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Steve vitto and Jennifer Russell school family parterships

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A FOCUS DAY MIBLSI TRAINING PRESENTED BY STEVEN VITTO AND JENNIFER RUSSELL, MAISD BEHAVIOR CONSULTANT OUTLINING A PROCESS FOR DEVELOPING SUPPORTS FOR EFFECTIVE HOME SCHOOL PARTNERSHIPS. …

A FOCUS DAY MIBLSI TRAINING PRESENTED BY STEVEN VITTO AND JENNIFER RUSSELL, MAISD BEHAVIOR CONSULTANT OUTLINING A PROCESS FOR DEVELOPING SUPPORTS FOR EFFECTIVE HOME SCHOOL PARTNERSHIPS. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS KRISTIE DILA FOR HER SUPPORT

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  • Begin on time. Use “coming together signal” to attain the attention of the group. Facilitators – introduce yourselves. Take about one minute each to explain who you are and how you came to be before the group. (no more than 3-4 minutes getting started!)
  • SAY: One of the things we commonly do during our core MiBLSi trainings is review “group norms” for the day so that we can stay on track and accomplish our objectives, which we will review in a few minutes. These are the norms we usually recommend...” (review slide Demonstrate “coming together” and “please begin” signals for the group. Swing arm in front of your body, then raise your hand in the air and say “May I have your attention please”
  • Instructions to Facilitator: SAY: The material for today’s training is the result of the research and work of many people, who are listed here. These materials are available online on the MiBLSi website Say: Our training today is intended for BUILDING LEVEL LEADERSHIP or SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT TEAMS to assess and plan for effective school/family partnerships in your building. During the morning we will review the research base for today’s material and begin thinking about systems considerations. This afternoon we will think about how to support the implementation of several key, evidence-based practices in school/family partnership and then evaluate both how well these practices are being implemented and their impact.
  • In order to access the materials from today’s training: Select MiBLSi Model on the MiBLSi home page (http://miblsi.cenmi.org) Select Support Select Family Support
  • Scroll down to the orange box on the bottom right portion of the Family Support Page . There are links to “Tools & Resources” for Professional Development, Teachers, Family and Positive Behavior Support at Home”. All of the materials for today’s training are listed under “Professional Development Tools”. Additional Resources including links, self-assessments, and tools and materials for both teachers and families are listed under Teacher Tools and Family tools.
  • SAY: We’re going to begin the day by exploring some of the critical beliefs, characteristics and behaviors of educators in school buildings where school-family partnerships flourish AND have an impact on student achievement.
  • School staff are working harder than ever… academic standards are rising, educators are being asked to implement evidence-based curriculum and instructional strategies, we have a mandate to educate EVERY student in these United States to proficiency with grade-level skills…there’s a lot to do. So why is MiBLSi asking educators to focus on school/family partnership as well?
  • Say: Please pull out the handout you have titled “A Blast from the Past” that is in your packet. We are borrowing this activity from staff at the National Network for Partnership Schools at John’s Hopkins University. The questions might seem a little random, but there IS a point to the activity! Please complete this questionnaire INDEPENDENTLY. I will pull you back together in about 3 minutes. Please begin. Once participants have worked on the worksheet independently (about 3-4 minutes) bring them back together with your coming back together signal. Say: NOW that you’ve had a chance to work on this alone, please answer the questions AGAIN as a group, with the help of others from your table. Please begin. After a few minutes, pull the group back together with your coming together signal. Say: With a show of hands, how many of you were able to accomplish much more after working together as a group? Comment on the number of hands you see. Say: I see a lot of hands! Clearly, (most/almost all) of you were able to get to a better outcome when you worked with others. This activity really summarizes why it is so important for us to work together with families to educate children. We get to better outcomes when we work together and have information from different perspectives.
  • “We are all familiar with the goals of MiBLSi” (quickly summarize slide)
  • SAY: A few years ago, MiBLSi partnered with the Michigan Alliance for Families which exists to promote school-family partnership and provide information and referral for parents of students with special needs or IEPs. Together, our organizations have developed several goals related to school-family partnership including the ones on this slide. These goals are also closely related to those of the National and Michigan PTA. ASK: Okay, now …Fist to five. How familiar are you with Michigan’s Common Core State Standards? Zero (0) meaning not at all and Five (5) meaning I could easily stand up here and facilitate a training about them? The reason I’m asking is because the Michigan PTA currently is in the process of training 150,000 parents across the state all about Michigan’s Common Core State Standards over the next couple of years so that parents will have a better understanding of what outcomes their children are expected to achieve by the end of each grade level. This will help families ask better questions about what teachers are expected to teach and how parents can better support their children’s learning at home. These trainings are taking place not just in schools, but at churches, Boys and Girls clubs, the Junior League, Kiwanis, and other community organizations. Michigan Alliance for Families is working to help provide guidance to families about how these questions can be answered for students with special needs and IEP’s. Other organizations including Michigan Department of Education is committed to this same process of educating parents about the standards. In case you didn’t know, the PTA also offers free trainings for families and staff on parent engagement and other topics. MiBLSi staff are committed to making sure that our participating schools have answers to the above questions so that they are prepared and welcoming of questions from parents and families related to the common core and how they will be supporting student’s to meet or exceed the standards. Today’s training will provide you with information that will hopefully help you assess where you are with this process and give you some ideas about how to make what you’re already doing even better!
  • Say: We’re now going to show you a little slide show that summarizes more for us “Why” school/family partnerships are important and the topic of quite a bit of conversation today. We’ll talk more about the points made in the slide show throughout the day. Play slideshow….The Power of Partnership: play to the music “If Everyone Cared” by Nickelback
  • So, of course, parents and educators both have the same goal – that students will be successful.
  • But, in order for us to really achieve our goals for high levels of student achievement, educators and families are going to have to work much more purposefully together. This is a huge undertaking…especially in today’s world with all that both teachers and families have going on in a typical day, but it is possible. So, we are going to first talk a bit about WHAT we mean by comprehensive – and authentic - school/family partnership, and then we will spend the rest of the day exploring HOW such partnerships can be achieved as part of all of our busy lives.
  • Read this definition to the participants…stress the words RELATIONSHIPS. “You will notice that this definition of authentic school/family partnership is highly complementary to the core principles of Response to Intervention (or RtI) we mentioned earlier…intervening early, problem solving around relevant data or information, monitoring progress, which is why the RtI process lends itself very nicely as a framework around which authentic school/family partnering can occur.
  • School/family partnership is really a school improvement effort , not just a project or an initiative. School improvement research has found the following characteristics to be consistently true of the most high-performing schools in our country…I’ll just let you read these characteristics. Have the participants READ with you the bolded parts of each bullet point.
  • While all of these characteristics lend themselves to the support of strong school/family partnerships, we are going to focus a bit on the last characteristic, which focuses on the development of strong, collaborative RELATIONSHIPS for a while.
