Inquiry Learning and the Big6

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This is a presentation prepared by Sheila Delattre-Carter and Sherry Woolam for LS5443, Librarians as Instructional Partners, a MLS course offered by Texas Woman's University.

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  • The Big6 is an information and technology literacy model and curriculum, implemented in thousands of schools – K through higher education. Some people call the Big6 an information problem-solving strategy because with the Big6, students are able to handle any problem, assignment, decision or task.Eisenberg, Mike. "Big6™ Skills Overview." Big6. 19 Nov. 2001. Web. 14 Oct. 2009. <http://www.big6.com/2001/11/19/a-big6%e2%84%a2-skills-overview/>.
  • London, Ellen. "The International Baccalaureate Program in International Schools and Big6: A Wonderful Partnership." Web log post. Big6 Blog Archive. The Big6, 9 Sept. 2006. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. <http://www.big6.com/2006/09/06/the-international-baccalaureate-program-in-international-schools-and-big6-a-wonderful-partnership/>.
  • Eisenberg, Mike. "Information Literacy: The Most Basic of Basics." Mike Eisenberg on Information Literacy. June 2009. Web. 6 Oct. 2009. http://uweoconnect.extn.washington.edu/publicmbeinfolit/.
  • Lowe, Carrie. "» Blog Archive » Rethinking Task Definition: Saving the World in Five Minutes (eNews 9.4, 3)." Big6. 12 Dec. 2008. Web. 15 Oct. 2009. <http://www.big6.com/2008/12/12/rethinking-task-definition-saving-the-world-in-five-minutes-enews-94-3/>.Focusing on Task Definition accomplishes a few different things. First, it makes the information problem solving process much more efficient, since the learner won’t waste a lot of time searching for things he or she doesn’t end up needing. Second, it forces the learner to develop some preliminary understanding of the topic and what kind of final product is expected. Finally, it requires the learner to think – at least preliminarily – about what kinds of resources might be best.
  • http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/big6-student-benefits/http://www.big6.com/files/Big6_aligned_with_ICT_Literacy_Standards.pdf
  • Integrates information needs, search strategies, presentation skills, and evaluation skills, along with technology tools. This systematic process helps students define information needs, find, engage, organize, present, and evaluate information for specific needs and tasks.
  • So far this slide is just a cut and paste of some info I found on the Big 6 website – you may want to use some of the information for why Big 6 is better.http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/big6-student-benefits/http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/how-will-educators-benefit-by-using-the-big6-skills/
  • So far this slide is just a cut and paste of some info I found on the Big 6 website – you may want to use some of the information for why Big 6 is better.http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/big6-student-benefits/http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/how-will-educators-benefit-by-using-the-big6-skills/
  • Division of Policy Coordination. "Chapter 110. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading." 19 TAC Chapter 110 Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency, 4 Sept. 2008. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. <http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter110/ch110b.html>.
  • Division of Policy Coordination. "Chapter 110. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading." 19 TAC Chapter 110 Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency, 4 Sept. 2008. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. <http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter110/ch110b.html>.
  • "Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies." TAC 19 Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. <http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/ch113b.html>.
