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Syllabus Biology 495 Spring 06
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Syllabus Biology 495 Spring 06 Syllabus Biology 495 Spring 06 Document Transcript

  • SYLLABUS BIOLOGY 495 (SECTION 1) AQUATIC ENTOMOLOGY AND WATER POLLUTION LECTURE AND LABORATORY (4 CREDITS) SPRING 2006 Lecture: Tuesday and Thursday 8:00-9:20AM; HMB N304 Laboratory: Tuesday 6:00-9:00PM HMB N311 Instructor: Dr. Jorge A. Santiago-Blay Office: HMB E-300E Hall Office Hours: Monday 6-7PM, Tuesday 5-6PM, Wednesday 1-3 and 6-7PM. If you cannot get a hold of me, please feel free to send me an email or leave a written message in my mailbox or with Ms. Simone Osborne (Administrative Secretary, Biology Department). Typically, Ms. Osborne can be reached from 8:00AM-4:30PM; her phone number is (202)651-5385 (V/TDD). E-mail: jorge.santiago-blay@gallaudet.edu Phone: (202)651-5483 (voice) Webpage: www.geocities.com/santiagoblay You should make it a habit to use your Gallaudet University email and Blackboard to communicate with me, particularly if you cannot be at Gallaudet University during my office hours. If you experience difficulties with this course, it is your responsibility to contact me (e.g. email, call, and/or visit me during office hours) for assistance. Students are responsible for using Blackboard as a resource for learning. Course Description This is an in-depth consideration of aquatic insects and their use as biological indicators of water pollution. This lecture portion of this course, which will involve extensive readings, will include topics such as: arthropods, hexapodans, morphology, respiration, habitat, life history and behavioral adaptations to aquatic life, ecology, phylogeny, among others. The lecture portion of this course will include collecting and analysis techniques and the recognition of aquatic insects and their morphology.
  • 2 Exit outcomes for this course (including the laboratory) 1. Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology, such as: a. compare and contrast b. understand how structure determines functions c. integrate concepts (e.g. prepare concept maps) 2. Problem solving and critical thinking skills, such as: a. information mining techniques (e.g literature searches) b. ability to read and evaluate information. Some examples follow: 1. identify key concepts in a body of information 2. compare and contrast competing scientific ideas 3. compare and contrast scientific and non-scientific information 4. develop testable hypotheses c. design and critique experiments following the scientific method 1. identify components of an experiment d. observational and technical (field, laboratory, etc.) skills 1. identify labware by name 2. know lab safety features and comply with lab safety rules, including the use of aseptic techniques 3. use dissection equipment, microscopes, pH meters, pipettes, balances, spectrophotometer, gel electrophoresis, data collecting in the field, culture and plating, PCR, etc. 4. use SI units and calculate measurements in metric 5. calculate and perform dilutions e. analytical and quantitative skills 1. observe and collect data 2. develop graphs 3. analyze data qualitatively and quantitatively 4. interpret data and its analyses 5. modeling 6. see the big picture f. written and oral communication skills 1. use word processing, spreadsheet (Excel), and presentations/posters (Power Point) software 2. use scientific nomenclature, including prefixes, suffixes, and roots 3. write papers in different formats 4. cite references appropriately 3. To be aware of the interactions of biology, such as: a. with other areas of knowledge (biological and non-biological) b. through geography (space) and time c. in the job market d. with people (ethics)