  • Click and read each slide to participants.
  • Summarize this slide (Example: “We know that authentic school/family partnership goes way beyond having a few parents on the PTO or volunteering in the classroom. True partnership involves all families…of every student…around all of the different levels of learning that are taking place in the building… which requires us educators to think a bit differently about how we do business, not just with regard to how we conduct a literacy night, but how we are creating opportunities to communicate and connect with the families of the children in our classrooms who are entrusted to us on a daily basis”.
  • We know that a focus on building respectful and trusting relationships with families is a cornerstone around which all other partnership efforts really depend. So as educators, we really need to openly and honestly evaluate how we’re doing with this effort – which includes asking people how they feel about the quality of the relationship they have with the school and their child’s teacher. This is because without strong, trusting relationships between school staff and families, other efforts are often wasted or ineffective or simply not sustainable.
  • How powerful is a trusting relationship between a parent and teacher? (Read slide).
  • READ THIS TRAINER NOTE TO PARTICIPANTS! Parents with higher versus lower levels of trust in the parent-teacher relationship Hold more positive attitudes about the value of their involvement in schools. They are more engaged in their child’s learning, and they are less likely to attach undue significance to occcasionnal negative events, demonstrating greater tolerance and a willingness to forgive. In short, trust in relationships allows people to problem solve instead of becoming defensive and moving into “flight or fight” mode. We must remember that the “in loco parentis” responsibility conferred on schools requires a big level of trust from families! So when we think of the power and importance of establishing relationships with our families, it forces us to examine ways we can build trust in ways that go beyond volunteering or the establishment of successful literacy nights, although these things are important too. But we really want to be thinking about the kinds of little things we are doing on a regular basis to help our families feel they are a welcome and comfortable and respected member of our school community, regardless of whether they have the time or the ability to come into the building.
  • In other words, schools differentiate what they do based on the different needs of their different families, just like effective teachers do with their students. With an RtI approach, this means that staff create a multi-tiered approach so that students can be effectively grouped so that students’ different needs can be met, staff learn about and use evidence-based practices to meet students’ needs, and they use data to drive their decision-making. All strategies schools can use to strengthen their school/family partnerships.
  • To summarize, (read slide)
  • Summarize slide.
  • Allow 10 minutes for this activity.
  • In our definition of Authentic School/Family Partnership, we mention that all participants observations and goals are respected. Teachers and Families: Do you know what each other’s goals are for the children in your lives? Do you have a common vision for each child’s future that you’re supporting together? Having a common vision for what we hope each child will accomplish is critical for moving forward together in partnership. It helps children to hear the same messages from the important adults in their lives. Families: What are your hopes and dreams for your child? Do you know what it will take for your child to reach these accomplishments? Do you share these expectations with your child? Do you help your children see how what they are doing in the classroom will help them meet these expectations? Children perform better in school and have more options in life when parents have high expectations for them. Teachers: Are you asking parents what their vision is for their child’s future? What do you do to help ensure each child and each family sees how the work you are doing in the classroom will help children reach their goals? If you have families who are struggling – working many hours to provide for basic needs, going through a divorce, coping with depression – this vision can sometimes get lost. Help create a space where families can contemplate this question so that you can send consistent messages about what is expected of students in your room. Administrators and Support staff: Are you helping teachers figure out how to allocate the time and materials and other support teachers and families need to have this conversation?
  • Summarize this slide.
  • Ask participants to find the document titled “Roles and Responsibilities” in their packets. Follow the prompts on the slide. Allow 15 minutes for this activity
  • SAY: “Before we begin this activity, at your table, please break into two groups. Each group, please take one minute to select… A facilitator – or someone who will ask the group your questions up here on the screen, make sure everyone who wants to has an opportunity to speak and who will keep the process going so your group can get this task completed on time- A recorder - who will jot down people’s answers to your questions. After one minute, conduct coming back together signal. Then say… “GROUP ONE: Answer questions one and two GROUP TWO: Answer questions three and four We are going to take about 5 minutes to complete this task. Just brainstorm some possible answers to the questions that are listed and then we discuss what you have written down. “ Ready, begin. Conduct coming back together signal after about 8 minutes, of if groups seem to be finished. Say “Group one please share your answers with group two, then vice versa”. We’ll give you each five minutes to share. Ready begin. Bring whole group back together after about ten minutes with coming back together signal. Say to whole group “What were some of the ideas you shared in your group”
  • Take five minutes for this activity. Explain to the participants that we will be focusing on some SELECTED EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES to meet these challenges, which give us all a great place to start. Once these basic, evidence-based practices are in place and being implemented by staff consistently and with fidelity, then it is important to begin exploring additional ways to address challenges and meet needs. A good way to get started with this is to ASK PEOPLE WHAT THEY NEED!
  • While socio-economic status is ASSOCIATED with vocabulary use and reading scores, it is CRITICAL for everyone to understand that a lower socio-economic status does not CAUSE these problems…lack of information, strategies, resources, support and connections are what cause these problems…all of which can be impacted by school staff.
  • Begin on time. Use “coming together signal” to attain the attention of the group. Facilitators – introduce yourselves. Take about one minute each to explain who you are and how you came to be before the group. (no more than 3-4 minutes getting started!)
  • We know that because of the complexity of what we are trying to accomplish and the lack of formal training that teachers commonly receive in their pre-service around how to partner with families, especially families who are different from themselves somehow, that this school/family partnership effort is a machine that really requires LEADERSHIP to get things moving in the right direction. Central to the leadership is a set of BELEIFS that ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN AND ALL FAMILIES CAN SUPPORT THEIR CHIILDREN’S EDUCATION along with expectations that all staff in the building act on this belief. Building leaders need to recognize that teachers and other school staff need training and time for preparation in order to be thinking about how they can build or enhance collaborative, helpful relationships with their families and these staff supports need to be organized. And all of this effort will require leaders to use data to help staff keep their ACTIONS PURPOSEFUL AND FOCUSED, so that effort is targeted to areas deemed a priority by the data you are using.
  • “Here we have the core principles of Response to Intervention or RtI. MiBLSi exists to support the integration of these core principles into the way that schools “do business” through training and technical assistance in partnership with almost 700 schools throughout the State of Michigan. Many of you are familiar with these principles, but some of you may not be. We will revisit these principles later in the day. Please take a minutes to quickly read through them”. Ready begin (bring participants back together with your signal after about a minute).
  • “Here we have the core principles of Response to Intervention or RtI. MiBLSi exists to support the integration of these core principles into the way that schools “do business” through training and technical assistance in partnership with almost 700 schools throughout the State of Michigan. Many of you are familiar with these principles, but some of you may not be. We will revisit these principles later in the day. Please take a minutes to quickly read through them”. Ready begin (bring participants back together with your signal after about a minute).