  • Inquiry Learning and the Big6

    1. 1. A Presentation for Middle school teachers<br />By Sheila DeLattre-Carter <br />Sherry Woolam<br />Inquiry-Based Learning Processand The Big6<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    2. 2. Crucial Skills for the 21st Century Learner<br />Inquiry-Based Learning Process<br />What is inquiry-based learning?<br />What are the benefits of the inquiry-based process?<br />How do you apply inquiry-based learning?<br />
    3. 3. What is inquiry-based learning?<br />A process that teaches research skills in any subject or content area<br />Promotes critical thinking skills<br />Information gathering process related to life<br />Students work cooperatively in groups to solve problems and answer questions<br />(Carnesi and DiGiorgio 32)<br />
    4. 4. The Benefits of Inquiry Learning<br />Encourages cooperative learning<br />Takes one project through major content areas<br />Caters to different learning styles<br />Multiple-intelligence friendly<br />(Carnesi and DiGiorgio 32)<br />
    5. 5. Applying Inquiry-Based Learning<br />The Six Step Inquiry Process<br />Questioning<br />Planning<br />Collecting and Crediting<br />Organizing<br />Synthesizing<br />Communicating<br />(Carnesi and DiGiorgio 32-36)<br />
    6. 6. Step 1: Questioning<br />Word Splash by Wordle.net<br />
    7. 7. Step 2: Planning<br />Students devise a plan or schedule <br />Students gather resources for project<br />Review and revise plan<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    8. 8. Step 3: Collecting and Crediting<br />Students collect information<br />Document information<br />Cite their sources<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    9. 9. Step 4: Organizing<br />Graphic organizers are a must<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    10. 10. Step 5: Synthesizing<br />Completing the final product<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    11. 11. Step 6: Communicating<br />The art of presenting<br />Addressing your audience<br />Image Source: Microsoft PowerPoint Clip Gallery<br />
    12. 12. The Inquiry Process<br />Image Source: Carnesi and DiGiorgio 32<br />
    13. 13. Six Step Inquiry Process in Action, Part 1<br />Image Source: Carnesi and DiGiorgio 35<br />
    14. 14. Six Step Inquiry Process in Action, Part 2<br />Image Source: Carnesi and DiGiorgio 35<br />
    15. 15. Inquiry Process in Action <br />Image Source: Harada and Yoshina 23<br />
    16. 16. Role of the SLMS<br />Image Source: Harada and Yoshina 24<br />
    17. 17. Conventional vs. Inquiry-Focused<br />Image Source: Harada and Yoshina 25<br />
    18. 18. The Big6 Research Model<br />What is the Big6 Research Model?<br />What is the Big6 process?<br />What are the benefits of the Big6?<br />How does the Big6 align with Texas Standards?<br />What resources are available?<br />www.big6.com<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    19. 19. What is the Big 6 Research Model?<br />“The Big6 is a proven approach to information problem-solving. It helps you succeed in school and life. Use the Big6 to find, use, apply, and evaluate information for specific needs and tasks” (Graphic Source: www.big6.com/<br />kids/7-12.htm).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    20. 20. Combines critical thinking, problem solving and manipulation of information for a meaningful solution<br />Provides a systematic approach to information problem-solving relying on critical thinking skills<br />Provides a basic framework for teaching and promoting information literacy<br />Tried and true method to answer a question, complete an assignment or create a unique product<br />The information problem-solving process steps are not necessarily sequential and may be repeated as needed<br />What is the Big 6 Research Model?<br />(London)<br />
    21. 21. What is the Big 6 Research Model?<br />Task Definition1.1 Define the information problem1.2 Identify information needed<br />Information Seeking Strategies 2.1 Determine all possible sources2.2 Select the best sources<br />Location and Access3.1 Locate sources (intellectually and physically)3.2 Find information within sources<br />Handout created by: Barbara J. Shoemaker, School Media Specialist, Mill Road Elementary, K-2 Red Hook Central School District, Red Hook, NY<br />
    22. 22. What is the Big 6 Research Model?<br />4. Use of Information4.1 Engage (e.g., read, hear, view, touch)4.2 Extract relevant information<br />5. Synthesis5.1 Organize from multiple sources5.2 Present the information<br />6. Evaluation6.1 Judge the product (effectiveness)6.2 Judge the process (efficiency)<br />Handout created by: Barbara J. Shoemaker, School Media Specialist, Mill Road Elementary, K-2 Red Hook Central School District, Red Hook, NY<br />
