Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation
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Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation

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An overview of services in the South West region and a brief reminder on how we can take care of our own breast health.

An overview of services in the South West region and a brief reminder on how we can take care of our own breast health.

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  • The average breast size of Australian women is 14C. It doesn’t matter if you are a triple A to a J cup; if your breasts are large or small – it’s important to be breast aware. Breast Awareness is about knowing what is normal for you - how your breasts normally look and feel. Knowing what is normal for you means that you are able to identify a change in the look and feel of your breast easily. Most changes that you feel or see are not going to be cancer – in fact 9 out of 10 changes will not be related to cancer. But, it is very important that you know what is normal for you so you can identify a change should one happen.
  • Unfortunately Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women, and everyday around Australia there are 38 women that will be told that they have it. Of those 38 women, 3 women will be under the age of 40. Australian women have a 1 in 9 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 85, and this number is increasing. The reason for this increase include the BreastScreen program, early detection, our ageing population and possible lifestyle factors. In 2007, the majority of cases were in women over the age of 50, the average age of a diagnosis of breast cancer was 60 years of age. However, 24 percent of new breast cancer cases occurred in women younger than 50.
  • For any men in the audience, it is important to know that breast cancer isn’t just a disease that women get. In fact, about 100 men are diagnosed wit the disease every year. It isn’t all doom and gloom, we’re surviving longer than we did 25 years ago.
  • Mammograms are a screening tool to detect breast cancer. It is basically a low dose breast x-ray.   Mammograms have two purposes, the first is as a screening tool to detect breast cancer. Mammograms are also used as a beast imaging technique for diagnostic and screening purposes. So if you find something unusual in your breast, a mammogram may be required to find out more information about what's going on.   Screening mammography, especially for women aged 50-69 years, is currently the best method available for detecting breast cancer early. Breast Cancers found early are easier to treat than those that have advanced. Early detection also gives best treatment options. If you are aged 50-69 you will be invited by a letter for a free mammogram every two years through the BreastScreen program. BreastScreen also offers mammograms for free to women over 40 and over 70, however reminder letters will not be sent to you. If you would like to make an appointment or to get more information on BreastScreen, give them a call on 13 20 50. This number is easy to remember. 13 is when you grow them, 20 is when you show them, 50 is when you screen them. Regular screening mammograms are not recommended for women under 40 years of age. The tissue of young women’s breasts tends to be denser than that of older women. This is due to the influence of hormones. On a mammogram, dense breast tissue shows up as a white area. Breast cancers also appear white and are therefore more difficult to find on younger women’s mammograms. Finding a tumour in a mammogram of a woman under the age of 40 was like "looking for a snowball in a blizzard." However if you are sent for investigative screening is likely that you will receive a mammogram and an ultra sound even if you are under 40.
  • Mammograms are a screening tool to detect breast cancer. It is basically a low dose breast x-ray.   Mammograms have two purposes, the first is as a screening tool to detect breast cancer. Mammograms are also used as a beast imaging technique for diagnostic and screening purposes. So if you find something unusual in your breast, a mammogram may be required to find out more information about what's going on.   Screening mammography, especially for women aged 50-69 years, is currently the best method available for detecting breast cancer early. Breast Cancers found early are easier to treat than those that have advanced. Early detection also gives best treatment options. If you are aged 50-69 you will be invited by a letter for a free mammogram every two years through the BreastScreen program. BreastScreen also offers mammograms for free to women over 40 and over 70, however reminder letters will not be sent to you. If you would like to make an appointment or to get more information on BreastScreen, give them a call on 13 20 50. This number is easy to remember. 13 is when you grow them, 20 is when you show them, 50 is when you screen them. Regular screening mammograms are not recommended for women under 40 years of age. The tissue of young women’s breasts tends to be denser than that of older women. This is due to the influence of hormones. On a mammogram, dense breast tissue shows up as a white area. Breast cancers also appear white and are therefore more difficult to find on younger women’s mammograms. Finding a tumour in a mammogram of a woman under the age of 40 was like "looking for a snowball in a blizzard." However if you are sent for investigative screening is likely that you will receive a mammogram and an ultra sound even if you are under 40.

Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation Presentation Transcript