  • MOVE FROM EMOTIONA TO EVIDENCE
  • Coaches can ask…how can information regarding curriculum, assessment results, and strategies that help improve student achievement and student social competence be shared and feedback received from families and community at each tier? How can families and community be engaged through opportunities to participate in training, decision-making, and volunteering?
  • Coaches can ask…how can information regarding curriculum, assessment results, and strategies that help improve student achievement and student social competence be shared and feedback received from families and community at each tier? How can families and community be engaged through opportunities to participate in training, decision-making, and volunteering?
  • How do we create authentic school/family partnerships? We begin by recognizing that all parents want their children to do well in school…. …that some families may have a very different understanding of what their role is in their child’s education compared to what we as educators may think about our own parenting role or the role of other parents, and that some parents may simply not have any idea what to do to support their children’s learning, but parents usually want their children to do well in school and are quite proud when they do. So we can focus on how we as educators can help guide parents in the support of their student’s learning goals and activities – from preschool through high school.
  • We can train staff so they know how to work with families and so teachers have the tools to help families support their child’s learning at home. We can make sure we focus on building those trusting relationships And we be willing to share the power we have as educators with our families…so that families understand the critical importance of their role, how their involvement helps their child, how it helps the teacher, and how educators can help by sharing information, stories, data, and resources.
  • Allow school improvement/leadership teams 10 minutes to complete the Mini-Audit Tool. Encourage teams to list practices they have in place at each tier. If only one grade level implements a particular practices, consider that a targeted practice (tier 2).
  • Begin on time. Use “coming together signal” to attain the attention of the group. Facilitators – introduce yourselves. Take about one minute each to explain who you are and how you came to be before the group. (no more than 3-4 minutes getting started!)
  • Trainer Talk: “There is a distinct difference between the activities related to an intervention and those related to implementation. It is important that we keep sight of both of these concepts and associated issues throughout the work we are doing during trainings and back in the building. We must not loose sight of the importance of establishing the systems that allow for implementation as we are eager to learn about interventions.”
  • Trainer Talk: “ Thisgraphic illustrates for us that when we the intervention is proven to be effective and we implement it effectively, then our students will benefit. If either part is not present, then student benefit will not be maximized. (i.e. we have an intervention that is proven to be effective, but we do not implement it effectively; or we spend time with effective implementation strategies, but the intervention that we are implementing is not proven to be effective.)”
  • Trainer Talk: “ There are actual stages to implementation. Let’s think about how they apply to our work today. Teams may be at various stages, we are not all in the same place. For example, if you have come today to learn about School-Family Partnership Practices, in order to decide if these practices might work for your school, then you are at the “exploration, adoption” stage. If your team has already decided that you will the practices outlined later in this training, the commitment is there, but you need to prepare for implementation by gaining training, materials, and an implementation plan, then you are most likely in the “installation” stage. Those of you who are already implementing this intervention, but maybe had not received training on it prior to this time, are at the “initial implementation” stage and today is providing support to implementers. We may have a few participants here today who have been implementing these interventions for some time and are in either the “elaboration or continuous regeneration” stage. How can attendance at today’s training benefit even those participants?”
  • Trainer Talk: “The take away message as it relates to this common RtI implementation error is to tighten up your implementation.”
  • Trainer Notes: “A common RtI implementation is Implementation is Loosely Defined. Taken directly from the book Keeping RtI On Track , the signs that your implementation might be too loosely defined include getting inconsistent results across your building or across grade levels; experiencing long delays between decisions; and having “action plans” at the building, grade-level or individual student level that do not seem to come to a clear “end.” If you are experiencing any or all of these things, then it is likely that your buildings’ implementation is too loosely defined.”
  • Trainer Note: This is an animated slide. When you are in presentation mode, each time you advance the slide you will see one part of this cycle. The animation ends with the quote in the middle. Trainer Talk: “Recallthe quote at the start of this section that talked about how RtI can be subject to the same misuse and eventual abandonment as any other educational innovation. Here’s the thing folks, we know that it DOES work, but there is this ‘nasty’ cycle that schools fall into which starts with (ADVANCE SLIDE) poor use of intervention. This is followed by (ADVANCE SLIDE) weak implementation effect, also known as poor results or outcomes. These poor outcomes lead to (ADVANCE SLIDE) reduced buy-in which makes sense – people are not seeing the results that they had hoped for or had heard or read about. With reduced buy-in (ADVANCE SLIDE) comes an inadequate use of data which leads you back to the poor use of the intervention. This cycle can easily continue until all hope is lost and (ADVANCE SLIDE) the intervention is abandoned. This is what we are trying to avoid!”
  • So… You have identified gaps in school/family partnership within your building (areas you want to be better) and hypothesized reasons for those gaps. You’ve identified a strategy or practice you would like to pursue to help close this gap. You have a plan to introduce this strategy or practice to school staff and family leaders/liaisons within your school community. They say “yes, let’s try that!” You plan for when and how you will train staff to use the strategies/practices you’ve identified. You plan for how staff will be supported when they move forward with their implementation efforts – including how they will manage time and other tasks as they learn. You have a plan for when and where and who and how you will assess if your strategy is working.
  • Trainer Talk: “Please take a moment to read this quote. PAUSE As you are selecting and implementing research-based or evidenced-based intervention programs and with your core reading program/instruction, please keep this quote in mind and be sure that you have the tools necessary and the infrastructure built into your implementation plan that includes a means for assessing whether or not the interventions are being implemented. In the book Keeping RtI on Track: How to Identify, Repair, and Prevent Mistakes that Derail Implementation ”, the authors discuss that whenever student performance does not improve, the first thing to do is to directly measure integrity of intervention implementation. Before determining that intervention is ineffective, we must be able to say with confidence and data that the intervention has been delivered as designed, as often as previously established, and that the student was present to benefit from the intervention.”
  • Trainer Talk: “When we are talking about implementation fidelity we are talking about the extent to which instruction or intervention is implemented as intended or designed. The bottom quote on this page clearly outlines the dangers we face if we are not implementing instruction and intervention with fidelity. We are also faced with these same dangers if we do not develop a system for collecting implementation fidelity data. This is part of building that intervention management system.”
  • Trainer Talk: “There are many ways to assess the fidelity of implementation. Before you start even thinking about how to assess fidelity of implementation, you must start with ensuring that those responsible for implementing an intervention have been appropriately trained to deliver the intervention, have seen the intervention modeled and that there is an implementation plan in place to support the staff through feedback of some kind. There are three common ways to assess the fidelity of implementation: Self-Report Permanent Products Direct Observation These are in order from the simplest/least intrusive to the most involved option. With Self-Report, the person responsible for the intervention rates or checks off how well he or she is implementing components of the intervention. “This approach is preferred less than others because research has shown that implementers tend to overrate how well they implemented the intervention” (Cook et al., 2010, p. 86). Assessing fidelity of implementation using Permanent Products requires the collection of byproducts of the intervention to document that the intervention has been implemented. This is more commonly used with behavioral interventions. Assessing fidelity of implementation using Direct Observation is the most involved option, but it is also the best approach to assessing if an intervention is being implemented as planned. This option requires someone other than the person implementing the intervention to observe the intervention being implemented and objectively observe and document whether or not the intervention is being implemented consistently and accurately. For both Self-Report and Direct Observation, an intervention script or intervention integrity checklist is used to assess the fidelity of implementation. With self-report, the person completing the intervention checks off the steps as he/she completes each component of the intervention. A percentage of steps completed is calculated and provides data on the degree of implementation. With Direct Observation, someone other than the person implementing the intervention uses the intervention integrity checklist during the observation of the intervention and checks off each step that is completed. Again a percentage of steps completed is calculated and provides data on the degree of implementation. Often a combination of Self-Report and Direct Observation is used to assess intervention implementation fidelity.”