    23. 23. What is the Big 6 Research Model?<br />The Big6 process is not just a linear process. Steps may be completed in any order as well as repeated as frequently as necessary to successfully complete the project (Eisenberg, &quot;Information Literacy:”).<br />Graphic source: http://uweoconnect.extn.washington.edu/publicmbeinfolit/<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    24. 24. Step 1: Task Definition<br />Facilitates information problem solving process by helping students focus on specific elements <br />Promotes a preliminary understanding of the topic and the expected outcome or end result<br />Starts the resource identification process. <br />(Lowe, 2008)<br />AASL Standards for the<br />21st-Century Learner <br />in Action<br />1.1.3 Develop and refine a range of questions to frame the search for new understanding (13).<br />1.2.1 Display initiative and engagement by posing questions and investigating the answers beyond the collection of superficial facts (13).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    25. 25. Step 2: Information Seeking Strategies<br />Teaches students to become discretionary users of internet resources<br />AASL Standards for the <br />21st-Century Learner <br />in Action<br />1.1.4 Find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions (13).<br />1.1.5 Evaluate information found in selected sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context (13).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    26. 26. Step 3: Location and Access<br />Guides students through the process of finding, sorting and applying relevant, credible information <br />Facilitates understanding of benefits of both print and non-print resources<br />Develops information search and retrieval skills<br />(Eisenberg, &quot;Big6™ <br />Skills Overview“)<br />AASL Standards for the <br />21st-Century Learner <br />in Action<br />1.1.8 Demonstrate mastery of technology tools for accessing information and pursuing inquiry (13).<br />1.3.2 Seek divergent perspectives during information gathering and assessment (13).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    27. 27. Step 4: Use of Information<br />Identify the main idea, key facts and quotes <br />Differentiate between fact and fiction <br />Understand requirements and importance of citing resources<br />(Eisenberg, &quot;Big6™ Skills Overview“)<br />AASL Standards for the 21st<br />Century Learner in Action<br />1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias (13).<br />2.1.1 Apply critical thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, evaluation, organization) to information and knowledge (14).<br />1.3.3 Follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information (13).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    28. 28. Step 5: Synthesis<br />Students learn how to organize and prioritize information from multiple sources <br />Facilitates interpretation, analysis and evaluation of information<br />Builds presentation skills and expertise<br />AASL Standards for the<br />21st-Century Learner <br />in Action<br />2.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to analyze and organize information (14).<br />3.1.4 Use technology and other information tools to organize and display knowledge and understanding in ways that others can view, use, and assess (15).<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    29. 29. Step 6: Evaluation<br />AASL Standards for <br />the 21st-Century Learner<br />in Action<br />3.4.1 Assess the processes by which learning was achieved in order to revise strategies and learn more effectively in the future (15).<br />3.4.2 Assess the quality and effectiveness of the learning product (15).<br />Self-assessment of not only the completed project to defined criteria but also during each phase of the process<br />The “Big6™” is copyright © (1987) Michael B. Eisenberg and Robert E. Berkowitz. For more information, visit: www.big6.com<br />
    30. 30. Advantages of the Big 6 Research Model<br />Integrates information needs, search strategies, presentation skills, and evaluation skills, along with technology tools. <br />A successful, tested approach that incorporates information and technology skills to strengthen your curriculum.<br />Helps students to evaluate information, track their own progress during assignments and reflect on their completed work before it’s graded.<br />Big6 stages allow students to develop information problem-solving skills as well as become organized, proficient users of information technologies.<br />Ensures that students learn the fundamental approach for success in an overwhelming information and communication age.<br />Develops the problem solving capacity of learners, including students who do not fit a traditional image of &quot;successful learners.”<br />(Big6 Associates, LLC)<br />
    31. 31. Big6 Benefit to Students<br />Learn transferable planning and organizing skills they will be able to apply for a lifetime School: homework, tests, decision-making, writing, research, projects Life: workplace, selecting entertainment, pursuing hobbies, friendship issues, making reservations, job hunting, apartment hunting<br />Find, sort, and apply relevant, credible information to creatively solve a problem.<br />Prepare a solution based on reliable information, and give proper credit to information sources.<br />Achieve results using any individual learning style. Students will consider if their current style and approach works well for problem solving.<br />Understand general problem-solving concepts and then refine each skill to learn and perfect specific details. <br />(Big6 Staff, Benefit to Students)<br />
