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Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation
 

Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation

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An overview of services in the South West region and a brief reminder on how we can take care of our own breast health.

An overview of services in the South West region and a brief reminder on how we can take care of our own breast health.

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  • The average breast size of Australian women is 14C. It doesn’t matter if you are a triple A to a J cup; if your breasts are large or small – it’s important to be breast aware. Breast Awareness is about knowing what is normal for you - how your breasts normally look and feel. Knowing what is normal for you means that you are able to identify a change in the look and feel of your breast easily. Most changes that you feel or see are not going to be cancer – in fact 9 out of 10 changes will not be related to cancer. But, it is very important that you know what is normal for you so you can identify a change should one happen.
  • Unfortunately Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women, and everyday around Australia there are 38 women that will be told that they have it. Of those 38 women, 3 women will be under the age of 40. Australian women have a 1 in 9 lifetime risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 85, and this number is increasing. The reason for this increase include the BreastScreen program, early detection, our ageing population and possible lifestyle factors. In 2007, the majority of cases were in women over the age of 50, the average age of a diagnosis of breast cancer was 60 years of age. However, 24 percent of new breast cancer cases occurred in women younger than 50.
  • For any men in the audience, it is important to know that breast cancer isn’t just a disease that women get. In fact, about 100 men are diagnosed wit the disease every year. It isn’t all doom and gloom, we’re surviving longer than we did 25 years ago.
  • Mammograms are a screening tool to detect breast cancer. It is basically a low dose breast x-ray.   Mammograms have two purposes, the first is as a screening tool to detect breast cancer. Mammograms are also used as a beast imaging technique for diagnostic and screening purposes. So if you find something unusual in your breast, a mammogram may be required to find out more information about what's going on.   Screening mammography, especially for women aged 50-69 years, is currently the best method available for detecting breast cancer early. Breast Cancers found early are easier to treat than those that have advanced. Early detection also gives best treatment options. If you are aged 50-69 you will be invited by a letter for a free mammogram every two years through the BreastScreen program. BreastScreen also offers mammograms for free to women over 40 and over 70, however reminder letters will not be sent to you. If you would like to make an appointment or to get more information on BreastScreen, give them a call on 13 20 50. This number is easy to remember. 13 is when you grow them, 20 is when you show them, 50 is when you screen them. Regular screening mammograms are not recommended for women under 40 years of age. The tissue of young women’s breasts tends to be denser than that of older women. This is due to the influence of hormones. On a mammogram, dense breast tissue shows up as a white area. Breast cancers also appear white and are therefore more difficult to find on younger women’s mammograms. Finding a tumour in a mammogram of a woman under the age of 40 was like "looking for a snowball in a blizzard." However if you are sent for investigative screening is likely that you will receive a mammogram and an ultra sound even if you are under 40.
  • Mammograms are a screening tool to detect breast cancer. It is basically a low dose breast x-ray.   Mammograms have two purposes, the first is as a screening tool to detect breast cancer. Mammograms are also used as a beast imaging technique for diagnostic and screening purposes. So if you find something unusual in your breast, a mammogram may be required to find out more information about what's going on.   Screening mammography, especially for women aged 50-69 years, is currently the best method available for detecting breast cancer early. Breast Cancers found early are easier to treat than those that have advanced. Early detection also gives best treatment options. If you are aged 50-69 you will be invited by a letter for a free mammogram every two years through the BreastScreen program. BreastScreen also offers mammograms for free to women over 40 and over 70, however reminder letters will not be sent to you. If you would like to make an appointment or to get more information on BreastScreen, give them a call on 13 20 50. This number is easy to remember. 13 is when you grow them, 20 is when you show them, 50 is when you screen them. Regular screening mammograms are not recommended for women under 40 years of age. The tissue of young women’s breasts tends to be denser than that of older women. This is due to the influence of hormones. On a mammogram, dense breast tissue shows up as a white area. Breast cancers also appear white and are therefore more difficult to find on younger women’s mammograms. Finding a tumour in a mammogram of a woman under the age of 40 was like "looking for a snowball in a blizzard." However if you are sent for investigative screening is likely that you will receive a mammogram and an ultra sound even if you are under 40.

Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation Breast Awareness - McGrath Foundation Presentation Transcript