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    Grammar  Cheat  Sheet Grammar Cheat Sheet Document Transcript

    • Lewis 1 Sarah Lewis Dr. Insenga ENGL 4238.01 9 December 2009 Prefatory Narrative For this unit plan I chose the book To Kill a Mockingbird. As one of the most treasured books of the twentieth century, it serves as one of the most commonly used texts in the 9th grade classroom across America. I chose to focus this unit on a 9th grade Honors classroom due to the heavy workload and extreme amount of reading that had to be done in such a short amount of time. For secondary texts, I focus in on the theme of discrimination and segregation. The texts that best serve this purpose were the documentary A Class Divided, the poem We Wear the Mask by Paul Laurence Dunbar, the song Strange Fruit by Billie Holiday and the song The Death of Emmett Till by Bob Dylan. In addition, I use the film To Kill a Mockingbird as a literary medium of its own. All of these texts culminate to teach students about the historical significance of racism in America. Many educators and scholars say that one of the most poignant themes in To Kill a Mockingbird, is the way that it forces the reader to come face to face with their own bigotry. I want students to understand that although the book’s setting takes place in the 1930s, many lessons are still very viable for today. As a stepping stone, I use the documentary A Class Divided, a forty-five minute film about a third grade class from the 1970s, and an adult audience in the mid-1980s. At first, it may seem that it is easy for a 3rd grade class to succumb to a segregation-experiment (perhaps the argument could be made that they are young and impressionable). However, as the film transitions into an adult-experiment, it becomes more clear that all humans, regardless of age, have the potential to discriminate and hate. Now the
    • Lewis 2 students have a connection to the novel because they may wonder if they themselves would have the potential to emanate such bigotry (in the documentary and in the situations that the novel encounters). This sort of self reflection can not only assist them with the encounter of other literary works but also in their own personal analysis as they read the world around them. To Kill a Mockingbird is filled with so many possibilities for lesson planning, it is hard to pick only enough to fit into a ten day plan. I knew that racism was one that would have to be addressed, but I also wanted to focus on the specific techniques of writing. In the classroom, I want students to have a clear idea of character development, theme, figurative language, setting and voice. All of which are very important characteristics of Harper Lee’s penmanship in this novel. I created and adapted very specific activities and projects to teach these concepts including: The Mapping of Maycomb, The Body Biography and The Mockingbird Printing Press. The mapping project not only provides a way for students to analyze setting, but also the importance of voice in a novel. Since Lee uses Scout’s voice to narrate the story, it only makes sense to have students hone into this and draw the town of Maycomb as she would see it. The students can suddenly walk in Scout’s shoes and soon get the concept and importance of voice in a narrative. The Body Biography is similar in that it focuses on character, but different in that it widens the scope to look at all of the characters’ development in the novel. Each group has to focus on internal and external forces and voices, as well as major changes the individual they have goes through. This clearly provides insight and clarity into the process of writing as well as opens a door for how they will look at all other literature they will encounter. The printing press activity culminates all they have learned about the story, as well as elements they have learned about writing and history, and creates a more in-depth way for them to be accessed. Since students are not accessed based on any major tests, I use writing and comprehension to see whether or not they understand certain concepts and can think in-depth for themselves.
    • Lewis 3 It was very important for me in this unit to create an organized way to hold students accountable, as well as to give them a sense of structure. I also feel very strongly about teaching students how to organize and present their work in a professional manner. The Novel Packet is a way for the students to keep all of their material in one place throughout the entire unit, and a way for them to observe their own progress as well. The final project of the packet is the Layered Cake exercise which allows students the freedom to choose how they will complete it within perimeters that I have already set. It also assists students in organizing their final product in a portfolio fashion before turning it in for a final grade. I really believe that when students have a folder or binder of material that they have worked hard on, a sense of pride and accomplishment can be a bigger reward than a good grade. In addition, on the last page of the packet students are shown a rubric. It is my intention to sit with every student to go over their grade and have them sign for it before I turn it back to them. I truly believe that it will prepare them to be responsible for their own work and will help create an atmosphere of care in my classroom. I am very excited about implementing this entire unit plan into an actual classroom because I am confident that it will be eye-opening for how students look at human beings as well as themselves.