  • MMcGrath Foundation and their Breast Care Nurses
  • MMMcGrath Foundation • The McGrath Foundation was established by Jane McGrath and her husband, Glenn, after her initial recovery from breast cancer • Jane was only 31 yrs old when first diagnosed in 1996 • In 2003 , Jane was re-diagnosed with breast cancer • The key difference the second time was access to a Breast Care Nurse, they had someone that could help make sense of what was happening around them, explain the treatment options, possible side effects and complications and someone with whom Jane could voice her fears
  • McGrath Foundation • The McGrath foundation’s mission is to ensure every family in Australia experiencing breast cancer has access to a breast care nurse no matter where they live or their financial situation- and estimates 150 McGrath Breast Care Nurses are needed to achieve this
  • McGrath Breast Care Nurse •85 McGrath Breast Care Nurses (MBCN) in Australia as at August 2013 •Up to date supported more than 20000 clients diagnosed with breast cancer and their families •In WA: based in Perth, Bunbury (2), Albany, Kalgoorlie, Esperance and Geraldton
  • McGrath Breast Care Nurse • McGrath Breast Care Nurses are health professionals specially trained to manage the care of breast cancer patients throughout the course of their treatment. • They are the principal liaison between the patient and the specialists who coordinate their treatment - whether it be surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy • Play an important advocacy role as well as helping to clarify technical or complicated information that the patient may not understand • Most importantly, McGrath Breast Care Nurses offer vital emotional support to the patient as well as being a friend for the patient and their families during what can be extremely difficult times. r complicated information that the patient t the course it be surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy.
  • Referral • Open referral process • 3 general surgeons in Bunbury providing breast surgery in the South West • Breast Clinics at RPH, SCGH, The Mount Hospital and SJOG • Breast Screen ( direct, via GP’s, surgeons) • Self referral • GP’s (WACHS Cancer Service Referral Forms)
  • Referral • Caseload of public and private patients • All services for breast cancer are now located in within the region and are shared between public/private facilities • Two breast care nurses for the South West Region • WACHS South West: Barbara Hasenoehrl (9722 1448) • SJOG Bunbury: Donna Cook
  • Why do we need Breast Care Nurses? • The support of a McGrath Breast Care Nurse can substantially improve a patient’s quality of care because they have one main source of information and contact throughout their treatment plan. • Continuous support from a McGrath Breast Care Nurse can greatly minimise the stress and trauma of a breast cancer diagnosis for the patient and their family.
  • Why do we need breast care nurses? • Source of information and education to nursing and allied health staff in the region • We are available for education sessions in the community, workplace or schools, so please just give us a ring!!!! • Jane’s other great passion was to: • Educate women on breast health and early detection methods in relation to breast cancer
  • Be breast aware with Curve Lurve
  • Whatever your age, size or shape, it’s important to take care of your body and your breasts. Being breast aware will make you feel more confident and it’s an important part of general body awareness. Breast awareness means getting to know how your breasts look and feel so you know what’s normal for you. It allows you to identify a change in the look and feel of your breasts – most of which will not be related to breast cancer.
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women. 38 women are diagnosed with breast cancer every day. 6% of cancer diagnoses are in women under 40 – that’s about 3 women every day. The number of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Australia is increasing. Australian women have a 1 in 9 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 85. In 2007, the average age of first diagnosis in women was 60 years.
  • The risk of breast cancer increases with age. Approximately 24 per cent of new breast cancer cases diagnosed in 2007 were in women younger than 50 years; 51 per cent in women aged 50-69; and 25 per cent in women aged 70 and over. Breast cancer isn’t just a women’s disease. About 100 men are diagnosed with it every year. Survival: Women diagnosed with breast cancer are living longer than they did 25 years ago. Prevalence: It is estimated that in 2006 there were 143,967 women alive who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the previous 25 years.
  • Statistics • Latest statistics from 2009: • WA: 10805 cases of new cancer, 6291 cases in males, 4514 cases in females • 1313 new cases of breast cancer in females, which placed this cancer to Rank 1 amongst the females cancers with 29.1% ( Cancer Council Western Australia)
  • ThThe South West • Cancer Incidence Report from 2010 • 102 new cases of breast cancer in 2010, compared to Perth with 1104 total cases • 165 new cases of breast cancer in 2012 ( McGrath Breast Care Nurse Report) • Ongoing support for women in the area
  • The benefits of early detection of breast cancer include increased survival, greater treatment options and improved quality of life. Be breast aware by: - Looking at the shape and appearance of your breasts and nipples in the mirror with your hands by your sides - Raising your arms above your head and looking for a change in the shape of your breasts - Feeling for lumps in your breasts either while lying down or standing up - Feeling for lumps in your nipple area and in the armpit
  • A general change in size or shape. A lump or lumpiness, or even a change in appearance of your breast (such as dimpling redness and appearance of veins). An area that feels different to the rest of your breast. Any pain in your breast. Any change in the shape or appearance of your nipple, such as your nipple being pulled in or development of a rash. A discharge from your nipple, particularly if it’s bloody. A swelling in your armpit or around your collarbone.
  • When to look for? Feel your breasts from time to time. A good time to do a self- examination is after the last day of your menstrual cycle. This is because during your period, your breasts can feel a little tender or lumpy. While it’s perfectly normal, it’s best to give your breasts a chance to settle down before you examine them. If you do notice a lump just before or during your period, it is generally safe to wait until after your period to see if it goes away. If it doesn’t settle down then, see your GP right away to be properly checked out. And, if you don’t have periods, the best idea is to just self-check when your breasts are soft and not tender and check them regularly.
  • First of all, don’t panic. Most changes in the breast are not related to breast cancer, so chances are you’ll be just fine. However if you do find a lump, or notice a change in your breast, it’s important to visit your GP immediately. Remember, the sooner you see your GP after finding a change in your breast, the better, Your GP will conduct a clinical breast examination to determine whether you will need further testing.
  • Screening mammography, especially for women aged 50-69 years, is currently the best method available for detecting breast cancer early. Breast Cancer found early while it is still small and confined to the breast provides the best chance of effective treatment. Mammography is the only method for early detection that has been shown in clinical trials to reduce deaths from breast cancer across the population. Women aged 50-69 are encouraged to have a free mammogram every two years through BreastScreen Australia. Mammograms are not a reliable screening test for women under 40.
  • And for men... As breast cancer is relatively uncommon in men, its diagnosis tends to be delayed and therefore the cancer is frequently more advanced at the time of diagnosis in men compared with women. This can lead to poorer outcomes for men than women. It is important that men who notice breast lumps or other changes in their breasts have them checked out quickly.
  • Remember regularly check your breasts for any changes we’ve discussed For men, diagnosis tends to be delayed, so if you notice any changes get them checked out quickly Don’t let abnormal become normal Speak to your GP if you have any concerns It’s your body, take control
  • Just launched the new "Curve Lurve” App !!!! Download it today and be breast aware