• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Earthquake Data in the Earth Toolbox
 

Earthquake Data in the Earth Toolbox

on

  • 1,106 views

Frankie's science project.

Frankie's science project.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,106
Views on SlideShare
1,099
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0

1 Embed 7

http://moodle.digitalbcs.com 7

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Earthquake Data in the Earth Toolbox Earthquake Data in the Earth Toolbox Presentation Transcript

    • Earthquake Data in the Earth Toolbox By: Frankie Antenucci
    • 10 Places I think Will Experience An Earthquake In The Future
      • California
      • Mexico
      • Chile
      • India
      • Algeria
      • Greece
      • Southern Italy
      • Singapore
      • North and South Korea
      • Alaska
    • 10 Places I think Will Experience An Earthquake In The Future
    • I think this country will experience a earthquake because . . .
      • 1. California – Japan had the major earthquake and it is sending aftershocks across the Pacific Ocean to California.
      • 2. Mexico – In the past few years, there has been many earthquakes on the western border of Mexico. This is because the country lies on a convergent (colliding together) plate boundary.
      • 3. Chile – In 2010, there were many earthquakes that occurred on the west coast of Chile. The country happens to lie on a convergent plate boundary which, triggers earthquakes.
      • 4. India – The eastern section of India has experienced a good amount of earthquakes over the past years. India has its eastern border lying on a transform-fault boundary, which is why I think it will experience an earthquake.
      • 5. Algeria – This country has not experienced many earthquakes in the past few years but has experienced in the past. Algeria’s northern section is on a convergent plate boundary where about 47 percent of earthquakes occur.
    • I think this country will experience a earthquake because . . . (cont.)
      • 6. Greece – Many earthquakes happen around this country so it is common for them to experience earthquakes. This country also has a border that is associated with a convergent plate boundary.
      • 7. Southern Italy – The southern tip of Italy is where many earthquakes occur. Southern Italy is also right above where the Eurasion Plate and African Plate collide, causing damage to the Earth (convergent plate boundaries).
      • 8. Singapore – Singapore is where many earthquakes occur. There has been a great amount of earthquakes that have happened by this island over the past few years. Singapore is located on a convergent plate boundary where the Eurasion Plate and Australian Plate collide.
      • 9. North and South Korea – In North and South Korea, there are not very many earthquakes that occur. I think that they are due for an earthquake because there have been a scarce amount in this area.
      • 10. Alaska – Lately, over the past few years, Alaska has experienced a good amount of earthquakes. The southern country lies on a convergent plate boundary, which is a common boundary line for earthquakes.
    • What have you learned about earthquakes and earthquake prediction?
      • I have learned a lot about earthquakes during this project. An earthquake is a result of a sudden release of energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. An earthquake prediction is a prediction that an earthquake of a certain magnitude will occur in a particular place at a particular time. I learned that there are a few things that go into making predictions about when earthquakes may occur. Making a prediction when referring to earthquakes are not all about how often earthquakes occur there. One big factor is where the country is on a plate boundary map. Many earthquakes occur on convergent plate boundaries. In fact, based on the research we collected, about 48 percent of earthquakes happen within 100 miles of a convergent plate boundary.
    • What factors influence earthquake prediction?
      • There are a few factors that go into predicting an earthquake. The first factor that helps seismologists predict an earthquake is the Earth’s plate boundaries. Where two plates meet on the Earth’s crust is where it is most common for earthquakes to occur. The second factor is where recent earthquakes have happened in the world. If there have been recent earthquakes occurring in one area, the country is most likely going to have more earthquakes because of the aftershocks of the original one. The last factor that influences earthquake prediction is where major earthquakes occur. If there are earthquakes that have happened recently and happen to be major earthquakes (7.0 to 10.0 magnitude), it is more likely for another earthquake to occur.
    • Where on Earth do most of the really big earthquakes strike?
      • When earthquakes occur on the Earth’s core, they usually have one thing in common, where they happen. Most earthquakes that are the largest and have more effect on the Earth happen on convergent plate boundaries. Convergent plate boundaries are when two of Earth’s tectonic plates move toward each other and collide. Based on the research we conducted in class, we calculated that about 47 percent of big earthquakes that have happened recently occur about 100 miles from a convergent plate boundary. Also, we discovered that 71 percent of big earthquakes happen within 200 miles of a convergent plate boundary.
    • Sig_Big_eq Screen Shot
    • 2010_eq Screen Shot
    • Both Sig_Big_eq and 2010_eq Screen Shot
    • Citations
      • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthquake_prediction
      • http://go.grolier.com/atlas?id=mtlr093&tn=/atlas/printerfriendly.html
      • http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2003/11aug_earthquakes/
      • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convergent_boundary