    • Lewis 4 To Kill a Mockingbird Unit Plan DAY ONE Concept / Topic To Teach: Pre- Reading Readiness for the novel. Standards Addressed : ELAALRL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to their contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods. The student relates a literary work to primary source documents of its literary period or historical setting; the student: a. Relates a literary work to the seminal ideas of the time in which it is set or the time of its composition. i. Native American literature ii. Colonial/Revolutionary/National literature b. Relates a literary work to the characteristics of the literary time period that it represents. i. Romanticism/Transcendentalism ii. Realism iii. Naturalism iv. Modernism (including Harlem Renaissance) General Goal(s): To set the historical preface and academic expectations before the reading. Specific Objectives : Students will be given all detailed academic expectations for the unit including a “Novel Packet” that contains important worksheets and secondary material for the unit. Students will be introduced to the historical significance of the 1930s including The Great Depression and Segregation. In addition, the class will have a greater knowledge of the woman behind the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, as they delve into the biography of Harper Lee. Required Materials: 1. “Novel Packet” 2. To Kill a Mockingbird 3. “Historical Background” Power Point 4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W33kkZNiLEA (the biography of Harper Lee) Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be given the Novel Packet. They will be advised that this packet will need to be brought to class everyday for the next two weeks and that it will serve as 60% of their final grade when completed and turned in at the end of the unit.
    • Lewis 5 2. Students will be asked to turn to page 2 of the Novel Packet and without any preface, fill out the first column of the Anticipation Guide (3). Once they are finished, the class will be advised that they will fill out the 2nd column on the last day of the unit to see if their answers have changed. 3. Students will be asked to turn to page 3 in the Novel Packet and will be advised of the reading schedule and due dates. The class will be offered to check out copies of To Kill a Mockingbird from my class collection, to download the entire book (Adobe) from my page linked to the school website, or to buy their own copy. 4. Ask class to circle 1st reading assignment for that evening: Chapters 1-4 and prepare for a writing-prompt the next morning. 5. Link to the You Tube website: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W33kkZNiLEA and watch (around 7 minutes) The Biography of Harper Lee. 6. Show Historical Background Power Point which creates a backdrop for the setting of the novel. Students will learn about the important aspects of the 1930s (especially The Great Depression), and I will merge this “back story” with the novel “back story.” Adaptations (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Students will be assisted according to their I.E.P. assessment and in compliance with the cooperating Special Education teacher, if applicable. DAY TWO Concept / Topic To Teach: Racism in America Standards Addressed : ELAALRL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to their contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.
    • Lewis 6 The student relates a literary work to primary source documents of its literary period or historical setting; the student: a. Relates a literary work to the seminal ideas of the time in which it is set or the time of its composition. i. Native American literature ii. Colonial/Revolutionary/National literature b. Relates a literary work to the characteristics of the literary time period that it represents. i. Romanticism/Transcendentalism ii. Realism iii. Naturalism General Goal(s): Students will have a better understanding of racism/segregation in America, by observing a film in which it occurs in front of them. Students will then relate the concept of racism back to the novel and to their own lives. Specific Objectives : For many students, the concept of segregation seems very abstract because they have never encountered it. The film that they will watch today will give them a better idea of how easy and how quickly humans can (if they are not careful and aware) take on roles that promote hate, segregation and ultimately racism. This will tie directly to the book To Kill a Mockingbird’s plot where racism is so prevalent. Although students have only read chapters 1-4 of the novel, they can already begin to see an emergence of racism and segregation reflected in the minor details of Maycomb and its citizens. Required Materials: 1. Novel Packet 2. To Kill a Mockingbird text 3. The film A Class Divided http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/divided/etc/view.html Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be asked to take out their Novel Packets and turn to page 7 (to the “Journal Writing” Section. A writing-prompt will be given that reflects the previous night’s homework (to read chapters 1-4). Write the prompt on the board: Miss Caroline does not seem impressed by how far advanced Scout is at the start of the school year. She berates her in front of the class and advises her that her father can no longer read to her at home. How does Scout handle this? Why would Miss Caroline punish a student for having knowledge instead of praising them? Write for 10 minutes. 2. Ask the students what they wrote about. Have students share their writing. Talk about how the Finch family (within the first 4 chapters) is already a little different from the usual Maycomb family. Ask the class what “traditional” means. Ask them how this fits in to the novel. Is the Finch family traditional? How can this be problematic for them?
