Focus Employability
  • 37. Individual Learning Community
  • 38. Institution Ownership Individual
  • 39. L e a r n e r Driver Te a c h e r
  • 40. Services Institutions Interoperability across silos
  • 41. ePortfolios are personal information silos
  • 42. ePortfolios are personal information silos hosted in information silos (ePortfolio platforms)
  • 43. ePortfolios are personal information silos hosted in information silos (ePortfolio platforms) managed by fragmented institutional silos
  • 44. 10 ePortfolio challenges 2009
  • 45. ePortfolio challenge
  • 46. ePortfolio 1. Universal ePortfolio Repository 2. Universal Competency Identifiers 3. ePortfolio social 4. ePortfolio semantic editors 5. ePortfolio Readers challenge 6. Open & Trusted Service Architecture 7. ePortfolio based performance support system 8. ePortfolio discovery mechanism 9. URIs as tags 10. Universal Metadata
  • 47. What are the problems with employability ePortfolios?
  • 48. ‘Classical’ View Candidate Employer Profile Match Profile
  • 49. Less ‘Classical’ View Candidate Employer Profile Profile Sole trader Match Entrepreneur Partners Profile Profile Profile Clients Needs
  • 50. Are there domains experiencing issues similar to ePortfolios?
  • 51. Curriculum Vitæ
  • 52. CRM vs CRM
  • 53. Personal health records
  • 54. "The vision for the future of health care starts with the premise that consumers should own their own total personal health and wellness data and that only consumers, not insurers, not the government, not employers and not even doctors, but only consumers should have complete control over how it is used" Adam Bosworth, Google Vice- President speech to the 2007 AMIA (American Medical Informatics Association)
  • 55. Is there a solution for ePortfolios?
  • 56. Is it possible to have a system supporting simultaneously accountability, employability and learning? learning individuals, communities and organisations? ownership by individuals, communities and institutions? interoperability across applications and organisations?
  • 57. Is it possible to have a system supporting simultaneously YES! accountability, employability and learning? learning individuals, communities and organisations? ownership by individuals, communities and institutions? interoperability across applications and organisations?
  • 58. It is an architecture, not an application
  • 59. Based on a simple principle...
  • 60. Free personal data!
  • 61. While the centre of gravity of information systems is moving from organisations towards individuals...
  • 62. While the centre of gravity of information systems is moving from organisations towards individuals... Yet, we can observe an increasing fragmentation of personal data
  • 63. Yet, we can observe an increasing fragmentation of personal data Source du graphique : Fred Cavazza
  • 64. Yet, we can observe an increasing fragmentation of personal data Source du graphique : Fred Cavazza
  • 65. We are not in control on how our personal data is being used
  • 66. Enslaved personal data affects our ability to freely construct our identity
  • 67. FROM Applications, the masters of my data
  • 68. TO Applications, the servants of my data
  • 69. How?
  • 70. Splitting data, metadata & services in a trustworthy environment
  • 71. Service Service Metadata Metadata Me Data Data
  • 72. Service Service Service Service Service Service Metadata Metadata Metadata Data Data
  • 73. Service Service Service Service Service Service Metadata Metadata Metadata Data Data Trust Architecture
  • 74. Service Service Service Service Service Service Metadata Metadata Metadata Data Data Trust Architecture
  • 75. IoS compliant IoS Infrastructure Business Services Business directories Dashboards Quality Control VRM Application (trust monitor/ enforcing agents) P er s on a l Social Networks D ata S t ore s Career Management Shared D i str i b u te d User User VRM Application Web Services Re p o s it o r y Healthcare (AIM, calendars, User directories, harvesting, (privacy protection) Learning Services publication, search engine, ... etc.) IoS Architecture
  • 76. IoS compliant IoS Infrastructure Business Services Business directories Dashboards Quality Control VRM Application (trust monitor/ enforcing agents) P er s on a l Social Networks D ata St ore s Career Management Shared D i str i but e d User VRM Application Web Services Re p osi t ory User Healthcare (AIM, calendars, directories, harvesting, (privacy protection) User Learning Services publication, search engine, ... etc.) IoS Architecture
  • 77. IoS compliant IoS Infrastructure Business Services Dashboard Business directories Quality Control P er s ona l D a ta Sto re Web Services VRM Application Shared Social Networks Dashboard Dashboard Career Management P e rs o n al Data VRM Application Store User User Healthcare Learning Services P e rs o n al Data User ... Store IoS Architecture