  • Begin on time. Use “coming together signal” to attain the attention of the group. Facilitators – introduce yourselves. Take about one minute each to explain who you are and how you came to be before the group. (no more than 3-4 minutes getting started!)
  • The Michigan PTA has outlined six categories of practices that have been found to be beneficial to the promotion of effective school family partnership.
  • The difference between the practices this slide and the categories we just mentioned, is that the practices to which we are referring here are things you could implement on Monday morning. The categories on the previous slide are general topic areas, and there are many, many practices that could fall in each of those categories. Of course, we want to focus on implementation of practices that are most likely to result in student achievement . This slide lists practices that have been found through research done by the Harvard Family Research Project with support from the US Dept of Education, the National PTA, and the SEDL to have the highest probability for impact on student achievement. You have a handout that is the same as this slide so you can use it as a quick reference, but we’re going to introduce you to a variety of practices, but we’ll focus specifically on the tools and materials to implement these practices.
  • One of the things you will notice about these high impact practices, is that they cut across “category” areas, meaning that you are “covering a lot of ground” with each practice. This is why they could be identified as being “high impact”. This slide is NOT scientifically generated…it was just created as an exercise to help the people creating this content to figure out how the two lists fit together, but it is interesting to notice that one could easily argue that each practice could be an example of almost every category. Engaging in each of these research-based practices provides an avenue for support to ALL students. The degree to which each practice is utilized may vary based on individual student needs.   ** Based on the data/needs of the families of the school/district, each of these practices could be enhanced through collaboration with community as needed. For example, mini-lessons/parent training events can be held at a local church or community center if families do not typically feel comfortable coming into the school. Regular, personalized communication could take place by teachers attending local community events.
  • Allow school improvement/leadership teams 10 minutes to complete this activity.
  • Allow school improvement/leadership teams 5 minutes to review the materials in their kits.
  • Leisa Gallagher, who is the Director of Reaching and Teaching Struggling Learners – a sister mandated activities project to MiBLSi - and Arezell Brown, MiBLSi’s Urban School’s Liaison, both have contact information regarding training and consultation that is available to schools or districts where staff have identified needs related to the building of cultural competence in their buildings. Leisa has information about consultants that are potentially able to provide services free of charge. If your school staff have identified the building of cultural competence as a need in your school and you are unaware of resources on this topic, feel free to contact these individuals for more information.
  • Effective Parent-Teacher Communication: One-Way Communication Say: Let’s take a look at the differences between one-way and two-way communication and why both are useful in communicating with families. Instructions to Facilitator: Read aloud the definition on the slide.
  • Examples Instructions to Facilitator: Read the examples on the slide and ask participants how these methods are used in their schools. Facilitate whole group responses. Say: Let’s look at these examples of one and two-way communication. How are these methods used in your school? Are there any examples that you would add to these lists?
  • This is an animated slide. Go ahead and just read the information off this slide.
  • Summarize this slide.
  • Allow five minutes for this activity.
  • Key Concepts: Humorous example of student responses to question Considerations: There are several examples embedded throughout the presentation. Just to lighten up the content Application:
  • Key Concepts: Humorous example of student responses to math problem Considerations: There are several examples embedded throughout the presentation. Just to lighten up the content Application:
  • Key Concepts: Humorous example of student responses to math problem Considerations: There are several examples embedded throughout the presentation. Just to lighten up the content Application:
  • Allow 15 minutes for this activity.
  • Summarize or have the participants read this slide. You could also go around and have different participants read each line.
  • Have participants read this slide to themselves.
  • Trainer Notes: Discuss what needs to be considered when it comes to implementation supports back in the building. Will there be peer coaching? Who will provide feedback to the person(s) responsible for implementing the intervention? Consider the information required in the Implementation Plan
  • Trainer Notes:
  • Begin on time. Use “coming together signal” to attain the attention of the group. Facilitators – introduce yourselves. Take about one minute each to explain who you are and how you came to be before the group. (no more than 3-4 minutes getting started!)
  • Allow school improvement/leadership teams at least 15 minutes to complete the worksheet and discuss next steps. Encourage teams to determine how they will collect data to drive their decision-making. Refer to the FAMILY-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP SYSTEMS CHECKLIST AND FAMILY SURVEYS as a potential first step. Refer also to the PRECISION POLLING document that teams can consider using to make surveying easier. Explain that once data is collected, if they have certain families that are not responding and/or who have not been engaged with the school, the FIRST STEP must be to back up and strategically build relationships with these families because nothing else will work until relationships and trust have been accomplished. This means staff need to think about ways to connect on a personal level with their families through conversation, etc. You can then refer to the handout titled “Applying Research to Practice” which highlights the types of practices which research have shown to have the greatest impact on student achievement to think about where to start with other practices.
  • Trainer Notes:
  • Trainer Notes: Please remind the participants to fill out the evaluation for today. If participants are getting SB-CEUs they will need to be sure to sign out. If they do not sign out we cannot provide the SB-CEUs – NO EXCEPTIONS
  • Transcript

    • 1. School/Family Partnerships An Overview Jennifer Russell Steven Vitto Great Lakes Conference Center Muskegon, Michigan January 2012
    • 2. Working Agreements
      • Please turn cell phones off or to vibrate
      • Please limit side-bar conversations (or step outside if you want to continue)
      • Please come together at signal
      • Please feel free to meet your needs …
    • 3.
      • Content for this training were based on the research and work of:
        • Better Together Toolkit – New Mexico Public Education Dept (NMPED)
        • Center for the Education & Study of Diverse Populations (CESDP)
        • Harvard Family Research Project
        • Joyce Epstein and the National Network of Partnership Schools
        • Michigan (& National) Parent Teacher Association
        • Sandra L. Christenson & Amy L. Reschly
        • Anne T. Henderson & Karen Mapp
        • Michigan Office of Field Services
        • Rob Horner, PBIS University of Oregon
        • Steven Constantino, Ed.D.