    • Lewis 7 3. Advise students they will be watching the film A Class Divided. Let them know this was an experiment led by an actual 3rd grade teacher in 1970 in Iowa. Preface the film with the fact that this was very close to the time of the Civil Rights Movement and the assassination of Martin Luther King. The children in this film knew very little about any other ethnicity other than white, and the teacher wanted to have them feel what it would have been like to be hated and segregated. Advise students that the “n” word is said at least once in the film. (this film is around 45-55 minutes long) 4. After the film, students will be asked to discuss what they thought of it. Do they think this could happen in their own classroom? Why or Why not? Can they see how easily prejudices and racism can be created? How can they connect this with the novel To Kill a Mockingbird? 5. Students will be assigned homework for the evening, to read chapters 5-9. Advise them there will be a quiz in the morning over their reading. 6. Students will be advised to turn to page 13 in the Novel Packet. They will be given the names of 2-3 other group members. Students will collaborate in their groups and exchange names, e- mails and phone numbers (writing the information on page 13 of their packet). Students will need to be in touch with their group members in order to complete several projects for the unit. For the time being, they need to familiarize themselves with their group members for the next 5 minutes and find out a little more about them. Adaptations (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Students will be assisted according to their I.E.P. assessment and in compliance with the cooperating Special Education teacher, if applicable. DAY THREE Concept / Topic To Teach: Narrative and Point-of-View in To Kill a Mockingbird Standards Addressed : ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation.
    • Lewis 8 General Goal(s): Students will focus on how Harper Lee utilizes narrative and point-of-view in the novel and how both function to create a multi-layered story. Specific Objectives : This class we will focus on the novel chapters 1-9, and look at the way Harper Lee tells the story through the voice of Scout. We will study the way in which a different character telling the story would change the narrative and plot. Students will learn about different story telling point-of-views and the purpose of using such techniques. Students will take part in an activity that illustrates how Scout sees the world around her, specifically the town of Maycomb in order to get a better idea of how powerful her perspective is to the story. Required Materials: 1. Novel Packet 2. To Kill a Mockingbird text 3. Student’s own paper and pen 4. 1 set of marker for every 3-4 students 5. 1 large sheet of white paper for every 3-4 students Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be given a quiz regarding the reading from the previous night’s homework (chapters 5-9). The quiz questions will be written on the board and students will need to have a full sheet of paper with their name, class name, period and date in the upper left hand corner to receive credit. Each answer is worth one point each, for a total of five points. THE QUIZ QUESTIONS: 1. What was the big question that Dill asked Scout in last night’s reading? 2. What do Dill and Jem decide to give Boo Radley? 3. What does Jem confess to Scout about his pants? 4. What happened one winter night in Maycomb County that was so unusual? 5. What did Scout and Jem receive for Christmas that they begged for? ANSWERS: 1. Dill asked Scout to marry him. 2. A note on the window sill 3. The pants were folded when he went back for them 4. It snowed. 5. Air rifles
    • Lewis 9 Students will pass papers to the front of the class and they will be collected so they can be graded as a quiz. 2. Students will be advised to take out a copy of To Kill a Mockingbird (either a class copy or their own), and paper to take notes. The class today will be focused on NARRATIVE and POINT-OF-VIEW. Ask: Who is the narrator in the novel? How old is she when the story unfolds? Is she a child or an adult as she recalls and narrates the story? Advise the students that because Lee used Scout as a 1st person narrator (as an adult reflecting back on her childhood) she has the best of both worlds: adult language and clarity with the insight of a child. Ask students to think about their own childhood and how they would tell the story if they were 7 and then how the story would change at age 15. How would it change? Do you look at life differently now than you did at age 7? Advise students of the different point-of-views in writing (1st person, 3rd person etc.) 3. Transition the lecture into the activity. Ask: Is the town of Maycomb important to Scout? In what way? Does her family fit into the stereotypical Southern Maycomb family? Why or why not? How does Scout relate to those around her? Who is she closest to? What places is she most familiar with (the town, her home, neighbor’s homes, backyard etc.) Now advise students of the activity “Mapping Maycomb.” Student will be given a large sheet of paper (from the media center or art room) and will pair up with their assigned groups. Students will need markers, several copies of the novel and pre-planning. The object is to map out the town through the eyes of Scout, marking places on a map that she most frequents. You are only to use the chapters we have read (chapters 1-9). Illustrate landmarks and roads according to how you think they look. You need to have at least 6 different landmarks, a “you have entered the town of Maycomb sign,” and at least 3 different spots marked in the Finch backyard. Work together! This will be due by the end of class and will be worth 10% of your unit grade. Make sure all names are on the front of the map!! 4. If time, students will share their “Mapping Maycomb” project with the class. Regardless all projects will be turned in at the end of class and graded (worth 10% of the unit grade) according to the perimeters given to the students on step 3 of the procedure. 5. Homework for this evening will be to read chapters 10-12. Advise students there will be a quiz on the reading the next day. Adaptations (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Students will be assisted according to their I.E.P. assessment and in compliance with the cooperating Special Education teacher, if applicable.