  • 78. IoS compliant The society of Subjects Business Services Business directories S u bj e ct S u bj ect S u bj ect S u bj ect Quality Control VRM Application Social Networks S u bj e ct S u bj ect S u bj ect S u bj ect Career Management User VRM Application S u bj e ct S u bj ect S u bj ect S u bj ect User Healthcare Learning Services User S u bj e ct S u bj ect S u bj ect S u bj ect ... IoS Architecture
  • 79. Service Ser vice Provi sion Provision D ata Data My Data Data Provision Our Data Data Pro vis ion Consumpt ion Consumption My Dashboard Our Dashboard Personal Proxy Business /Network Proxy S e rv i c e S erv ice S e r vi c e S e r vi c e S er v ic e Pro v i si o n Provision P ro vi sion P ro vis io n P rov i s i o Data D at a Da ta Data D a ta D a ta D a ta Da t a D at a M y D a ta M y Data M y Da ta M y Da ta My D a t s umpti o n Pro vi s io n C onsump tion Provision C on su m p tio n P ro vis io n C on su m p tio n P ro v is i o n Co n s u m p t i on My My My My My D a s h bo a rd Dashb oard D a sh bo a rd D a sh bo a rd D as h b oa S e rv i c e S erv ice S e r vi c e S e r vi c e S er v ic e Pro v i si o n Provision P ro vi sion P ro vis io n P rov i s i o Data D at a Da ta Data D a ta D a ta D a ta Da t a D at a M y D a ta M y Data M y Da ta M y Da ta My D a t s umpti o n Pro vi s io n C onsump tion Provision C on su m p tio n P ro vis io n C on su m p tio n P ro v is i o n Co n s u m p t i on My My My My My D a s h bo a rd Dashb oard D a sh bo a rd D a sh bo a rd D as h b oa
  • 80. Structure of a PDS
  • 81. All by me All by us All about me All about us All by me All by me All about me All about me
  • 82. Paradigm shift
  • 83. Individual Corporation
  • 84. Individual Corporation
  • 85. Individual Corporation
  • 86. Individual Corporation
  • 87. Corporation Individual
  • 88. Corporation Individual
  • 89. Corporation Individual Business Privacy enabler enforcer
  • 90. me me me me me
  • 91. me me me me me
  • 92. me me me me me
  • 93. me
  • 94. me
  • 95. I am in full control
  • 96. I am in full control I can be discovered
  • 97. I can be discovered I am in I full control can hide
  • 98. I can be discovered I am in full control I can hide I can share
  • 99. How can services interact with PDS?
  • 100. Query Metadata harvested in PDS Return numbers of matching profiles Notify subjects that they have been searched Subjects decide to connect (or not) anynomously to query Query maker can push information to connected profiles
  • 101. Benefit #1
  • 102. Reduce asymetry of information access / broadcast
  • 103. Benefit #2
  • 104. Meaningful anonymous interaction
  • 105. Prospects can stay anonymous while their needs are visible
  • 106. The 7 Rules of the IoS
  • 107. 1. Personnal control 7 Rules 2. Discoverability 3. Instant Social Networking 4. Ubiquity 5. Symmetry 6. Minimisation 7. Accountability
  • 108. New manifesto
  • 109. Now, imagine....
  • 110. Imagine a network made up of personal data stores, where identity data and personal information systems representing individuals are at the very centre of the architecture. Imagine a situation where online connections to people, services, and to documents are seamless, rather than being fragmented over a number of services. Imagine a scenario where personal identities are securely held in one logical space and shared dynamically across a number of communities.
  • 111. Use cases
  • 112. Lifelong learning Lifelong & life wide learning portfolios Informal learning recognition
  • 113. Healthcare Sharing and augmenting personal health records Creating an AA group Analysys of buying patterns
  • 114. Policies Citizen dashboards Learning / intelligent territories Accountability
  • 115. Business Create instantly a competitor to Facebook Get competitive business offers Vendor Relationship Management
  • 116. M I S S I O N Put people back into control of their personal data: creating the technical and organisational conditions for individuals to be able to reunite their personal data and take over control and their exploitation.
  • 117. M I S S I O N Put people back into control of their personal data: creating the technical and organisational conditions for individuals to be able to reunite their personal data and take over control and their exploitation. Support research on identity construction: inviting all fields of knowledge to confront current identity theories and practices across cultures, worldwide, to the new reality of a digitally expanded world.
  • 118. And now?
  • 119. y r Francis Maude, toda Cabinet Office Ministe ship called for a radic al shift in the relation g the state, when deliverin between citizens and rities, his first keynote spe ech to leaders of cha ses. voluntary grou ps and social enterpri
  • 120. “The real danger is not that computers will begin to think like men, but that men will begin to think like computers.” Sydney J. Harris
  • 121. “I find television very educational. Every time someone switches it on I go into another room and read a good book.” Groucho Marx
  • 122. OfSUBJECTS INTERNET Merci www.iosf.org serge.ravet@iosf.org