        • Colorado Department of Education
        • Ruby Payne
        • Sharon Dietrich at Center for Educational Networking
        • Caryn Pack Ivey & Michelle Miller at Michigan Alliance for Families
        • Mary Bechtel -- Sue Mack --Kriya Gaillard --Melissa Nantais
        • Kim St. Martin --April Goodwin --Steve Vitto
      ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
    • 6. Purpose and Outcomes
      • Please read the “purpose” and “outcomes” for today to yourself (handout)
      • Pick one outcome that interests you the most and plan a 30 second speech around why that one is important for you
      • Turn to an elbow partner and share with them which one you picked and why
    • 7. Agenda
      • Overview
      • Establishing Systems
      • High Impact Practices
      • Using Data to Drive Decision Making
      • Organize and Integrate
    • 8. 1.0 Successful School Family Partnerships: Critical Beliefs, Characteristics & Behaviors
    • 9. WHY is MiBLSi focusing on School/Family Partnerships?
    • 10.
      • A Blast from the Past
        • Complete the questions INDEPENDENTLY at your table.
        • Come back together for discussion at the signal
      ACTIVITY
    • 11.  
    • 12. Goals of MiBLSi
      • Increase reading performance
      • Reduce behavior problems
      • Have accurate knowledge of behavior and reading performance
      • Use student performance information to develop and implement interventions
    • 13. MiBLSi & MI Alliance for Families School-Family Partnership GOALS
      • School staff will create a welcoming environment for ALL students and families and will share with families an understanding of the following:
      • What children are expected to know & be able to do at the end of each grade level in Michigan schools (Common Core State Standards & Behavioral Expectations)
      • How & when student progress - in relation to standards and other students in the class - is measured and reported to parents at each school (using rubrics, data graphs, etc.)
      • What evidence-based practices (and potential modifications) teachers are implementing to help students meet standards or extend their learning if standards have been met
      • How parents can support their student’s learning at home.
    • 14. The Power of Partnership: Slide Show
    • 15. We all want the same thing…
    • 16. It is time…
      • “…to move beyond random acts of parent involvement to a strategy for comprehensive partnerships to promote child competence.”
      (Christianson & Reschly, 2010; Caspe & Lopez, 2006)
    • 17. WHAT is Authentic School/Family Partnership? “ Relationships within which all participants’ observations and goals are respected, where information pertinent to the student’s learning success is offered and received, and where plans for each partner’s complementary contributions to student learning are made, and following implementation, are evaluated and adjusted as needed.” (Christianson & Reschly, 2010; Hoover-Dempsey, Whitaker, Ice, 2010)
    • 18. Characteristics of High-Performing Schools
      • A clear focus/shared understanding of goals and expectations for ALL involved in the school system that is clearly communicated among all stakeholders.
      • High standards and expectations for all students.
      • 3. A strong cadre of leaders that provides support for the goals and expectations of the school and school community.
    • 19. Characteristics of High-Performing Schools
      • High levels of collaboration and communication among school staff
      • Curriculum, instruction, and assessments that are aligned with state standards
      • Frequent collection of data for the monitoring of teaching and learning.
    • 20. Characteristics of High-Performing Schools
      • Focused professional development
      • School staff establish strong, collaborative relationships with family & community partners.
      • Hope for Urban Education: A Study of Nine High Performing, High Poverty
      • Urban Elementary Schools (Mayer, D. P., Mullens, J. E., & Moore, M. T., 2000);
      • Berman & Chambliss, 2000; McLaughlin, 1990, Cuban 1988; Elmore &
      • McLaughlin, 1998; Fullan, 1993; Griffen & Barnes, 1984, Southwest
      • Educational Development Laboratory, 2006.
    • 21. Our Goal: Help Families & Schools Move…
      • Parent Involvement School/family/community
      • partnerships
      • Responsibility on parents Part of school and
      • to make connections classroom organization
      • Being organized by a Part of comprehensive
      • few parent leaders school improvement plan
      • Results focused on Results focused on student
      • parent/public relations achievement & climate
      • Activities incidental, Practices linked to results accidental, or off to the for students, parents,
      • side teachers, community
      From…. To… Adapted from School, Family & Community Partnerships: Your Handbook for Action, 3 rd Edition, Epstein, J. L., et. al. (2009).
    • 22. Authentic Partnerships The evidence is consistent, positive, and convincing: many forms of family and community involvement influence student achievement… not just volunteering in the classroom or serving on the PTO (although these things are important too)
    • 23. Improve Student Outcomes through Strong Collaborative Relationships When programs and initiatives focus on building respectful and trusting relationships among school staff, families, and community members, they are more effective in creating and sustaining connections that support student achievement. (Christenson & Reschly, 2010)
    • 24. Build Trust
      • “Trust between parents and teachers has been shown to correlate with students’ credits earned, GPA…attendance, and to predict student achievement.”
      • (Christenson & Reschly, 2010; Adams & Christenson, 2000; Bryk & Schneider, 2002; Goddard et al., 2001)
    • 25.  
    • 26.
      • “The amount of respect families feel from school personnel has been found to be more important in the family-school relationship than how much time families spend at school.”
      • (Grossmann, 1999; Christenson & Reschly, 2010)
      Show Respect
    • 27. Embrace Diversity Parent involvement programs that are effective… engage diverse families , recognize cultural and class differences , address needs , and build on strengths . Scribner, Young & Pedroza (1999), Chrispeels & Rivero (2000), Lopez (2001)
    • 28. Be Welcoming & Needs-Focused Actions that successfully connect with families and communities invite involvement , are welcoming , and address specific parental and community needs . Hoover-Dempsey & Sandler (1997), Sanders & Harvey (2000), Pena (2000)
    • 29. Share Power Effective connections embrace a philosophy of partnership where power is shared —the responsibility for children’s educational development is a collaborative enterprise among parents, school staff, and community members. (Power = information/data, decision-making) Wang, Oates & Weishew (1997), Smrekar et al (2001), Moore (1998)
    • 30.  
    • 31. Core Principals & Actions Critical for Collaborative Relationships
      • Find a partner at your table.
      • Find the handout titled “ Core Principles and Actions Critical for Collaborative Relationships in your packet.
      • 3. At the signal, please read silently to yourself. Take notes, summarizing main ideas.
      • 4. At the next signal, please be ready to discuss what you’ve read with a partner at your table
      ACTIVITY
    • 32.
      • Do teachers and families share a
      • COMMON VISION
      • for student success at your building?
      • Have you talked about it?
    • 33.
      • Have teachers and families clarified your various
      • Roles and Responsibilities
      • regarding children’s education
      • in your school?
    • 34.
      • 1. Find a partner at your table. Decide who will be a number “one” and who will be a number “two”.
      • Identify your reading assignment below.
      • At the signal, read your assigned section silently to yourself.
      • At the next signal, summarize your section for your partner.
      • Ones : Please read pages 1, 2 & 3 UP TO the section that says “Role Construction: Teachers” then STOP
      • Twos : Please read page 1 up to the section that says “Role Construction: Families” then STOP and move to page 3. Begin reading from “Role Construction Teachers” until the end of the document.