    • Lewis 10 DAY FOUR Concept / Topic To Teach: Character Development and Theme Standards Addressed : ELAALRL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in a work of American literature and provides evidence from the work to support understanding. ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation. General Goal(s): Students will focus on how characters face a series of thematic challenges in the novel. Specific Objectives : In every novel, the protagonist and the antagonist play key roles in relaying the author’s objectives or focused themes. Today, the class will delve into the prevalent
    • Lewis 11 themes of the novel and analyze how the characters use internal and external voices to encounter them. In addition, students will learn how the characters adapt and change from the beginning of a work to the end of the work. Required Materials: 1. Novel Packet Body Biography (Ms Effie’s) 2. To Kill a Mockingbird text (Lee) 3. 1 set of markers for every 3-4 students 4. 1 sheet of paper (4 ft. wide X 6 ft. tall) for every 3-4 students 5. Student’s own paper and pen Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be given a quiz regarding the reading from the previous night’s homework (chapters 10-12). The quiz questions will be written on the board and students will need to have a full sheet of paper with their name, class name, period and date in the upper left hand corner to receive credit. Each answer is worth one point each, for a total of five points. THE QUIZ QUESTIONS: 1. What do Scout and Jem notice about their father that is different from the other kid’s fathers at school? 2. What was wrong with the dog Tim Johnson? 3. What was it rumored that Mrs. Dubose kept hidden in her shawl? 4. What did Jem do with Scout’s baton? 5. What was Mrs. Dubose addicted to? ANSWERS: 1. He is older than the other fathers. 2. He was rabid. 3. A Confederate pistol 4. Used it as a machete to cut down Mrs. Dubose camellia bushes 5. Morphine Students will pass papers to the front of the class and they will be collected so they can be graded as a quiz. 2. Advise students they will need to take notes. Write on the board: PROTAGONIST: the character that usually overcomes weakness to achieve a new understanding by the work’s end. ANTAGONIST: the character or group of people that opposes the protagonist, barring or complicating his/her fulfillment. Ask: Who is the protagonist in this novel? What is the weakness
    • Lewis 12 that she had to overcome? What do you think will be her new understanding? Who is the antagonist in this novel? Is it a person, a group of people or something bigger? What are they barring or complicating for the protagonist? Advise students: normally in a novel, the development of the characters can be traced and followed. As an audience we are privileged to hear internal and external dialogue. What is internal dialogue? What is external dialogue? Let’s look through Chapter 10 and find some examples of both. Ask students to locate examples and share them with the class. Ask students: What are some themes in this novel that we have already discussed? HAVE STUDENTS TAKE TURNS WRITING THEMES, THEY SEE IN THE STORY, ON THE BOARD. Ask: Are these themes the cause for turmoil for the protagonist? How? 3. Students will be asked to separate into their groups and turn to page 9 and 10 of the Novel Packet. Read through the instructions on page 10, Body Biography. Advise students they need to draft what their larger creation will look like on page 9 before attempting it. Students will be asked to get 1 set of markers, 1 sheet of 4’6’ paper and 1 novel. Students will have the rest of the class to work on this. 4. CLEAN UP: Before the end of class, advise students to roll up their projects and rubber-band them in the corner for the next day. 5. HOMEWORK: will be given for the next day (read chapters13-15) DAY FIVE Concept / Topic To Teach: Symbolism in the film To Kill a Mockingbird Standards Addressed : ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation. General Goal(s): Using the film To Kill a Mockingbird, students will locate specific symbols that the director (adapting Lee’s book) is trying to portray. Specific Objectives : Students will watch the film up until the point they have read. The film will be looked at in two ways; as a way to enhance what they have already read and add clarity to any confusing plot points, and as another way to look at symbolism (whether author or director intended). Required Materials: 1. A copy of the film To Kill a Mockingbird
