Sandra	  J.	  Weiss,	  PhD,	  DNSc	  	  Professor	  &	  Eschbach	  Endowed	  Chair	  University	  of	  California,	  San	 ...
Touch	  with	  Other	  People	  
Touch	  with	  Animals	  
Touch	  with	  Objects	  
 	  	  Touch	  in	  Crea8on	  of	  Art	  
Touch	  in	  Apprecia8on	  of	  Art	  
Touch	  and	  Emo8on	  —  Regardless	  of	  the	  context,	  touch	  can	  	  —  elicit	  emotion	  —  express	  emotio...
 	  	  Somatosensory	  System	  —  First	  system	  to	  develop	  in	  the	  womb	  —  Most	  mature	  system	  at	  bi...
THE	  SKIN	  — Is	  our	  body’s	  largest	  organ	  — Covers	  about	  20	  square	  feet	  — Makes	  up	  15	  to	  2...
THE	  SKIN	  —  Has	  about	  6	  million	  cells	  in	  each	  	  square	  inch	  —  Houses	  the	  sensory	  receptors...
Sensory	  Transmission:	  	  From	  Touch	  to	  Tac8le	  Percep8on	  
Touch	  triggers	  an	  electrical	  and	  biochemical	  cascade…	  	  —  ….that	  travels	  from	  sensory	  receptors	 ...
Somatosensory	  Cortex	  
The	  Language	  of	  Touch	  Communicates	  Emo8on	  —  Location	  —  Action	  —  Intensity	  —  Duration	  —  Frequ...
LOCATION	  — The	  area	  of	  the	  body	  that	  is	  touched	  — Social	  and	  cultural	  meaning	  — Different	  ne...
SOME	  BODY	  AREAS	  HAVE	  MANY	  RECEPTORS	  AND	  NERVE	  PATHWAYS	  — Face,	  feet,	  genitalia,	  head,	  hands,	  ...
Sensory	  Receptors	  and	  Art	  —  Because	  sensitivity	  is	  pronounced	  in	  hands	  and	  fingertips,	  the	  emot...
ACTION	  — The	  gesture	  or	  movement	  used	  	  during	  touch	  (e.g.	  stroke,	  squeeze)	  — Different	  actions	...
Ac8ons	  and	  Emo8onal	  Expression	  —  Stroking	  and	  patting	  –	  sympathy	  —  Hitting	  and	  squeezing	  –	  a...
INTENSITY	  — The	  degree	  of	  pressure	  to	  the	  skin	  	  	  	  	  (e.g.	  firm,	  light)	  — Can	  reduce	  or	 ...
Qualita8ve	  Dimensions	  — Stimulating	  Touch	  —  Vigorous	  Actions	  —  Highly	  Innervated	  Locations	  —  Stro...
Quan8ta8ve	  Dimensions	  —  Amount	  of	  Touch	  —  Frequency	  —  Duration	  
Touch	  Creates	  Mental	  Images	  —  This	  language	  of	  touch	  elicits	  mental	  images	  	  —  Research	  has	 ...
 Mental	  Images	  —  Softness	  and	  hardness	  —  Roughness	  and	  smoothness	  —  Coldness	  and	  warmth	  —  Si...
Emo8onal	  Quality	  of	  Touch	  —  The	  language	  of	  touch	  can	  affect	  emotional	  response	  differently	  base...
Oxytocin:	  	  A	  Hormone	  &	  Neuropep8de	  	  
Oxytocin	  —  Inhibits	  our	  stress	  response	  at	  all	  levels	  of	  the	  CNS	  and	  decreases	  stress	  hormon...
Touch	  and	  Oxytocin	  —  Animal	  Studies:	  	  Stimulating	  touch	  (via	  licking	  and	  grooming)	  increases	  e...
Effects	  of	  Oxytocin	  Release	  
Touch	  and	  Brain-­‐Derived	  Neurotrophic	  Factor	  (BDNF)	  —  Animal	  studies	  also	  show	  that	  stimulating	 ...
 Effects	  of	  BDNF	  on	  Emo8ons	  —  High	  levels	  of	  BDNF	  have	  been	  related	  to	  increased	  amygdala	  v...
Vagus	  Nerve	  Complex	  
Touch	  and	  Vagal	  Nerve	  S8mula8on	  —  Vagus	  Nerve	  Complex	  –	  A	  component	  of	  the	  parasympathetic	  n...
Tac8le	  Temperament	  	  —  Sensitivity	  to	  touch	  	  —  Immediacy	  of	  response	  –	  threshold	  for	  awarenes...
Impairments	  in	  Tac8le	  Percep8on	  —  Excessive	  reactivity	  to	  touch	  —  Difficulty	  regulating	  sensations	 ...
TACTILE	  DEFENSIVENESS	  —  Impairments	  can	  result	  in	  a	  fight	  or	  flight	  reaction	  to	  touch	  	  —  Thi...
Sensa8on	  Seeking	  —  Has	  a	  very	  high	  threshold	  for	  touch	  	  	  —  Attempt	  to	  touch	  and	  be	  tou...