  • 3 Requirements 1. Textbooks Merritt, R. W. and K. W. Cummins. 1996. An introduction to the aquatic insects of North America. Third Edition. Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company. Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 862 pp. ISBN: 0-7872-3241-6 (spiral bound). Available at the bookstore or you may order online from many bookstores. A list of online bookstores (not comprehensive) is included. Mason, C. 2002. Biology of freshwater pollution. Fourth Edition. Prentice Hall. Essex, England, United Kingdom. 387 pp. ISBN 0-13-090639-5 (hardcover) 2. Supplies: Students must bring a calculator, pens/pencils, the textbook, and notebook to all lecture sessions. 3. Computer: Using the Blackboard via http://my.gallaudet.edu is required. Therefore, an access to computer is mandatory for every student. Computers are available for registered students on campus. The course requires students to be prepared, which means reading and understanding the assigned readings from the textbook and other assigned readings before coming to lecture sessions. Students will be constantly encouraged and expected to use their critical thinking skills when discussing topics. Resources Provided by the Instructor and by the University Handouts: Syllabus and Departmental Policies (during the first class session only). Online Materials: PowerPoint notes, online activities, online grade book, and other resourceful files located at http://my.gallaudet.edu. Support Services: 1. Office for Students with Disabilities (SAC 1022) provides comprehensive support services for students with disabilities. If you need support, go to OSWD as soon as possible to discuss your needs. Do not wait until mid-semester as it may be too late to get caught up course! 2. Tutorial and Instructional Programs (SAC 1221) provides free tutoring and instructional support. 3. English Works! (SAC 1221) provides free tutorial assistance in writing projects. If you need support, go to SAC 1221 as soon as possible. Do not wait until midsemester – it may be too late to catch up! Walk-in hours for both TIP and English Works! are Monday through Thursday 9AM to 9PM, and Friday 9AM to 4PM.
  • 4 Policies 1. Gallaudet University Academic Honesty Policy Gallaudet University students are expected to represent themselves honestly at all times and in all contact with University faculty, administrative, and staff personnel. Misrepresentation on University documents, course assignments, or examinations is in conflict with the spirit and teachings of a university. Thus, all students are expected to learn and abide by the rules and regulations of Gallaudet University, to provide full and accurate information on University documents, and to fully acquaint themselves with proper procedures for doing research, writing papers, and taking examinations. Standards of academic conduct are set forth in a document entitled University's Academic Information 2005-2006 (see http://admissions.gallaudet.edu/catalog/05-06/05- 06_academic_information.pdf). Please, note that suspicion or actual violations will not be treated lightly and disciplinary actions will be taken should such violations be proven to occur. If a student knowingly provides false information, forges, or conceals relevant information on admissions, registration, or any other University documents, the student's registration may be canceled. If such a discovery is made after a student is enrolled in the University, that student may be dismissed from the University. A faculty member who discovers that a student is involved in unethical practices in connection with required coursework or examinations has full discretion to give a failing grade for the particular assignment, a failing grade for the course, and/or to recommend dismissal. 2. On-Time attendance, active participation, and turning in homework on-time are essential Students are expected to attend all lecture sessions and arrive timely. Missing classes will affect students’ participation grade (see “Grading”, page 6). Attendance is essential to understand the material in this class. Please, do not expect me to bring (or email) you handouts from previous class meetings if you are absent. Active participation, an essential part of the learning experience, means paying attention to and actively engaging in thinking about what is being said in class. I welcome your comments and questions. Make sure to understand the material in class as this will facilitate your ability to recall the material later. Exam questions are designed to test your understanding of the concepts and depth of knowledge. Homework must be submitted to the instructor in hard copy on the due date at the beginning of class. Papers must not be placed in the instructor mailboxes. Late papers will either be penalized or not be accepted (and receive a zero), in accordance with the syllabus, and the discretion of the instructor.