    • Lewis 13 2. The Novel Packet (pages 17-19) Film Study Guide: Symbolism Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be asked to turn to page 17 in their Novel Packet, the Film Study Guide. Read the guide to the students, making sure they understand the concept of symbolism in terms of film. Students will be asked to analyze certain items in the film and fill out the graph, located on page 18 of the packet. This must be completed by the end of class. 2. Begin the film. 3. Have each student share their symbolic findings with the class. Ask: Where did they see these certain items? In what scene? What do you think the director intended them to mean? Do you think this is what Harper Lee intended? Do you see any differences between the film and the book so far? 4. Homework for the weekend: read chapters 16-21. There will be a quiz on Monday. 5. Advise students to also begin working on the Mockingbird Layer Cake (Leskow) exercise in the Novel Packet on pages 4-6, as this will be 40% of the unit plan grade and count as their final exam. Read through all of the instructions on the worksheet and ask if any students have questions. DAY SIX Concept / Topic To Teach: Symbolism and Figurative Language in the novel Standards Addressed : ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation. General Goal(s): Students will learn to identify figurative language and symbolism in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Students will learn the effects of using such elements. Specific Objectives : Teaching students to locate symbolism and figurative language in this novel and others will show them how to find deeper meaning in the world around them. By the end of this lesson, students will be able to identify images, similes and metaphors in the novel and to analyze their meaning. Required Materials: 1. A copy of the text To Kill a Mockingbird 2. The Novel Packet (p.14) Strange Fruit by Billie Holiday
    • Lewis 14 3. The Novel Packet (p.15) The Death of Emmett Till 4. The Novel Packet (p.16)We Wear the Mask 5. Student’s own paper and pen 6. Billie Holiday singing Strange Fruit: <http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=h4ZyuULy9zs > 7. Emmett Till biography pictures featuring Bob Dylan singing: <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjfGcRM35xg> Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be given a quiz regarding the reading from the weekend’s homework (chapters 16-21). The quiz questions will be written on the board and students will need to have a full sheet of paper with their name, class name, period and date in the upper left hand corner to receive credit. Each answer is worth one point each, for a total of five points. THE QUIZ QUESTIONS: 1. Jem and Scout watched from home as a “parade of people walked past their house all dressed up” (12). Where were they going? 2. Why does Atticus give Ewell a pen and envelope in court? 3. What happened to Tom Robinson’s arm when he was a child? 4. What did Mr. Gilmer continue to call Tom in court? 5. What was so peculiar about Mr. Raymond’s home life? ANSWERS: 1. To court. 2. To write his name to see if he was left or right handed 3. It was caught in a cotton gin. 4. Boy 5. He lived with a black woman and they had many mixed children Students will pass papers to the front of the class and they will be collected so they can be graded as a quiz.
    • Lewis 15 2. Write the terms and definitions on the board: IMAGE-a vivid representation or description. SIMILE-a comparison between two things using “like” or “as.” METAPHOR- a comparison in which one thing is figuratively transformed so as to reveal its essence. Ask: Give examples of an image in the world. Give examples of a simile. Give examples of a metaphor. One of the most important symbols in the novel is that of the mockingbird. It becomes a central figure and an icon. Many have said that the Mockingbird is the most peaceful bird of all birds, and it only sings other bird’s songs (therefore “mocking” them). Who in the novel is characterized by other’s “songs” or words about them? Atticus says, "I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.”(Lee) What does he mean by this? 3. Ask students to turn to page 14 of the Novel Packet. Access the internet and play the video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4ZyuULy9zs . Ask students to analyze in class the poem. Ask: What is strange fruit? What is this song about? How does the song use the images of beauty and contrast them with images of horror? Why would the writer do this? 4. Ask students to turn to page 15 of the Novel Packet. Access the internet and play the video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjfGcRM35xg . Ask students to analyze the song. Ask: Have you ever heard of the story of Emmett Till? Although no one in the novel goes through quite the horror that Emmett Till did, how can this relate to Tom Robinson’s ordeal? What can we learn from this? 5. Ask students to turn to page 16 of the Novel Packet. Ask several students to read the poem aloud. Have a class discussion to talk about the symbolism and figurative language used in the poem. 6. Have students separate back into their groups and gather their Body Biography materials. Students will need to finish this project by the end of class today in order to receive credit for it. 7. Assign students to read chapters 22-25 for the next day and to be prepared for a journal question.