Persons	  with	  Down	  Syndrome	  	  —  They	  experience	  frequent	  challenges	  in	  processing	  stimuli	  from	  t...
Larger	  Context	  of	  the	  Response	  to	  Touch	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  	  — Genetic	  Predisposition	  — Age	  —...
 Touch	  and	  Emo8ons	  —  The	  language	  of	  touch	  serves	  to	  both	  communicate	  our	  emotions	  and	  to	  ...
Touch	  and	  Emo8ons	  —  Evidence	  suggests	  that	  pleasurable	  touch	  helps	  to	  regulate	  our	  stress	  resp...
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss

695 views
502 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
695
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Touching Art: Tribute to Judith Scott - Presentation by Sandra Weiss

  1. 1. Sandra  J.  Weiss,  PhD,  DNSc    Professor  &  Eschbach  Endowed  Chair  University  of  California,  San  Francisco  
  2. 2. Touch  with  Other  People  
  3. 3. Touch  with  Animals  
  4. 4. Touch  with  Objects  
  5. 5.      Touch  in  Crea8on  of  Art  
  6. 6. Touch  in  Apprecia8on  of  Art  
  7. 7. Touch  and  Emo8on  —  Regardless  of  the  context,  touch  can    —  elicit  emotion  —  express  emotion    —  How  does  this  occur?  —  It’s  all  about  the  very  sophisticated  makeup  of  our  somatosensory  system  –  the  system  that  governs  touch    
  8. 8.      Somatosensory  System  —  First  system  to  develop  in  the  womb  —  Most  mature  system  at  birth  —  Our  skin  is  its  primary  organ    
  9. 9. THE  SKIN  — Is  our  body’s  largest  organ  — Covers  about  20  square  feet  — Makes  up  15  to  20%  of  total  body    weight  (  8-­‐10  lbs)  
  10. 10. THE  SKIN  —  Has  about  6  million  cells  in  each    square  inch  —  Houses  the  sensory  receptors  that  make  it  possible  to  experience  touch    
  11. 11. Sensory  Transmission:    From  Touch  to  Tac8le  Percep8on  
  12. 12. Touch  triggers  an  electrical  and  biochemical  cascade…    —  ….that  travels  from  sensory  receptors  in  the  skin  across  nerve  pathways  to  the  somatosensory  cortex  —  …and  transmits  detailed  information  about  the  specific  properties  or  qualities  of  touch  
  13. 13. Somatosensory  Cortex  
  14. 14. The  Language  of  Touch  Communicates  Emo8on  —  Location  —  Action  —  Intensity  —  Duration  —  Frequency  
  15. 15. LOCATION  — The  area  of  the  body  that  is  touched  — Social  and  cultural  meaning  — Different  nerve  pathways  
  16. 16. SOME  BODY  AREAS  HAVE  MANY  RECEPTORS  AND  NERVE  PATHWAYS  — Face,  feet,  genitalia,  head,  hands,  neck  
  17. 17. Sensory  Receptors  and  Art  —  Because  sensitivity  is  pronounced  in  hands  and  fingertips,  the  emotional  experience  of  the  artist  who  works  with  her  hands  is  dramatically  increased  
  18. 18. ACTION  — The  gesture  or  movement  used    during  touch  (e.g.  stroke,  squeeze)  — Different  actions  carry  very  different  meanings  
  19. 19. Ac8ons  and  Emo8onal  Expression  —  Stroking  and  patting  –  sympathy  —  Hitting  and  squeezing  –  anger  —  Pushing  –  disgust  —  Hugging  and  stroking  -­‐  love  
  20. 20. INTENSITY  — The  degree  of  pressure  to  the  skin          (e.g.  firm,  light)  — Can  reduce  or  increase  the  transmission  of  sensory  information  to  the  brain    
  21. 21. Qualita8ve  Dimensions  — Stimulating  Touch  —  Vigorous  Actions  —  Highly  Innervated  Locations  —  Strong  Intensity  — Complex  Touch  —  Varied  Actions  —  Diverse  Locations  — Affective  Touch  —  Comforting  or  Pleasurable  —  Distressing  or  Painful    
  22. 22. Quan8ta8ve  Dimensions  —  Amount  of  Touch  —  Frequency  —  Duration  
  23. 23. Touch  Creates  Mental  Images  —  This  language  of  touch  elicits  mental  images    —  Research  has  shown  that  the  blind  can  create  3-­‐dimensional  images  of  what  they  touch  on  the  basis  of  tactile  information  alone  
  24. 24.  Mental  Images  —  Softness  and  hardness  —  Roughness  and  smoothness  —  Coldness  and  warmth  —  Size  and  form    —  Responsiveness  and  rigidity  
  25. 25. Emo8onal  Quality  of  Touch  —  The  language  of  touch  can  affect  emotional  response  differently  based  upon  these  mental  images  and  how  stimulating,  complex,  pleasurable  or  extensive  the  touch  is  —  Different  dimensions  of  touch  conjure  up  images  that  create  emotion  when  we  touch  or  are  touched  —  This  emotional  response  to  touch  is  influenced  to  a  great  extent  by  our  neurobiology    