  • 5 Assessments 1. Exams: There are two exams in this course, given during class periods. The midterm will include materials discussed up to approximately the mid portion of this course and the final will emphasize the second half of the semester but questions from the first part are possible. Each exam is worth 25%. 2. Quizzes and/or Homework: There will be weekly quizzes and/or homework. The quizzes will be given at the beginning of a lecture period and should typically not exceed 10 minutes. If you cannot arrive on time, you will miss the quiz. Homework must be turned in at the beginning of the due class period. There is no makeup for quizzes/homework. Each quiz/homework is worth 4%. Material for all the exams and quizzes will be derived from lecture material as well as assigned readings, handouts, and the laboratory. Exams and quizzes cannot be rescheduled, or made up, except for extreme circumstances such as university closing due to bad weather, hospitalization, a death in the immediate family (e.g. mother, father, siblings), or a court order. If you are seriously ill (e.g. hospitalized) on exam day, you must contact your instructor via phone or e-mail before the exam. You are allowed to reschedule one exam because of a documented (written letter on official letterhead from a doctor, including a phone number) illness. The makeup exam will have to be taken within one week of the exam date. If you do not contact your instructor before the exam is given, you will receive a grade of zero on that exam. Because you are given a syllabus at the beginning of each class, you must be familiarized with the exam and quiz schedules. You are expected to show up on time, ready to take quizzes and exams. Please look over the schedule carefully. Exam and quiz dates will change only if the University is closed (e.g. snow emergency). If you see any potential conflicts, please let me know immediately. Readings indicate chapters in the required textbook or handouts. Disruptive Behavior As their sounds/vibrations may be disruptive to classmates, pagers, cell phones, and other electronic devices must be turned off while you are in class. If you persist in disruptive behavior, I will ask you to leave the room and return when you have finished your business. Grading Two (2) Exams 50% Participation: Weekly Quizzes (10 quizzes, 4% each) 40% Presentation (during the last laboratory period) 10% Total 100%
  • 6 Week 1 Lecture and Laboratory: Introduction to insects and to aquatic insects Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills (use of microscopes) 1. To distinguish insects and other arthropods from other animal phyla using microscopes 2. To distinguish insects and other arthropods from each other using microscopes 3. To recognize the immature and adults of the major insect orders containing aquatic insects (Odonata, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera, Plecoptera, Megaloptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Trichoptera) using microscopes To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. We will study captioned videos on insects. 2. Study representative specimens of all animals phyla (preserved in liquids, pinned, and on slides) - to kinesthetically and visually reinforce learning objectives. 3. Study representative specimens of all the major insect orders containing aquatic insects (Odonata, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera, Plecoptera, Megaloptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, and Trichoptera). Assessments: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. Weeks 2 and 3 Lecture and Laboratory: Principles of insect morphology Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills (use of microscopes) 1. To distinguish insects and other arthropods from each other by naming and understanding the functional significance of their major body parts 2. To recognize the major orders of aquatic insects by naming and understanding the functional significance of their major body parts and diagnostic structures 3. To master the use of the dissecting and compound microscopes 4. To become familiarized with the scanning electron microscope. To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Examine representative specimens of all major animal phyla that live in water (preserved in liquids, pinned, and on slides). 2. Examine representative specimens of all the major orders of aquatic insects. 3. Competently use dissecting and compound microscopes 4. Field Trip - Week # 3 – Visit the National Museum of Natural History
  • 7 Assessment: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. Weeks 4 and 5 Lecture and Laboratory: Insect Phylogeny with emphasis in the aquatic orders Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills (use of phylogenetic analysis packages) 1. To compare the three schools of classification (cladistics, phenetics, and evolutionary) 2. To place insects and other arthropods in a generally accepted phylogenetic tree 3. To support each of the braches of the phylogenetic tree with, at least, one characteristic or synapomorphy. 4. To generate computer generated phylogenies given a data set. To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Exercises on classification that can be done manually 2. Computer equipped with MacClade or PAUP* Assessment: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. Week 6 Lecture and Laboratory: Sampling aquatic insects Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills [observational and technical (field, laboratory, etc.), data entry] 1. To recognize major sampling tools in aquatic entomology and their appropriate uses 2. To sample aquatic insects in different environments with the appropriate tools To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Surber sampler, Malaisse trap, water sampler, nets, vials, alcohol, labels, etc. 2. Field Trip - Week # 6 (Thursday) - National Arboretum Assessment: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials.