      TEACHER & FAMILY ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES
    • 35. Roles & Responsibilities
      • BIG IDEA: Context influences both parents’ and teachers’ motivations for working together.
      • The way we impact context is through the development of SYSTEMS – to set everyone up for success! (Just like we do through PBIS).
    • 36. We all want students to achieve, and we definitely think we should be working together to accomplish this goal, BUT….
      • … there are realities that make implementation of partnership practices easier said than done…
    • 37. 1. What are some of the common challenges that teachers face in helping all students achieve at high levels? 2. What are some of the challenges teachers face in building strong partnerships with the families of all their students? 3. What are some of the common challenges that families face in helping to successfully support their children’s educational needs? 4. What are some of the challenges families face in building strong partnerships with their children’s teachers? WHAT DO YOU THINK?
    • 38.
      • See “Addressing Challenges” in your packet.
      • Compare the list your group generated with what researchers have found to be common challenges school staff and families face.
      • We will spending the rest of the day discussing how to build implementation plans to support staff as they work to implement selected evidence-based strategies to address some of these challenges!
      CHALLENGES
    • 39.
      • Family participation in education is twice as predictive of students’ academic success as family socioeconomic status. Some of the more intensive programs had effects that were 10 times greater than other factors.
      • Michigan Department of Education, Walberg (1984)
      Don’t Miss this Opportunity…
    • 40. 2.0 How to Create Authentic School-Family Partnerships: Overview
    • 41.
      • Think about positive home school partnerships you have had…
      • What are the components that have made them successful?
      • Think about more challenging home school partnerships you have had…
      • What were the variables that made it difficult?
      • What were some strategies that made an impact on those relationships ?
      • – maintaining or improving
    • 42. “ In a collaborative relationship, trust develops over time as the result of a series of positive interactions.”
    • 43. USE DATA Staff Surveys & Self-Assessments Family Surveys Student Achievement Data BUILD SYSTEMS Clear Expectations & Responsibilities Adequate Resources Implementation Plans Feedback Loops IMPLEMENT HIGH-IMPACT PRACTICES Be Welcoming Support Student Success Speak for EVERY child Communicate frequently Share Power
    • 44. Core Principles of Response to Intervention (RtI)
      • We can effectively teach ALL children when we…
      • Intervene early (instead of waiting for them to fail)
      • Use a multi-tiered model of service delivery
      • Use problem-solving logic to make data-driven decisions
      • Use research-based, scientifically validated interventions/instruction to the extent available
      • Monitor student progress to inform instruction
      • Use data to make decisions
      • Use assessment for three different purposes: 1) screening; 2) diagnosis; and 3) progress monitoring.
    • 45. Core Principles of Response to Intervention (RtI) Applied to School-Family Partnership
      • We can effectively teach ALL children when we…
      • Intervene/communicate with families early and positively (instead of waiting for a problem to arise)
      • Use a multi-tiered model of service delivery (to meet the needs of ALL our families)
      • Use problem-solving logic to make data-driven decisions (in collaboration with other staff and with families)
    • 46.
      • Use research-based, scientifically validated interventions/instruction to the extent available (and educate people who care for each of our students how they can use or support effective academic and behavior support strategies at home and in the community)
      • Monitor student progress to inform instruction and action planning (and communicate results and related action plans plans to our families)
      • Use data to make decisions (and share data with families and use data to make decisions about the success of our partnership efforts)
      • Use assessment for three different purposes: 1) screening; 2) diagnosis; and 3) progress monitoring. (and educate families about these different types of assessment)
      RtI Applied to School-Family Partnership
    • 47. Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success through School, Family & Community Partnership 5-10% 80-90%
      • Secondary Interventions
      • Some families (at-risk)
      • Targeted community supports
      • High efficiency
      • Rapid response
      • Planned Interventions
      • Some Individualizing
      External Resources Internal Systems & Practices
      • Tertiary Interventions
      • Few students
      • Intense, durable procedures
      • Secondary Interventions
      • Some students (at-risk)
      • High efficiency
      • Rapid response
      • Planned Interventions
      • Some Individualizing
      • Tertiary Interventions
      • Few families
      • Involvement of specialized
      • community supports
      • High intensity
      1-5%
      • Universal Interventions
      • All students
      • Preventive, proactive
      • Universal Interventions
      • All families
      • Businesses, faith-based
      • organizations, non-profits,
      • etc.
      • Preventive, proactive
    • 48. Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success through School, Family & Community Partnership 5-10% 80-90%
      • Secondary Interventions
      • Some families (at-risk)
      • Targeted community supports
      • High efficiency
      • Rapid response
      • Planned Interventions
      • Some Individualizing
      External Resources Internal Systems & Practices
      • Tertiary Interventions
      • Few students
      • Intense, durable procedures
      • Secondary Interventions
      • Some students (at-risk)
      • High efficiency
      • Rapid response
      • Planned Interventions
      • Some Individualizing
      • Tertiary Interventions
      • Few families
      • Involvement of specialized
      • community supports
      • High intensity
      1-5%
      • Universal Interventions
      • All students
      • Preventive, proactive
      MTSS Multi-Tiered Systems of Support
      • Universal Interventions
      • All families
      • Businesses, faith-based
      • organizations, non-profits,
      • etc.
      • Preventive, proactive
    • 49.
      • Create a Welcoming Environment : Focus efforts to engage families on developing trusting and respectful relationships. Recognize that all parents, regardless of income, education level, or cultural background are involved in their children's education and want their children to do well in school.
      • Establish One &Two Way Communication Loops
      • Support Student Success (Learning at School & Home ): Link family and community engagement efforts to student learning. Create initiatives that will support families to guide their children's learning, from preschool through high school.
      HOW do we create authentic school/family partnerships?
    • 50. Two Way Communication
    • 51. HOW do we create authentic school/family partnerships?
      • Speak up for EVERY child .
      • Share Power : Embrace a philosophy of partnership and be willing to share power with families. Make sure that parents and school staff understand that the responsibility for children's educational development is a collaborative enterprise.
      • Collaborate with Community : Develop the capacity of school staff to work with families;
      • National & Michigan PTA Standards for Family Involvement
    • 52.
      • List your current school-wide , targeted , and intensive school-family partnership practices on the Mini-Audit Tool .
      Team Time
    • 53. 3.0 How to Create Authentic School-Family Partnerships: Establishing Effective & Durable Systems
    • 54. The Science of Implementation
      • An “intervention” is one set of activities
      • (What we do with students)
      • “ Implementation” is a very different set of activities. (What we do with staff so they can effectively teach their students).