    32. 32. Benefit to Educators<br />Adaptable:Current units and lessons can be framed within the Big6 context. Big6 compliments standards-based curriculum, and has terminology to fit student learning in grades K-12 and beyond.<br />Flexible: Emphasize one Big6 skill or all Big6 skills throughout a school year, based on needs in school, time and resources available, and library/classroom partnership.<br />Collaboration: Big6 facilitates communication among administrators, classroom teachers, and teacher-librarians. The Big6 is useful when you need to coordinate cross-curricular projects.<br />(Big6 Staff, “How Will Educators Benefit”)<br />
    33. 33. Big 6 Educator Resources<br />Word Cloud by Wordle.net<br />
    34. 34. Big 6 Alignment to TEKS ELAR Curriculum<br />(19.b.22)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:<br />(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and<br />(B)  apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.<br />(19.b.23)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:<br />(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources;<br />(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;<br />(C)  record data, utilizing available technology in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data;<br />(D)  identify the source of notes and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and<br />(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.<br /><ul><li>Task Definition
    35. 35. Information Seeking
    36. 36. Location and Access
    37. 37. Use of Information
    38. 38. Synthesis
    39. 39. Evaluation</li></ul>(Division of Policy Coordination, “Chapter 110”)<br />
    40. 40. Big 6 Alignment to TEKS ELAR Curriculum<br />(19.b.24)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:<br />(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; <br />(B)  evaluate the relevance and reliability of sources<br />(19.b.25)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:<br />(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;<br />(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;<br />(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and<br />(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge<br /><ul><li>Task Definition
    41. 41. Information Seeking
    42. 42. Location and Access
    43. 43. Use of Information
    44. 44. Synthesis
    45. 45. Evaluation</li></ul>(Division of Policy Coordination, “Chapter 110”)<br />
    46. 46. Big 6 Alignment to Social Studies TEKS<br />(23.b.21)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:<br />(A)  differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources to acquire information about Texas;<br />(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;<br />(C)  organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals (graphs, charts, timelines, and maps);<br />(D)  identify points of view from the historical context and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;<br />(E)  support a point of view on a social studies issue or event;<br />(F)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;<br />(G)  evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author; <br />(H)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.<br /><ul><li>Task Definition
    47. 47. Information Seeking
    48. 48. Location and Access
    49. 49. Use of Information
    50. 50. Synthesis
    51. 51. Evaluation</li></ul>(&quot;Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies.”)<br />
    52. 52. Big 6 Alignment to Science TEKS<br />(19.b.2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to: <br />(A) plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology; <br />(B) design and implement comparative and experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology; <br />(C) collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers; <br />(D) construct tables and graphs, using repeated trials and means, to organize data and identify patterns; and <br />(E) analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends. <br /><ul><li>Task Definition
    53. 53. Information Seeking
    54. 54. Location and Access
    55. 55. Use of Information
    56. 56. Synthesis
    57. 57. Evaluation</li></ul>(&quot;Chapter 112. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science.”)<br />
    58. 58. Big 6 Alignment to Mathematics TEKS<br />(23.b.13)  Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 7 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to:<br />(A)  identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;<br />(B)  use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;<br />(C)  select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from a variety of different types, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and<br />(D)  select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil, and technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems.<br /><ul><li>Task Definition