  26. 26. Oxytocin:    A  Hormone  &  Neuropep8de    
  27. 27. Oxytocin  —  Inhibits  our  stress  response  at  all  levels  of  the  CNS  and  decreases  stress  hormones  (cortisol)    —  Elicits  a  calming  effect  on  behavior,  and  reduces  blood  pressure  and  heart  rate    —  Increases  a  sense  of  contentment,  belonging,  safety  and  general  well-­‐being    
  28. 28. Touch  and  Oxytocin  —  Animal  Studies:    Stimulating  touch  (via  licking  and  grooming)  increases  expression  of  oxytocin  —  Human  Studies:    —  Maternal  affectionate  touch  of  the  infant  (stroking,  kissing)  and  skin-­‐to-­‐skin  contact  both  increase  oxytocin  levels  —  Oxytocin  is  also  released  when  adults  both  give  and  receive  pleasant  touch  (hugging,  holding  hands,  massage)    
  29. 29. Effects  of  Oxytocin  Release  
  30. 30. Touch  and  Brain-­‐Derived  Neurotrophic  Factor  (BDNF)  —  Animal  studies  also  show  that  stimulating  touch  (high  levels  of  licking  and  grooming)  increases  levels  of  BDNF  as  well  as  altering  expression  of  the  BDNF  gene  over  time  (epigenetics)    
  31. 31.  Effects  of  BDNF  on  Emo8ons  —  High  levels  of  BDNF  have  been  related  to  increased  amygdala  volume  —  The  amygdala  is  the  main  region  of  the  brain  responsible  for  emotional  expression  and  emotional  response  —  BDNF  is  also  a  modulator  of  key  neurotransmitters  such  as  serotonin,  dopamine  and  norepinephrine  that  contribute  to  emotional  well  being    —  Emotional  disorders  such  as  depression  are  associated  with  reduced  BDNF  
  32. 32. Vagus  Nerve  Complex  
  33. 33. Touch  and  Vagal  Nerve  S8mula8on  —  Vagus  Nerve  Complex  –  A  component  of  the  parasympathetic  nervous  system  which  reduces  the  stress  response  and  arousal  —  Polyvagal  Theory  of  Emotion  (Porges)  –  Vagal  nerve  stimulation  enhances  positive  emotion  and  helps  to  regulate  negative  emotion      —  Touch  activates  the  vagal  system,  creating  relaxation  and    feelings  of  well  being  
  34. 34. Tac8le  Temperament    —  Sensitivity  to  touch    —  Immediacy  of  response  –  threshold  for  awareness  —   Reactivity  when  touched  —  Strength  of  neurological  and  behavioral  response  —  Tolerance  for  being  touched  —  Ability  to  endure  the  response  without  distress  
  35. 35. Impairments  in  Tac8le  Percep8on  —  Excessive  reactivity  to  touch  —  Difficulty  regulating  sensations  associated  with  being  touched  —  Difficulty  recognizing  tactile  sensations  –  hyposensitivity  —   Difficulty  discriminating  between  types  of  tactile  sensation      
  36. 36. TACTILE  DEFENSIVENESS  —  Impairments  can  result  in  a  fight  or  flight  reaction  to  touch    —  This  results  most  often  from  a  very  low  threshold  for  touch  —  A  person  can  experience  a  strong,  often  frightening  degree  of  emotional  arousal  when  touched  
  37. 37. Sensa8on  Seeking  —  Has  a  very  high  threshold  for  touch      —  Attempt  to  touch  and  be  touched  frequently  to  address  feelings  of  tactile  deprivation  —  Use  touch  to  increase  stimulation  and  to  enhance  their  experience  of  the  world  –  to  feel  more  alive  
  38. 38. Persons  with  Down  Syndrome    —  They  experience  frequent  challenges  in  processing  stimuli  from  touch  —  The  sensory  and  motor  skills  in  hands  and  fingers  may  be  only  modestly  developed  —  Their  perception  of  tactile  stimuli  may  be  heightened  (hypersensitivity)  
  39. 39. Larger  Context  of  the  Response  to  Touch                    — Genetic  Predisposition  — Age  — Gender  — Health  Status  — Cultural  and  family  traditions  — Past  experiences  with  touch  — Personal  attitudes  about  touch    
  40. 40.  Touch  and  Emo8ons  —  The  language  of  touch  serves  to  both  communicate  our  emotions  and  to  enable  a  fuller  experience  of  them      —  Touch  is  inherently  ‘emotional’  because  its  sensory  receptors  have  nociceptive  (pain-­‐related),  excitatory,  and  erogenous  capabilities    
  41. 41. Touch  and  Emo8ons  —  Evidence  suggests  that  pleasurable  touch  helps  to  regulate  our  stress  response  system,  increase  our  desire  to  express  emotion,  and  improve  our  emotional  health  through  neurobiological  mediators  such  as  oxytocin,  BDNF  &  vagal  stimulation  —  This  type  of  pleasurable  touch  might  occur  in  interactions  with  people,  or  in  the  case  of  Judith  Scott,  also  with  her  art.  

×