      • Leadership teams and principals must hold both of these concepts and issues simultaneously
      • Today we are going to discuss “Implementation” of School-Family Partnership Practices
    • 55. Implementation Science Effective NOT Effective Effective NOT Effective IMPLEMENTATION INTERVENTION Student Benefits (Institute of Medicine, 2000; 2001; New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003; National Commission on Excellence in Education,1983; Department of Health and Human Services, 1999)
    • 56. Stages of Implementation for the Implementation of School-Family Partnership Practices Exploration/Adoption Installation Initial Implementation Elaboration Continuous Regeneration Development Commitment Provide Significant Support to Implementers Embedding within Standard Practice Improvements: Increase Efficiency and Effectiveness Creating the systems and materials to prepare for implementation; Set Up Data Systems
    • 57. The Need for A Tightly Defined Implementation Plan
    • 58. Implementation is Loosely Defined
      • Signs of this error:
        • Results across buildings/grade levels are inconsistent
        • There are long delays between decisions
        • There are times when action plans do not seem to come to an “end”
      (VanDerHeyden & Tilly, 2010)
    • 59. “ Unstable results are bound to weaken the implementation effort and cause users to begin to abandon implementation.” (VanDerHeyden & Tilly, 2010; p. 9)
    • 60. Adapted from: Barry Sweeney, 2002 Partnership Practices
    • 61. Building an Effective Implementation Plan
      • 1. Select high-impact, evidence-based practices
      • 2. Train staff to use the practices
        • Develop an initial training plan
        • Develop ongoing training plan (for new staff, etc.)
      • 3. Develop an implementation support plan
        • Select practice coaches, if possible
        • Provide implementation fidelity checklists
        • Coordinate co-implementation among staff
        • Schedule reflection time at staff/grade-level meetings
      • 4. Evaluate effectiveness
        • Collect data
        • Review & analyze data
    • 62. “ We are faced with the paradox of non-evidence-based implementation of evidence-based programs.” (Drake, Gorman, & Toreey, 2002)
    • 63. Intervention Implementation Fidelity
      • The extent to which instruction or intervention is implemented as intended or designed.
      • (Fixsen et al., 2005; Gresham, 1989)
      • Without fidelity of implementation of the instruction or intervention, teams will be unable to determine if a student failed to respond to a well-implemented intervention or failed to respond because the intervention was implemented inaccurately or inconsistently.
      • (Cook et al., 2010)
    • 64. Ensuring Interventions Are Delivered As Designed
      • Training, Modeling, & Feedback
      • Self-Report
      • Permanent Products
      • Direct Observation
    • 65. 4.0 How to Create Authentic School-Family Partnerships: High Impact Practices
    • 66. EFFECTIVENESS RANKING ACTIVITY
      • Look at the list of family home partnership practices
      • As a table, choose two practices you think are high impact, and two you think are low-impact
      • Write each practice on a separate post-it note
      • Place each post it on the wall to represent your table’s ranking of effectiveness
    • 67.
      • Parent Coordinators
      • Parent Volunteers
      • Parent Training Events
      • Parent Goal Setting
      • Weekly Data Sharing Folders
      • Regular, Personalized Communication
      • Fundraisers
      • Back to School Night
      • Parent Resource Rooms
      • Potlucks
      • Parent Social-Services
      • Parent Teacher Conferences
      • Positive Phone Calls Home
      • Home Visits
      • Student Performances
      • Generic School newsletters
      • Classroom Observations or Mini-lessons
      • Interactive Homework, Tools & Tips for Home Learning
    • 68. High-Impact Practices
      • “Regardless of parent education, family size, student ability, or school level…parents are more likely to become partners in their children’s education if they perceive that the schools have strong practices to involve parents at the school.”
      • Epstein & Dauber from “Beyond the Bake Sale”, 2007
    • 69. Implementing High-Impact School-Family Partnership Practices
      • Create the context for staff to implement evidence-based practices and create a welcoming environment for all families
        • Select which behaviors & practices staff will be encouraged and held-accountable to implement
        • Organize the materials, time, training and opportunities for reflection that staff need to both implement AND evaluate how they are implementing the practices
    • 70. High Impact Practice Need Areas /Categories
      • Create a Welcoming Environment
      • Use One &Two Way Communication Strategies
      • Support Student Success (Learning at School & Home)
      • Speak up for EVERY child.
      • Share Power
      • Collaborate with Community
    • 71. Sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Education in partnership with United Way Worldwide, National PTA, SEDL, and the Harvard Family Research Project High Impact Practices Sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Education in partnership with United Way Worldwide, National PTA, SEDL, and the Harvard Family Research Project
    • 72. High Impact Practices – Meet Multiple Needs With One Strategy
    • 73. In Defense of Potlucks
    • 74. Need Category: Create a Welcoming Environment How?
      • Have regular personalized communication
      • Examine assumptions about families
      • Create an accepting environment for ALL families
      • Use welcoming signs, words and gestures
    • 75.
      • Read “ Tips for C reating a Welcoming Environment ” in your “Creating a Welcoming Environment” tool kit.
      • Underline strategies you believe your school is doing well. Circle strategies you believe your school could improve.
      • Share with a partner: Why did you underline & circle what you did?
      • Review together the “ Staff Self-Assessment – Creating a Welcoming Environment ”. How could this tool be used back in your building?
      Partner Study Activity
    • 76.
      • Take ten minutes to review, discuss & generally familiarize yourselves with the materials in your “ Create a Welcoming Environment” tool kit.
      Activity
    • 77. Cultural Competence: Need More Information?
      • Leisa Gallagher, Director, Reaching & Teaching Struggling Learners
      • [email_address]
      • Arezell Brown, MiBLSi Urban Schools Liaison [email_address]
    • 78. Cultural Diversity
    • 79. Effective Parent-Teacher Communication One-way communication is linear and limited because it occurs in a straight line from sender to receiver and serves to inform, persuade , or command. Two-way communication always includes feedback from the receiver to the sender that lets the sender know the message has been received accurately . In two-way communication both sender and receiver listen to each other and work toward a clear understanding. Increase Student Outcomes by Using Both One & Two-Way Communication
    • 80. Examples EXAMPLES: One-way: Two-way: Class/School Newsletters Bulletin boards School handbooks Progress notes/ Teacher notes Report cards Mass emails Informal conversations Rubrics/data folders with request for parent response/questions Collaborative problem solving and goal-setting Surveys & Focus Groups Personalized e-mail or phone calls with questions
    • 81. One & Two-Way Communication Strategies, Sharing Data & Supporting Learning at Home
      • In a study of Title I elementary schools, researchers found that teacher outreach to parents improve student progress in reading and math by 40 – 50 % when teachers did these three things:
      • 1) Met face to face with each family in their class at the beginning of the year (to discuss a common vision for student success, review grade-level goals and clarify teacher & parent roles & responsibilities)
      • 2) Sent materials each week to families on specific ways to help their children at home
      • 3) Telephoned routinely with news about how their children were doing, not just when they were acting up or having problems. (Mapp, et. al, 2007)
    • 82.
      • Make positive phone calls to each child’s home at least two or three times during the school year to:
      • introduce yourself to the parent/guardian;
      • comment on specific positive progress the child is making;
      • share particular strengths of the child and an anecdote/story about the child’s school experience;
      • invite parents to open house, conferences, volunteer opportunities and other school functions;
      • describe the school curriculum.