  • 8 Week 7 Lecture and Laboratory: Adaptations for aquatic life I: Gas exchange Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills [preparation of specimens for scientific study]. 1. To recognize common families of aquatic insects by naming and understanding the functional significance of their major body parts, some of which are adaptations to gas exchange 2. To prepare specimens of aquatic insects for scientific study (preserved in alcohol or mounted on slides) 3. To master the use of the dissecting and compound microscopes To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Identify representative specimens of common families of aquatic insects. 2. Prepare specimens (pinned, on slides, in liquids) using standard entomological equipment, such as slide warmers, mounting media (e.g. Euparal), etc. Assessments: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. On the Thursday of week # 6 or 7, midterm. Weeks 8 and 9 Lecture and Laboratory: Adaptations for aquatic life II: Life histories of aquatic insects Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills [observational and technical (field, laboratory, etc.) skills] 1. To recognize major families of aquatic insects by naming and understanding the functional significance of their major body parts, some of which are adaptations to gas exchange and their life histories 2. To prepare specimens of aquatic insects for scientific study (preserved in alcohol or mounted on slides) To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Identify representative specimens of common families of aquatic insects. 2. Prepare specimens (pinned, on slides, in liquids) using standard entomological equipment, such as slide warmers, mounting media (e.g. Euparal), etc. Assessments: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials.
  • 9 Weeks 10 and 11 Lecture and Laboratory: Ecological Principles and Ecology of Aquatic Insects Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills [observational and technical (field, laboratory, etc.), data entry]. 1. To qualitatively and quantitatively sample aquatic insects in different environments with the appropriate sampling tools 2. To continue data gathering and begin data analysis of organisms collected To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Surber sampler, Malaisse trap, water sampler, nets, vials, alcohol, labels, etc. 2. Field Trip - Week # 10-11 (Thursday) - National Arboretum 3. To begin entering data on insects collected using Excel Assessment: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. Weeks 12-15 Lecture and Laboratory: Aquatic entomology and water pollution Objectives: Subject matter knowledge of the core curriculum in biology. Problem solving and critical thinking skills [observational and technical (field, laboratory, etc.), data entry]. To be aware of the interactions of biology with other areas of knowledge (biological and non-biological). 1. To compare the signature of different types of water pollution in aquatic insect communities 2. To qualitatively and quantitatively sample aquatic insects in different environments with the appropriate tools 3. To complete data analysis of organisms collected To accomplish those objectives we will do the following activities 1. Surber sampler, Malaisse trap, water sampler, nets, vials, alcohol, labels, etc. 2. Field Trip - Week # 12 (Thursday) - National Arboretum Assessments: Once a week (ideally on the first class day of the following meeting, a Tuesday), an objectives-based graded quiz based on lecture and laboratory of previous week(s) materials. A report based on the data collected (15%) Week 16 – Final Exam
  • 10 Your letter grades will be determined, as follows: 98.0%-100%A+, 97.9%-94.0%A, 93.9%-90.0%A- 88.0%-89.9%B+, 87.9%-84.0%B, 83.9%-80.0%B- 78.0%-79.9%C+, 77.9%-74.0%C, 73.9%-70.0%C- 68.0%-69.9%D+, 67.9%-64.0%D, 63.9%-60.0%D- 58.0%-59.9%F+, 57.9%-54.0%F, ≤ 54% F- Disclaimers The terms of this syllabus and the course schedule are subject to reasonable change by the instructor at any time. The instructor reserves the right to announce changes to the syllabus and/or lecture and exam schedule during class sessions. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the information in these announcements. The instructor reserves the right to dismiss a student from the classroom if the student is disruptive or unprepared for class. Copyright © 1999-2006 Gallaudet University Department of Biology 800 Florida Avenue NE Washington DC 20002 TDD/V: 202-651-5385