    59. 59. Information Seeking
    60. 60. Location and Access
    61. 61. Use of Information
    62. 62. Synthesis
    63. 63. Evaluation</li></ul>(Division of Policy Coordination, “Chapter 111”)<br />
    64. 64. Application of the Big6 Process<br />The Big6 process can be applied to the <br />following sample of middle school projects<br />Research and present findings on the pros and cons of one or more alternative energy sources<br />Read a biography on a Texas historical figure, research additional facts on the person’s life and accomplishments and present the findings<br />Investigate and report findings regarding the effect of changes in ocean currents and temperatures on the weather<br />Explore the role and significance of Spanish missions in Texas history<br />
    65. 65. Conclusion<br />(Harada & Yoshina, 22-23)<br />
    66. 66. Works Cited<br />American Association of School Librarians. Standards for the 21st Century in Action. Chicago: American Association of School Librarians, 2009. Print.<br />Big6 Associates, LLC. The Big6™ Skills Approach: Putting It All Together. Big6 Associates, LLC. Index of Files. Big6 Associates, LLC, 2007. Web. 18 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/files/2007_Big6_Summer_Academy_Catalog.pdf&gt;. <br />The Big6 Staff. “Big6 Student Benefits.&quot; Big6. 18 July 2005. Web. 18 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/big6-student-benefits/&gt;.<br />The Big6 Staff. “How Will Educators Benefit by Using the Big6 Skills?&quot; Big6. 18 July 2005. Web. 20 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/2005/07/18/big6-student-benefits/&gt;.<br />Carnesi, Sabrina and Karen DiGiorgio. 2009, March. “Teaching the Inquiry Process to 21st Century Learners.” Library Media Connection, 27(5), 32-36. Accessed 29 September 2009 from Academic Search Complete.<br />
    67. 67. Works Cited<br />&quot;Chapter 112. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science.“ Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/teks/science/ch112b_as_approved032709.pdf&gt;.<br />&quot;Chapter 113. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies.&quot; TAC 19 Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter113/ch113b.html&gt;.<br />Division of Policy Coordination. &quot;Chapter 110. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading.&quot; 19 TAC Chapter 110 Subchapter B. Middle School. Texas Education Agency, 4 Sept. 2008. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. http:/ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter110/ch110b.html<br />
    68. 68. Works Cited<br />Division of Policy Coordination. &quot;Chapter 111. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Mathematics.&quot; Chapter111. Subchapter B. Texas Education Agency, 3 Feb. 2009. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter111/ch111b.html&gt;.<br />Eisenberg, Mike, and Robert Berkowitz. Big6 Kids. Chart. The Big6, 13 Feb. 2002. Web. 18 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/kids/7-12.htm&gt;.<br />Eisenberg, Mike. &quot;Big6™ Skills Overview.&quot; Big6. 19 Nov. 2001. Web. 14 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/2001/11/19/a-big6%e2%84%a2-skills-overview/&gt;.<br />Eisenberg, Mike. &quot;Information Literacy: The Most Basic of Basics.&quot; Mike Eisenberg on Information Literacy. June 2009. Web. 6 Oct. 2009. http://uweoconnect.extn.washington.edu/publicmbeinfolit/.<br />Harada, Violet H. and Joan M. Yoshina. 2004. “Moving from Rote to Inquiry: Creating Learning That Counts.” Library Media Connection, 23(2), 22-25. <br />
    69. 69. Works Cited<br />London, Ellen. &quot;The International Baccalaureate Program in International Schools and Big6: A Wonderful Partnership.&quot; Web log post. Big6 Blog Archive. The Big6, 9 Sept. 2006. Web. 16 Oct. 2009. http://www.big6.com/2006/09/06/the-international-baccalaureate-program-in-international-schools-and-big6-a-wonderful-partnership/.<br />Lowe, Carrie. &quot;» Blog Archive » Rethinking Task Definition: Saving the World in Five Minutes (eNews 9.4, 3).&quot; Big6. 12 Dec. 2008. Web. 15 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.big6.com/2008/12/12/rethinking-task-definition-saving-the-world-in-five-minutes-enews-94-3/&gt;. <br />
    70. 70. Useful Web Sites<br />Big6 Method: http://www.big6.com/<br />EasyBib: http://easybib.com/<br />Exploratree by FutureLab: www.exploratree.org.uk/<br />InfoPlease.com: www.infoplease.com/homework/writingskills1.html<br />NoteStar: http://notestar.4teachers.org/<br />ReadWriteThink: http://www.readwritethink.org<br />Teacher Tap (Web quest creation tool): http://eduscapes.com/tap/topic4.htm<br />TeAchnology: www.teach-nology.com/teachers/lesson_plans/computing/web_quests<br />ThinkQuest: www.thinkquest.org/en/<br />ThinkTank: http://thinktank.4teachers.org/<br />Webquest.Org: http://webquest.sdsu.edu<br />Wordle.net: www.wordle.net<br />

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