      Improve Student Outcomes by Making Positive Phone Calls Home
    • 83. Phone Call Video
    • 84.
      • Quickly review the handout titled “Positive Phone Calls Make a Difference”.
      • Share as a group at your table whether this is a practice staff in your building are implementing, and if so, how your practice compares to the practice description.
      • Why do you think this is an evidence-based practice?
      Activity
    • 85. Improve Student Outcomes by Engaging in Collaborative Goal Setting & Data/Progress Reporting
      • To create a culture of accountability, parents and teachers should stay in constant touch with each other and with families about high-quality teaching and learning
      • Teachers should share grade level goals/ standards , rubrics , data graphs , and examples of student work regularly with families
    • 86.
      • SHARING EXAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK
    • 87.  
    • 88.  
    • 89.  
    • 90. Improve Student Outcomes by Sharing Information about Standards
      • Distribute information about grade-level standards to families through…
        • Emails, your school website, and electronic newsletters with links to PTA Standard Guides for families and the Common Core Initiative website
        • Share hard copies of grade-level standards
        • Notify families about Common Core phone applications
      • Consider scheduling PTA family trainings on the Common Core State Standards
    • 91. Improve Student Outcomes with Weekly Data Folders & Action Plans
    • 92.
      • Split into two groups at your table.
      • Group one: Review the materials titled “ Examples of How to Help Teachers Discuss Standards with Parents ”
      • Group Two: Review “ What are Data Folders ?”, “ Data Folders – Description from the Classroom ” and “ Student Data Folders Sample ”.
      • At the signal, group one summarize what you read for your partner. Then switch. Discuss whether these are practices staff in your building are consistently implementing, and if so, how your practice compares to the examples shared.
      • Why do you think these are evidence-based practices?
      Group Activity
    • 93. Increase Student Outcomes by Preparing Families for Meaningful Conferences
      • Prepare families to ask about both academics and behavior
      • Schedule family workshops about how to ask good questions at conferences and meetings with teachers
      • Have family members practice and do role-plays
      • Families should not only be asking “How is my child behaving?” but “ At what level is my child reading ?”
    • 94. Conduct High Quality Parent-Teacher Conferences
      • BEFORE CONFERENCES
      • Send invitations
      • Review student work
      • Prepare thoughts and
      • materials
      • Send reminders
      • Create a welcoming
      • environment
      • DURING CONFERENCES
      • Use data to discuss
      • progress and growth
      • Use examples
      • Ask questions and
      • listen actively
      • Share ideas for
      • supporting learning
      • Seek solutions
      • collaboratively
      • Make an action plan
      • Establish lines of
      • communication
      • AFTER CONFERENCES
      • Follow up with families
      • Communicate regularly
      • Connect in-class
      • activities to goals &
      • action plans
    • 95. Preparing Families for a Meaningful Conference Example
      • Presenter will read assignment aloud
    • 96.  
    • 97. Increase Student Outcomes by: Scheduling Classroom Observations or Mini-Lessons, Parent Trainings & Tools & Tips for Home Learning
      • Schedule grade-level & classroom events that are linked directly to learning and student achievement
      • Explain what students are learning in class
      • Demonstrate a learning activity and explain how the activity will develop those skills
      • Give materials to each family , along with advice on how to use them
      • Help parents know how to assess children’s progress on activities and steer children to the next steps
    • 98. VIDEO
    • 99.
      • Count off 1 to 4 at your table.
      • Determine your reading assignment on the next slide.
      • At the signal, read silently to yourself. Jot down main ideas.
      • At the next signal, summarize for your team/table partners the main ideas of your resource.
      Team Jigsaw & Sharing Activity
    • 100.
      • Person One: Review the “ Parent-Teacher Conference Tip Sheet ” from the Harvard Family Research Project.
      • Person Two: Read “ Making Parent-Teacher Conferences Meaningful ” from the New Mexico Department of Education Working Together Toolkit .
      • Person Three: Read “ Academic Teacher-Parent Teams: Reorganizing Parent-Teacher Conferences around Data ” from the Harvard Family Research Project
      • Person Four: Read “ Making Use of DIBELS Data In Effective New Mexico Reading First Schools ”
      Team Jigsaw & Sharing Activity
    • 101.
      • Look again at the practices you have in place in your school…
      • How do the practices you have in place compare to those that have been found to have high-impact on student achievement?
      • Discuss with your team one or two high-impact strategies you would like to select for implementation back in your building.
      Team Time
    • 102. Implementation Plan: Training Ideas
      • Allocate time during staff meetings, grade-level meetings, or scheduled PD time to introduce & demonstrate selected practices to staff
      • Provide staff with all of the materials they need to implement selected practices
    • 103. Train Teachers to Reach Out to Parents
      • “A district in Los Angeles developed a curriculum for teachers to discuss student work with parents. At every grade level (K-12), teachers know how to have a conversation with parents around the state standards. The teacher explains what the standard means, what is expected of the child, and how parents can help the child meet the standard”. (Mapp, et. al, 2007)
    • 104. Implementation Plan: Implementation Support Ideas
      • Determine who, when, and how will staff be supported during their initial implementation of your selected practices. For example:
        • Schedule time for follow-up after implementation has taken place during grade-level or department meetings, staff meetings, or PD time to compare actual practices to practice profiles and reflect on implementation goals.
        • Ask staff and parents how the implementation is going during scheduled meetings, with surveys
        • Use practice/peer coaches, self-assessment checklists
    • 105. Implementation Plan: Training & Implementation Supports As a Team, Complete the Implementing Section of the Implementation Plan Activity
    • 106. 5.0 How to Create Authentic School-Family Partnerships: Using Data to Drive Decision-Making
    • 107. THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIPS
    • 108. Without data, how can we know if we’re on track to get where we want to go?
    • 109. Implementation Plan: Evaluating
      • How will you know…
        • If ALL the families of students in your building feel welcome at your school?
        • If the families of ALL of your students are getting the information and support they need to support their children’s learning?
        • If teachers have the information, materials, training and support they need to communicate effectively with their student’s families?
    • 110. School/Family Partnership Data Sources
      • Schoolwide Systems Checklists
      • Teacher Practice Checklists
      • Family/Community Perception Surveys
      • Staff Perception Surveys
      • Student Achievement Data
        • CBM
        • Formative Assessments
        • Summative Assessments
    • 111.
      • Review the School-Family Partnership Systems Checklist and Teacher Reflection Tools with your team.
      Evaluation: Team Time #1
    • 112. Implementation Plan: Evaluating As a Team, Complete the Evaluating Section of the Implementation Plan Evaluation: Team Time #2
    • 113.
      • The work you are doing is so important. Thank you for being a part of our learning community and for all that you do for students!
      • Safe travels Home!

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