    • Lewis 16 DAY SEVEN Concept / Topic To Teach: Demonstrating Comprehension through Writing Standards Addressed : ELAALRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. General Goal(s): Students will use the knowledge they have learned about the novel and will apply it in a writing creation of their own. Specific Objectives : As students have learned about the novel they have absorbed certain elements of the time period surrounding it. Students will utilize this knowledge and research even further in order to create a newspaper that would fit into that time. Students will not only use plot points and characters from the novel, but they will also use writing skills and team work in order to create a project worth 10% of their grade. Required Materials: 1. A copy of the text To Kill a Mockingbird 2. The Novel Packet The Mockingbird Printing Press (page 11-13) 3. Access to the website: http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=110&title= 4. Access to computer lab
    • Lewis 17 5. 1 USB memory stick per group Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Write the Journal Question on the board: Name 2-3 examples of hypocrisy in the novel, people that say one thing, but behind closed doors do another. Advise students to journal on page 7 and 8 of their packet. 2. Have students turn to page 11 of their packet. Read through the project instructions. Ask for any questions concerning the project. Advise students they will have two days to work on this in class, and the rest will need to be done at home. Advise students this will count as 10% of their grade. 3. Utilize a SmartBoard or equivalent to log onto http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=110&title= . Show students how the site works. Ask for any questions. 4. Have students separate into groups and reread through the instructions. Have students assign different portions to different members of their group. Have students come up with a plan B for their group if they do not finish in class. Will they finish separately? Will they meet over the weekend? Will they phone each other? Have solidified plans. 5. Have students go to the computer lab to work for the remainder of the class. Give them a USB stick to save their work and entrust it to one group member. Walk around assisting students and answering questions. 6. Advise students of homework: to finish the novel (chapters 26-31)
    • Lewis 18 DAY EIGHT Concept / Topic To Teach: Demonstrating Comprehension through Writing Standards Addressed : ELAALRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. General Goal(s): Students will use the knowledge they have learned about the novel and will apply it in a writing creation of their own. Specific Objectives : As students have learned about the novel they have absorbed certain elements of the time period surrounding it. Students will utilize this knowledge and research even further in order to create a newspaper that would fit into that time. Students will not only use plot points and characters from the novel, but they will also use writing skills and team work in order to create a project worth 10% of their grade. Required Materials: 1. A copy of the text To Kill a Mockingbird 2. The Novel Packet The Mockingbird Printing Press(page 11-13) 3. Access to the website: http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=110&title= 4. Access to computer lab 5. 1 USB memory stick per group Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will meet the entire period in the computer lab working on the Newspaper project. Walk around observing and answering questions.
    • Lewis 19 2. Advise students that whatever they do not finish today becomes homework and will be due with the Novel Packet after the weekend on Monday. Advise students it will need to be printed out and stapled to the packet. DAY NINE Concept / Topic To Teach: Developing Media Literacy Concept / Topic To Teach: Become literate watchers of the film To Kill a Mockingbird Standards Addressed : ELAALRL1 The student demonstrates comprehension by identifying evidence (i.e., examples of diction, imagery, point of view, figurative language, symbolism, plot events and main ideas) in a variety of texts representative of different genres (i.e., poetry, prose [short story, novel, essay, editorial, biography], and drama) and using this evidence as the basis for interpretation. General Goal(s): Using the movie To Kill a Mockingbird, students will consider the language of film. Specific Objectives : Students will watch the remainder of the film. Students will gain clarity on plot points they have already read and will learn about the language that film speaks. In other words, they will learn about specific details that the director may have chosen in order to make the film its own entity, separate from the novel. Required Materials: 1. A copy of the film To Kill a Mockingbird 2. The Novel Packet (page 20) The Film Study Guide for Media Literacy Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Have students turn to page 20 of their packet. Read through the Study of film literacy. Advise students to keep a pen with them while they watch and mark down examples of this they see as they watch the film. Ask if they are any questions. 2. Begin the film. 3. Go over the students’ findings. What were they able to gather about film literacy by watching the 2nd half of the film?
