• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
How to Create an Outstanding Presentation
 

How to Create an Outstanding Presentation

on

  • 1,918 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,918
Views on SlideShare
1,793
Embed Views
125

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
46
Comments
0

4 Embeds 125

http://www.mentalammo.com 96
http://mentalammo.com 27
http://www.slideshare.net 1
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    How to Create an Outstanding Presentation How to Create an Outstanding Presentation Presentation Transcript

    • How to Prepare an Outstanding Presentation
      Presented by
      Saundra Washington
      www.techtools4biz.com
    • You’ve got to give a presentation and you’re dreading it.
    • Not to worry: The secret to a good presentation is effective preparation.
      Following are 10 tips to help you prepare an outstanding talk.
    • 1. Don’t usetechnology as a crutch.
      For example, too many speakers depend too heavily on PowerPoint®.
      PowerPoint®, Keynote® and other software should enhance your presentation. They should never become your presentation.
      My Presentation
    • 2. Start by outlining your talk.
      Don’t even turn on PowerPoint®until you know what you want to say.Use a pencil and paper or your word processor to create an outline.
    • Or better yet, use a mindmap to organize your thoughts.
    • 3. Don’t be boring.
      Never read the slides word-for-word unless you’re planning to put your audience to sleep.Instead prepare speaking notes in advance and use them to speak extemporaneously.
    • 4. Practice.
      Run through your talk in advance to ensure a smooth delivery.
      If possible, practice in the room where your presentation will be given.
    • 5. Be prepared for technology failures.
      Have a hardcopy of your presentation with you in case something goes wrong.
      Practice giving your talk without a computer or slides.
    • 6. Don’t try to tell too much.
      Blah, blah, blah, blah
      Blah, blah, blah, blah
      Blah, blah, blah, blah
      A short, well-organized presentation is better than a long, rambling talk.
      Therefore, identify only two or three main points you want to convey and build your presentation around those points.
    • 7. Structure Your Talk.
      • The Beginning: Give an introduction in which you highlight what your talk will be about.
      • The Middle: Present the body of your talk.
      • The End: Wrap up by giving a summary of your main points.
    • 8. Avoid information overload.
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Too much information
      Limit each slide to 2-3 bullet points.
    • 9. Keep it simple.
      Slides, charts, and graphs should be simple to understand and easy to read—even from the back of the room.
    • 10. Don’t clown around with special effects.
      Use animation and fancy slide transitions sparingly. Encourage your audience to focus on what you’re saying rather than the funny stuff that’s happening on the screen.
    • To sum it up: A good presentation…
      …is not dependent on PowerPoint®,
      …is not dependent on technology,
      …and is presented spontaneously.
    • A good presentation…
      … is short and to the point;
      …is planned around a few central ideas;
      …and has an easy to identify beginning, middle, and end.
    • It features…
      …simple, easy-to-understand visuals;
      …uncluttered slides readable even in the back of the room;
      …and minimal special effects.
    • Finally, a good presentation has a confident, knowledgeable presenter…
      …You.