    • Lewis 20 4. Advise students to continue working on their packet and any unfinished work for the newspaper assignment for homework tonight. DAY TEN Concept / Topic To Teach: Workshop Day Standards Addressed : ELAALRL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents. General Goal(s): Assessment based on comprehensive tasks. Specific Objectives : Since there is no comprehensive test given for this unit, students will be required to show their knowledge by finishing their collaborative packet. The packet has essentially served as a portfolio for the past two weeks, exemplifying everything they have learned and providing them ways to apply it. This class will be used as a time for them to focus and complete the final assignment The Mockingbird Layer Cake, as well as any other assignments that need finishing. Required Materials: 1. A copy of the text To Kill a Mockingbird 2. The Novel Packet Step- By-Step Procedures : 1. Students will be asked to turn to the Anticipation guide in their Novel packet and to fill out the second column. Ask students: Have your answers changed? Why or why not? Go through each question taking an inventory of the class’s changes from the beginning of the unit to the end. Focus students in on the importance of these questions as they outline a person’s own moral compass and belief systems. 2. Students will be advised that this class will serve as a workshop. The atmosphere of the classroom for today needs to be professional and collaborative and anyone who cannot commit to these requirements will have consequences. Advise students that this class will serve as a time in which they can organize their packet, finish up any unfinished work and complete their other assignments. Students will have access to classroom computers, art material and the help of all teachers and their peers.
    • Lewis 21 2. Students will be reminded of the due dates for the packet (Monday at the beginning of class). They will be advised to work on creating a neat and professional portfolio in a binder along with their packet. They need to make certain they look on the rubric on the last page to include all necessary material. This packet will serve as over 50% of their grade. Works Cited "A Class Divided." www.pbs.org. Web. 30 November 2009. <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/divided/etc/view.html>. Baker, Frank. "FILM STUDY GUIDE FOR TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. MEDIA LITERACY" www.frankwbaker.com. Web. 2 December 2009. < http://www.frankwbaker.com/MediaLiteracytkam.htm>. Baker, Frank. "FILM STUDY GUIDE FOR TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. SYMBOLISM" www.frankwbaker.com. Web. 2 December 2009. <http://www.frankwbaker.com/symbolism.htm>. Dunbar, Paul Laurence. "We Wear the Mask." www.potw.org. Web. 28 November 2009. <http://www.potw.org/archive/potw8.html>. Dylan, Bob. "The Death of Emmett Till." www.bobdylan.com. Web. 1 Dec 2009. <http://www.bobdylan.com/#/songs/death-emmett-till>. Hogue, Dawn. "To Kill a Mockingbird Newspaper Project (amended)." http://www.sheboyganfalls.k12.wi.us. Web. 3 Dec 2009. <http://www.sheboyganfalls.k12.wi.us/staff/dehogue/ce9/tkam_news.htm>. Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. 2007. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2007. Print. Leskow, Amy. "To Kill a Mockingbird unit sheet. (amended)" Help 4 Teachers. Web. 11
    • Lewis 22 November 2009. <http://help4teachers.com/AmyToKillAMockingBird.htm>. Lewis, Allan. "Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit." www.songlyrics.com. Web. 24 November 2009. <http://www.songlyrics.com/billie-holiday/strange-fruit-lyrics/>. "Mr. Jeffrey's To Kill a Mockingbird Anticipation Guide (adapted)." www.mrjeffrey.com. Web. 12 November 2009. <www.mrjeffrey.com/English%20I/To%20Kill%20a%20Mockingbird /Anticipation%20Guide.doc >. "Ms Effie's Lifesavers." http://homepage.mac.com/mseffie. Web. 1 December 2009. <http://homepage.mac.com/mseffie/handouts/bodybiography.html>. "ReadWriteThink Printing Press." Web. 3 Dec 2009. <http://interactives.mped.org/view_interactive.aspx?id=110&title=>. "The Death of Emmett Till." You Tube. Web. 2 Dec 2009. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjfGcRM35xg>. "The Making of Harper Lee." You Tube. Web. 10 November 2009. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W33kkZNiLEA >. To Kill a Mockingbird (film). Dir. Robert Mulligan." Perf. Peck, Gregory. Universal Pictures: 1962, Film. "To Kill a Mockingbird Historical Background." Pete's Power Point Presentation Station. Web. 1 November 2009. <http://literature.pppst.com/JKL/harper- lee.html>.
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